China and India will lead the world’s nuclear power growth, experts say

India and China are set to drive the world’s nuclear power production growth as the two developing nations — among the top consumers of energy in the world — pursue their respective national nuclear energy programs. According to the International Energy Agency, nuclear power production will grow by about 46 percent by 2040 — and more than 90 percent of the net increase will come from China and India. Global nuclear electricity output grew 1 percent in 2017, as the world’s nuclear fleet generated


India and China are set to drive the world’s nuclear power production growth as the two developing nations — among the top consumers of energy in the world — pursue their respective national nuclear energy programs. According to the International Energy Agency, nuclear power production will grow by about 46 percent by 2040 — and more than 90 percent of the net increase will come from China and India. Global nuclear electricity output grew 1 percent in 2017, as the world’s nuclear fleet generated
China and India will lead the world’s nuclear power growth, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: melissa goh, lin shanchuan, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nuclear, power, india, international, production, lead, world, growth, energy, report, china, experts, worlds, say


China and India will lead the world's nuclear power growth, experts say

India and China are set to drive the world’s nuclear power production growth as the two developing nations — among the top consumers of energy in the world — pursue their respective national nuclear energy programs.

According to the International Energy Agency, nuclear power production will grow by about 46 percent by 2040 — and more than 90 percent of the net increase will come from China and India.

Global nuclear electricity output grew 1 percent in 2017, as the world’s nuclear fleet generated 2,503 terawatt-hours (TWh) of electricity, according to the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2018.

Take China out of the picture, however, and the reality looks starkly different: Global nuclear power generation would have declined for a third consecutive year, the report showed.

Asia, for its part, saw 8 to 9 percent growth in nuclear capacity last year, Agneta Rising, the director general of the World Nuclear Association, told CNBC at the Singapore International Energy Week conference last week.

“(The) largest growth in nuclear energy is in the Asia region, especially in China and India,” she said, adding that nuclear power is “absolutely compatible” and “necessary” for a low carbon future.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: melissa goh, lin shanchuan, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nuclear, power, india, international, production, lead, world, growth, energy, report, china, experts, worlds, say


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Blockchain tech is taking on renewable energy trading in one country

In Singapore, companies can buy and sell so-called renewable energy certificates (RECs) that represent a unit of green energy production from the likes of wind or solar power. It could eventually even facilitate cross-border energy credit trading, the utility company has said. Wong spoke of a future in which energy trading is more decentralized, driven by technology and where consumers are empowered to make sustainable energy choices. In that model the power system would be a lot more robust,” W


In Singapore, companies can buy and sell so-called renewable energy certificates (RECs) that represent a unit of green energy production from the likes of wind or solar power. It could eventually even facilitate cross-border energy credit trading, the utility company has said. Wong spoke of a future in which energy trading is more decentralized, driven by technology and where consumers are empowered to make sustainable energy choices. In that model the power system would be a lot more robust,” W
Blockchain tech is taking on renewable energy trading in one country Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: melissa goh, everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trading, energy, solar, tech, system, taking, country, power, technology, recs, blockchain, renewable, singapore, week


Blockchain tech is taking on renewable energy trading in one country

Blockchain, the technology underpinning cryptocurrency bitcoin, has been recommended and theorized for uses across a broad spectrum of sectors and countries. Now, one Southeast Asian city-state is putting the tech to work in reshaping its energy industry.

In Singapore, companies can buy and sell so-called renewable energy certificates (RECs) that represent a unit of green energy production from the likes of wind or solar power. The idea is that firms seeking to offset their non-green energy production can purchase RECs from a company producing excess green power.

It’s a system similar to carbon trading that takes place in many localities, and, as of last week, companies can now engage in their REC trading on a blockchain-powered system.

That’s more than just a gimmick, according to utilities provider SP Group, which launched the new platform: It will allow for better transparency and lower costs in power trading because it reduces the need for a centralized entity to verify transactions. It could eventually even facilitate cross-border energy credit trading, the utility company has said.

“A consumer in Singapore who wishes to buy green energy can now, through blockchain-powered REC trading, purchase a REC from a hydro-producer based in Laos,” SP Group CEO Wong Kim Yin told CNBC at the Singapore International Energy Week conference last week. “This reduces the cost, reduces the friction in the market.”

High costs in verifying certificates as well as the difficulties in tracking RECs have led to relatively low trading volumes in Singapore, and even so, a majority of the transactions occur directly between one originator and buyer — not on a marketplace.

Adding blockchain to the equation may change that: The distributed ledger system effectively eliminates the need for verification processes at a centralized entity, reducing costs and allowing small energy consumers and producers to participate.

Wong spoke of a future in which energy trading is more decentralized, driven by technology and where consumers are empowered to make sustainable energy choices.

“In the past, you have big power stations in the centralized model and you would transmit power to the households. In the future you would have solar panels and you would have batteries. In that model the power system would be a lot more robust,” Wong said.

Green energy options are limited with land constraints in the city-state, meaning large-scale construction of wind farms isn’t an option. Solar panels, which are installed on surfaces, are also a function of land area, as well as the residential and commercial build-up.

Innovations like floating solar energy panels on reservoirs, which are currently being tested in Singapore, could help alleviate the spatial constraints of land, but the potential extent of such technology remains a question.

As a result, experts expect that demand will continue to outstrip supply in Singapore in the near future. Lars Kvale, managing director at APX, which is an issuer of RECs globally, told CNBC that “there is significant demand for renewable energy in Singapore but a limited amount of renewable energy capacity to meet all of the demand.”

Blockchain could unlock some of that potential through matching cross-border demand and supply.

“The true promise of blockchain and distributed ledger technology in the context of environmental commodity platforms is allowing these platforms to establish trusted relationships with upstream information sources without having to revalidate it,” Kvale added.

SP Group owns and operates electricity and gas transmission and distribution businesses in Singapore and Australia, as well as district cooling businesses in Singapore and China.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: melissa goh, everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trading, energy, solar, tech, system, taking, country, power, technology, recs, blockchain, renewable, singapore, week


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As Japan grows ‘so-so,’ one of its largest companies looks for international expansion

Having a comparative advantage is important for operating in the current environment of global trade uncertainty, according to the chief executive of Japan Post Holdings, one of Japan’s largest conglomerates. But I think the other parts of the world, (Southeast Asian) nations, China, (Asia Pacific) countries are growing much faster. We want to join that growing opportunities over the world,” Nagato told CNBC. Instead, Japan Post is looking internationally for growth, at least in the logistics bu


Having a comparative advantage is important for operating in the current environment of global trade uncertainty, according to the chief executive of Japan Post Holdings, one of Japan’s largest conglomerates. But I think the other parts of the world, (Southeast Asian) nations, China, (Asia Pacific) countries are growing much faster. We want to join that growing opportunities over the world,” Nagato told CNBC. Instead, Japan Post is looking internationally for growth, at least in the logistics bu
As Japan grows ‘so-so,’ one of its largest companies looks for international expansion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-19  Authors: melissa goh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companys, post, soso, expansion, grows, trade, largest, toll, japan, china, nagato, looks, logistics, international, companies, growing, world


As Japan grows 'so-so,' one of its largest companies looks for international expansion

Having a comparative advantage is important for operating in the current environment of global trade uncertainty, according to the chief executive of Japan Post Holdings, one of Japan’s largest conglomerates.

The same philosophy drove the company’s diversification strategy into the logistics business in 2015 — when it acquired transport and logistics provider Toll Group — and is now driving its wider expansion.

Speaking at the launch of Toll City, a logistics hub owned by Toll Group and situated in western Singapore, Masatsugu Nagato, president and CEO of Japan Post Holdings, said he saw the facility as a “symbolic gateway” for the company’s Asia expansion.

Spanning the size of 15 football fields, the new hub is expected to increase Toll’s network in the region, through its proximity to road links into Malaysia and Tuas Port, which will consolidate Singapore’s container operations in a single terminal by next year.

“We have (a) 147-year old history, but we’ve been mainly confined in Japan. Japan is still growing so-so. But I think the other parts of the world, (Southeast Asian) nations, China, (Asia Pacific) countries are growing much faster. We want to join that growing opportunities over the world,” Nagato told CNBC.

The launch of Toll City marks the company’s latest move to diversify away from the insurance and banking businesses-which have been hurt by the low and negative interest rates in Japan. Instead, Japan Post is looking internationally for growth, at least in the logistics business.

While his business on the whole has yet to be hit by the ongoing trade war between the U.S. and China, Nagato said that the world’s two largest economies would eventually have to find a “harmony” in bilateral trade relations.

“I don’t think, you know, China and the United States can get something bigger after this so-called trade war. They have to find out how to get the harmony regarding trade bonds between the United States and China,” the CEO said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-19  Authors: melissa goh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companys, post, soso, expansion, grows, trade, largest, toll, japan, china, nagato, looks, logistics, international, companies, growing, world


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The trade war’s impact on shipping has been limited so far, industry experts say

There is not any evidence yet showing that the shipping sector has been significantly impacted by the escalating U.S.-China trade war, according to the shipping association of one of the world’s most crucial port cities. “In the container segment there is no clear evidence as yet, of any major impact,” Esben Poulsson, president of the Singapore Shipping Association, told CNBC. Impact on the tanker business has been limited as well. At the same time, trade to enter Asia, remains “robust,” Poulsso


There is not any evidence yet showing that the shipping sector has been significantly impacted by the escalating U.S.-China trade war, according to the shipping association of one of the world’s most crucial port cities. “In the container segment there is no clear evidence as yet, of any major impact,” Esben Poulsson, president of the Singapore Shipping Association, told CNBC. Impact on the tanker business has been limited as well. At the same time, trade to enter Asia, remains “robust,” Poulsso
The trade war’s impact on shipping has been limited so far, industry experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-13  Authors: melissa goh, everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, limited, trade, maersk, wars, industry, according, impact, poulsson, experts, exports, china, shipping, say, far, evidence, told


The trade war's impact on shipping has been limited so far, industry experts say

There is not any evidence yet showing that the shipping sector has been significantly impacted by the escalating U.S.-China trade war, according to the shipping association of one of the world’s most crucial port cities.

“In the container segment there is no clear evidence as yet, of any major impact,” Esben Poulsson, president of the Singapore Shipping Association, told CNBC. “One or two (shipping) lines have reduced their capacity somewhat, but there is no solid evidence of any great impact to date.”

While Poulsson said there has been some reduction in the exports of soybeans from the U.S. to China, as well as cutbacks in iron ore shipments, which have negatively affected sentiment, those have been “relatively minor.”

Impact on the tanker business has been limited as well. At just 7.7 million tonnes last year, U.S. exports of crude oil to China constituted only 17 percent of the total U.S. exports of crude oil globally, according to BP’s statistical review of world energy.

At the same time, trade to enter Asia, remains “robust,” Poulsson said.

President Donald Trump’s administration earlier this week announced a plan to impose tariffs on an additional $200 billion in Chinese goods, the latest move in the ongoing trade spat. The list included items ranging from furniture, electronics, food products, chemicals, tobacco, to iron and steel.

Shipping company Maersk also made a positive assessment of where things now stand, but it warned, however, that continued escalation could result in “severe consequences for global trade.”

“Current tariff measures between U.S. and China remain curtailed in terms of impact on the trans-Pacific trade,” a Maersk spokesperson told CNBC.

U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminium imports from the EU, Canada and Mexico have also had only a limited impact on global container trade, according to the Maersk spokesperson.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-13  Authors: melissa goh, everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, limited, trade, maersk, wars, industry, according, impact, poulsson, experts, exports, china, shipping, say, far, evidence, told


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The US-China trade spat isn’t endangering the global system, says former WTO rep

The U.S. and China may be ramping up their trade rhetoric in a series of tit-for-tat threats, but Hong Kong’s former representative to the World Trade Organization, Stuart Harbinson, says the system isn’t currently in danger. In the latest trade escalation between Washington and Beijing, the U.S. is potentially considering a curb on Chinese investments in U.S. technology firms and restricting some technology exports to China. Harbinson, who now advises clients on trade issues at global communica


The U.S. and China may be ramping up their trade rhetoric in a series of tit-for-tat threats, but Hong Kong’s former representative to the World Trade Organization, Stuart Harbinson, says the system isn’t currently in danger. In the latest trade escalation between Washington and Beijing, the U.S. is potentially considering a curb on Chinese investments in U.S. technology firms and restricting some technology exports to China. Harbinson, who now advises clients on trade issues at global communica
The US-China trade spat isn’t endangering the global system, says former WTO rep Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-27  Authors: melissa goh, thomas peter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spat, think, system, isnt, rep, plumbing, theres, china, uschina, endangering, wto, global, need, trade, harbinson


The US-China trade spat isn't endangering the global system, says former WTO rep

The U.S. and China may be ramping up their trade rhetoric in a series of tit-for-tat threats, but Hong Kong’s former representative to the World Trade Organization, Stuart Harbinson, says the system isn’t currently in danger.

“What we have now is one particular country, the U.S., that is saying that the system is being unresponsive, but the EU and China are still firmly backing the system,” said Harbinson, who represented Hong Kong, and subsequently the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China, in the WTO from 1994 to 2002.

In the latest trade escalation between Washington and Beijing, the U.S. is potentially considering a curb on Chinese investments in U.S. technology firms and restricting some technology exports to China. China has consistently said it is ready to fight back.

Harbinson, who now advises clients on trade issues at global communications firm Hume Brophy, likened the global trade body to a plumbing system that was “antiquated” and could either be ripped apart or improved on.

“I think most of the countries that are involved in the WTO see it the second way: Let’s keep the basics, but we need to move forward and improve on that system substantially,” Harbinson said.

China, Japan and the European Union, which have felt the brunt of Trump’s “America First” policy, have each lodged complaints at the WTO in response to the U.S. tariffs on imported steel and aluminium — which Washington justifies on the grounds of national security.

Rising protectionism and unilateral action, however, are calling into question the relevance of the international body’s ability to champion the principles of free, equal and non-discriminatory trade.

At the same time, a U.S. withdrawal from multilateral agreements such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership and a shift in White House preference toward bilateral agreements are threatening the viability of large free trade agreements and, consequently, its championing bodies.

Still, Harbinson said there’s value in the WTO in its ability to “set a lowest common denominator, which is valuable — there’s a back stop.”

“The WTO is sweeping up behind and gradually raising the bar at a multilateral level,” Harbinson told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “There’s a lot of activity in the free trade agreement area and I don’t expect that to die down. On the contrary, I think it will ramp up.”

Calling the WTO “basic plumbing” that’s part of a global trading system, Harbinson said, “In many cases there are very complex global supply chains and maybe the WTO rules haven’t quite caught up with the latest commercial practices in this area so there is a case I think, that can be made that we need to keep the basic plumbing, but we need to try and improve on it for the future.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-27  Authors: melissa goh, thomas peter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spat, think, system, isnt, rep, plumbing, theres, china, uschina, endangering, wto, global, need, trade, harbinson


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Is China ready for 24-hour gyms? This company thinks so

Fitness franchise Anytime Fitness aims to open up to 500 gyms in China in the coming years, betting that growing incomes in the world’s second-largest economy will foster a fitness craze. The U.S.-based franchise currently boasts of over 3,500 gyms serving 3 million members globally, and plans to operate 300 to 500 gyms in China by 2020. Rising disposable incomes and health-consciousness among the young population are driving growth in China’s fitness industry, experts said. “We are an internati


Fitness franchise Anytime Fitness aims to open up to 500 gyms in China in the coming years, betting that growing incomes in the world’s second-largest economy will foster a fitness craze. The U.S.-based franchise currently boasts of over 3,500 gyms serving 3 million members globally, and plans to operate 300 to 500 gyms in China by 2020. Rising disposable incomes and health-consciousness among the young population are driving growth in China’s fitness industry, experts said. “We are an internati
Is China ready for 24-hour gyms? This company thinks so Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-28  Authors: melissa goh, special to cnbc
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, industry, fitness, 24hour, open, thinks, franchise, business, company, ready, local, population, china, gyms, mortensen


Is China ready for 24-hour gyms? This company thinks so

Fitness franchise Anytime Fitness aims to open up to 500 gyms in China in the coming years, betting that growing incomes in the world’s second-largest economy will foster a fitness craze.

The U.S.-based franchise currently boasts of over 3,500 gyms serving 3 million members globally, and plans to operate 300 to 500 gyms in China by 2020.

Open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, the gym franchise joins a clutch of gyms and fitness centres in China’s burgeoning fitness industry which grew 11.8 percent annually between 2011 to 2016.

Rising disposable incomes and health-consciousness among the young population are driving growth in China’s fitness industry, experts said. A report by ACMR-IBISWorld in 2016 anticipated that in the five years through 2021, industry revenue will increase 7.8 percent annually to total $8.47 billion.

In Shanghai for the launch, Dave Mortensen, president and co-founder of Anytime Fitness told CNBC’s Squawk Box, “Out of the markets that I’ve been in – and I’ve been in over 30 countries – China is just right for expansion.”

The China market is largely untapped – in 2015, China had a gym membership penetration rate of just 0.4 per cent, out of its near 1.4 billion population, according to an IHRSA Asia-Pacific Health Club Report.

Anytime Fitness is currently open in all 50 states in the U.S. and has outlets across Europe and Asia, including Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong and the Philippines.

“We are an international brand and we partner with local experts,” said Mortensen, which cited local partnerships as key to success in navigating local business environments beyond the U.S. The brand is partnering franchisee Maurice Levine for its China expansion.

“We’re in the business of building communities and helping people achieve their goals, something that transcends across borders,” Mortensen said. “We are confident our business model paired with the China capacity, will prosper thousands of gyms.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-28  Authors: melissa goh, special to cnbc
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, industry, fitness, 24hour, open, thinks, franchise, business, company, ready, local, population, china, gyms, mortensen


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