Marc Benioff was pushing for Salesforce to buy Twitter — until an accident changed his mind

Three years ago, Salesforce took a serious look at buying social media giant Twitter. But the actual decision was driven in part by a personal experience, Benioff reveals in his new book, “Trailblazer.” He had a vision that Twitter could integrate well into Salesforce’s business, becoming a great way for his customers to reach their consumers. Then, as he was heading to a meeting to begin to secure financing for the deal, Benioff slipped on a curb and sliced his leg open. WATCH: Benioff says sto


Three years ago, Salesforce took a serious look at buying social media giant Twitter. But the actual decision was driven in part by a personal experience, Benioff reveals in his new book, “Trailblazer.” He had a vision that Twitter could integrate well into Salesforce’s business, becoming a great way for his customers to reach their consumers. Then, as he was heading to a meeting to begin to secure financing for the deal, Benioff slipped on a curb and sliced his leg open. WATCH: Benioff says sto
Marc Benioff was pushing for Salesforce to buy Twitter — until an accident changed his mind Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: matt rosoff, https, wwwlinkedincom in mattrosoff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pushing, leg, vision, buy, changed, homeless, twitter, stockholders, stakeholder, took, salesforce, deal, social, marc, benioff, accident, mind


Marc Benioff was pushing for Salesforce to buy Twitter — until an accident changed his mind

Three years ago, Salesforce took a serious look at buying social media giant Twitter.

In the end, CEO Marc Benioff decided to pull out of the deal. He said at the time that Salesforce stockholders had made it very clear that they didn’t want the company to pursue the acquisition.

But the actual decision was driven in part by a personal experience, Benioff reveals in his new book, “Trailblazer.”

He had a vision that Twitter could integrate well into Salesforce’s business, becoming a great way for his customers to reach their consumers. A lot of his advisors were against the idea, saying it would be too complicated and risky. He kept pushing forward anyway.

Then, as he was heading to a meeting to begin to secure financing for the deal, Benioff slipped on a curb and sliced his leg open.

He took it as a sign that he should think twice. He recounted the circumstances in a recent phone interview:

“I slipped on the sidewalk and split my leg, and had other problems with my knee,” Benioff said. “As I had blood dripping down my leg as I was pitching the bond-rating firms, [I was] thinking to myself, ‘Is this a sign?’ Maybe I shouldn’t be moving in this direction. But I so strongly loved my vision of what it could become. Eventually our investors, who are a key stakeholder of mine, they said no, we don’t really want you to move in this direction.”

Benioff has been a huge critic of social media company Facebook, comparing it to cigarettes because the platform uses technology to make it hard to quit. He acknowledged that Twitter has similar problems — “Hopefully they’re cleaning it up.”

He also criticized CEO Jack Dorsey for his refusal to support Proposition C, which imposes a tax on wealthy San Francisco companies to raise more funds for fighting homelessness. (It passed with less than the two-thirds majority necessary to avoid a legal battle, and is now in the courts.)

“Jack Dorsey was quite against Prop C and helping the homeless, even though between Twitter and Square, they’ve created between 50 and 60 billion dollars of market cap — or maybe more now [Ed: it’s actually around $55 billion as of Monday afternoon] — they were not supporting the major homeless NGOs and major homeless programs. They still aren’t.”

He adds, “When you’re in San Francisco, you and I know that if your stakeholder is not the homeless, I don’t know who is.”

WATCH: Benioff says stockholders were very clear on Twitter deal


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: matt rosoff, https, wwwlinkedincom in mattrosoff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pushing, leg, vision, buy, changed, homeless, twitter, stockholders, stakeholder, took, salesforce, deal, social, marc, benioff, accident, mind


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Jeff Bezos: This is the one Amazon leadership principle that ‘surprises people’ the most

But there is one that “surprises people,” according to Jeff Bezos — it’s Amazon’s fourth leadership principle: “be right, a lot.” “…[G]ood leaders are right a lot,” Bezos said at the Pathfinder Awards in Seattle in 2016. “People who are right a lot, they listen a lot, and people who are right a lot, change their mind a lot,” Bezos said. Though it’s important to be “right, a lot,” Bezos points out that there are times when being wrong is OK too. You’re gonna try something on your way to that vi


But there is one that “surprises people,” according to Jeff Bezos — it’s Amazon’s fourth leadership principle: “be right, a lot.” “…[G]ood leaders are right a lot,” Bezos said at the Pathfinder Awards in Seattle in 2016. “People who are right a lot, they listen a lot, and people who are right a lot, change their mind a lot,” Bezos said. Though it’s important to be “right, a lot,” Bezos points out that there are times when being wrong is OK too. You’re gonna try something on your way to that vi
Jeff Bezos: This is the one Amazon leadership principle that ‘surprises people’ the most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrong, important, surprises, mind, youre, principle, amazon, gonna, right, change, leadership, lot, jeff, bezos, think


Jeff Bezos: This is the one Amazon leadership principle that 'surprises people' the most

Amazon famously has 14 leadership principles that are part of the company’s ethos.

But there is one that “surprises people,” according to Jeff Bezos — it’s Amazon’s fourth leadership principle: “be right, a lot.”

“…[G]ood leaders are right a lot,” Bezos said at the Pathfinder Awards in Seattle in 2016. “You’re not going to be right all the time, but I think with practice, you can be right more often.”

How do you do that? “People who are right a lot, they listen a lot, and people who are right a lot, change their mind a lot,” Bezos said.

That may be easier said then done, because most people just seek out information to bolster their current beliefs and tune out opposing opinions, according to Bezos. But “people who are right” do the opposite, he says.

“People who are right seek to dis-confirm their most profoundly held convictions, which is very unnatural for humans,” he said. “Humans mostly, as we go about life, we’re very selective in the evidence we let seep into us, and we like to observe the evidence that confirms our pre-existing beliefs.”

Having the ability to see multiple viewpoints and understand the bigger picture, rather than being too confined to your own beliefs, increases your chances of being right.

“Life is complicated, the world is complicated,” Bezos said. “Sometimes you get new data, and you change your mind. Sometimes you don’t get new data, and you just reanalyze the situation, and you realize it’s more complicated than you initially thought it was, and you change your mind.”

Bezos is not the only one to make this point — billionaire Ray Dalio says the same thing.

“The biggest tragedy of most people is that they think that the right decisions are in their heads, they have opinions that they are attached to,” Dalio said to Kara Swisher on the Recode Decode podcast in November of 2017. “I learned through experiences, I learned humility.”

Even the late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple, had a tendency to change his mind frequently, according to Apple CEO Tim Cook.

“Steve would flip on something so fast that you would forget that he was the one taking the 180-degree polar opposite position the day before,” Cook recalled at a D10 conference in 2012. “I saw it daily. This is a gift, because things do change, and it takes courage to change. It takes courage to say, ‘I was wrong.’ I think he had that.”

Though it’s important to be “right, a lot,” Bezos points out that there are times when being wrong is OK too.

“You really can’t accomplish anything important if you aren’t stubborn on vision,” Bezos said in 2016. “But you need to be flexible about the details because you gotta be experimental to accomplish anything important, and that means you’re gonna be wrong a lot. You’re gonna try something on your way to that vision, and that’s going to be the wrong thing, you’re gonna have to back up, take a course correction, and try again.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrong, important, surprises, mind, youre, principle, amazon, gonna, right, change, leadership, lot, jeff, bezos, think


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Growing nationalism in China could embolden Xi Jinping, says ex-US ambassador

A sense of nationalism is growing in China, and that could bolster support for those hoping to wait out the trade dispute with the U.S., said Max Baucus, a former American ambassador to China. They’re going to try to hang in there, waiting for President (Donald) Trump to come to them,” he told CNBC on Monday. “There’s a feeling that nationalism is getting a little stronger … I think that’s also emboldening President Xi,” said Baucus, who served as ambassador to China from February 2014 to Januar


A sense of nationalism is growing in China, and that could bolster support for those hoping to wait out the trade dispute with the U.S., said Max Baucus, a former American ambassador to China. They’re going to try to hang in there, waiting for President (Donald) Trump to come to them,” he told CNBC on Monday. “There’s a feeling that nationalism is getting a little stronger … I think that’s also emboldening President Xi,” said Baucus, who served as ambassador to China from February 2014 to Januar
Growing nationalism in China could embolden Xi Jinping, says ex-US ambassador Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ambassador, growing, embolden, chinese, mind, baucus, president, wait, exus, china, trade, chinas, jinping, nationalism, economy, trump


Growing nationalism in China could embolden Xi Jinping, says ex-US ambassador

A sense of nationalism is growing in China, and that could bolster support for those hoping to wait out the trade dispute with the U.S., said Max Baucus, a former American ambassador to China. “Don’t forget … Chinese (are) very patient historically, they’ll wait it out, they’ll play lots of different angles. They’re going to try to hang in there, waiting for President (Donald) Trump to come to them,” he told CNBC on Monday. “There’s a feeling that nationalism is getting a little stronger … I think that’s also emboldening President Xi,” said Baucus, who served as ambassador to China from February 2014 to January 2017, under former President Barack Obama’s administration.

The Chinese are afraid to reach a deal with this president — it may not last, they can’t count on it, he might change his mind again. Max Baucus former American ambassador to China

In fact, the sentiment on the ground in China is that Beijing could be in it “for the long haul,” he said. “The Chinese (are) beginning to want to wait out Trump,” said Baucus. He added that China might be perceiving that the U.S. is in a weaker position — its economy might be worse than current indications, and American farmers appear to be taking a big hit from the tariffs. China on Sunday imposed additional duties on certain U.S. goods on a $75-billion target list, while U.S. tariffs on $112 billion of Chinese imports also took effect the same day.

Unpredictable Trump

There are also trust issues between the two sides as Beijing perceives Trump as unpredictable, said Baucus. “From China’s perspective, China … has a hard time trusting President Trump, who keeps changing his mind. He pulls out the rug from under his negotiators … The Chinese are afraid to reach a deal with this president — it may not last, they can’t count on it, he might change his mind again,” Baucus said. “If there’s another administration, they think it might be better in the sense that it’d be more predictable, there’d be less uncertainty. It’d be more standard negotiations,” he continued. U.S. presidential elections are slated to take place in November 2020, with much debate on whether both parties would come to an agreement before the polls.

Earlier this month, Baucus told CNBC that China “can withstand more pain” than the Americans. His recent comments echoed the sentiment of other analysts, who have said China’s best option is to play the long game — by tapping the power of its domestic economy rather than depending on external trade. The decline in exports — a result of the trade war — hasn’t made much of a dent in China’s gross domestic product growth, they said. On the other hand, the country’s consumption is increasingly contributing to its economy, they added.

Ahead of 70th anniversary


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ambassador, growing, embolden, chinese, mind, baucus, president, wait, exus, china, trade, chinas, jinping, nationalism, economy, trump


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This is how Bill Gates’ brain works

Bill Gates’ biggest fear is that his brain will “stop working.” That’s what Gates says in the upcoming three-part Netflix documentary “Inside Bill’s Brain: Decoding Bill Gates.” But some things about how Gates brain works can be gleaned from the series short trailer, released Thursday. Gates is a “multiprocessor ” says his wife Melinda Gates in the trailer. “But when Bill stills himself, he can pull ideas together that other people can’t see.”


Bill Gates’ biggest fear is that his brain will “stop working.” That’s what Gates says in the upcoming three-part Netflix documentary “Inside Bill’s Brain: Decoding Bill Gates.” But some things about how Gates brain works can be gleaned from the series short trailer, released Thursday. Gates is a “multiprocessor ” says his wife Melinda Gates in the trailer. “But when Bill stills himself, he can pull ideas together that other people can’t see.”
This is how Bill Gates’ brain works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inside, mind, melinda, brain, gates, bill, documentary, works, world, trailer


This is how Bill Gates' brain works

Bill Gates’ biggest fear is that his brain will “stop working.” That’s what Gates says in the upcoming three-part Netflix documentary “Inside Bill’s Brain: Decoding Bill Gates.”

With the documentary, which drops Sept. 20, director and executive producer Davis Guggenheim aims to find out what goes on inside the mind of the second richest man in the world. But some things about how Gates brain works can be gleaned from the series short trailer, released Thursday.

Gates is a “multiprocessor ” says his wife Melinda Gates in the trailer. “He will be reading something else but then processing at the same time. It’s chaos!” Melinda says.

Gates “thrives on complexity, ” Melinda says. “He makes a framework in his mind, then he starts slotting in the information. If something doesn’t line up, he gets really frustrated. ”

“It’s scary,” says Melinda. “But when Bill stills himself, he can pull ideas together that other people can’t see.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inside, mind, melinda, brain, gates, bill, documentary, works, world, trailer


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Ray Dalio’s Beatles-inspired routine for success

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio is widely considered a rock star of the investing world. Ray Dalio, founder of investment firm Bridgewater Associates. It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. “It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. Don’t miss: Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Like this story?


Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio is widely considered a rock star of the investing world. Ray Dalio, founder of investment firm Bridgewater Associates. It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. “It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. Don’t miss: Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Like this story?
Ray Dalio’s Beatles-inspired routine for success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, routine, bridgewater, meditation, mind, practice, beatlesinspired, works, dalios, subconscious, success, dalio, hedge, rock, ray


Ray Dalio's Beatles-inspired routine for success

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio is widely considered a rock star of the investing world. But the source of his success has a lot to do with superstars of another sort: The Beatles. Dalio was in his early twenties when he was inspired by the famous foursome to take up a new skill: Meditation. Today, half a century on, it remains a constant of his daily routine, and one to which he attributes his greatest career wins.

Ray Dalio, founder of investment firm Bridgewater Associates. J. Countess | Getty Images

“It was life changing,” Dalio, now 70, told CNBC’s Christine Tan in a recent episode of “Managing Asia.” The English rock band popularized a silent form of meditation — known as Transcendental Meditation — in 1968, following a two-month trip to India. The practice, developed by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, involves the use of a mantra, such as “OM,” to reach a state of subconsciousness. Dalio, over the course of his five-decade career, has practiced the technique twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening, for 20 minutes each.

It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. Ray Dalio founder of Bridgewater Associates

That has helped him cope with the ups and downs of running the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, the company he founded in 1975, he said. That includes the near-collapse of the business in 1982 when Dalio mistakenly bet on the next financial downturn — a moment he has described as “painfully humbling.” “It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. In other words, a centered-ness, a calm centered-ness in the middle of a storm,” Dalio explained. The practice also provides an opportunity for creative thinking away from life’s daily distractions, which Dalio said has been vital for his personal development. “It’s like if you take a hot shower and the ideas come to you,” he said. “That ability to reflect well and to be above those things that you’re operating so you can navigate them well is a real great thing to have.” Don’t miss: Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, routine, bridgewater, meditation, mind, practice, beatlesinspired, works, dalios, subconscious, success, dalio, hedge, rock, ray


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Dallas Fed’s Kaplan says he’d like to avoid cutting rates again in September, but has ‘open mind’

Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan would like to avoid additional stimulus but is keeping an “open mind.” Kaplan said the Fed’s GDP forecast of 2% growth this year has risks to the “downside.” Holding up is the consumer economy, the biggest part of the economy. Kaplan also addressed concerns about the inverted yield curve. Earlier on Thursday, Kansas City Fed President Esther George said the July rate cut “wasn’t required ” and Philadelphia Fed President Patrick Harker said he doesn’t see the ca


Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan would like to avoid additional stimulus but is keeping an “open mind.” Kaplan said the Fed’s GDP forecast of 2% growth this year has risks to the “downside.” Holding up is the consumer economy, the biggest part of the economy. Kaplan also addressed concerns about the inverted yield curve. Earlier on Thursday, Kansas City Fed President Esther George said the July rate cut “wasn’t required ” and Philadelphia Fed President Patrick Harker said he doesn’t see the ca
Dallas Fed’s Kaplan says he’d like to avoid cutting rates again in September, but has ‘open mind’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dallas, fed, yield, rates, hed, open, feds, rate, president, consumer, cutting, kaplan, economy, curve, months, avoid, growth, mind


Dallas Fed's Kaplan says he'd like to avoid cutting rates again in September, but has 'open mind'

Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan would like to avoid additional stimulus but is keeping an “open mind.”

“I’d like to avoid having to take further action but I think I’m going to have an open mind about taking action over the next number of months if we need to,” Kaplan told CNBC’s Steve Liesman on Thursday from the Federal Reserve’s economic policy symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Kaplan said the Fed’s GDP forecast of 2% growth this year has risks to the “downside.”

“Even though the consumer is very strong and a key underpinning to the economy, manufacturing sector is weak and probably weakening and global growth decelerating is probably finding its way to seep into the U.S. economy,” said Kaplan.

U.S. manufacturer growth slowed to the lowest level in almost 10 years in August, according to data released Thursday. The U.S. manufacturing PMI (purchasing managers’ index) was 49.9 in August, down from 50.4 in July and below the neutral 50.0 threshold for the first time since September 2009, according to IHS Markit.

Holding up is the consumer economy, the biggest part of the economy. In the second-quarter, personal consumption expenditures rose 4.3%, the best performance in six quarters.

“As long as the consumer stays strong we are going to have solid growth,” said Kaplan.

Kaplan also addressed concerns about the inverted yield curve. He said he is less “obsessed” with the little movements in the curves “back and forth.”

“I’m more focused on the fact that the whole curve has moved down over the last three and a half months and the fed funds rate at two to two and a quarter is now above every rate along the curve which to me is a bit of a reality check that says it’s possible our monetary policy stays a little tighter than I would have thought three or four months ago,” he said.

Earlier on Thursday, Kansas City Fed President Esther George said the July rate cut “wasn’t required ” and Philadelphia Fed President Patrick Harker said he doesn’t see the case for additional stimulus.

Following their comments, the bond market’s main yield curve inverted briefly for the third time in less than two weeks on concern that maybe the Fed wouldn’t do enough to save the economy from a recession.

Kaplan is a nonvoting member this year of the Fed’s Open Market Committee.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dallas, fed, yield, rates, hed, open, feds, rate, president, consumer, cutting, kaplan, economy, curve, months, avoid, growth, mind


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Bank of England keeps an ‘open mind’ on Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra

Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney at the annual Mansion House dinner on June 20, 2019, in London, England. Bank of England Governor Mark Carney unveiled new initiatives on Thursday to help modernize and steer the central bank toward a new digital economy. At his annual Mansion House speech, Carney announced measures including how to address inefficiencies in small business funding, allowing for more widespread use of cloud technology, and incorporating big data into regulatory technolo


Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney at the annual Mansion House dinner on June 20, 2019, in London, England. Bank of England Governor Mark Carney unveiled new initiatives on Thursday to help modernize and steer the central bank toward a new digital economy. At his annual Mansion House speech, Carney announced measures including how to address inefficiencies in small business funding, allowing for more widespread use of cloud technology, and incorporating big data into regulatory technolo
Bank of England keeps an ‘open mind’ on Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: joumanna bercetche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, carney, libra, keeps, governor, cryptocurrency, facebooks, mind, mansion, house, open, online, bank, speech, payments, mark, england


Bank of England keeps an 'open mind' on Facebook's cryptocurrency Libra

Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney at the annual Mansion House dinner on June 20, 2019, in London, England.

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney unveiled new initiatives on Thursday to help modernize and steer the central bank toward a new digital economy.

At his annual Mansion House speech, Carney announced measures including how to address inefficiencies in small business funding, allowing for more widespread use of cloud technology, and incorporating big data into regulatory technology.

One key area of focus is that of that of payments systems. The BOE noted that the proportion of online sales has been going up while the use of cash has been “declining from two-thirds to one quarter” over the past decade — both necessitating new demands on finance and transactions.

In his speech, the Governor said the “UK is still a long way behind countries such as Sweden, where users can make direct, free and real time bank-to-bank payments in-store and online with a text or a scan of a QR code. “


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: joumanna bercetche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, carney, libra, keeps, governor, cryptocurrency, facebooks, mind, mansion, house, open, online, bank, speech, payments, mark, england


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Crypto founder, who won Buffett lunch, wants to change the billionaire’s hatred of bitcoin

Justin Sun, the crypto entrepreneur who paid a record $4.57 million for lunch with Warren Buffett, told CNBC Tuesday he wants to change the billionaire investor’s mind on hating bitcoin. Sun, founder of cryptocurrency TRON and CEO of file-sharing company BitTorrent, had the highest bid in the 20 years of the charity auction. Winning the auction allows Sun to invite seven guests, and he said he’s going to bring other cryptocurrency industry leaders to the lunch in New York. In the past, he’s call


Justin Sun, the crypto entrepreneur who paid a record $4.57 million for lunch with Warren Buffett, told CNBC Tuesday he wants to change the billionaire investor’s mind on hating bitcoin. Sun, founder of cryptocurrency TRON and CEO of file-sharing company BitTorrent, had the highest bid in the 20 years of the charity auction. Winning the auction allows Sun to invite seven guests, and he said he’s going to bring other cryptocurrency industry leaders to the lunch in New York. In the past, he’s call
Crypto founder, who won Buffett lunch, wants to change the billionaire’s hatred of bitcoin Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winners, founder, hatred, crypto, bitcoin, billionaires, hes, auction, won, past, mind, industry, cryptocurrency, buffett, wants, told, lunch, change


Crypto founder, who won Buffett lunch, wants to change the billionaire's hatred of bitcoin

Justin Sun, the crypto entrepreneur who paid a record $4.57 million for lunch with Warren Buffett, told CNBC Tuesday he wants to change the billionaire investor’s mind on hating bitcoin.

Sun, founder of cryptocurrency TRON and CEO of file-sharing company BitTorrent, had the highest bid in the 20 years of the charity auction. Proceeds go to the Glide Foundation to help the homeless in San Francisco, where BitTorrent is located.

Winning the auction allows Sun to invite seven guests, and he said he’s going to bring other cryptocurrency industry leaders to the lunch in New York. But He told CNBC he’s not sure who he’s going to be bring yet.

Sun said he’s a believer and a fan of Buffet and his “long-term value investing strategy,” adding he wanted to pay Buffett “back for his inspiration.”

However, the Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO is not a fan of bitcoin. In the past, he’s called it “rat poison squared.”

When asked for comment on the lunch, Buffett laughed and told CNBC’s Becky Quick that he was looking forward to it.

Sun admitted on “Squawk Box” he knows he won’t change Buffett’s mind in a three hour lunch, but he hopes to offer him a different opinion and show him “how much progress we’ve made” in the past 10 years in the cryptocurrency industry. “I want him to learn what the younger generations are doing,” Sun added.

While some past winners have chosen to stay anonymous, Ted Weschler — later hired as a Berkshire investment manager — and Greenlight Capital’s David Einhorn were winners of the auction in previous years.

— CNBC’s Kate Rooney contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winners, founder, hatred, crypto, bitcoin, billionaires, hes, auction, won, past, mind, industry, cryptocurrency, buffett, wants, told, lunch, change


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Chinese ambassador on trade talks: The US ‘changes its mind so often’

Chinese Ambassador to the United States Cui Tiankai speaks at a reception celebrating the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) at the Chinese embassy in Washington D.C., the United States, on July 27, 2017. Cui Tiankai, the Chinese ambassador to the United States, said on Tuesday that U.S. negotiators have “often” backed out on partial trade deals at the last minute. “If we review the process of trade talks between us over the last year or so, it is quit


Chinese Ambassador to the United States Cui Tiankai speaks at a reception celebrating the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) at the Chinese embassy in Washington D.C., the United States, on July 27, 2017. Cui Tiankai, the Chinese ambassador to the United States, said on Tuesday that U.S. negotiators have “often” backed out on partial trade deals at the last minute. “If we review the process of trade talks between us over the last year or so, it is quit
Chinese ambassador on trade talks: The US ‘changes its mind so often’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, states, ambassador, talks, tiankai, trade, cui, chinese, changes, told, mind, united


Chinese ambassador on trade talks: The US 'changes its mind so often'

Chinese Ambassador to the United States Cui Tiankai speaks at a reception celebrating the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) at the Chinese embassy in Washington D.C., the United States, on July 27, 2017.

Cui Tiankai, the Chinese ambassador to the United States, said on Tuesday that U.S. negotiators have “often” backed out on partial trade deals at the last minute.

“If we review the process of trade talks between us over the last year or so, it is quite clear it is the U.S. side that, more than once, changed its mind overnight, and broke the tentative deal already reached,” Cui told Fox News.

“It is the U.S. side who changes its mind so often,” Cui added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, states, ambassador, talks, tiankai, trade, cui, chinese, changes, told, mind, united


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