More than three-quarters of Americans feel bad about this investing mistake

Turns out, according to personal finance site MagnifyMoney, investing brings a host of bad feelings. The most common regrets: not starting to save for retirement earlier (31%) and not investing in stocks sooner (24%). Even young Gen Z has fear of missing out: Sixty-nine percent of respondents age 18 to 22 said they feel bad about not investing sooner. Given the past 10 years of a bull market, Cummins thinks his retirement money could be as much as six figures higher. “It is very difficult to bea


Turns out, according to personal finance site MagnifyMoney, investing brings a host of bad feelings.
The most common regrets: not starting to save for retirement earlier (31%) and not investing in stocks sooner (24%).
Even young Gen Z has fear of missing out: Sixty-nine percent of respondents age 18 to 22 said they feel bad about not investing sooner.
Given the past 10 years of a bull market, Cummins thinks his retirement money could be as much as six figures higher.
“It is very difficult to bea
More than three-quarters of Americans feel bad about this investing mistake Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threequarters, retirement, cummins, bad, market, stocks, gordon, investing, personal, regrets, feel, americans, mistake, chen, 20s


More than three-quarters of Americans feel bad about this investing mistake

Rene Carillo, 51, regrets not investing more when the stock market dropped. Rene Carillo

We all have financial regrets. Things we bought, bills we paid late, decisions we didn’t research. Turns out, according to personal finance site MagnifyMoney, investing brings a host of bad feelings. The top one is not investing at all, according to research conducted in September and December. MagnifyMoney surveyed 836 people with investment accounts and found an unmistakable pattern: People of all ages second-guessed their earlier decisions around investing.

The most common regrets: not starting to save for retirement earlier (31%) and not investing in stocks sooner (24%). These two hold true no matter the respondent’s age. Younger respondents (77% of millennials) said they wished they’d started investing earlier. Baby boomers were only slightly less sorry than millennials, at 76%. Even young Gen Z has fear of missing out: Sixty-nine percent of respondents age 18 to 22 said they feel bad about not investing sooner.

Missed the sale

Current expenses seemed more pressing than future retirement to Rene Carillo, now 51, back when he was in his 20s. Carillo, a video engineer and personal finance blogger in Miami, started investing in the company 401(k) only up to the match. He joined because a coworker who was about to retire recommended he participate and contribute as much as possible. Carillo says he is glad he held onto his stocks during the market drop — he remembers seeing his coworkers move into bonds — but wishes he’d turned up his own contribution level during that time. Missing out on the chance to buy shares at low prices was a mistake he still feels bad about.

Cash-out sorrows

DJ Cummins, 37, treated 401(k)s like severance packages whenever he left a job. Source: DJ Cummins

Your 401(k) has a few thousand dollars in it, an amount that seems considerable. So when you leave your job, you scoop it out and spend it. That’s what DJ Cummins, 37, did four times. Since graduating from college, Cummins, who lives in Bethalto, Illinois, and blogs about personal finance, has had several jobs. He didn’t know about rollovers or much about finances in general. “I just knew I didn’t want to leave money behind at my previous employer,” he said. More from Invest in You:

Money mind hacks from bloggers can boost your finances

Retirement luxury on a Social Security budget

If you don’t know much about investing start here The largest balance was $7,000, which he used to buy a rental property. That turned out to be a good decision, he says, but not so the $6,000 he used for a down payment on a car. “I cashed out my retirement in order to take on debt,” he said. “If I knew then what I know now, I would have rolled each of them over rather than treating them like a bonus when I left a job,” Cummins said. The plan balances totaled about $20,000, not to mention the potential gains. Given the past 10 years of a bull market, Cummins thinks his retirement money could be as much as six figures higher. “I’m not even going to do the math,” Cummins said.

Hard to pick

Andrew Chen, 39, still winces when he recalls selling off stocks during the financial crisis. Source: Andrew Chen

Stock picking didn’t work out for Andrew Chen, 39, a product manager at a San Francisco tech company and personal finance blogger. As an inexperienced investor, he tried his hand at individual stocks before turning to broad-based, passively managed index funds. To make things worse, Chen sold many of the stocks at a loss during the financial crisis and lost about a third of his net wealth. If he’d used this strategy earlier, Chen says, he would “almost certainly be double-digit percentage points wealthier now.” Not only is it easier to invest in funds, it’s less stressful. You won’t have to worry about stocks bouncing back when the market dips, Chen says, or wonder if there is some fundamental issue with specific companies. It’s much harder to analyze specific companies for an ordinary person. “It is very difficult to beat the market in the long run, but very easy to simply match the market,” Chen said. Index funds “allow you to enjoy market-matching returns for zero effort and near-zero cost.”

Discounting small amounts

Tracey Gordon, 58, regrets not saving for retirement in her 20s. Tracey Gordon

When she was in her 20s, Tracey Gordon, now 58, worked in financial services. Even while surrounded by a wealth of investing knowledge, she was cavalier about saving for her own future. Several things made retirement saving seem almost beside the point. The amount you could put into a 401(k) — less than $8,000 — wasn’t that large and Gordon remembers thinking it wouldn’t make a difference. She felt she’d have time to focus on retirement later. Gordon came to rue these decisions — “I had really lost a decade of opportunity,” she said — but luckily started investing in her 30s. “If I had stayed underinvested, I would be in big trouble now,” she added. Perhaps more important than amassing a lot of money in your 20s is establishing a savings mindset, she says. Compounding is an obvious benefit, but there’s also a behavioral economics component. “If you get into the habit of doing something good for yourself — socking away small amounts early on — the habit stays with you,” Gordon said.

Terrifying headlines

Mike Pearson, 38, regrets not investing in a 401(k) in his 20s Source: Mike Pearson


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threequarters, retirement, cummins, bad, market, stocks, gordon, investing, personal, regrets, feel, americans, mistake, chen, 20s


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This costly Social Security mistake could result in years of regret

Retirees can boost their Social Security payments substantially by avoiding one costly, yet common, mistake. Americans can claim Social Security benefits as early as age 62. That’s because Social Security payments are larger the later retirees claim them. Someone who claims at age 62 would get a monthly check that’s 30% smaller than someone claiming at “full retirement age,” according to the Social Security Administration. That’s why financial experts recommend waiting to claim Social Security a


Retirees can boost their Social Security payments substantially by avoiding one costly, yet common, mistake.
Americans can claim Social Security benefits as early as age 62.
That’s because Social Security payments are larger the later retirees claim them.
Someone who claims at age 62 would get a monthly check that’s 30% smaller than someone claiming at “full retirement age,” according to the Social Security Administration.
That’s why financial experts recommend waiting to claim Social Security a
This costly Social Security mistake could result in years of regret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: greg iacurci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, monthly, security, claim, retirees, regret, thats, payments, age, wait, result, costly, mistake


This costly Social Security mistake could result in years of regret

Retirees can boost their Social Security payments substantially by avoiding one costly, yet common, mistake.

Americans can claim Social Security benefits as early as age 62. While it may be tempting to begin receiving that monthly income as soon as possible, retirees could leave a lot of money on the table by doing so.

That’s because Social Security payments are larger the later retirees claim them.

Someone who claims at age 62 would get a monthly check that’s 30% smaller than someone claiming at “full retirement age,” according to the Social Security Administration. Full retirement age is 67 for those born in 1960 or later.

Retirees get a monthly paycheck that’s 8% larger each year they wait, between ages 62 and 70. These payments are guaranteed, inflation-protected and last as long as an individual lives.

That’s why financial experts recommend waiting to claim Social Security as long as possible — age 70, ideally — since claiming early essentially amounts to a penalty. Plus, they wonder where else a retiree could get a guaranteed 8% annual investment return that adjusts with inflation.

“It pays to wait,” said Joel Eskovitz, a senior policy advisor with the AARP Public Policy Institute. “It really is the best game in town. You wouldn’t be able to beat that on the open market, certainly without taking some risk.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: greg iacurci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, monthly, security, claim, retirees, regret, thats, payments, age, wait, result, costly, mistake


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US military says general’s letter announcing Iraq withdrawal was a mistake: ‘This is not what’s happening’

The Pentagon on Monday said that a U.S. general’s letter informing Iraq’s Defense Ministry that U.S.-led coalition troops would leave Iraq “was a mistake,” and American Defense officials insisted that the troops would remain there. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper told reporters earlier, “We are repositioning forces throughout the region, No. “Beyond that with regard to the letter, which I’ve read once, I can’t tell you the veracity of that letter,” Esper said. The letter to Iraq’s Defense Minist


The Pentagon on Monday said that a U.S. general’s letter informing Iraq’s Defense Ministry that U.S.-led coalition troops would leave Iraq “was a mistake,” and American Defense officials insisted that the troops would remain there.
Secretary of Defense Mark Esper told reporters earlier, “We are repositioning forces throughout the region, No.
“Beyond that with regard to the letter, which I’ve read once, I can’t tell you the veracity of that letter,” Esper said.
The letter to Iraq’s Defense Minist
US military says general’s letter announcing Iraq withdrawal was a mistake: ‘This is not what’s happening’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: amanda macias christina wilkie dan mangan, amanda macias, christina wilkie, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iraq, happening, iraqs, seely, mistake, pentagon, generals, military, letter, whats, reporters, milley, esper, troops, withdrawal, announcing, told, defense


US military says general's letter announcing Iraq withdrawal was a mistake: 'This is not what's happening'

A U.S. Army armored vehicle flies an American flag as it provides security escort for a convoy of vehicles pulling equipment that is heading to Kuwait from Camp Adder as the Army continues to send it’s soldiers and equipment home and the base is prepared to be handed back to the Iraqi government later this month on December 2, 2011 at Camp Adder, near Nasiriyah, Iraq.

The Pentagon on Monday said that a U.S. general’s letter informing Iraq’s Defense Ministry that U.S.-led coalition troops would leave Iraq “was a mistake,” and American Defense officials insisted that the troops would remain there.

“That letter is a draft, it was a mistake, it was unsigned, it should never have been released,” Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Mark Milley told reporters hours after reports about the letter ostensibly written by Marine Brig. Gen. William Seely were published by the Reuters and AFP wire services.

“Poorly worded, implies withdrawal,” Milley said.

“That is not what’s happening,” he continued.

The general’s comments came after the top U.S. Defense official appeared to be confused about the letter Monday. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper told reporters earlier, “We are repositioning forces throughout the region, No. 1.”

“Beyond that with regard to the letter, which I’ve read once, I can’t tell you the veracity of that letter,” Esper said. “That letter is inconsistent of where we are right now.”

“There has been no decision whatsoever to leave,” he said.

The letter to Iraq’s Defense Ministry came to light a day after Iraq’s parliament voted to expel all foreign forces from the country.

Neither Esper nor Milley would clarify how the letter was made public, or who directed it to be drafted.

Neither Seely nor Pentagon spokesmen responded to questions about the letter’s origin.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: amanda macias christina wilkie dan mangan, amanda macias, christina wilkie, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iraq, happening, iraqs, seely, mistake, pentagon, generals, military, letter, whats, reporters, milley, esper, troops, withdrawal, announcing, told, defense


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Don’t make the costly mistake of paying late: Credit card late fees may rise to $40 in 2020

Credit card late fees are likely to hit $40 in early 2020. Effective Jan. 1, 2020, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) will raise the permissible maximum for credit card late payment fees by $1. Credit card late fees may riseWhy credit card late fees are risingWhen card issuers implement the increaseHow to avoid late feesWhich credit cards don’t charge late fees? Why credit card late fees are rising? Most credit cards charge late fees, but there are some cards that never charge late


Credit card late fees are likely to hit $40 in early 2020.
Effective Jan. 1, 2020, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) will raise the permissible maximum for credit card late payment fees by $1.
Credit card late fees may riseWhy credit card late fees are risingWhen card issuers implement the increaseHow to avoid late feesWhich credit cards don’t charge late fees?
Why credit card late fees are rising?
Most credit cards charge late fees, but there are some cards that never charge late
Don’t make the costly mistake of paying late: Credit card late fees may rise to $40 in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apr, card, costly, transfer, apply, late, balance, paying, rise, dont, fee, mistake, cash, credit, fees


Don't make the costly mistake of paying late: Credit card late fees may rise to $40 in 2020

Paying your credit card bill late is about to get more expensive in the new year. Credit card late fees are likely to hit $40 in early 2020. Effective Jan. 1, 2020, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) will raise the permissible maximum for credit card late payment fees by $1. First-time late fees: $29, up from $28 in 2019

$29, up from $28 in 2019 Subsequent violations made within six billing cycles: $40, up from $39 in 2019 CNBC Select breaks down some common questions surrounding the increase and tips on how to avoid late fees.

Credit card late fees may rise

Why credit card late fees are rising

When card issuers implement the increase

How to avoid late fees

Which credit cards don’t charge late fees?

Why credit card late fees are rising?

The CARD Act of 2009 set numerous consumer protections, which included regulations on fees so the penalty for paying your bill late wasn’t outrageously high. Late fees were capped at $25 for the first instance and up to $35 for additional violations made within six billing cycles. Every year, the CFPB makes adjustments to late fees based on inflation. Late fees typically fluctuate annually by about $1 and may increase, decrease or remain the same. While the CARD Act prevents card issuers from charging excessive late fees that doesn’t mean it won’t make a dent in your wallet. Nearly ten years later, late fees have increased $5 to a maximum of $40, and when you add on interest charges you pay on your balance, the costs add up.

When will card issuers implement the increase?

Card issuers can’t raise fees overnight since the law generally requires they give cardholders at least 45 days notice. Some issuers may choose not to increase late fees at all. However, issuers like to copy each other — if one increases late fees, others likely follow suit shortly after. If you card issuer plans on increasing late fees, expect to receive a notification stating how much and when the change takes effect.

How to avoid late fees

While we recommend always paying at least your minimum payment on time, it’s understandable that sometimes you might miss a payment. No one wants to be charged a fee for something that’s easily avoidable, so here are some ways you can prevent late fees. Set up autopay. The easiest way to avoid late fees is to set up autopay. By using autopay, you won’t have to worry about remembering to pay your bill each month. You can customize payments for your minimum due, statement balance or other amount.

The easiest way to avoid late fees is to set up autopay. By using autopay, you won’t have to worry about remembering to pay your bill each month. You can customize payments for your minimum due, statement balance or other amount. Ask your card issuer for a waiver. If your account is in good standing, and you pay late, call your card issuer to ask if the late fee can be waived. It never hurts to ask, and many issuers can be understanding, especially if this is the first time you’ve paid late.

If your account is in good standing, and you pay late, call your card issuer to ask if the late fee can be waived. It never hurts to ask, and many issuers can be understanding, especially if this is the first time you’ve paid late. Use a credit card that doesn’t charge a late payment fee. A handful of credit cards boast no late fees whatsoever. If you struggle to pay your bill on time, you might want to consider signing up for one of these cards. You will still be charged interest on any balance you carry from month to month.

Which credit cards don’t charge late fees?

Most credit cards charge late fees, but there are some cards that never charge late fees or provide a one-time fee waiver.

Credit cards that have no late fees

Citi Simplicity® Card – No Late Fees Ever Apply Now Rewards None

Welcome bonus None

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% for the first 21 months on balance transfers and 0% for the first 12 months on purchases

Regular APR 16.24% to 26.24% variable

Balance transfer fee 5%, minimum $5

Foreign transaction fee 3%

Credit needed Excellent/Good

Terms apply. On Citi’s secure site

Petal Visa® Credit Card Learn More Rewards 1% cash back on all purchases and 1.5% after you make 12 on-time monthly payments

Welcome bonus None

Annual fee $0

Intro APR None

Regular APR 14.49% to 25.49% variable

Balance transfer fee None

Foreign transaction fee None

Credit needed N/A

Terms apply. Information about the Petal Visa Credit Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

PenFed Promise Visa® Card Learn More Rewards None

Welcome bonus $100 statement credit when you spend $1,500 in the first 90 days from account opening

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 4.99% for the first 12 months on balance transfers;

Regular APR 12.49% to 17.99% variable

Balance transfer fee None

Foreign transaction fee None

Credit needed N/A

Terms apply. Information about the PenFed Promise Visa® Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Credit cards that waive your first late fee

Discover it® Cash Back Apply Now Rewards 5% cash back at different places each quarter after you activate bonus categories (on up to $1,500 in purchases, then 1%). Plus, unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases.

Welcome bonus At the end of your first year, Discover automatically matches all the cash back you earned

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% for the first 14 months on purchases and balance transfers

Regular APR 13.49% to 24.49% variable on purchases and balance transfers

Balance transfer fee 3% intro balance transfer fee, up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms)*

Foreign transaction fee None

*See our methodology, terms apply. On Discover’s secure site

Discover it® Balance Transfer Apply Now Rewards 5% cash back at different places each quarter after you activate bonus categories (on up to $1,500 in purchases, then 1%). Plus, unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases.

Welcome bonus At the end of your first year, Discover automatically matches all the cash back you earned

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% APR for the first 6 months on purchases; 0% APR for the first 18 months on balance transfers

Regular APR 13.49% to 24.49% variable

Balance transfer fee 3% intro balance transfer fee, up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms)*

Foreign transaction fee None

Credit needed Excellent/Good

*See rates and fees, terms apply. On Discover’s secure website.

Discover it® Student Cash Back Apply Now Rewards 5% cash back in different categories (gas stations, grocery stores, restaurants, Amazon and more) each quarter, up to the quarterly maximum each time you activate. Plus, earn unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases

Welcome bonus Discover automatically matches all the cash back you earned at the end of your first year

Annual fee $0

Intro APR 0% APR for the first 6 months on purchases; 10.99% APR for the first 6 months on balance transfers

Regular APR 19.49% variable

Balance transfer fee 3% intro balance transfer fee, up to 5% fee on future balance transfers (see terms)*

Foreign transaction fee None

Credit needed Excellent/Good

*See rates and fees, terms apply. On Discover’s Secure Site

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apr, card, costly, transfer, apply, late, balance, paying, rise, dont, fee, mistake, cash, credit, fees


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Jim Cramer: ‘It’s a mistake to freak out about the impeachment process’

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Wednesday said investors on Wall Street care more about company fundamentals than they care about the impeachment process in Washington, D.C.As the House debated impeaching President Donald Trump throughout the day, the major U.S. stock averages barely moved. “Still, even if we have a few down days coming up … market history says it’s a mistake to freak out about the impeachment process.” Facebook shares rose about 2% in the session after Deutsche Bank raised its price tar


CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Wednesday said investors on Wall Street care more about company fundamentals than they care about the impeachment process in Washington, D.C.As the House debated impeaching President Donald Trump throughout the day, the major U.S. stock averages barely moved.
“Still, even if we have a few down days coming up … market history says it’s a mistake to freak out about the impeachment process.”
Facebook shares rose about 2% in the session after Deutsche Bank raised its price tar
Jim Cramer: ‘It’s a mistake to freak out about the impeachment process’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, process, target, impeachment, stock, mistake, price, rose, freak, jim, cramer, surged, shares, investors, moved


Jim Cramer: 'It's a mistake to freak out about the impeachment process'

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Wednesday said investors on Wall Street care more about company fundamentals than they care about the impeachment process in Washington, D.C.

As the House debated impeaching President Donald Trump throughout the day, the major U.S. stock averages barely moved. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slipped 0.10%, and the S&P 500 dipped 0.04%. The Nasdaq Composite rose 0.05%.

“While the impeachment debate didn’t seem to do much damage, a late wave of selling was, indeed, met with almost no buyers today, and that’s not what you want to see if you’re hoping for smooth sailing going forward into year end,” the “Mad Money” host said. “Still, even if we have a few down days coming up … market history says it’s a mistake to freak out about the impeachment process.”

Cramer explained that investors are more concerned about valuations.

Facebook shares rose about 2% in the session after Deutsche Bank raised its price target for the stock to $270 from $260. Tesla is closing in on its $420 price target after the stock gained 3.7% to set a new closing high of $393.15, and Netflix shares moved 1.69% on news that Disney+ does not appear to be putting a dent in its sales, Cramer said.

Micron Technology shares surged 4% in the after hours on a top- and bottom-line beat in the chipmaker’s first-quarter report.

“Even better, CEO Sanjay Mehrotra … said that the current quarter would mark the bottom for Micron’s business, meaning the future is looking brighter than the past,” Cramer said. “No wonder the stock surged in after-hours trading. I expect more bullish semiconductor pin action again tomorrow.”

The host also pointed out that the stocks of Tyson Foods, which will be buoyed by the pork shortage in China, and Nvidia, which landed deals with Chinese companies, have momentum.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, process, target, impeachment, stock, mistake, price, rose, freak, jim, cramer, surged, shares, investors, moved


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Don’t make this common rookie mistake during a job interview, says career expert

“Tell me about yourself” is one of the most common interview questions, yet lots of job candidates draw a blank when trying to come up with a strong answer. Through practice and preparation, though, you can avoid common mistakes and make a good impression on your potential employer. Chelsea Goodman, president and career elevation expert at Got The Job, says one rookie mistake candidates make when asked about yourself is giving away too much. Start by thinking about how your current role has help


“Tell me about yourself” is one of the most common interview questions, yet lots of job candidates draw a blank when trying to come up with a strong answer.
Through practice and preparation, though, you can avoid common mistakes and make a good impression on your potential employer.
Chelsea Goodman, president and career elevation expert at Got The Job, says one rookie mistake candidates make when asked about yourself is giving away too much.
Start by thinking about how your current role has help
Don’t make this common rookie mistake during a job interview, says career expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-14  Authors: ivana pino, tim stobierski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, job, dont, start, mistake, common, career, interview, expert, weaknesses, strengths, rookie, set, goals, role, goodman, question


Don't make this common rookie mistake during a job interview, says career expert

“Tell me about yourself” is one of the most common interview questions, yet lots of job candidates draw a blank when trying to come up with a strong answer. Though the question may seem straightforward, it’s open-ended, and responding concisely and effectively is hard. Through practice and preparation, though, you can avoid common mistakes and make a good impression on your potential employer. Chelsea Goodman, president and career elevation expert at Got The Job, says one rookie mistake candidates make when asked about yourself is giving away too much. “More often than not, people are prepared with answers about their strengths and weaknesses, references from prior roles, yet when asked this question, they’ll start talking about their kids or the activities they enjoy doing outside of work, and that’s not the point of this question,” says Goodman. Instead, stay focused. Here are three points you want to cover when answering this question in an interview.

1. What are you doing now?

Goodman says your response should be a brief, like an elevator pitch. Avoid telling your entire life story. Instead, take a minute to pick out the most relevant details about you and your professional life. Start by thinking about how your current role has helped you improve your strengths and weaknesses. If you manage a team, describe your responsibilities and include specific examples of initiatives or projects that you oversee on a daily basis. You want to emphasize the experiences that make you qualified for the role, so try to be more selective about the information you share. “The impression that you make within the first couple of minutes during your interview is going to shape how that person thinks,” says Goodman. “There are many people who don’t start on the right foot and then they have to recover from that, all because they couldn’t answer the easiest question, which is not meant to be a 20 minute spiel about your life.”

2. What do you hope to do next?

Ideally, the role you’re applying for will take your career to the next level. Mention where you see yourself in the future and how, if given the opportunity, the role will set the stage to help you achieve those career goals. Come up with a few long-term goals and the time frame in which you hope to achieve them.

“You want to find out what you can about a company as it’s important to you,” says Berger. She suggests framing it your goals this way shows that this potential relationship could be mutually beneficial. Say the position is looking for a candidate who is willing to work flexible hours, rather than a set schedule, or to take on various projects at once. Mention how and why your situation has made you well-positioned, and excited, to rise to that challenge.

3. Why would you be good in this role?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-14  Authors: ivana pino, tim stobierski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, job, dont, start, mistake, common, career, interview, expert, weaknesses, strengths, rookie, set, goals, role, goodman, question


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Don’t make this common mistake when starting up your 401(k)

In 401(k) and other workplace retirement plans, funds are typically listed alphabetically. Many Americans will depend on savings accumulated in a 401(k) or other workplace plan to fund a comfortable retirement. Some employers require you to work at the company for a specified period before you can start contributing to a 401(k). Pick your investments and review feesThere will be a few investment options to select from within your 401(k) plan, typically index funds, like the following: Stock fund


In 401(k) and other workplace retirement plans, funds are typically listed alphabetically.
Many Americans will depend on savings accumulated in a 401(k) or other workplace plan to fund a comfortable retirement.
Some employers require you to work at the company for a specified period before you can start contributing to a 401(k).
Pick your investments and review feesThere will be a few investment options to select from within your 401(k) plan, typically index funds, like the following: Stock fund
Don’t make this common mistake when starting up your 401(k) Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, options, investments, starting, plan, common, bonds, dont, 401k, mistake, investment, money, funds, retirement


Don't make this common mistake when starting up your 401(k)

Making sense of the options in your 401(k) can seem daunting at first. As a result, that causes many people to make investment decisions that are influenced by something very simple — the order in which they’re presented. In 401(k) and other workplace retirement plans, funds are typically listed alphabetically. This creates a significant cognitive bias, a mental trap that can affect your decisions. The earlier a fund shows up in your list of options, the more likely you are to include it among your investments. And you might invest more of your money in it, too, according to a recent research paper in the Financial Review. “Funds listed at the beginning of plan menus receive significantly greater allocations compared to funds listed towards the end of plan menus,” the authors concluded. Making wise investment decisions is an important part of setting up your 401(k). While it doesn’t take long to sign up and decide how much money to contribute, don’t skimp on the time you spend deciding how to invest that money.

Why you should take advantage of a 401(k)

Workplace retirement plans are a common benefit: Nearly seven in 10, or 67%, of employees had access to one in 2018, according to figures from the Employee Benefit Research Institute. But only 79% of employees with a workplace plan took advantage of it. Many Americans will depend on savings accumulated in a 401(k) or other workplace plan to fund a comfortable retirement. That’s why it’s so important to start investing as early as possible. And 401(k)s have other advantages: They offer a valuable tax break and many employers match a portion of contributions, which means they give you what amounts to free money that can supercharge your savings. Here’s how to get started.

1. Sign up

You might even be able to skip this step, since some companies automatically enroll new employees into a 401(k) with a default contribution — either a dollar amount or a small percentage of the employee’s salary. Whether your company automatically enrolls you or not, it’s still important to get details about the plan and when you can start contributing. Your first stop to get that info is the human resources department. “Go to HR and find out who the plan sponsor is,” David Reyes, a financial advisor and founder of Reyes Financial Architecture, told Grow earlier this year. That information can help you set up an account with that plan sponsor, if you’re not already enrolled, or log in to tackle the next steps. Some employers require you to work at the company for a specified period before you can start contributing to a 401(k). About 4 in 10 companies impose a wait of three months or more, according to data from the Plan Sponsor Council of America.

Video by Ian Wolsten

2. Decide how much to contribute

One reason experts like 401(k) plans so much is because they make it easy to start investing. “They take the guesswork out of when to invest because money comes out of your paycheck automatically,” Christine Benz, director of personal finance at Morningstar, told Grow earlier this year. “Turns out, that’s a really great way to invest.” Still, you need to decide how much money to contribute each pay period. Experts typically advise you aim to put away 10% to 15% of your salary for retirement each year, but even if you’re juggling a lot of other expenses, some is better than none. “Put $50 or $100 in there just so you’re used to saving and seeing a statement that has investments in there,” Reyes recommends. As you earn more money, aim to increase your contributions. You can make an annual 401(k) contribution of up to $19,000 a year, plus an extra $6,000 if you’re 50 or older, as of 2019. Those amounts increase to $19,500 and $6,500 for 2020. It’s especially important to contribute to a 401(k) if your employer offers a match. There are a variety of formulas for matching contributions, but the average reached a record high of 4.7% this year. That means, if you make $50,000 and contribute at least that amount, your company will contribute $2,350 as well.

3. Pick your investments and review fees

There will be a few investment options to select from within your 401(k) plan, typically index funds, like the following: Stock funds. Your options here may include companies of different sizes (small-, mid-, and large-cap stocks) or from different geographic regions (U.S. and international).

Your options here may include companies of different sizes (small-, mid-, and large-cap stocks) or from different geographic regions (U.S. and international). Bond funds . Options might range from funds representing a large portion of the bond market to specific regions.

. Options might range from funds representing a large portion of the bond market to specific regions. Target-date retirement funds. These are made up of a mix of investments that changes over time, depending on when you plan to retire.

Video by Courtney Stith When selecting investments, also known as determining your asset allocation, you have two options: The do-it-yourself route, in which you select individual investments from that list of funds, or the hands-off approach of allocating all your funds into one already-mixed target-date fund. Regardless, the goal is to have a variety of assets to balance out potential risks, or what’s known as diversification. Funds are grouped by asset type, so be sure to avoid that aforementioned alphabetical bias and compare similar options before making a decisions. If you take the DIY approach, you’ll need to decide what portion of your portfolio is invested in bonds versus stocks. The Baltimore-based money managers at T. Rowe Price suggest these goals: 20s and 30s: 90% to 100% in stocks (because of your long investment timeline), with up to 10% remaining in bonds.

90% to 100% in stocks (because of your long investment timeline), with up to 10% remaining in bonds. 40s: 80% to 100% in stocks, with up to 20% remaining in bonds.

80% to 100% in stocks, with up to 20% remaining in bonds. 50s: 60% to 80% in stocks, 20% to 30% in bonds, and up to 10% in cash.

60% to 80% in stocks, 20% to 30% in bonds, and up to 10% in cash. 60s: 50% to 65% in stocks, 25% to 35% in bonds, and 5% to 15% in cash. Target-date funds are popular because they alleviate the stress of figuring out asset allocation yourself. “Sometimes, not overthinking it is the best strategy,” Benz says. “You can really muddy the waters by trying to be too tactical.”

Sometimes, not overthinking it is the best strategy. You can really muddy the waters by trying to be too tactical. Christine Benz director of personal finance at Morningstar

As you pick investments, pay attention to fees for individual funds and the overall account. The lower, the better. All other things equal, an investor paying annual fees of 1.3% will reach retirement with about $100,000 less than one paying fees of just 0.25%, according to the Center for American Progress. If you see a lot of offerings in your plan with fees greater than 1%, Benz recommends contributing just enough money to get your employer’s match — and then shopping around for alternative ways to invest the rest, like an IRA.

Remember to check in periodically


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, options, investments, starting, plan, common, bonds, dont, 401k, mistake, investment, money, funds, retirement


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A parenting expert shares the common mistake that psychologically damages kids—and what to do instead

When children are given an order, they’re more likely to resist being told what to do. When children are given an order, they’re more likely to resist being told what to do. While it may work in the moment, it’s still likely to cause resentment and make them less likely to cooperate in the future. While it may work in the moment, it’s still likely to cause resentment and make them less likely to cooperate in the future. Blaming is a put-down, and it can easily cause children to feel guilty, unlo


When children are given an order, they’re more likely to resist being told what to do.
When children are given an order, they’re more likely to resist being told what to do.
While it may work in the moment, it’s still likely to cause resentment and make them less likely to cooperate in the future.
While it may work in the moment, it’s still likely to cause resentment and make them less likely to cooperate in the future.
Blaming is a put-down, and it can easily cause children to feel guilty, unlo
A parenting expert shares the common mistake that psychologically damages kids—and what to do instead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: hunter clarke-fields
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parenting, common, theyre, behavior, damages, cause, instead, expert, work, psychologically, kidsand, mistake, likely, given, children, shares, feel, resentment, order


A parenting expert shares the common mistake that psychologically damages kids—and what to do instead

When parents want their kids to follow an order, and their efforts at skillful communication aren’t working, they often “put their foot down” to enforce a solution. The immediate result? One person “wins,” getting his or her needs met, while the other “loses.” This outcome might work for you if you subscribe to an authoritarian parenting style, which stems from the belief that in order to develop properly, children need to be punished for bad behavior and be rewarded for good behavior. It’s a familiar and sensible concept to most parents, but those who follow it pay a high price for obedience.

Why punishment does more harm to your kids

How to raise good humans—without punishing them

The most effective way to enforce boundaries without putting your foot down is to let your kids make the rules — with the help of your guidance, of course. But the key is to focus on the words you use, as well as how you use them. Let’s say your kid just left a messy pile of toys all over the living room floor, after you both agreed that he or she could play with them — only if they clean everything up after they’re done. Here’s what not to say: “Pick these up right now. I don’t want you leaving a mess like that again.” When children are given an order, they’re more likely to resist being told what to do. (Imagine how you’d feel if you were given an avalanche of orders every day. It can get pretty overwhelming.)

When children are given an order, they’re more likely to resist being told what to do. (Imagine how you’d feel if you were given an avalanche of orders every day. It can get pretty overwhelming.) “If you don’t pick these up immediately, I’m going to take away your screen time.” Threats cause a similar resistance. They can make a child feel coerced and manipulated. While it may work in the moment, it’s still likely to cause resentment and make them less likely to cooperate in the future.

Threats cause a similar resistance. They can make a child feel coerced and manipulated. While it may work in the moment, it’s still likely to cause resentment and make them less likely to cooperate in the future. “You should know better.” Blaming is a put-down, and it can easily cause children to feel guilty, unloved and rejected. Even worse, it prevents you from developing a positive relationship with them. Instead, invite your kid to make changes from the inside out. Gently, without exhibiting any signs of anger, explain how their unacceptable behavior makes you feel. Always start with the word “I” (e.g., “I feel disappointed when I see this big mess.”).

Even wonderful, gentle punishments like a time-out or reasoning — those don’t work Alan Kazdin director, Yale Parenting Center

Next, help them understand how their behavior affects you both: “With all these toys on the ground, we can’t stretch out our legs like this” — and then lay down on the floor with your arms and legs expanded. When you lighten the mood and inject some humor, feelings of resentment, anger and guilt are less likely to take place.

Model the language you want your kids to use


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: hunter clarke-fields
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parenting, common, theyre, behavior, damages, cause, instead, expert, work, psychologically, kidsand, mistake, likely, given, children, shares, feel, resentment, order


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Don’t make this common mistake when picking investments for your 401(k)

Yet 401(k) investors are more likely to invest in mutual funds “early in the alphabet,” according to research from The Financial Review. The average 401(k) plan offers 19.8 fund options, according to the report, and the more options there are, the more likely participants are to choose the top-listed funds. But the so-called “alphabeticity bias” occurs even when investors aren’t given many investment choices in their 401(k) plan, the researchers behind the report found. Two psychological short c


Yet 401(k) investors are more likely to invest in mutual funds “early in the alphabet,” according to research from The Financial Review.
The average 401(k) plan offers 19.8 fund options, according to the report, and the more options there are, the more likely participants are to choose the top-listed funds.
But the so-called “alphabeticity bias” occurs even when investors aren’t given many investment choices in their 401(k) plan, the researchers behind the report found.
Two psychological short c
Don’t make this common mistake when picking investments for your 401(k) Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, status, picking, common, bias, options, mutual, dont, investments, likely, report, mistake, fund, 401k, funds


Don't make this common mistake when picking investments for your 401(k)

When it comes to picking investments, first isn’t always best. Yet 401(k) investors are more likely to invest in mutual funds “early in the alphabet,” according to research from The Financial Review.

Funds beginning with A, B and C, in other words, are more likely to be selected by investors than those that begin with a letter later in the alphabet.

In fact, the first four funds listed receive 10% more money each, on average, than they would if investors’ money was allocated equally among all of the options, per the report. Funds listed 11th or lower received 10% less money.

The average 401(k) plan offers 19.8 fund options, according to the report, and the more options there are, the more likely participants are to choose the top-listed funds. But the so-called “alphabeticity bias” occurs even when investors aren’t given many investment choices in their 401(k) plan, the researchers behind the report found.

Two psychological short cuts humans use can help explain the phenomenon, the researchers contend: Status quo bias and “satisficing.” Status quo bias, or relying on the default options given, comes into play because most 401(k) plans list their mutual fund options in alphabetical order, and investors look through them in that order.

Satisificing occurs when an individual finds an “acceptable” mutual fund offering and stops looking at the funds offered beyond that, even though there could be better options further down the list.

These tendencies can have serious consequences for retirement savings.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, status, picking, common, bias, options, mutual, dont, investments, likely, report, mistake, fund, 401k, funds


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