Pompeo says the US message on Huawei is clear. Trump’s words say otherwise

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said this week the U.S. has been very clear about its stance toward Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei. “No mixed messages, not at all,” Pompeo told CNBC earlier this week. “The threat of having Chinese telecom systems inside of American networks or inside of networks around the world presents an enormous risk — a national security risk. Our mission set is to find a way to reduce that risk, to take that risk down as much as we possibly can,” he said. The


U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said this week the U.S. has been very clear about its stance toward Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei. “No mixed messages, not at all,” Pompeo told CNBC earlier this week. “The threat of having Chinese telecom systems inside of American networks or inside of networks around the world presents an enormous risk — a national security risk. Our mission set is to find a way to reduce that risk, to take that risk down as much as we possibly can,” he said. The
Pompeo says the US message on Huawei is clear. Trump’s words say otherwise Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, words, trumps, huawei, clear, week, mixed, inside, message, networks, say, chinese, way, world, pompeo, equipment, risk


Pompeo says the US message on Huawei is clear. Trump's words say otherwise

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said this week the U.S. has been very clear about its stance toward Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei.

“No mixed messages, not at all,” Pompeo told CNBC earlier this week. “President Trump has been unambiguous. I don’t think there’s a mixed message at all.”

“The threat of having Chinese telecom systems inside of American networks or inside of networks around the world presents an enormous risk — a national security risk. Our mission set is to find a way to reduce that risk, to take that risk down as much as we possibly can,” he said.

The U.S. has said Huawei is a risk because its equipment could be used as a backdoor by the Chinese government to carry out espionage — allegations the network equipment maker has consistently denied.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, words, trumps, huawei, clear, week, mixed, inside, message, networks, say, chinese, way, world, pompeo, equipment, risk


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Kevin O’Leary: Stop saying this in your emails, nobody’s reading it

If you’re looking to grab the attention of “Shark Tank” star and investor Kevin O’Leary over email, here’s a pointer: Skip the “let’s do lunch” cliche because it won’t work. “I really hate it, and I get a lot of this, ‘Let’s do lunch,'” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “How about we don’t do lunch but you tell me what you really want in the first place.” What’s more, don’t even think about using a cute little emoji along with the message — that really makes O’Leary’s blood boil. Don’t miss:Kevin O’Le


If you’re looking to grab the attention of “Shark Tank” star and investor Kevin O’Leary over email, here’s a pointer: Skip the “let’s do lunch” cliche because it won’t work. “I really hate it, and I get a lot of this, ‘Let’s do lunch,'” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “How about we don’t do lunch but you tell me what you really want in the first place.” What’s more, don’t even think about using a cute little emoji along with the message — that really makes O’Leary’s blood boil. Don’t miss:Kevin O’Le
Kevin O’Leary: Stop saying this in your emails, nobody’s reading it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, message, email, kevin, wrote, advice, wont, tell, nobodys, emails, reading, saying, really, stop, lunch, oleary


Kevin O'Leary: Stop saying this in your emails, nobody's reading it

If you’re looking to grab the attention of “Shark Tank” star and investor Kevin O’Leary over email, here’s a pointer: Skip the “let’s do lunch” cliche because it won’t work.

“I really hate it, and I get a lot of this, ‘Let’s do lunch,'” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “How about we don’t do lunch but you tell me what you really want in the first place.”

What’s more, don’t even think about using a cute little emoji along with the message — that really makes O’Leary’s blood boil.

“Little smiley faces really piss me off,” O’Leary says.

Instead, if you want to grab his attention over email, or anyone of importance for that matter, he suggests following a couple of rules.

First, keep the message short. O’Leary says he never reads past the first paragraph.

“Make it one paragraph and tell me what you want,” he says, “I’m not going to waste my time unless I know what you want.”

In fact, it’s ideal to try to get your message across in two lines or less, he says.

And be as specific as possible.

“Tell me what you want and [have] a really catchy kind of subject line,” he says.

O’Leary says it’s critical for the next generation of entrepreneurs to learn how to effectively communicate if they want to succeed in today’s economy. Rambling in email, he says, won’t get you there, “nobody reads it [and] that’s the truth.”

As for cliches, O’Leary isn’t alone.

Gary Burnison, CEO of Korn Ferry, a global consulting firm, wrote an article for CNBC Make It in July, urging people to stop asking successful people, “Can I pick your brain?”

Burnison wrote that those five words make up “the most thoughtless, irritating and generic way to ask for advice — and any person who is a rock star in their industry has heard it more than a dozen times.”

Instead, he suggests following the advice of Harvard researchers, who recommend to be straightforward and say, “I’d love your advice.”

Burnison, along with O’Leary, both advise young people to come prepared with specifics on why they are seeking that person’s advice as well.

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook.

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Kevin O’Leary: This is the age when you should have at least $100,000 saved

Kevin O’Leary says he spends $1,000 a day on food


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, message, email, kevin, wrote, advice, wont, tell, nobodys, emails, reading, saying, really, stop, lunch, oleary


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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has kept the same message to Wall Street for 22 years

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announces Blue Moon, a lunar landing vehicle for the Moon, during a Blue Origin event in Washington, DC, May 9, 2019. Jeff Bezos has gone through a lot of changes since Amazon’s IPO in 1997 — most notably in his appearance and level of wealth. That approach, which Bezos touted in his first letter to investors 22 years ago, was made abundantly clear this week in Amazon’s second-quarter earnings report. Amazon beat Wall Street estimates on revenue but missed on profit, mostly


Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announces Blue Moon, a lunar landing vehicle for the Moon, during a Blue Origin event in Washington, DC, May 9, 2019. Jeff Bezos has gone through a lot of changes since Amazon’s IPO in 1997 — most notably in his appearance and level of wealth. That approach, which Bezos touted in his first letter to investors 22 years ago, was made abundantly clear this week in Amazon’s second-quarter earnings report. Amazon beat Wall Street estimates on revenue but missed on profit, mostly
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has kept the same message to Wall Street for 22 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bezos, wrote, ceo, amazon, message, wall, letter, profit, 22, jeff, shortterm, earnings, street, kept, thats


Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has kept the same message to Wall Street for 22 years

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announces Blue Moon, a lunar landing vehicle for the Moon, during a Blue Origin event in Washington, DC, May 9, 2019.

Jeff Bezos has gone through a lot of changes since Amazon’s IPO in 1997 — most notably in his appearance and level of wealth. But there’s one thing that’s remained constant: his relentless focus on the future.

That approach, which Bezos touted in his first letter to investors 22 years ago, was made abundantly clear this week in Amazon’s second-quarter earnings report. Amazon beat Wall Street estimates on revenue but missed on profit, mostly because of increased spending across the board, a pattern that’s continuing.

“The investment will be stepping up in 2019,” Amazon CFO Brian Olsavsky said during the earnings call on Thursday.

Shipping costs accelerated 36%, the highest in five quarters, to $8.1 billion, after the company spent more than the projected $800 million to make one-day delivery the standard for Prime members. In other words, Amazon is cutting into its profit margin today so it can send more things faster and, if the thesis works, lure even more consumers into Prime.

Amazon shares fell close to 2% on Friday following the disappointing earnings number. But the stock is still up 29% this year, and Amazon remains the world’s second most valuable publicly traded company, behind only Microsoft.

Here’s what Bezos wrote in his 1997 shareholder letter — shortly after the company’s IPO — which has been included in every annual letter as a reminder of what’s important:

“We will continue to make investment decisions in light of long-term market leadership considerations rather than short-term profitability considerations or short-term Wall Street reactions,” Bezos wrote in the letter at the time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: eugene kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bezos, wrote, ceo, amazon, message, wall, letter, profit, 22, jeff, shortterm, earnings, street, kept, thats


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European markets close lower after Draghi’s mixed message on stimulus

European stocks fluctuated Thursday afternoon but ended lower after the European Central Bank ECB kept interest rates on hold but signaled that more monetary easing could be on the horizon. The pan-European Stoxx 600 clkosed provisionally down by 0.5% during trade, with most sectors and major bourses in negative territory. However, ECB President Mario Draghi gave a more mixed message in a subsequent press conference, suggesting that some members of the central bank weren’t convinced on certain a


European stocks fluctuated Thursday afternoon but ended lower after the European Central Bank ECB kept interest rates on hold but signaled that more monetary easing could be on the horizon. The pan-European Stoxx 600 clkosed provisionally down by 0.5% during trade, with most sectors and major bourses in negative territory. However, ECB President Mario Draghi gave a more mixed message in a subsequent press conference, suggesting that some members of the central bank weren’t convinced on certain a
European markets close lower after Draghi’s mixed message on stimulus Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: chloe taylor sam meredith, chloe taylor, sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stimulus, different, ecb, message, markets, easing, central, draghis, lower, mixed, close, told, european, members, bank, low


European markets close lower after Draghi's mixed message on stimulus

European stocks fluctuated Thursday afternoon but ended lower after the European Central Bank ECB kept interest rates on hold but signaled that more monetary easing could be on the horizon.

The pan-European Stoxx 600 clkosed provisionally down by 0.5% during trade, with most sectors and major bourses in negative territory.

The ECB prepared markets for more easing measures on Thursday, causing the euro to briefly fall to a two-year low against the dollar, also sending shares higher. However, ECB President Mario Draghi gave a more mixed message in a subsequent press conference, suggesting that some members of the central bank weren’t convinced on certain aspects of a possible stimulus package.

He told CNBC’s Annette Weisbach that all ECB members agreed that further stimulus was needed, but there were differences regarding the various elements of any program. “We had a broad discussion,” he said, “Whenever we have a package so complex as this, you’d expect that people have different nuances about the different parts of the package.”

Draghi also told reporters Thursday that the risk of a recession in the region was low.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: chloe taylor sam meredith, chloe taylor, sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stimulus, different, ecb, message, markets, easing, central, draghis, lower, mixed, close, told, european, members, bank, low


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Hong Kong protesters march again, this time taking their message to mainland Chinese tourists

Protesters march to the West Kowloon railway station during a demonstration in Hong Kong on July 7, 2019. Protesters in Hong Kong gathered for demonstrations again on Sunday afternoon, in a bid to take their message to mainland Chinese visitors in the city about a controversial extradition bill that has led to widespread anger. CCTV, a mouthpiece for the Chinese government, said the “rare scene” was “condemned by people from all walks of life in Hong Kong,” according to a CNBC translation. Previ


Protesters march to the West Kowloon railway station during a demonstration in Hong Kong on July 7, 2019. Protesters in Hong Kong gathered for demonstrations again on Sunday afternoon, in a bid to take their message to mainland Chinese visitors in the city about a controversial extradition bill that has led to widespread anger. CCTV, a mouthpiece for the Chinese government, said the “rare scene” was “condemned by people from all walks of life in Hong Kong,” according to a CNBC translation. Previ
Hong Kong protesters march again, this time taking their message to mainland Chinese tourists Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-07  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protesters, kowloon, message, taking, chinese, hong, mainland, station, kong, tourists, citys, railway, west


Hong Kong protesters march again, this time taking their message to mainland Chinese tourists

Protesters march to the West Kowloon railway station during a demonstration in Hong Kong on July 7, 2019.

Protesters in Hong Kong gathered for demonstrations again on Sunday afternoon, in a bid to take their message to mainland Chinese visitors in the city about a controversial extradition bill that has led to widespread anger.

Demonstrators began assembling around 3:30 p.m. HK/SIN, and set off to march through shopping areas popular with Chinese tourists, before ending up at the West Kowloon station, a new high-speed railway station that connects the city with mainland China.

Organizers said about 230,000 people turned out for the demonstration. Police, meanwhile, put the number at roughly 56,000. Hundreds of police lined the route, temporarily closing some roads and diverting public transport.

Organizers of Sunday’s march have said they want to explain their movement to people from the mainland, where news coverage of protests that have wracked Hong Kong for the past month has been heavily restricted.

There was no major coverage of the protests in any Chinese state media until last Tuesday — a day after a group of protesters turned violent and broke into the territory’s legislative council building.

CCTV, a mouthpiece for the Chinese government, said the “rare scene” was “condemned by people from all walks of life in Hong Kong,” according to a CNBC translation.

Lau Wing-hong, one of the protest organizers, told Reuters the rally would be peaceful and would finish after demonstrators arrived at their destination near the train station. There were no plans to enter the station, he said.

Although many of the protesters appeared to have left by nightfall, some continued to march. Live TV footage appeared to show a handful of such demonstrators being detained after being wrestled to the ground by police.

For nearly three weeks now, political tensions in Hong Kong have risen amid protests over an extradition bill that would have allowed some arrested in the city to be sent for trial in mainland China. The bill has since been suspended, but protesters have called for it to be withdrawn completely.

In the most dramatic turn yet, demonstrators ransacked the city’s main legislative building on Monday before they were driven back by police firing tear gas.

Hong Kong was a British colony until 1997, when it became a special administrative region of China under a “one country, two systems” framework with the territory’s legal system independent from the rest of the country. Many citizens of the financial hub have expressed concern that their civil rights are slowly being eroded under Beijing.

The demonstration on Sunday afternoon — finishing at the railway station — was the first protest in the Kowloon area, the peninsula across the city’s harbor. Previous events have been on Hong Kong island, the city’s government and business center.

The development of the West Kowloon station has stirred controversy ahead of its opening last September because passengers go through Chinese immigration and customs inside it. Mainland law applies in the area, roughly a quarter of the station.

While convenient for travelers, some opposition lawmakers argued the move violates the Basic Law, Hong Kong’s mini-constitution under which it retained its own legal system and civil liberties after reverting from British to Chinese rule in 1997.

The high-speed rail network connects Hong Kong to 44 cities in the mainland and that will rise to 58 destinations this week.

Hong Kong’s MTR Corporation, which runs the city’s underground railway, said it would shut all entrances to the station, apart from a specific route for passengers, on Sunday.

— CNBC’s Grace Shao, the Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-07  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protesters, kowloon, message, taking, chinese, hong, mainland, station, kong, tourists, citys, railway, west


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MIT president warns ‘toxic atmosphere’ for people of Chinese descent will hurt US competitiveness

Reif said national security risks are a top priority for him, but said excessive scrutiny of immigrants will hurt both the U.S. and MIT. And we should expect it to have serious long-term costs for the nation and for MIT,” Reif wrote. Today, I feel compelled to share my dismay about some circumstances painfully relevant to our fellow MIT community members of Chinese descent. As head of an institute that includes MIT Lincoln Laboratory, I could not take national security more seriously. WATCH: Why


Reif said national security risks are a top priority for him, but said excessive scrutiny of immigrants will hurt both the U.S. and MIT. And we should expect it to have serious long-term costs for the nation and for MIT,” Reif wrote. Today, I feel compelled to share my dismay about some circumstances painfully relevant to our fellow MIT community members of Chinese descent. As head of an institute that includes MIT Lincoln Laboratory, I could not take national security more seriously. WATCH: Why
MIT president warns ‘toxic atmosphere’ for people of Chinese descent will hurt US competitiveness Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warns, nation, world, competitiveness, president, toxic, atmosphere, national, reif, descent, community, serious, hurt, mit, message, security, chinese


MIT president warns 'toxic atmosphere' for people of Chinese descent will hurt US competitiveness

L. Rafael Reif smiles as he addresses a news conference after he was announced as the 17th president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., Wednesday, May 16, 2012. Reif was elected to the post Wednesday morning by the MIT Corporation and will assume the presidency on July 2, 2012. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

The U.S. government’s rhetoric and policies on immigration could “have serious long-term costs,” Massachusetts Institute of Technology President L. Rafael Reif said in an email to the school community Tuesday.

The relationship between the U.S. and China has been strained in recent months over escalating tariffs. The U.S. has also raised national security concerns about Chinese technology firms like Huawei, against which the Justice Department has filed criminal charges in two cases.

In the email, Reif discussed how tensions between China and the U.S. have bled onto MIT’s campus. He warned of the risk for justified concerns about “academic espionage” in service of the Chinese government to morph into “a toxic atmosphere of unfounded suspicion and fear.”

“Looking at cases across the nation, small numbers of researchers of Chinese background may indeed have acted in bad faith, but they are the exception and very far from the rule,” Reif wrote. “Yet faculty members, post-docs, research staff and students tell me that, in their dealings with government agencies, they now feel unfairly scrutinized, stigmatized and on edge – because of their Chinese ethnicity alone.”

Reif said national security risks are a top priority for him, but said excessive scrutiny of immigrants will hurt both the U.S. and MIT.

“Protracted visa delays. Harsh rhetoric against most immigrants and a range of other groups, because of religion, race, ethnicity or national origin. Together, such actions and policies have turned the volume all the way up on the message that the US is closing the door – that we no longer seek to be a magnet for the world’s most driven and creative individuals. I believe this message is not consistent with how America has succeeded. I am certain it is not how the Institute has succeeded. And we should expect it to have serious long-term costs for the nation and for MIT,” Reif wrote.

Read Reif’s message to the MIT community below:

To the members of the MIT community, MIT has flourished, like the United States itself, because it has been a magnet for the world’s finest talent, a global laboratory where people from every culture and background inspire each other and invent the future, together. Today, I feel compelled to share my dismay about some circumstances painfully relevant to our fellow MIT community members of Chinese descent. And I believe that because we treasure them as friends and colleagues, their situation and its larger national context should concern us all. The situation As the US and China have struggled with rising tensions, the US government has raised serious concerns about incidents of alleged academic espionage conducted by individuals through what is widely understood as a systematic effort of the Chinese government to acquire high-tech IP. As head of an institute that includes MIT Lincoln Laboratory, I could not take national security more seriously. I am well aware of the risks of academic espionage, and MIT has established prudent policies to protect against such breaches. But in managing these risks, we must take great care not to create a toxic atmosphere of unfounded suspicion and fear. Looking at cases across the nation, small numbers of researchers of Chinese background may indeed have acted in bad faith, but they are the exception and very far from the rule. Yet faculty members, post-docs, research staff and students tell me that, in their dealings with government agencies, they now feel unfairly scrutinized, stigmatized and on edge – because of their Chinese ethnicity alone. Nothing could be further from – or more corrosive to ­– our community’s collaborative strength and open-hearted ideals. To hear such reports from Chinese and Chinese-American colleagues is heartbreaking. As scholars, teachers, mentors, inventors and entrepreneurs, they have been not only exemplary members of our community but exceptional contributors to American society. I am deeply troubled that they feel themselves repaid with generalized mistrust and disrespect. The signal to the world For those of us who know firsthand the immense value of MIT’s global community and of the free flow of scientific ideas, it is important to understand the distress of these colleagues as part of an increasingly loud signal the US is sending to the world. Protracted visa delays. Harsh rhetoric against most immigrants and a range of other groups, because of religion, race, ethnicity or national origin. Together, such actions and policies have turned the volume all the way up on the message that the US is closing the door – that we no longer seek to be a magnet for the world’s most driven and creative individuals. I believe this message is not consistent with how America has succeeded. I am certain it is not how the Institute has succeeded. And we should expect it to have serious long-term costs for the nation and for MIT. For the record, let me say with warmth and enthusiasm to every member of MIT’s intensely global community: We are glad, proud and fortunate to have you with us! To our alumni around the world: We remain one community, united by our shared values and ideals! And to all the rising talent out there: If you are passionate about making a better world, and if you dream of joining our community, we welcome your creativity, we welcome your unstoppable energy and aspiration – and we hope you can find a way to join us. * * * In May, the world lost a brilliant creative force: architect I.M. Pei, MIT Class of 1940. Raised in Shanghai and Hong Kong, he came to the United States at 17 to seek an education. He left a legacy of iconic buildings from Boston to Paris and China to Washington, DC, as well on our own campus. By his own account, he consciously stayed alive to his Chinese roots all his life. Yet, when he died at the age of 102, the Boston Globe described him as “the most prominent American architect of his generation.” Thanks to the inspired American system that also made room for me as an immigrant, all of those facts can be true at the same time. As I have discovered through 40 years in academia, the hidden strength of a university is that every fall, it is refreshed by a new tide of students. I am equally convinced that part of the genius of America is that it is continually refreshed by immigration – by the passionate energy, audacity, ingenuity and drive of people hungry for a better life. There is certainly room for a wide range of serious positions on the actions necessary to ensure our national security and to manage and improve our nation’s immigration system. But above the noise of the current moment, the signal I believe we should be sending, loud and clear, is that the story of American immigration is essential to understanding how the US became, and remains, optimistic, open-minded, innovative and prosperous – a story of never-ending renewal. In a nation like ours, immigration is a kind of oxygen, each fresh wave reenergizing the body as a whole. As a society, when we offer immigrants the gift of opportunity, we receive in return vital fuel for our shared future. I trust that this wisdom will always guide us in the life and work of MIT. And I hope it can continue to guide our nation. Sincerely, L. Rafael Reif

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WATCH: Why the US thinks Huawei has been a massive national security threat for years


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warns, nation, world, competitiveness, president, toxic, atmosphere, national, reif, descent, community, serious, hurt, mit, message, security, chinese


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Carbon testing- asset from scratch(V2.4.1)

Melania Trump aide Stephanie Grisham picked as next White House… In a text message, Grisham confirmed to CNBC that she will still be working for the first lady even as she takes on her new roles. Politicsread more


Melania Trump aide Stephanie Grisham picked as next White House… In a text message, Grisham confirmed to CNBC that she will still be working for the first lady even as she takes on her new roles. Politicsread more
Carbon testing- asset from scratch(V2.4.1) Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, carbon, white, takes, stephanie, working, trump, text, testing, message, scratchv241, picked, asset, grisham, rolespoliticsread


Carbon testing- asset from scratch(V2.4.1)

Melania Trump aide Stephanie Grisham picked as next White House…

In a text message, Grisham confirmed to CNBC that she will still be working for the first lady even as she takes on her new roles.

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25
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Jefferies upgrades Deere, sees a major farming turnaround

Melania Trump aide Stephanie Grisham picked as next White House… In a text message, Grisham confirmed to CNBC that she will still be working for the first lady even as she takes on her new roles. Politicsread more


Melania Trump aide Stephanie Grisham picked as next White House… In a text message, Grisham confirmed to CNBC that she will still be working for the first lady even as she takes on her new roles. Politicsread more
Jefferies upgrades Deere, sees a major farming turnaround Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turnaround, sees, white, takes, jefferies, stephanie, upgrades, working, farming, deere, trump, text, message, major, picked, grisham, rolespoliticsread


Jefferies upgrades Deere, sees a major farming turnaround

Melania Trump aide Stephanie Grisham picked as next White House…

In a text message, Grisham confirmed to CNBC that she will still be working for the first lady even as she takes on her new roles.

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turnaround, sees, white, takes, jefferies, stephanie, upgrades, working, farming, deere, trump, text, message, major, picked, grisham, rolespoliticsread


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US military drone shot down by missile in international airspace, US official says

A surface-to-air missile shot down a U.S. military drone in international airspace over the Strait of Hormuz, a U.S. official told NBC News Thursday morning. The U.S. official said a US RQ-4 Global Hawk drone was shot down in international airspace above the Strait of Hormuz. It was not in Iranian airspace, the official said, which has been disputed by Iran. The recently appointed chief of Iran’s elite Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), Major General Hossein Salami, told Iranian state TV


A surface-to-air missile shot down a U.S. military drone in international airspace over the Strait of Hormuz, a U.S. official told NBC News Thursday morning. The U.S. official said a US RQ-4 Global Hawk drone was shot down in international airspace above the Strait of Hormuz. It was not in Iranian airspace, the official said, which has been disputed by Iran. The recently appointed chief of Iran’s elite Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), Major General Hossein Salami, told Iranian state TV
US military drone shot down by missile in international airspace, US official says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, missile, official, airspace, strait, irans, salami, message, drone, told, shot, international, iran, military


US military drone shot down by missile in international airspace, US official says

A surface-to-air missile shot down a U.S. military drone in international airspace over the Strait of Hormuz, a U.S. official told NBC News Thursday morning.

The U.S. official said a US RQ-4 Global Hawk drone was shot down in international airspace above the Strait of Hormuz. It was not in Iranian airspace, the official said, which has been disputed by Iran. The official said they consider this to be an unprovoked attack.

The recently appointed chief of Iran’s elite Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), Major General Hossein Salami, told Iranian state TV that the downing was “a clear message” to Washington.

“The downing of the American drone was a clear message to America … our borders are Iran’s red line and we will react strongly against any aggression,” Salami said. “Iran is not seeking war with any country, but we are fully prepared to defend Iran.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: natasha turak
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Google CEO’s sunny new message: We want to be helpful

Google CEO Sundar Pichai takes the stage during the presentation of new Google hardware in San Francisco on Oct. 4, 2016. Google CEO Sundar Pichai wrote the annual Founders’ Letter for its parent company Alphabet this week, and he sounded a theme familiar from his on-stage appearance at the company’s Google I/O conference in May: Google wants to help you. Pichai writes, “Now we are focused on building an even more helpful Google for everyone. “One of our most helpful products is YouTube,” he wro


Google CEO Sundar Pichai takes the stage during the presentation of new Google hardware in San Francisco on Oct. 4, 2016. Google CEO Sundar Pichai wrote the annual Founders’ Letter for its parent company Alphabet this week, and he sounded a theme familiar from his on-stage appearance at the company’s Google I/O conference in May: Google wants to help you. Pichai writes, “Now we are focused on building an even more helpful Google for everyone. “One of our most helpful products is YouTube,” he wro
Google CEO’s sunny new message: We want to be helpful Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: matt rosoff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceos, products, pichai, wrote, sunny, google, help, letter, helping, videos, company, helpful, message


Google CEO's sunny new message: We want to be helpful

Google CEO Sundar Pichai takes the stage during the presentation of new Google hardware in San Francisco on Oct. 4, 2016.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai wrote the annual Founders’ Letter for its parent company Alphabet this week, and he sounded a theme familiar from his on-stage appearance at the company’s Google I/O conference in May: Google wants to help you.

Although Pichai is not a founder, this is his second shot at the note — his first was in 2015, and actual co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin have each written one since then.

But Pichai is clearly the public face of the company these days, and was the top Alphabet exec present to answer questions from shareholders on Wednesday as well.

His note reads like a response to growing scrutiny from regulators, press and employees. Over the last two years, Pichai has testified before Congress about political bias and privacy and faced a walkout from employees angry over reports that the company had paid big payments to departing execs accused of sexual misconduct. He has also faced criticism over reported plans to re-enter China with a censored search engine and to sell artificial intelligence technology to the U.S. military.

The affable CEO has handled this pressure with calm grace — as Page and Brin stayed out of the spotlight. Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Justice is reportedly gearing up for a possible antitrust investigation.

In his letter, which appeared in an Securities and Exchange Commission filing on Wednesday, Pichai sounded a consistently sunny theme:

The company has moved on from its original goal of “organizing the world’s information.” Pichai writes, “Now we are focused on building an even more helpful Google for everyone. We aspire to give everyone the tools they need to increase their knowledge, health, happiness, and success.”

“Our products are designed to save you time in ways that add up over the course of a day,” he wrote, citing features like Google Translate and Smart Compose, which helps write emails more quickly.

“One of our most helpful products is YouTube,” he wrote, pointing out all the helpful educational how-to videos that people watch there. This comes after months of criticism about the site, including allegations that it radicalizes teenagers by guiding them toward extremist content, promotes videos of children to people who have already watched erotic videos, and applies rules about hate speech unevenly. (Later, Pichai does address these problems, noting that “removing hate speech is both a hard computer science problem and a hard societal problem ” and “problematic or borderline content on YouTube accounts for less than 1% of the consumption on the platform.”)

He writes: “We want to help you connect with the people and things you love,” like photos of family and friends, and “help you disconnect from technology when you want, with Digital Wellbeing features like WindDown to help you switch off at night, or our FamilyLink app, which helps you to manage your kids’ screen time.”

“We’re also challenging the notion that products need more data to be helpful” — a direct response to the criticism that Google and other large digital platforms invade users’ privacy.

The letter continues, highlighting how Google is helping people in developing countries with cheaper options to get online, helping local communities by investing in housing, helping save journalism with the $300 million Google News Initiative and so on.

Look for this theme of helpfulness to continue to be a big part of Google’s messaging as scrutiny of the company continues to grow.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: matt rosoff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceos, products, pichai, wrote, sunny, google, help, letter, helping, videos, company, helpful, message


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