Jeff Bezos named businessperson of the decade by global finance chiefs, CNBC survey says

A majority of financial executives in boardrooms around the world say Amazon Founder and Chief Executive Jeff Bezos should be considered as the top businessperson of the decade. Almost a third of chief financial officers (CFOs) quizzed in CNBC’s latest Global CFO Council survey picked out Bezos as their most impressive business leader. Jack Ma, founder of rival online marketplace Alibaba, and Tesla boss Elon Musk came in second and third, respectively. The CNBC Global CFO Council represents some


A majority of financial executives in boardrooms around the world say Amazon Founder and Chief Executive Jeff Bezos should be considered as the top businessperson of the decade.
Almost a third of chief financial officers (CFOs) quizzed in CNBC’s latest Global CFO Council survey picked out Bezos as their most impressive business leader.
Jack Ma, founder of rival online marketplace Alibaba, and Tesla boss Elon Musk came in second and third, respectively.
The CNBC Global CFO Council represents some
Jeff Bezos named businessperson of the decade by global finance chiefs, CNBC survey says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cfo, amazon, decade, cfos, members, chiefs, named, jeff, global, finance, council, world, online, bezos, survey, businessperson


Jeff Bezos named businessperson of the decade by global finance chiefs, CNBC survey says

A majority of financial executives in boardrooms around the world say Amazon Founder and Chief Executive Jeff Bezos should be considered as the top businessperson of the decade.

Almost a third of chief financial officers (CFOs) quizzed in CNBC’s latest Global CFO Council survey picked out Bezos as their most impressive business leader.

Jack Ma, founder of rival online marketplace Alibaba, and Tesla boss Elon Musk came in second and third, respectively. Other names picked out by the CFOs included, Satya Nadella, Tim Cook, Warren Buffett and Jamie Dimon.

Bezos first launched Amazon in the mid-1990s as an online bookstore. It is now the world’s largest online marketplace and also rakes in revenue from its activities in cloud computing and artificial intelligence.

In 2015, Amazon surpassed Walmart to become America’s biggest retailer. In 2018, it recorded nearly $233 billion in sales. According to both Forbes and Bloomberg’s Billionaires Index, Bezos is now personally worth $109 billion.

The CNBC Global CFO Council represents some of the largest public and private companies in the world, collectively managing nearly $5 trillion in market value.

To other questions asked, almost 71% of respondents said they did not think the U.S. economy would experience a recession in 2020. Notably, EMEA executives were less bullish on U.S. economic prospects with almost half believing U.S. output could contract next year.

Nearly a third (30.9%) of CFOs surveyed predicted no cuts or hikes from the U.S. Federal Reserve in 2020. The most common answer was the 36.4% who opted for one cut.

On the matter of stocks, exactly 55% of U.S. CFOs expect the Dow Jones industrial average to rise above 29,000 points rather than the 40% who see it falling back below 24,000 points first. The remainder (5%) were unsure.

The Council’s global economic outlook has dipped slightly on a geographic basis. Now, four of 11 countries or regions — China, euro zone ex. U.K., Latin America ex. Brazil and the United Kingdom — are all seen as “declining.” All other areas were rated as “stable.”

(Note: 55 of the 135 current members of the CNBC Global CFO Council responded to this quarter’s survey, including 20 North American-based members, 21 EMEA-based members and 14 APAC-based members. The survey was conducted from Nov. 20–Dec 3., 2019.)


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cfo, amazon, decade, cfos, members, chiefs, named, jeff, global, finance, council, world, online, bezos, survey, businessperson


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Fed Decision: Interest rates left unchanged, indicates no changes through 2020

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve held interest rates steady following its two-day meeting this week and indicated that no action is likely next year amid persistently low inflation. In its statement explaining the decision, the committee indicated that monetary policy is likely to stay where it is for an unspecified time, though officials will continue to monitor conditions as they develop. The decision to keep rates unchanged was unanimous, following several dissents in recent meetings. ‘Dot pl


WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve held interest rates steady following its two-day meeting this week and indicated that no action is likely next year amid persistently low inflation.
In its statement explaining the decision, the committee indicated that monetary policy is likely to stay where it is for an unspecified time, though officials will continue to monitor conditions as they develop.
The decision to keep rates unchanged was unanimous, following several dissents in recent meetings.
‘Dot pl
Fed Decision: Interest rates left unchanged, indicates no changes through 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fed, 2020, interest, committee, rate, unchanged, policy, indicated, estimate, funds, inflation, decision, members, changes, indicates, left, rates, likely


Fed Decision: Interest rates left unchanged, indicates no changes through 2020

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve held interest rates steady following its two-day meeting this week and indicated that no action is likely next year amid persistently low inflation. Concluding a year that saw the central bank take down its benchmark rate three times, the Federal Open Market Committee on Wednesday met widely held expectations and kept the funds rate in a target range of 1.5%-1.75%. In its statement explaining the decision, the committee indicated that monetary policy is likely to stay where it is for an unspecified time, though officials will continue to monitor conditions as they develop. The decision to keep rates unchanged was unanimous, following several dissents in recent meetings. “The Committee judges that the current stance of monetary policy is appropriate to support sustained expansion of economic activity, strong labor market conditions, and inflation near the Committee’s symmetric 2 percent objective,” the statement said.

“The Committee will continue to monitor the implications of incoming information for the economic outlook, including global developments and muted inflation pressures, as it assesses the appropriate path of the target range for the federal funds rate,” the committee added. The language is consistent with recent statements from Fed Chairman Jerome Powell and his colleagues, who have said policy is in “a good place” and likely to remain unchanged as long as current conditions persist. Those sentiments also were reflected in the likely path forward.

‘Dot plot’ shows no 2020 hike now

Through the “dot plot” of individual members’ future projections, the FOMC indicated little chance of a cut or increase in 2020. At the committee’s September meeting, individual members were split on what could happen next year, with eight members seeing no change and nine indicating the likelihood of one or more increases. One member even foresaw three hikes. On balance, the estimate then was for at least one hike in 2020. Wednesday’s projections saw a decided downward shift in the dots, with just four of 17 members anticipating one quarter-point move up in 2020. There also was a general downward shift for 2021, with the chart pointing to at least one and possibly two increases. The central projection came down for each of the four years included in the committee’s estimates. The median expectation for the funds rate is 1.6% in 2019 and 2020, down from 1.9% in the September estimate, and rising to 1.9% in 2021, compared with the previous estimate of 2.1%. The 2022 projection also came down to 2.1% from 2.4%, though the longer-run estimate remained consistent at 2.5%.

GDP forecast


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fed, 2020, interest, committee, rate, unchanged, policy, indicated, estimate, funds, inflation, decision, members, changes, indicates, left, rates, likely


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NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say

LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape. NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union. U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech


LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape.
NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union.
U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech
NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, survive, change, needs, tech, say, president, posed, nato, taking, global, firm, analysts


NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM – JULY 11: Heads of state and government, including French President Emmanuel Macron (7th L), German Chancellor Angela Merkel (8th L), U.S. President Donald Trump, British Prime Minister Theresa May (5th R), and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (3rd R), mingle after posing for a family picture during the opening ceremony at the 2018 NATO Summit at NATO headquarters on July 11, 2018 in Brussels, Belgium.

LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape.

Leslie Vinjamuri, the head of the U.S. and the Americas Programme at think tank Chatham House, believes there will now be “several years of grappling” to reform the military alliance.

She added that one of the main issues is that the institution is not set up to deal with the current geopolitical landscape. NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union.

But the rise of the world’s second-largest economy, China, has posed new challenges to the West and trade and political tensions between Beijing and Washington have come to the fore in the last two years. The disagreements have involved the tech sector with the U.S. taking steps to ban the Chinese firm Huawei from selling its technology in the United States.

U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech firm has denied. This issue has sparked division within NATO allies, with Germany and France taking a different stance to the U.S. administration.

“NATO is at a crossroads,” Agathe Demarais, global forecasting director at the research firm The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), highlighted to CNBC Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, survive, change, needs, tech, say, president, posed, nato, taking, global, firm, analysts


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UAW leaders approve Fiat Chrysler labor deal that includes $9,000 ratification bonuses, improved benefits

The deal includes the Italian-American automaker investing $9 billion in its U.S. manufacturing, including $4.5 billion in previously announced investments, and the creation of 7,900 U.S. jobs over the life of the contract. Unlike the recent UAW contracts with GM and Ford, Fiat Chrysler was not expected to close any U.S. plants under the terms of the contract. Current employees are expected to be offered jobs at other Fiat Chrysler facilities or at the facility with the supplier. The UAW’s rough


The deal includes the Italian-American automaker investing $9 billion in its U.S. manufacturing, including $4.5 billion in previously announced investments, and the creation of 7,900 U.S. jobs over the life of the contract.
Unlike the recent UAW contracts with GM and Ford, Fiat Chrysler was not expected to close any U.S. plants under the terms of the contract.
Current employees are expected to be offered jobs at other Fiat Chrysler facilities or at the facility with the supplier.
The UAW’s rough
UAW leaders approve Fiat Chrysler labor deal that includes $9,000 ratification bonuses, improved benefits Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, union, chrysler, voting, workers, members, fiat, bonuses, includes, deal, ratification, leaders, labor, uaw, improved, expected


UAW leaders approve Fiat Chrysler labor deal that includes $9,000 ratification bonuses, improved benefits

DETROIT – Local United Auto Workers leaders from across the country on Wednesday approved a new four-year labor contract with Fiat Chrysler, sending it to their rank-and-file members for final approval.

The deal includes the Italian-American automaker investing $9 billion in its U.S. manufacturing, including $4.5 billion in previously announced investments, and the creation of 7,900 U.S. jobs over the life of the contract.

The deal, which was patterned off recently ratified deals with General Motors and Ford Motor, also includes $9,000 ratification bonuses, which would match the bonuses of Ford workers but be $2,000 less than what GM workers received after a 40-day strike against the automaker. The agreement also would improve health-care coverage for lower-paid workers, increase profit-sharing payments and includes 3% raises or 4% lump-sum bonuses each year.

Unlike the recent UAW contracts with GM and Ford, Fiat Chrysler was not expected to close any U.S. plants under the terms of the contract. However, the automaker does plan to end a joint-venture of an axle plant with a German auto supplier in Michigan. The union expects the supplier, ZF Friedrichshafen, to continue operating the plant. Current employees are expected to be offered jobs at other Fiat Chrysler facilities or at the facility with the supplier.

The UAW’s roughly 47,200 rank-and-file members with Fiat Chrysler are scheduled to begin voting on the tentative deal starting Friday. Voting is expected to end on Wednesday, two days ahead of previously expected, according to the union.

The rushed voting, according to the union, is an attempt to get ratification bonuses to union members before the holidays, if the deal is approved.

Fiat Chrysler declined to comment following the union leaders’ decision.

Ratification of the deal is not guaranteed. Fiat Chrysler workers four years ago set a new precedent by voting down an initial leadership-approved deal during the last round of talks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, union, chrysler, voting, workers, members, fiat, bonuses, includes, deal, ratification, leaders, labor, uaw, improved, expected


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Three charts that show why Trump thinks NATO is a bad deal

Trump has repeatedly said that the U.S. provides too much cash for NATO, spending large on maintaining missile defense systems across Europe and siting 65,000 troops within the continent. In 2014, all NATO members agreed to increase their defense spending to 2% of GDP by 2024. “On spending, NATO allies are now really stepping up and delivering more that they have done for many, many years,” he told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in London. Macron has said NATO is experiencing “brain death” because of pres


Trump has repeatedly said that the U.S. provides too much cash for NATO, spending large on maintaining missile defense systems across Europe and siting 65,000 troops within the continent.
In 2014, all NATO members agreed to increase their defense spending to 2% of GDP by 2024.
“On spending, NATO allies are now really stepping up and delivering more that they have done for many, many years,” he told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in London.
Macron has said NATO is experiencing “brain death” because of pres
Three charts that show why Trump thinks NATO is a bad deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, trump, member, members, turkish, charts, president, nato, spending, thinks, military, bad, spend, deal


Three charts that show why Trump thinks NATO is a bad deal

The NATO summit celebrates its 70th birthday in London this week but some of the main attendees aren’t quite in the party mood.

The biggest guest, President Donald Trump, has traveled to the U.K. capital to attend the meeting and join other heads of state in marking the alliance’s seven decades in existence.

Trump has repeatedly said that the U.S. provides too much cash for NATO, spending large on maintaining missile defense systems across Europe and siting 65,000 troops within the continent. On Tuesday, Trump issued another broadside, this time accusing Germany of not paying its fair share on defense.

A withdrawal of the U.S. from NATO would effectively destroy it at a stroke, and while nothing official has ever been said, several reports suggest Trump has considered ending U.S. involvement.

NATO itself estimates that as a percentage of GDP, the U.S. will far outstrip the spending of any other member country in 2019.

In 2014, all NATO members agreed to increase their defense spending to 2% of GDP by 2024.

As of June 2019, NATO data estimated that only seven of its 29 members — including the U.S. — are estimated to spend 2% or more of their annual GDP (gross domestic product) on defense this year.

On Monday, Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg defended the spending of member nations.

“On spending, NATO allies are now really stepping up and delivering more that they have done for many, many years,” he told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in London.

Stoltenberg said non-U.S. NATO allies, i.e. Europe plus Canada, are on target to add more than $400 billion to their defense budgets by 2024.

“That’s unprecedented and will make NATO stronger,” he added.

Should that additional spend materialize, it will bring the combined spend of all the NATO allies up to around par with the current U.S. outlay alone.

NATO’s earliest incarnation was a 1947 agreement between France and the U.K. to help each other in the event of any attack from Germany or the Soviet Union.

This expanded into a military alliance that included the U.S.. In 1949, member countries put their signature to the North Atlantic Treaty for the first time.

Its relevance and popularity has ebbed and flowed. In 1966, France, under President Charles de Gaulle, left NATO’s military outfit, doubting the organization’s might against any invasion from the Soviet Union.

Full membership by France was only restored in 2009 and just 10 years later, current French leader Emmanuel Macron is again doubting the alliance.

Macron has said NATO is experiencing “brain death” because of pressure to reform from Trump and unpredictable military action from Turkey.

Macron has said the Turkish invasion of Syria is a threat to NATO’s battle against the Islamic State.

In an angry response, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Macron himself was suffering from “brain death” and he was showing disrespect and hubris by questioning Turkish action.

“You know how to show off, but you cannot even properly pay for NATO. You are a novice,” Erdogan reportedly said.

NATO’s Stoltenberg said Monday that while the alliance’s members have often had different opinions, history shows that “we have always been able to agree around our core task to protect and defend each other.”

As Trump, Macron and Erdogan meet, this week will provide a stern test of that theory.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, trump, member, members, turkish, charts, president, nato, spending, thinks, military, bad, spend, deal


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Trump slams Macron for ‘insulting’ and ‘disrespectful’ NATO comments

President Donald Trump has denounced recent comments made by French President Emmanuel Macron on the military alliance NATO. He added that it was “very insulting” for the French president to label NATO as brain dead. “You can’t go around saying that about NATO,” Trump added. The U.S. president said relations between the U.S. and European NATO members were not causing any divide, with the exception of France. I’m looking at him and I’m saying he (Macron) needs protection more than anybody and I s


President Donald Trump has denounced recent comments made by French President Emmanuel Macron on the military alliance NATO.
He added that it was “very insulting” for the French president to label NATO as brain dead.
“You can’t go around saying that about NATO,” Trump added.
The U.S. president said relations between the U.S. and European NATO members were not causing any divide, with the exception of France.
I’m looking at him and I’m saying he (Macron) needs protection more than anybody and I s
Trump slams Macron for ‘insulting’ and ‘disrespectful’ NATO comments Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, members, slams, saying, macron, president, disrespectful, insulting, nato, comments, alliance, french


Trump slams Macron for 'insulting' and 'disrespectful' NATO comments

President Donald Trump has denounced recent comments made by French President Emmanuel Macron on the military alliance NATO.

In November, Macron told The Economist magazine that the world was experiencing the “brain death” of NATO, warning that members of the alliance could no longer rely on the U.S.

In comments to the press ahead of a NATO meeting in London on Tuesday, Trump said Macron’s words had been “very, very nasty” to the other 28 member states. He added that it was “very insulting” for the French president to label NATO as brain dead. “You can’t go around saying that about NATO,” Trump added.

The U.S. president said relations between the U.S. and European NATO members were not causing any divide, with the exception of France.

“I do see France breaking off. I’m looking at him and I’m saying he (Macron) needs protection more than anybody and I see him breaking off, so I’m a little surprised at that,” said the American leader.

Trump has himself criticized the international body, previously describing NATO as “obsolete.” And in comments just before arriving in the U.K., Trump also called out some of the alliance members as “delinquent,” in an apparent reference to the amount of money that some nations spend on defense.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, members, slams, saying, macron, president, disrespectful, insulting, nato, comments, alliance, french


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Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with

US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018. Defense spending, againSpending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading. Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again. The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S. In September


US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018.
Defense spending, againSpending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading.
Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again.
The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S.
In September
Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, russia, summit, natos, trump, issue, defense, deal, pressing, alliance, spending, nato, military


Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with

US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018. NurPhoto | NurPhoto | Getty Images

As heads of state and government meet in the U.K. this week for the 70th anniversary of the military alliance NATO, discussions are likely to focus on shifting geopolitical relations and military threats, that thorny issue of defense spending and, crucially, the alliance’s future. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said earlier this year that the summit on Dec. 3 and 4 will give members the opportunity to address “current and emerging security challenges and how NATO continues to invest and adapt to ensure it will remain a pillar of stability in the years ahead.” The summit on the outskirts of London comes at a tricky time for NATO with unsettled relationships countering older insecurities like its relations with Russia. Furthermore, the commitment of its most powerful member, the U.S., to the alliance is now more uncertain than ever. “Rarely has NATO not been under verbal siege over these past few months,” Judy Dempsey, a non-resident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe, said in an editorial piece on Tuesday last week. “The fact that that this meeting will not be called a summit shows how NATO’s seventieth birthday is not being celebrated with great fanfare but instead with a degree of self-doubt, if not anxiety.” That anxiety comes after a tough few years for the alliance, especially when it comes to the issue of who pays the most. NATO agreed at a summit in Wales in 2014 to reverse the trend of declining defense budgets and to raise them over the coming decade, a move that was designed to “further strengthen the transatlantic bond.” Then, members agreed to spend a minimum of 2% of their GDP (gross domestic product) on defense. At last year’s summit in Brussels, President Donald Trump chided other members of the group for not meeting spending targets agreed at the NATO summit in 2014. Experts note that discussions at this NATO “Leaders Meeting,” as it’s being called, will be informed as much by issues not on the formal agenda as those that are. “Member states will be keen to bring their political differences back behind closed doors, whilst emphasizing the military coherence and credibility of their alliance,” Sarah Raine, consulting senior fellow for geopolitics and strategy at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), told CNBC. “The degree to which Europe should do more not just for itself, but also by itself, remains highly contentious. Assessment of the scope of NATO’s engagement on China’s challenge, including the U.S. push to include the issue of 5G within these discussions, risk further highlighting these sensitivities,” she said.

Defense spending, again

Spending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading. NATO estimates for 2019, released in June, show that only the U.S., U.K., Greece, Estonia, Romania, Poland and Latvia have met or surpassed that target. The highest defense spend was made by the U.S., at 3.4% of its GDP, while the lowest spend was by Luxembourg which only spent 0.55%. Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again. Germany has been singled out for especially harsh treatment because of its budget surplus. The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S.

US commitment to NATO

Defense spending, or the lack thereof, has created so much ire in Trump that there are reports that he frequently discussed pulling the U.S. out of the alliance, even with Congressional support. In July, he also likened countries not meeting the defense spend target, like Germany, to delinquents. “We’re the schmucks that are paying for the whole thing,” Trump said at a rally in July. “Frankly, many countries owe us a tremendous amount of money for many years back, where they’re delinquent, as far as I’m concerned, because the United States has had to pay for them,” singling out Germany as “the number one” culprit.

Perhaps the only thing Trump has in common with his predecessor Barack Obama was their shared dismay at the perception that the U.S. bears the brunt of NATO spending. Obama called out “free riders” in NATO that benefit from U.S. military support without contributing enough to defense themselves.

Europe’s commitment to NATO

Ironically, questions over members’ commitment to NATO could come from closer to home (it’s headquartered in Brussels) with increasing talk in Europe about strengthening the EU’s cooperation and coordination on defense. French President Emmanuel Macron has caused a stir ahead of this week’s NATO meeting after he said in early November that “what we are currently experiencing is the brain death of Nato.” Speaking to The Economist magazine, Macron cited the U.S. failure to consult NATO before pulling out of Syria as a reason for his comment, and also questioned NATO’s validity. He argued that Europe should focus on its own defense alliance, although German Chancellor Angela Merkel believes the continent is too weak “for now” to defend itself. Speaking to lawmakers last week, Merkel said that “we rely on this trans-Atlantic alliance, and that is why it is right for us to work for this alliance and take on more responsibility.” IISS’s Raine told CNBC that the short-term priority for the alliance “must be to get NATO’s public messaging back on track.” “That includes the presentation of an alliance that is militarily more capable than ever before, and that is adapting to the evolving security threats its members face, not at the expense of its traditional focus but in addition to it,” she said. The NATO secretary general will be hoping for summit headlines that focus attention away from the state of NATO’s brain, Raine said, “and towards admiration for NATO’s muscles, by highlighting the range and depth of NATO’s operational commitments and capabilities.”

The ‘R’-word

NATO was set up in 1949 as a military alliance between 10 European countries, the U.S. and Canada “to promote cooperation among its members and to guard their freedom,” the alliance says, “within the context of countering the threat posed at the time by the Soviet Union.” Seventy years on, and after several decades of relatively good relations and cooperation, NATO’s relations with Russia are tense. This comes after Moscow’s 2014 annexation of Crimea and its role in a pro-Russian uprising in eastern Ukraine. NATO says that the channels of communication remain open with Russia but that “Russia’s destabilizing actions and policies go beyond Ukraine” citing its “provocative military activities near NATO’s borders stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea.” It has also cited its “irresponsible and aggressive nuclear rhetoric,” its support for the regime in Syria as well as the U.K. nerve agent attack which it said was “a clear breach of international norms.” NATO has said it supported the U.S.’ decision to withdraw from the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty in response to “Russia’s material breach.” On Russia’s part, perhaps the most controversial NATO decision has been the decision to deploy NATO missile defense systems in Romania and Poland (although completion of this Aegis Ashore — a land-based missile defense system — site is delayed to 2020). Along with the deployment of thousands of NATO troops to the Baltic nations and Poland in the last few years, these developments appear to have served only to exacerbate tensions with Russia. Russia has widely criticized the deployment of missile defense shields in its former backyard. The prospect of Ukraine and Georgia, both of which used to be part of the former USSR, joining NATO (and even potentially the European Union) is also an unsavory prospect for Moscow. In September 2019, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said that “NATO approaching our borders is a threat to Russia.” That view was echoed by Russian President Vladimir Putin this month, when he told Russia’s Security Council that he was “seriously concerned about the NATO infrastructure approaching our borders, as well as the attempts to militarize outer space.”

The future?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, russia, summit, natos, trump, issue, defense, deal, pressing, alliance, spending, nato, military


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Boeing invites industry members to 737 Max factory in charm offensive for beleaguered plane

Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored on employee parking lots near Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. After a pair of crashes, the 737 MAX has been grounded by the FAA and other aviation agencies since March, 13, 2019. Boeing is inviting airline industry members, experts and analysts to its facilities in the Seattle area this week in an effort to outline its plan to bring the beleaguered 737 Max back to service after two fatal crashes. Flight-control software that was erroneou


Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored on employee parking lots near Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Washington.
After a pair of crashes, the 737 MAX has been grounded by the FAA and other aviation agencies since March, 13, 2019.
Boeing is inviting airline industry members, experts and analysts to its facilities in the Seattle area this week in an effort to outline its plan to bring the beleaguered 737 Max back to service after two fatal crashes.
Flight-control software that was erroneou
Boeing invites industry members to 737 Max factory in charm offensive for beleaguered plane Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, boeing, crashes, seattle, public, invites, max, charm, industry, factory, offensive, month, beleaguered, 737, invitation, flight, members, plane


Boeing invites industry members to 737 Max factory in charm offensive for beleaguered plane

Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored on employee parking lots near Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. After a pair of crashes, the 737 MAX has been grounded by the FAA and other aviation agencies since March, 13, 2019.

Boeing is inviting airline industry members, experts and analysts to its facilities in the Seattle area this week in an effort to outline its plan to bring the beleaguered 737 Max back to service after two fatal crashes.

The manufacturer is scrambling to gain regulator approval to return the jets to the skies, a process it hopes to conclude this month, but regulators have publicly said several times that they don’t have ant timeline.

The planes have been grounded since mid-March after the second of two crashes within five months of nearly brand-new 737 Maxes, killing a total of 346 people.

Boeing on Tuesday and Wednesday will host the invitees, who do not include the media, and offer briefings with executives, according to an invitation seen by CNBC. The invitation, which includes a visit to Boeing’s aircraft delivery center and its Max production facility in Renton, offers to cover flight and hotel expenses.

It is the latest attempt by Boeing to gain support and rebuild public trust in the planes as the grounding enters its 10th month. Airlines have lost hundreds of millions of dollars and curbed their growth plans because of the grounding.

In addition to industry analysts, representatives from flight attendant unions are also attending, including those that represent cabin crews at United and American.

Pilots and flight attendants will be key in reassuring the public about the planes after approval, executives have said.

Flight-control software that was erroneously activated in both crashes prompted Boeing to develop a fix, but government safety officials have not yet signed off on it.

The Federal Aviation Administration, which is under fire for first approving the planes in 2017, will take the unusual step of reviewing each new 737 Max before they’re delivered to airline customers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, boeing, crashes, seattle, public, invites, max, charm, industry, factory, offensive, month, beleaguered, 737, invitation, flight, members, plane


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American Express announces new reservation booking tool for Platinum and Centurion members

American Express is introducing a new reservation booking tool in the Amex mobile app. The new feature will allow Platinum® Card and Centurion members to search, book and manage reservations in one streamlined mobile experience. This new reservation booking tool is now available to a portion of Platinum Card® members and will be available to the broader Business Platinum®, Platinum® and Centurion card members in early 2020. When you dine at a restaurant booked through this tool, you’re not requi


American Express is introducing a new reservation booking tool in the Amex mobile app.
The new feature will allow Platinum® Card and Centurion members to search, book and manage reservations in one streamlined mobile experience.
This new reservation booking tool is now available to a portion of Platinum Card® members and will be available to the broader Business Platinum®, Platinum® and Centurion card members in early 2020.
When you dine at a restaurant booked through this tool, you’re not requi
American Express announces new reservation booking tool for Platinum and Centurion members Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, centurion, mobile, express, reservation, dining, members, card, restaurants, reservations, announces, tool, booking, platinum, american


American Express announces new reservation booking tool for Platinum and Centurion members

American Express is introducing a new reservation booking tool in the Amex mobile app. The new feature will allow Platinum® Card and Centurion members to search, book and manage reservations in one streamlined mobile experience.

According to Amex, dining is the number-one request through the Platinum concierge and a top spending category for cardholders. As a result, the company has been rolling out numerous dining initiatives, such as the ongoing expansion of the Global Dining Collection and recent acquisitions of Resy, Pocket Concierge and Cake Technologies.

“Knowing how integrated digital is in our card members’ lives, we’re excited to provide our Platinum Card members access to reservations at more than 10,000 restaurants through this new capability in our mobile app. Our card members love to dine out and we’re constantly looking for new ways to connect them with restaurants they love, whether in their local city or across the globe,” Chris Cracchiolo, SVP of global loyalty and benefits at American Express tells CNBC Select.

This new reservation booking tool is now available to a portion of Platinum Card® members and will be available to the broader Business Platinum®, Platinum® and Centurion card members in early 2020.

Eligible cardholders can access reservations at over 10,000 restaurants worldwide from the Global Dining Collection, Resy platform, BookTable and SevenRooms. Participating restaurants include Gramercy Tavern (New York), STK (Los Angeles) and Chiltern Firehouse (London).

Card members can make multiple bookings per day, but will not be able to make multiple bookings at the same restaurant for the same day within the Amex mobile app. If you want to book additional reservations at the same restaurant, contact the Platinum Concierge via phone or mobile chat for assistance.

When you dine at a restaurant booked through this tool, you’re not required to pay with your American Express card. Some restaurants may require a credit card to hold the reservation, and you’ll be prompted to opt into linking your American Express card to the reservation.

Do you love dining out? Check out the best dining rewards credit cards and ways to maximize the rewards and perks you can earn on dining.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, centurion, mobile, express, reservation, dining, members, card, restaurants, reservations, announces, tool, booking, platinum, american


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The WeWork problem people aren’t talking about that is spreading across the co-working world

Yet there’s been a paradigm shift as to whom these co-working spaces are actually serving. According to Bloomberg, General Electric, KPMG and Merck all rent out dozens of desks at co-working spaces. Between 2017 and 2018, 71% of WeWork members were corporate full-timers at companies that were either located in a WeWork office or used WeWork to house their remote teams. There’s a huge disconnect between who co-working spaces are serving and what the future of the workplace looks like. Co-working


Yet there’s been a paradigm shift as to whom these co-working spaces are actually serving.
According to Bloomberg, General Electric, KPMG and Merck all rent out dozens of desks at co-working spaces.
Between 2017 and 2018, 71% of WeWork members were corporate full-timers at companies that were either located in a WeWork office or used WeWork to house their remote teams.
There’s a huge disconnect between who co-working spaces are serving and what the future of the workplace looks like.
Co-working
The WeWork problem people aren’t talking about that is spreading across the co-working world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-23  Authors: casey mccarty, idea foundry ceo, sylvain kalache, co-founder of the holberton school
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spaces, wework, dont, independent, talking, members, arent, space, employees, coworking, problem, workers, community, world, spreading


The WeWork problem people aren't talking about that is spreading across the co-working world

Inside Spacious, a co-working service that operates out of New York restaurants. Andrew Frasz | Spacious

The number of co-working spaces worldwide is projected to soon cross 20,000 and reach 25,968 by 2022, an increase of 42% from 2019, according to CoworkingResources in its recently released Global Coworking Growth Study 2019. Yet there’s been a paradigm shift as to whom these co-working spaces are actually serving. Hint: It’s no longer the independent worker. And that’s a huge mistake, as 40% of American workers are expected to be freelancers by 2020. Today the market value of co-working spaces is estimated at $26 billion worldwide, and it’s growing exponentially: Every 7.5 days, one more site opens in New York City, claims the study. But the audience and feel of these co-working spaces has dramatically shifted since its inception in 2005, when Brad Neuberg launched the first official collaborative space, at the Spiral Muse in the Mission District of San Francisco, with just a few folding card tables to give independent workers structure and overcome the feeling of isolation. Neuberg rented the space two days a week for just $300 a month.

The changing face of the co-working space

Now large corporations are hopping on board, renting out blocks of desks for their own employees. According to Bloomberg, General Electric, KPMG and Merck all rent out dozens of desks at co-working spaces. For many these environments provide additional real estate at a lower cost. Between 2017 and 2018, 71% of WeWork members were corporate full-timers at companies that were either located in a WeWork office or used WeWork to house their remote teams. By 2019, employees of corporations with more than 500 employees represented 40% of WeWork’s member base. All this demand is upping the competition for WeWork, Impact Hub, Industrious and others, who are now distinguishing themselves by the high-end amenities they offer. Instead of catering to the independent worker, they have pivoted toward attracting corporate accounts, promising an alternative to cubicle-ville by providing flashy amenities, such as free breakfast, onsite brewpubs, golf simulators or rooftop pools. According to DeskMag, the average monthly price for a dedicated desk in the U.S. is now $387, and the average monthly cost for a hot desk — any open seat in a co-working space — is $195 per month. In New York City a dedicated desk option costs $636 per month, and a hot desk option costs $453 per month.

But is this flashy transformation really paying off?

There’s a huge disconnect between who co-working spaces are serving and what the future of the workplace looks like. The existing 22,000 co-working spaces worldwide have accidentally focused on creating a commodity specifically to sell to larger companies as part of their benefits packages rather than nurturing the 53 million bootstrapped independents in today’s U.S. workforce, many of whom don’t have deep enough pockets to regularly utilize these flashy co-working spaces. For more on tech, transformation and the future of work, join CNBC at the @ Work Summit in San Francisco on April 1, 2020.

A WeWork office in San Francisco Kate Munsch | Reuters

While most spaces couldn’t sustain WeWork’s $1.25 billion loss in revenue — the company would have run out of cash by the end of October if it hadn’t received the new financing from SoftBank — even more fiscally conservative brands are hemorrhaging money. In conversation with other managers of co-working spaces about our shared experiences, the words I tend to hear regarding the co-working membership revenue stream include “loss leader” and “break even.”

The biggest amenity for the independent workforce

A rooftop pool won’t help independent workers maintain success. Free breakfast won’t lift their entrepreneurial endeavor off the ground. Community is the strongest yet least visible amenity. There is a critical culture distinction between the independent and the corporate co-working members. While corporate employees are charmed by the amenities of a space but don’t necessarily strive to contribute to the culture, independent workers are driven to co-working spaces for the only resource they can’t access alone: community. So how do you build a community that supports the future of work? 1. Don’t force it. Many co-working spaces treat community as another checkbox in an amenities list: scheduling a myriad of drab networking events and mixers rife with the type of cringeworthy ice breakers and forced socialization that can seem more punishment than opportunity to creatives and independents. In our own space, we’ve observed co-working members hang out over snacks and engage in sincere conversations after mandatory fire drills more than any of the half-dozen types of daytime networking events we have concocted. Rather than investing dollars in hosting networking events, co-working spaces need to focus on investing in creating a collaborative space that encourages organic, authentic relationships on a daily basis. 2. Build camaraderie through failure. From the beginning our Makerspace — a space where members have access to shared tools, technology and educational resources — always had a natural sense of community, with no forced networking required. Our Makerspace is conducive to creating natural, intimate relationships. We realized that seeing the process of creation openly from start to finish creates a level of transparency. Failure builds trust, and trust builds community.

While corporate employees are charmed by the amenities of a space but don’t necessarily strive to contribute to the culture, independent workers are driven to co-working spaces for the only resource they can’t access alone: community.

In this era of carefully staged and edited Instagram highlight reels, there is intimacy built by sharing your most epic failures with fellow creatives and small business owners. Co-working spaces need to create an environment where failure becomes a celebrated part of the arduous journey of entrepreneurship. By demystifying the successes and setbacks independents and small businesses experience, co-working spaces can create a humble and open culture willing to share ideas and feedback,and engage in mentorship. 3. Don’t treat ‘community’ as a buzzword. In 2018, independent workers spent a billion hours freelancing each week, and the Small Business Administration estimates that more than 627,000 new businesses open each year. At the Idea Foundry alone, our membership includes more than 400 small business owners and entrepreneurs, a fifth of whom launched their businesses after joining us, and a quarter of our non-entrepreneur members are considering a launch within the next two years — data that suggests members feel confident they have access to the resources and support here to take the leap into entrepreneurship.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-23  Authors: casey mccarty, idea foundry ceo, sylvain kalache, co-founder of the holberton school
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spaces, wework, dont, independent, talking, members, arent, space, employees, coworking, problem, workers, community, world, spreading


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