Israel launches Gaza strikes after rockets fired at Tel Aviv

Israeli military aircraft bombed Hamas facilities in the Gaza Strip on Friday, hours after two rockets were launched from the Palestinian enclave at Tel Aviv in the first such attack since a 2014 war. The Israeli military said it was targeting “terror sites” in Gaza. On Thursday night, the sirens howled farther north, in Tel Aviv, Israel’s commercial capital, set off by what the military said were two incoming, longer-range rockets from Gaza. Explosions were heard in Tel Aviv and witnesses said


Israeli military aircraft bombed Hamas facilities in the Gaza Strip on Friday, hours after two rockets were launched from the Palestinian enclave at Tel Aviv in the first such attack since a 2014 war. The Israeli military said it was targeting “terror sites” in Gaza. On Thursday night, the sirens howled farther north, in Tel Aviv, Israel’s commercial capital, set off by what the military said were two incoming, longer-range rockets from Gaza. Explosions were heard in Tel Aviv and witnesses said
Israel launches Gaza strikes after rockets fired at Tel Aviv Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: majdi fathi, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, launches, aviv, security, israeli, hamas, israel, military, strikes, fired, rockets, rocket, tel, gaza


Israel launches Gaza strikes after rockets fired at Tel Aviv

Israeli military aircraft bombed Hamas facilities in the Gaza Strip on Friday, hours after two rockets were launched from the Palestinian enclave at Tel Aviv in the first such attack since a 2014 war.

There was no immediate word of casualties in the air strikes that hit six buildings used by the dominant Islamist group’s security forces, and which had been evacuated as a precaution.

Witnesses said powerful explosions from the air strikes rocked buildings in Gaza and lit the skies over targeted sites.

The Israeli military said it was targeting “terror sites” in Gaza. In a possible sign of further escalation, it said rocket sirens were sounded in Israeli communities near the Gaza border.

On Thursday night, the sirens howled farther north, in Tel Aviv, Israel’s commercial capital, set off by what the military said were two incoming, longer-range rockets from Gaza.

That salvo caused no casualties or damage, missing built-up areas. But it rattled Israeli nerves ahead of an April 9 election in which Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is seeking a fifth term on the strength of his national security credentials.

Explosions were heard in Tel Aviv and witnesses said Iron Dome interceptor missiles were fired skyward and detonated —although the military said no rockets were shot down.

It was the first such attack on the city since the 2014 Gaza war between Hamas and Israel. There have been several smaller rounds of fighting since, reined in by Egyptian and U.N. mediations.

“This was basically a surprise,” military spokesman Brigadier-General Ronen Manelis told Israel Radio on Thursday.

In that interview, Manelis said Israel did not yet know who had carried out the rocket launches. But another Israeli military spokesman laid the blame with Hamas on Friday.

“Hamas carried out the rocket fire against Tel Aviv yesterday evening,” Lieutenant-Colonel Avichay Adraee said.

Hamas denied involvement, saying the launches took place as its leaders met Egyptian delegates about efforts to secure a long-term ceasefire with Israel.

Islamic Jihad and the Popular Resistance Committees, two smaller Gaza armed factions, also denied responsibility.

Israeli analysts speculated that Palestinian militants opposed to any deal between Hamas and Israel were behind the launchings.

The flare-up of Thursday and Friday drew a U.S. statement of support for Israel. “Hamas and other terror orgs in Gaza continue to fail their people day after day & drag Gaza further & further down by constantly choosing violence,” tweeted Jason Greenblatt, the White House’s Middle East envoy. “This method will never work. Ever!”

Naftali Bennett, a member of Netanyahu’s security Cabinet who is vying against him for rightist votes in the looming election, demanded the assassination of Hamas chiefs. “The time has come to defeat Hamas once and for all,” he said on Thursday.

Netanyahu also faced pressure from the center-left opposition, whose leading candidate, former General Benny Gantz, said: “Only aggressive, harsh action will restore the deterrence that has eroded” under the prime minister’s watch.

Tensions have been high for the past year along the Israel-Gaza frontier since Palestinians began violent protests near Israel’s border fence that have often drawn a lethal response from the Israeli military.

About 200 Palestinians have been killed in the demonstrations and about 60 more Palestinians have died in other incidents, including exchanges of fire across the border. Two Israeli soldiers have been killed by Palestinian fire.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: majdi fathi, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, launches, aviv, security, israeli, hamas, israel, military, strikes, fired, rockets, rocket, tel, gaza


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America’s top defense officials say Google’s work in China benefits Beijing’s military

WASHINGTON — America’s top two defense officials slammed Google’s work with China on Thursday saying it has “indirectly benefited” Beijing’s military. “The work that Google is doing in China is indirectly benefiting the Chinese military,” Dunford said. In addition, the company also said it would not renew a Pentagon contract that analyzed aerial drone imagery for the military. Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan, also speaking before the Senate committee, echoed concerns that China has


WASHINGTON — America’s top two defense officials slammed Google’s work with China on Thursday saying it has “indirectly benefited” Beijing’s military. “The work that Google is doing in China is indirectly benefiting the Chinese military,” Dunford said. In addition, the company also said it would not renew a Pentagon contract that analyzed aerial drone imagery for the military. Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan, also speaking before the Senate committee, echoed concerns that China has
America’s top defense officials say Google’s work in China benefits Beijing’s military Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: amanda macias, navy petty officer class dominique pineiro, department of defense photo, lockheed martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, work, china, americas, joint, military, country, googles, theft, talent, technology, search, say, beijings, officials, benefits, google


America's top defense officials say Google's work in China benefits Beijing's military

WASHINGTON — America’s top two defense officials slammed Google’s work with China on Thursday saying it has “indirectly benefited” Beijing’s military.

“We watch with great concern when industry partners work in China knowing that there is that indirect benefit,” Marine Corps Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told members of the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing.

“The work that Google is doing in China is indirectly benefiting the Chinese military,” Dunford said. “The way I describe it to industry partners is, ‘look we’re the good guys and the values that we represent and the system we represent is the one that will allow and has allowed you to thrive,'” he said.

Dunford’s comments come in the wake of the tech giants’ decision not to pursue some of the Pentagon’s lucrative contracts while considering projects in China.

In October, Google said it would no longer compete for the Pentagon’s Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, or JEDI, cloud computing contract, an award that could be worth $10 billion. Google said that the contract may conflict with its corporate values. In addition, the company also said it would not renew a Pentagon contract that analyzed aerial drone imagery for the military.

Meanwhile, it was revealed last year that the tech giant was studying the idea of working with the Chinese government on “Project Dragonfly,” a censored search engine that would block certain sites and search terms. More recently, after pushback from politicians and activists, Google said it had dropped those plans.

Read more: Senator slams Google’s censored search engine work in China

But Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai has said the company will continue to invest in China while also considering projects with the U.S. government.

Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan, also speaking before the Senate committee, echoed concerns that China has gamed American innovation.

“$5 trillion of their [China’s] economy is state-owned enterprises. So the technology that has developed in the civil world transfers to the military world, it’s a direct pipeline. Not only is there a transfer, there is systemic theft of U.S. technology that facilitates even faster development of emerging technology,” he said.

“The talent is in this country, we need to use the talent in this country and the talent in this country needs to support our great power competition,” Shanahan added.

The criticism comes as the U.S. trade battle with China marches on, with intellectual property theft proving to be a major sticking point between the world’s two largest economies.

U.S. officials have long complained that intellectual property theft has cost the economy billions of dollars in revenue, thousands of jobs and threatens national security.

“If China successfully captures these emerging industries of the future, America will have no economic future and its national security will be severely compromised,” White House trade advisor Peter Navarro said in June.

For the Pentagon, there is no better example of Navarro’s comments than the most expensive U.S. weapons system: the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: amanda macias, navy petty officer class dominique pineiro, department of defense photo, lockheed martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, work, china, americas, joint, military, country, googles, theft, talent, technology, search, say, beijings, officials, benefits, google


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The British army is to invest $44 million in a fleet of tiny hand-sized drones

The British army will invest £31 million ($43.5 million) in a fleet of tiny drones in an effort to “outmanoeuvre enemies on the battlefield.” Funding for the mini-drones will come from a £160 million “Transformation Fund,” U.K. Defence Minister Gavin Williamson announced on Wednesday, adding that the fund would inject £66 million into army robotics. British newspaper The Times reported that the drones will be “smaller than a hand” and weigh less than 200 grams. The report added that the fleet wi


The British army will invest £31 million ($43.5 million) in a fleet of tiny drones in an effort to “outmanoeuvre enemies on the battlefield.” Funding for the mini-drones will come from a £160 million “Transformation Fund,” U.K. Defence Minister Gavin Williamson announced on Wednesday, adding that the fund would inject £66 million into army robotics. British newspaper The Times reported that the drones will be “smaller than a hand” and weigh less than 200 grams. The report added that the fleet wi
The British army is to invest $44 million in a fleet of tiny hand-sized drones Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: chloe taylor, chesky_w, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fleet, military, tiny, million, technology, drones, handsized, 44, british, army, invest, soldiers, end, fund, exercise


The British army is to invest $44 million in a fleet of tiny hand-sized drones

The British army will invest £31 million ($43.5 million) in a fleet of tiny drones in an effort to “outmanoeuvre enemies on the battlefield.”

Funding for the mini-drones will come from a £160 million “Transformation Fund,” U.K. Defence Minister Gavin Williamson announced on Wednesday, adding that the fund would inject £66 million into army robotics.

The new technology will provide soldiers with an “eye-in-the-sky,” the Ministry of Defence said in a press release Tuesday.

British newspaper The Times reported that the drones will be “smaller than a hand” and weigh less than 200 grams. The report added that the fleet will be used to spy on terrorism suspects and monitor battlefields before soldiers arrive.

Williamson said at a military conference on Tuesday that the tech would be deployed to various locations including Estonia, Afghanistan and Iraq by the end of this year.

“Each of these new technologies will enhance our Army’s capabilities whilst reducing the risk to our personnel and I’m delighted we will be revolutionising frontline technology by the end of the year,” he said.

The army tested a range of products at the end of last year as part of the biggest military robot exercise in British history, “Exercise Autonomous Warrior.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: chloe taylor, chesky_w, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fleet, military, tiny, million, technology, drones, handsized, 44, british, army, invest, soldiers, end, fund, exercise


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China’s defense spending is growing more slowly. But that doesn’t mean military tensions are easing

China announced Tuesday that military spending will grow at a slower pace than last year, but one analyst cautioned that it should not be interpreted to mean that military tensions with the United States will ease. At its annual parliamentary meeting, the National People’s Congress, Beijing set its 2019 defense spending at 7.5 percent higher than a year ago — or 1.19 trillion yuan ($177.61 billion). Military tensions between the U.S. and China have been on the rise in recent years as Beijing tak


China announced Tuesday that military spending will grow at a slower pace than last year, but one analyst cautioned that it should not be interpreted to mean that military tensions with the United States will ease. At its annual parliamentary meeting, the National People’s Congress, Beijing set its 2019 defense spending at 7.5 percent higher than a year ago — or 1.19 trillion yuan ($177.61 billion). Military tensions between the U.S. and China have been on the rise in recent years as Beijing tak
China’s defense spending is growing more slowly. But that doesn’t mean military tensions are easing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: kelly olsen, str, afp, getty images, vcg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doesnt, tensions, mean, military, heath, sea, growing, easing, beijing, defense, slowly, china, chinas, spending, slower


China's defense spending is growing more slowly. But that doesn't mean military tensions are easing

China announced Tuesday that military spending will grow at a slower pace than last year, but one analyst cautioned that it should not be interpreted to mean that military tensions with the United States will ease.

At its annual parliamentary meeting, the National People’s Congress, Beijing set its 2019 defense spending at 7.5 percent higher than a year ago — or 1.19 trillion yuan ($177.61 billion).

That’s lower than the 8.1 percent growth in 2018 and far below double-digit increases of previous years — though analysts have long questioned how accurately the budget reflects actual spending.

Military tensions between the U.S. and China have been on the rise in recent years as Beijing takes a more assertive stance on territorial claims in the South China Sea and East China Sea, as well as over Taiwan — a self-ruled territory which Beijing claims as its own.

But slower growth in defense spending doesn’t mean tensions with Washington have ceased, warned Timothy Heath, senior international defense researcher at U.S. think tank Rand Corporation.

In fact, the stated amount is less important than what it’s used for, Heath told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: kelly olsen, str, afp, getty images, vcg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doesnt, tensions, mean, military, heath, sea, growing, easing, beijing, defense, slowly, china, chinas, spending, slower


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Scaparrotti says to not sell F-35 jets to Turkey amid Russian missile system deal

WASHINGTON — The United States should not follow through with a multi-billion dollar weapons sale of F-35 jets to Turkey, if Ankara takes delivery of an advanced Russian missile system, the top U.S. military commander for Europe told Congress on Tuesday. “I would hope that they [Turkey] would reconsider this one decision on the S-400,” Scaparrotti said, adding that there could be potential consequences, namely, no future foreign military sales between Washington and Ankara. In 2017, Ankara sign


WASHINGTON — The United States should not follow through with a multi-billion dollar weapons sale of F-35 jets to Turkey, if Ankara takes delivery of an advanced Russian missile system, the top U.S. military commander for Europe told Congress on Tuesday. “I would hope that they [Turkey] would reconsider this one decision on the S-400,” Scaparrotti said, adding that there could be potential consequences, namely, no future foreign military sales between Washington and Ankara. In 2017, Ankara sign
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: amanda macias, sergei malgavko, tass via getty images, atilgan ozdil, anadolu agency, getty images, department of defense photo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, sell, systems, working, s400, washington, told, turkey, scaparrotti, jets, f35, deal, russian, weapons, missile, military, system


Scaparrotti says to not sell F-35 jets to Turkey amid Russian missile system deal

WASHINGTON — The United States should not follow through with a multi-billion dollar weapons sale of F-35 jets to Turkey, if Ankara takes delivery of an advanced Russian missile system, the top U.S. military commander for Europe told Congress on Tuesday.

“My best military advice would be that we don’t then follow through with the F-35, flying it or working with allies that are working with Russian systems, particularly air defense systems,” Army Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, head of U.S. European Command, told members of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

“I would hope that they [Turkey] would reconsider this one decision on the S-400,” Scaparrotti said, adding that there could be potential consequences, namely, no future foreign military sales between Washington and Ankara.

In 2017, Ankara signed an agreement with Moscow for the S-400 missile system, a deal reportedly worth $2.5 billion. All the while, Turkey has helped finance America’s most expensive weapons system, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

In short, these two big ticket weapons systems, the S-400 and the F-35, can be used against each other.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: amanda macias, sergei malgavko, tass via getty images, atilgan ozdil, anadolu agency, getty images, department of defense photo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, sell, systems, working, s400, washington, told, turkey, scaparrotti, jets, f35, deal, russian, weapons, missile, military, system


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US, South Korea end spring military drills to back diplomacy

South Korea and the U.S. are eliminating their massive springtime military drills and replacing them with smaller exercises in what they call an effort to support diplomacy aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis. The drills’ cancellation is an olive branch to North Korea, which has viewed them as an invasion rehearsal. The Pentagon said in a release that the U.S. and South Korean defense chiefs decided to conclude the Key Resolve and Foal Eagle series of exercises. Jeong expressed hi


South Korea and the U.S. are eliminating their massive springtime military drills and replacing them with smaller exercises in what they call an effort to support diplomacy aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis. The drills’ cancellation is an olive branch to North Korea, which has viewed them as an invasion rehearsal. The Pentagon said in a release that the U.S. and South Korean defense chiefs decided to conclude the Key Resolve and Foal Eagle series of exercises. Jeong expressed hi
US, South Korea end spring military drills to back diplomacy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-03  Authors: ed jones, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diplomacy, spring, drills, summit, north, military, statement, korea, end, korean, exercises, defense, training, south


US, South Korea end spring military drills to back diplomacy

South Korea and the U.S. are eliminating their massive springtime military drills and replacing them with smaller exercises in what they call an effort to support diplomacy aimed at resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis.

The decision announced by both countries Sunday came after President Donald Trump complained about the cost of joint drills even as his high-stakes second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un collapsed last week.

The drills’ cancellation is an olive branch to North Korea, which has viewed them as an invasion rehearsal. But some experts say it will likely weaken the allies’ military readiness amid worries that tensions erupt again in the wake of the failed nuclear summit in Vietnam.

The Pentagon said in a release that the U.S. and South Korean defense chiefs decided to conclude the Key Resolve and Foal Eagle series of exercises. It said the allies agreed to maintain firm military readiness through newly designed command post exercises and revised field training programs.

Acting U.S. Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan and South Korean Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo “made clear that the alliance decision to adapt our training program reflected our desire to reduce tension and support our diplomatic efforts to achieve complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a final, fully verified manner,” the statement said.

Seoul’s Defense Ministry released a similar statement.

Jeong expressed his regrets at the lack of agreement at the Trump-Kim summit but still hopes that Washington and Pyongyang will continue negotiations, the South Korean statement said.

The new training, dubbed “Dong Maeng,” which means “alliance” in English, starts Monday and runs through March 12. It will focus on “strategic operational and tactical aspects of general military operations on the Korean Peninsula,” South Korea’s military and the U.S.-South Korean combined forces command said in a joint statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-03  Authors: ed jones, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diplomacy, spring, drills, summit, north, military, statement, korea, end, korean, exercises, defense, training, south


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What’s next for Venezuela? Anti-Maduro allies regroup after the fight for humanitarian aid

Venezuela’s opposition has formally urged the international community to keep all options on the table, after deadly clashes broke out in border towns over the weekend. It comes at a time when the South American nation is in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. President Donald Trump has consistently refused to rule out the prospect of military intervention in Venezuela and the country’s opposition leader, Juan Guaido, has called on the international


Venezuela’s opposition has formally urged the international community to keep all options on the table, after deadly clashes broke out in border towns over the weekend. It comes at a time when the South American nation is in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory. President Donald Trump has consistently refused to rule out the prospect of military intervention in Venezuela and the country’s opposition leader, Juan Guaido, has called on the international
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: sam meredith, luis robayo, afp, getty images, schneyder mendoza
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, humanitarian, regroup, fight, intervention, deadly, antimaduro, allies, clashes, action, venezuela, options, prospect, community, aid, international, opposition, whats, military


What's next for Venezuela? Anti-Maduro allies regroup after the fight for humanitarian aid

Venezuela’s opposition has formally urged the international community to keep all options on the table, after deadly clashes broke out in border towns over the weekend.

On Saturday, at least three people were killed and hundreds more were left injured, Reuters reported, as opposition activists tried to defy a government ban to bring food supplies, hygiene kits and nutritional supplements into the country.

It comes at a time when the South American nation is in the midst of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crisis in recent memory.

President Donald Trump has consistently refused to rule out the prospect of military intervention in Venezuela and the country’s opposition leader, Juan Guaido, has called on the international community to “keep all options open.”

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted over the weekend that Washington would “take action against those who oppose the peaceful restoration of democracy in Venezuela.”

To be sure, the prospect of U.S.-led military intervention is clearly being signaled as a form of “action.”

“I think large-scale U.S. military intervention remains unlikely, though the chances are increasing — that’s worrying,” Tom Long, assistant professor in the department of politics and international studies at the University of Warwick, told CNBC via email.

“More than the deadly clashes, what I worry could push towards military action is the lack of options remaining for the opposition and its international allies to increase pressure,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: sam meredith, luis robayo, afp, getty images, schneyder mendoza
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, humanitarian, regroup, fight, intervention, deadly, antimaduro, allies, clashes, action, venezuela, options, prospect, community, aid, international, opposition, whats, military


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After Putin’s warning, Russian TV lists nuclear targets in US

The report, unusual even by the sometimes bellicose standards of Russian state TV, was broadcast on Sunday evening, days after President Vladimir Putin said Moscow was militarily ready for a “Cuban Missile”-style crisis if the United States wanted one. With tensions rising over Russian fears that the United States might deploy intermediate-range nuclear missiles in Europe as a Cold War-era arms-control treaty unravels, Putin has said Russia would be forced to respond by placing hypersonic nuclea


The report, unusual even by the sometimes bellicose standards of Russian state TV, was broadcast on Sunday evening, days after President Vladimir Putin said Moscow was militarily ready for a “Cuban Missile”-style crisis if the United States wanted one. With tensions rising over Russian fears that the United States might deploy intermediate-range nuclear missiles in Europe as a Cold War-era arms-control treaty unravels, Putin has said Russia would be forced to respond by placing hypersonic nuclea
After Putin’s warning, Russian TV lists nuclear targets in US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-25  Authors: andrey rudokov, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russian, nuclear, russia, state, united, states, putins, tv, lists, targets, missiles, military, moscow, warning


After Putin's warning, Russian TV lists nuclear targets in US

Russian state television has listed U.S. military facilities that Moscow would target in the event of a nuclear strike, and said that a hypersonic missile Russia is developing would be able to hit them in less than five minutes.

The targets included the Pentagon and the presidential retreat in Camp David, Maryland.

The report, unusual even by the sometimes bellicose standards of Russian state TV, was broadcast on Sunday evening, days after President Vladimir Putin said Moscow was militarily ready for a “Cuban Missile”-style crisis if the United States wanted one.

With tensions rising over Russian fears that the United States might deploy intermediate-range nuclear missiles in Europe as a Cold War-era arms-control treaty unravels, Putin has said Russia would be forced to respond by placing hypersonic nuclear missiles on submarines near U.S. waters.

The United States says it has no immediate plans to deploy such missiles in Europe and has dismissed Putin’s warnings as disingenuous propaganda. It does not currently have ground-based intermediate-range nuclear missiles that it could place in Europe.

However, its decision to quit the 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty over an alleged Russian violation, something Moscow denies, has freed it to start developing and deploying such missiles.

Putin has said Russia does not want a new arms race, but has also dialed up his military rhetoric.

Some analysts have seen his approach as a tactic to try to re-engage the United States in talks about the strategic balance between the two powers, something Moscow has long pushed for, with mixed results.

In the Sunday evening broadcast, Dmitry Kiselyov, presenter of Russia’s main weekly TV news show ‘Vesti Nedeli’, showed a map of the United States and identified several targets he said Moscow would want to hit in the event of a nuclear war.

The targets, which Kiselyov described as U.S. presidential or military command centres, also included Fort Ritchie, a military training center in Maryland closed in 1998, McClellan, a U.S. Air Force base in California closed in 2001, and Jim Creek, a naval communications base in Washington state.

Kiselyov, who is close to the Kremlin, said the “Tsirkon” (‘Zircon’) hypersonic missile that Russia is developing could hit the targets in less than five minutes if launched from Russian submarines. Hypersonic flight is generally taken to mean travelling through the atmosphere at more than five times the speed of sound.

“For now, we’re not threatening anyone, but if such a deployment takes place, our response will be instant,” he said.

Kiselyov is one of the main conduits of state television’s strongly anti-American tone, once saying Moscow could turn the United States into radioactive ash.

Asked to comment on Kiselyov’s report, the Kremlin said on Monday it did not interfere in state TV’s editorial policy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-25  Authors: andrey rudokov, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russian, nuclear, russia, state, united, states, putins, tv, lists, targets, missiles, military, moscow, warning


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Russia bans soldiers from using smartphones to prevent tracking of military

Russian lawmakers voted on Tuesday to ban its soldiers from using smartphones and social media to help prevent tracking of the nation’s military operations. The State Duma — Russia’s parliament — approved the draft law on Tuesday, it said in a Twitter post. The proposed law will now be passed on to President Vladimir Putin for formal approval, according to British newspaper The Times. Digital activity has previously enabled media outlets to expose military operations that had been denied by the


Russian lawmakers voted on Tuesday to ban its soldiers from using smartphones and social media to help prevent tracking of the nation’s military operations. The State Duma — Russia’s parliament — approved the draft law on Tuesday, it said in a Twitter post. The proposed law will now be passed on to President Vladimir Putin for formal approval, according to British newspaper The Times. Digital activity has previously enabled media outlets to expose military operations that had been denied by the
Russia bans soldiers from using smartphones to prevent tracking of military Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, andrey rudakov, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voted, military, russian, vladimir, law, using, media, russia, social, bans, prevent, smartphones, tracking, state, soldiers


Russia bans soldiers from using smartphones to prevent tracking of military

Russian lawmakers voted on Tuesday to ban its soldiers from using smartphones and social media to help prevent tracking of the nation’s military operations.

The State Duma — Russia’s parliament — approved the draft law on Tuesday, it said in a Twitter post.

Under the new legislation, military personnel will be banned from posting about themselves or colleagues online, using smart devices, and recording or distributing audio, photo, video or geolocation data.

The proposed law will now be passed on to President Vladimir Putin for formal approval, according to British newspaper The Times.

Digital activity has previously enabled media outlets to expose military operations that had been denied by the state. In recent years, pictures and social media posts posted by Russian soldiers have contradicted government assertions that the military was not fighting in Ukraine or involved in Syria’s conflict.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, andrey rudakov, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voted, military, russian, vladimir, law, using, media, russia, social, bans, prevent, smartphones, tracking, state, soldiers


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Russia bans soldiers from using smartphones to prevent tracking of military

Russian lawmakers voted on Tuesday to ban its soldiers from using smartphones and social media to help prevent tracking of the nation’s military operations. The State Duma — Russia’s parliament — approved the draft law on Tuesday, it said in a Twitter post. The proposed law will now be passed on to President Vladimir Putin for formal approval, according to British newspaper The Times. Digital activity has previously enabled media outlets to expose military operations that had been denied by the


Russian lawmakers voted on Tuesday to ban its soldiers from using smartphones and social media to help prevent tracking of the nation’s military operations. The State Duma — Russia’s parliament — approved the draft law on Tuesday, it said in a Twitter post. The proposed law will now be passed on to President Vladimir Putin for formal approval, according to British newspaper The Times. Digital activity has previously enabled media outlets to expose military operations that had been denied by the
Russia bans soldiers from using smartphones to prevent tracking of military Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, andrey rudakov, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voted, military, russian, vladimir, law, using, media, russia, social, bans, prevent, smartphones, tracking, state, soldiers


Russia bans soldiers from using smartphones to prevent tracking of military

Russian lawmakers voted on Tuesday to ban its soldiers from using smartphones and social media to help prevent tracking of the nation’s military operations.

The State Duma — Russia’s parliament — approved the draft law on Tuesday, it said in a Twitter post.

Under the new legislation, military personnel will be banned from posting about themselves or colleagues online, using smart devices, and recording or distributing audio, photo, video or geolocation data.

The proposed law will now be passed on to President Vladimir Putin for formal approval, according to British newspaper The Times.

Digital activity has previously enabled media outlets to expose military operations that had been denied by the state. In recent years, pictures and social media posts posted by Russian soldiers have contradicted government assertions that the military was not fighting in Ukraine or involved in Syria’s conflict.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: chloe taylor, andrey rudakov, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voted, military, russian, vladimir, law, using, media, russia, social, bans, prevent, smartphones, tracking, state, soldiers


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