This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no


Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no
This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


This woman sold her app for $85 million — here's the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette Lykke

Building a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. She co-founded fitness app Endomondo in 2007, developing the company for almost a decade before it gained enough interest to be acquired by American firm Under Armour. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017.

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According to Lykke, who began her career as a management consultant, a business can only experience vast growth rates if the people at its reins exercise what she calls “patient impatience.” “Every day you have to push (yourself) and you have to be willing to do that for quite a while,” she said. “I think a lot of stories about start-ups give the impression that two guys start a company in a basement and boom, two years later they change the world. That’s just not how it works – it takes years, so working hard every day is crucial.”

Be clear on your purpose

For the past two years, Lykke has been the CEO of Too Good To Go — an organization that works with restaurants and food retailers to tackle waste by selling food at a discounted price. The app has 11 million users and works with 22,000 stores across 11 countries. Her involvement with the company began around 9 months after the service was launched, when a friend who knew its founders showed her the app. “I thought it was such a cool concept,” she told CNBC. “I got invited to invest and then was asked to help the founders run the business.” She said her core driving force when it came to work was being part of a company that had a strong purpose and could make a real impact. “I work a lot and put everything into it, so I want to do something that really matters,” she explained. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and now I have an even stronger purpose in tackling food waste. I just hadn’t realized the scale of this problem, but it had always been natural to me not to throw away food.” Entrepreneurs looking to grow a company needed to follow her lead and work on something that they felt was meaningful, Lykke added. “Make sure you’re really, really passionate about what you do — that’s fundamental,” she said. “There are going to be days and nights where, if you don’t have that passion, it’s going to be too difficult.”

As well as being passionate about their business, start-up founders needed to build a team who believed in the purpose of the company. “Being clear about the company’s vision is important, (but) the people you find for your team need to believe what you believe — it’s important to establish that team really early on,” Lykke told CNBC. She noted that having a strong ethical purpose was also a big competitive advantage, helping to attract both talented employees and investors.

Seek advice — and share it too


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


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Sallie Krawcheck: The No. 1 investing mistake women make has nothing to do with where they invest

When it comes to investing, the biggest mistake women make has nothing to do with where they’re choosing to invest their money — in fact, women tend to earn higher returns than men. Rather, the issue is they’re not investing enough in the first place, says Sallie Krawcheck, co-founder and CEO of Ellevest, a digital investment platform for women. Sallie Krawcheck Co-founder and CEO of Ellevest. Noam Galai | Getty Images”We certainly don’t invest as much as men do, ” Krawcheck tells CNBC Make It.


When it comes to investing, the biggest mistake women make has nothing to do with where they’re choosing to invest their money — in fact, women tend to earn higher returns than men. Rather, the issue is they’re not investing enough in the first place, says Sallie Krawcheck, co-founder and CEO of Ellevest, a digital investment platform for women. Sallie Krawcheck Co-founder and CEO of Ellevest. Noam Galai | Getty Images”We certainly don’t invest as much as men do, ” Krawcheck tells CNBC Make It.
Sallie Krawcheck: The No. 1 investing mistake women make has nothing to do with where they invest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, krawcheck, sallie, tend, mistake, women, invest, index, ellevest, theyre, putting, investing, retirement


Sallie Krawcheck: The No. 1 investing mistake women make has nothing to do with where they invest

When it comes to investing, the biggest mistake women make has nothing to do with where they’re choosing to invest their money — in fact, women tend to earn higher returns than men. Rather, the issue is they’re not investing enough in the first place, says Sallie Krawcheck, co-founder and CEO of Ellevest, a digital investment platform for women.

Sallie Krawcheck Co-founder and CEO of Ellevest. Noam Galai | Getty Images

“We certainly don’t invest as much as men do, ” Krawcheck tells CNBC Make It. “We tend to leave more than 70% of our wealth in cash as opposed to investing it. For the typical professional woman, that can cost her hundreds of thousands — for some women, millions — of dollars over the course of their lives.” Not putting their money to work can be “a bigger drain on their net worth than the gender pay gap,” Krawcheck adds.

That’s why her No. 1 piece of financial advice for women is to simply start investing. Ellevest, the robo-advisor that Krawcheck founded in 2014 to help close the gender investing gap, makes it easy to do so — there’s no minimum required to open an account. Here are some other low-stress ways to dip your toe in investing: Enroll in your company’s 401(k) retirement plan and take full advantage of any company match, which is essentially free money.

Contribute to an individual retirement account that offers tax breaks, like a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA.

Use a micro-investing app like Acorns or Stash, which make investing simple and accessible. Acorns even lets you invest your “spare change” by rounding up your purchases to the nearest dollar and automatically putting your coins to work.

Look into low-cost index funds, which Warren Buffett recommends. Index funds hold every stock in an index such as the S&P 500, including big-name companies such as Apple, Microsoft and Google. Because this type of fund is highly diversified, it stays relatively constant and avoids some of the risk that comes with picking individual stocks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, krawcheck, sallie, tend, mistake, women, invest, index, ellevest, theyre, putting, investing, retirement


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Mortgage rates sink to 3-year low, but one-third of borrowers are making this big mistake

That pushed the yield on the 10-year Treasury, which mortgage rates loosely follow, down sharply. The average rate on the popular 30-year fixed mortgage hit 3.70% on Friday, the lowest since November 2016, according to Mortgage News Daily. The size of that population, however, is still very sensitive to even the slightest rate moves, since so many borrowers have already refinanced to very low rates. Rates are now incredibly favorable for both refinance and home purchase, consumers still need to


That pushed the yield on the 10-year Treasury, which mortgage rates loosely follow, down sharply. The average rate on the popular 30-year fixed mortgage hit 3.70% on Friday, the lowest since November 2016, according to Mortgage News Daily. The size of that population, however, is still very sensitive to even the slightest rate moves, since so many borrowers have already refinanced to very low rates. Rates are now incredibly favorable for both refinance and home purchase, consumers still need to
Mortgage rates sink to 3-year low, but one-third of borrowers are making this big mistake Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: diana olick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, borrowers, rate, rates, mistake, big, onethird, lower, 3year, low, mortgage, according, million, 30year, making, refinance, lender, sink


Mortgage rates sink to 3-year low, but one-third of borrowers are making this big mistake

Escalating tensions over a trade war with China sent investors rushing to the relative safety of the bond market late last week. That pushed the yield on the 10-year Treasury, which mortgage rates loosely follow, down sharply.

The average rate on the popular 30-year fixed mortgage hit 3.70% on Friday, the lowest since November 2016, according to Mortgage News Daily. That rate will likely dip even lower Monday, as bond yields continue to fall.

The drop last week meant that 8.2 million 30-year mortgage holders could likely qualify for a refinance and save at least 0.75% off of their current interest rate by doing so, according to a new tally by Black Knight, a mortgage software and analytics company.

The size of that population, however, is still very sensitive to even the slightest rate moves, since so many borrowers have already refinanced to very low rates. Just a one-eighth of a point move lower could add another 1.5 million borrowers to the eligible refinance pool, and the same move in the other direction would knock 1.3 million out.

“Lower rates have also increased the buying power for prospective homebuyers looking to purchase the average-priced home by the equivalent of 15%, meaning that they could effectively buy $45,000 ‘more house’ while still keeping their payments the same as they would have been last fall,” said Ben Graboske, president of Black Knight Data and Analytics.

“As affordability pressures have eased, it also appears to be putting the brakes on the home price deceleration we’ve been tracking since February 2018,” he added.

Rates are now incredibly favorable for both refinance and home purchase, consumers still need to shop around for the best rate. But a full one-third of them are not, according to a new survey from Fannie Mae. The vast majority of consumers will comparison shop for other products, but mortgages are apparently too daunting.

“Unfortunately, comparison shopping for a mortgage can be a much more complicated and time-consuming endeavor. Simply evaluating the ‘price’ of a mortgage involves looking at several interrelated components – including rates, fees, and points – and making an assumption about how long a borrower will stay in that mortgage,” noted Fannie Mae’s chief economist, Doug Duncan, in the report.

“While it’s easy to find “teaser” rates advertised online, a true mortgage quote is based on a handful of variables that are unique to each buyer and evaluated differently by each lender,” he continued.

Consumers instead tend to rely on advice from family and friends or simply go to the same lender they’ve used before.

“Non-shoppers also reported much less concern with competitive terms when selecting a lender, citing other non-financial priorities, such as customer service/responsiveness and having a preexisting account with a lending institution. Individual households may have good reason for accepting that tradeoff,” added Duncan.

Mortgage rates have been quite volatile lately, so borrowers who could benefit from a refinance will need to act quickly. Rates could move lower, but different lenders will be responding to the changing market conditions at different paces.

“Once the dust settles, however, we’re talking about a move to the “mid 3’s” for best-case 30-year fixed rates,” said Matthew Graham, chief operating officer of Mortgage News Daily. “Can rates go lower from here? Sure! Rates can always go lower.”

Of course if rates go into historically low territory, there will be pushback from both lenders and investors in the bonds that back mortgages, as they will both see diminishing returns. If fewer of those bonds are purchased, it could send rates back up.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: diana olick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, borrowers, rate, rates, mistake, big, onethird, lower, 3year, low, mortgage, according, million, 30year, making, refinance, lender, sink


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There’s a major mistake most aspiring entrepreneurs make, start-up investor warns

But building a business — no matter how big or small — is a difficult process, riddled with challenges and unpredictability. Yet, there is one stumbling block you can avoid right from the outset — and it’s one many founders miss, according to investor Sebastien Eckersley-Maslin. “Understand the problem you’re solving,” says Eckersley-Maslin, himself an entrepreneur and founder of Australian start-up accelerator BlueChilli. “Most people come up with a solution first, without thinking through the


But building a business — no matter how big or small — is a difficult process, riddled with challenges and unpredictability. Yet, there is one stumbling block you can avoid right from the outset — and it’s one many founders miss, according to investor Sebastien Eckersley-Maslin. “Understand the problem you’re solving,” says Eckersley-Maslin, himself an entrepreneur and founder of Australian start-up accelerator BlueChilli. “Most people come up with a solution first, without thinking through the
There’s a major mistake most aspiring entrepreneurs make, start-up investor warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, poor, major, market, love, investor, need, mistake, warns, problem, aspiring, entrepreneurs, bluechilli, founder, idea, startup, eckersleymaslin, theres


There's a major mistake most aspiring entrepreneurs make, start-up investor warns

Many of us would love to found the next billion-dollar start-up. But building a business — no matter how big or small — is a difficult process, riddled with challenges and unpredictability. Yet, there is one stumbling block you can avoid right from the outset — and it’s one many founders miss, according to investor Sebastien Eckersley-Maslin. “Understand the problem you’re solving,” says Eckersley-Maslin, himself an entrepreneur and founder of Australian start-up accelerator BlueChilli. It may sound obvious, Eckersley-Maslin recently told CNBC Make It, but you’d be amazed how many people overlook it.

Maskot | Getty Images

Too often, he said, would-be entrepreneurs come up with an idea they think customers will love, only to find it meets no need — or misses the need altogether. “Most people come up with a solution first, without thinking through the problem,” noted Eckersley-Maslin. That’s troubling given that failure to solve a problem — otherwise known as poor market fit — ranked as the top start-up killer, ending 42% of businesses, according to a 2018 study by investment research firm CB Insights. Other common reasons included insufficient funding, a lack of suitable talent, market competition and poor timing. Yet that potential issue can be overcome by validating your idea early on, said Eckersley-Maslin.

Sebastien Eckersley-Maslin, founder and CEO of Australian start-up accelerator BlueChilli. BlueChilli


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, poor, major, market, love, investor, need, mistake, warns, problem, aspiring, entrepreneurs, bluechilli, founder, idea, startup, eckersleymaslin, theres


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Seniors should avoid this mistake as the Fed lowers rates

On Wednesday, the Federal Reserve lowered the federal funds rate — the interest rate banks charge to lend each other money — by 0.25%. At the same time, they also lower the interest credited to savings accounts and more. He noted that the yield curve had inverted earlier this year, meaning rates on short-term Treasurys were higher than rates on long-term Treasurys. However, they are asking investors to think deeply about their ability to withstand a period of low interest rates and a market uphe


On Wednesday, the Federal Reserve lowered the federal funds rate — the interest rate banks charge to lend each other money — by 0.25%. At the same time, they also lower the interest credited to savings accounts and more. He noted that the yield curve had inverted earlier this year, meaning rates on short-term Treasurys were higher than rates on long-term Treasurys. However, they are asking investors to think deeply about their ability to withstand a period of low interest rates and a market uphe
Seniors should avoid this mistake as the Fed lowers rates Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, rates, investors, avoid, savings, seniors, market, mistake, retirees, yield, wealth, stock, fed, interest, lowers


Seniors should avoid this mistake as the Fed lowers rates

Graiki | Moment Open | Getty Images

Retirees are facing a tough decision: Should they make up for even less growth on their cash by ramping up stock exposure? On Wednesday, the Federal Reserve lowered the federal funds rate — the interest rate banks charge to lend each other money — by 0.25%. The range is now 2.00% to 2.25%. Rate cuts reduce interest costs for people with variable rate loans. At the same time, they also lower the interest credited to savings accounts and more.

Right now, online savings accounts are offering annual percentage yields as high as 3%. The possibility of having those rates reduced is a scary one for retirees, and it may nudge them into chasing returns to sustain their standard of living. “Every time they lower the rate, it makes people want to shift more aggressive,” said Jeffrey Levine, CPA and CEO of BluePrint Wealth Alliance in Garden City, New York. “Retirees who have taken more risk got away with it due to the long bull market, but when will it catch up?” he said. “Because at some point it has to.”

The upward climb

Stock investors have been enjoying a decade-long bull run. However, advisors are feeling cautious as of late, worrying that an economic downturn might be around the corner. “The stock market has been hitting all-time highs, but the reason we’re facing lower interest rates is because the economy seems to be slowing down and we’re heading toward a recession,” said Leon LaBrecque, certified financial planner and chief growth officer at Sequoia Financial Group in Troy, Michigan. He noted that the yield curve had inverted earlier this year, meaning rates on short-term Treasurys were higher than rates on long-term Treasurys. Essentially this means investors holding longer-term U.S. debt are being compensated less compared to those holding shorter-term issues. Investors and economists interpret a yield curve inversion as a sign of an approaching recession.

A gut check

ATABOY | Getty Images

Advisors working with retirees and near-retirees are discouraging them from chasing riskier returns. However, they are asking investors to think deeply about their ability to withstand a period of low interest rates and a market upheaval. “Clients who are worried about stock market implosions may benefit from modifying their portfolio so that they don’t have more than the appropriate amount of exposure to equities,” said Vance Barse, a wealth strategist at Manning Wealth Management in San Diego.

He’s addressing this by having clients complete a semi-annual risk tolerance questionnaire. Retirees should also consider the purpose of the “safe money” they keep in money market funds and savings accounts. “The conservative part of the portfolio is there to provide some diversification and buffer — it’s a low bogey,” said Randall S. Lee, a CFP and partner at TrustCore Financial Services in Brentwood, Tennessee. “The coaching I’ve had to do with clients is to help them understand that their bogey isn’t the S&P 500, ” he said. “You should be trying to make the rate of return you need to earn in your retirement plan. “If you’re hitting it, you’re solid.”

Finding yield


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, rates, investors, avoid, savings, seniors, market, mistake, retirees, yield, wealth, stock, fed, interest, lowers


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Facebook’s instant articles a costly mistake, says Taboola CEO

Facebook’s relationships with publishers have evolved into a huge misstep for the company, Taboola CEO Adam Singolda told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday. Singolda said the sheer size of Facebook makes it worth a “worth a look.” “When you’re so big, even a mistake that happens by mistake is significant.” Taboola is an advertising company that integrates monetized primary and third-party content onto publisher’s sites. Singolda calls Facebook’s Libra a long shot.


Facebook’s relationships with publishers have evolved into a huge misstep for the company, Taboola CEO Adam Singolda told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday. Singolda said the sheer size of Facebook makes it worth a “worth a look.” “When you’re so big, even a mistake that happens by mistake is significant.” Taboola is an advertising company that integrates monetized primary and third-party content onto publisher’s sites. Singolda calls Facebook’s Libra a long shot.
Facebook’s instant articles a costly mistake, says Taboola CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: anjali sundaram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, costly, mistake, facebook, singolda, company, makes, taboola, facebooks, articles, advertising, libra, publishers, instant, companies


Facebook's instant articles a costly mistake, says Taboola CEO

Facebook’s relationships with publishers have evolved into a huge misstep for the company, Taboola CEO Adam Singolda told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday.

“When I look at some of the past initiatives, like instant articles for publishers, when they host content within Facebook versus allowing traffic to go back to journalism, to me that was a mistake,” Singolda told “Squawk Box” Thursday. “That mistake cost a lot to journalism.”

The Department of Justice has opened a broad antitrust review of Facebook and other tech companies. Facebook recently reached an agreement with the FTC to pay a $5 billion fine, to settle on privacy violations, something CEO Mark Zuckerberg explicitly mentioned in Facebook’s earnings call late Wednesday. The social media giant has also been criticized for its political advertising and spread of fake news ahead of the 2016 elections.

Singolda said the sheer size of Facebook makes it worth a “worth a look.”

“When you’re so big, even a mistake that happens by mistake is significant.”

Taboola is an advertising company that integrates monetized primary and third-party content onto publisher’s sites. Reaching over 44% of the worldwide internet, the company partners with over 10,000 digital properties, including CBSi, Microsoft, Le Figaro, and CNBC and NBCNews.

Singolda sees a crackdown on Facebook as possibly opening more opportunities for ad revenue to be spread around other players.

“We’re seeing a slew of new companies that are going public…and companies like us, that are still small, only a little over a billion dollars in revenue, give small businesses and brands an opportunity to maybe explore other options,” he said.

Singolda is optimistic about Slack, Pinterest, and the other new tech IPOs. The advertising CEO sees them as a way to refresh what is becoming a stale business model for big tech.

“Google is facing their own Facebook moment with advertising slowing down,” Singolda said. “They might have to introduce some sort of Libra/Calibra initiation of their own, trying to look for the next search engine type of growth.”

Singolda calls Facebook’s Libra a long shot.

“With a company like Facebook, that really owns their arpu (average return per user) …why launch Libra? Why do it unless you know something that we don’t know? Unless you need some sort of growth engine that goes beyond advertising?”

Facebook’s answer to cryptocurrencies has also been under scrutiny, after going through multiple hearings by the House of Representatives, which has focused on privacy and the possibility for misuse. As Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies in general are getting questioned by many parties, including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Singolda questions Facebook’s decision to enter into the space.

“It makes sense to enable payments. Why get into crypto, why getting into something that’s so controversial…from my perspective, Calibra makes sense. Libra, I would skip it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: anjali sundaram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, costly, mistake, facebook, singolda, company, makes, taboola, facebooks, articles, advertising, libra, publishers, instant, companies


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Regret your Amazon Prime Day purchase? Here’s how to course correct

filadendron | E+ | Getty ImagesAmazon’s 48-hour Prime Day is over, which means regret over some of your purchases might be sinking in. He spent around $60 on each of the pots, which have been popular items since the first Prime Day was held four years ago. “I kind of got wrapped up in Prime Day,” McNamara said. Katie Raffa, an executive assistant in New York, snapped up a $65 juicer during last year’s Prime Day, thinking it was a bargain. Events like Amazon Prime Day can trigger uncontrollable s


filadendron | E+ | Getty ImagesAmazon’s 48-hour Prime Day is over, which means regret over some of your purchases might be sinking in. He spent around $60 on each of the pots, which have been popular items since the first Prime Day was held four years ago. “I kind of got wrapped up in Prime Day,” McNamara said. Katie Raffa, an executive assistant in New York, snapped up a $65 juicer during last year’s Prime Day, thinking it was a bargain. Events like Amazon Prime Day can trigger uncontrollable s
Regret your Amazon Prime Day purchase? Here’s how to course correct Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: mallika mitra, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weiss, mcnamara, think, day, purchase, amazon, regret, mistake, prime, heres, getty, splurge, correct, youre, course, ones


Regret your Amazon Prime Day purchase? Here's how to course correct

filadendron | E+ | Getty Images

Amazon’s 48-hour Prime Day is over, which means regret over some of your purchases might be sinking in. You’re not alone. Eddie McNamara, a 43-year-old cook in New York, still regrets his Prime Day purchase of two Instant Pots — one for him and one for his sister — back in 2016. He spent around $60 on each of the pots, which have been popular items since the first Prime Day was held four years ago. “I kind of got wrapped up in Prime Day,” McNamara said. “I saw it was on sale and got overexcited.” McNamara said he made a few recipes with the pot that turned out badly. His sister never even took hers out of the box. “I ended up sort of hating the thing,” McNamara said. “It was haunting me, this lousy purchase.”

Katie Raffa, an executive assistant in New York, snapped up a $65 juicer during last year’s Prime Day, thinking it was a bargain. “It ended up sitting in my closet really high up, where I can’t reach it, for 11 months,” Raffa said. “I regretted making an impulse purchase that I wasn’t going to use.” She ended up regifting it at a wedding last month.

We think we’re the only ones who splurge. We feel like we’re the only ones who made a mistake. Brent Weiss co-founder of Facet Wealth

Impulse purchases are common. In 2017 a survey conducted by personal finance website finder.com found that 88.6% of American adults have impulsively shopped, each spending on average $81.75 per shopping session. Events like Amazon Prime Day can trigger uncontrollable spending, said April Lane Benson, a psychologist and author who specializes in compulsive shopping. A sense of urgency kicks in when there’s a buzz around a deal, encouraging shoppers to whip out the plastic. “You think you’re never going to get this kind of deal again, ” she said. Do you regret buying two Fire TV sets? Here’s what to do.

Don’t beat yourself up

krisanapong detraphiphat | Moment | Getty Images

“We think we’re the only ones who splurge,” said Brent Weiss, certified financial planner and co-founder of Facet Wealth. “We feel like we’re the only ones who made a mistake.” Forgiving yourself is the first step to learning from the mistake and ensuring it doesn’t happen again, he said.

Return, regift or sell

Hispanolistic | E+ | Getty Images

Adjust your budget

Draw up your budget and commit to it. Weiss uses a vision board to track his progress toward different goals, including vacations and saving for retirement. “You want to hack your mind and not your money,” he said, adding that seeing our plans visually can make us act differently. It’s particularly important to do this when you’re behind, like after a splurge. “It will get you back in the balance,” Weiss said.

Learn from the splurge


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: mallika mitra, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weiss, mcnamara, think, day, purchase, amazon, regret, mistake, prime, heres, getty, splurge, correct, youre, course, ones


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Former car salesman: The No. 1 mistake first-time car buyers make

Almost always, a car will end up costing you more than the sticker price — and not anticipating the true cost is “the absolute biggest mistake first-time buyers make,” says former car salesman Matt Jones, who is now the senior manager of insights at Edmunds, a car-review site. There’s also insurance, he adds, which can be higher for first-time buyers, as they’re typically on the younger side and don’t have as much driving experience. “Take a look at your car deal with a 360-degree view,” says Jo


Almost always, a car will end up costing you more than the sticker price — and not anticipating the true cost is “the absolute biggest mistake first-time buyers make,” says former car salesman Matt Jones, who is now the senior manager of insights at Edmunds, a car-review site. There’s also insurance, he adds, which can be higher for first-time buyers, as they’re typically on the younger side and don’t have as much driving experience. “Take a look at your car deal with a 360-degree view,” says Jo
Former car salesman: The No. 1 mistake first-time car buyers make Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, younger, car, gas, mistake, using, youre, salesman, firsttime, insurance, jones, buyers, sites


Former car salesman: The No. 1 mistake first-time car buyers make

Almost always, a car will end up costing you more than the sticker price — and not anticipating the true cost is “the absolute biggest mistake first-time buyers make,” says former car salesman Matt Jones, who is now the senior manager of insights at Edmunds, a car-review site.

“People get fixated on their car payment,” Jones tells CNBC Make It, and forget to factor in all of the expenses that come with actually owning a vehicle, like gas, maintenance and repairs.

There’s also insurance, he adds, which can be higher for first-time buyers, as they’re typically on the younger side and don’t have as much driving experience.

“Take a look at your car deal with a 360-degree view,” says Jones. That means using sites like fueleconomy.gov to research fuel prices in your area and the gas mileage of the car you’re interested in buying. Next, get an auto insurance quote using sites like State Farm or Geico.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, younger, car, gas, mistake, using, youre, salesman, firsttime, insurance, jones, buyers, sites


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It’s a ‘mistake’ to bring Huawei into trade discussions: CEO

It’s a ‘mistake’ to bring Huawei into trade discussions: CEO4 Hours AgoFrank Lavin of Export Now says Huawei cannot be both a security issue and a trade negotiating chip, and U.S. President Donald Trump is weakening Washington’s position by being “a little undisciplined” in his messaging.


It’s a ‘mistake’ to bring Huawei into trade discussions: CEO4 Hours AgoFrank Lavin of Export Now says Huawei cannot be both a security issue and a trade negotiating chip, and U.S. President Donald Trump is weakening Washington’s position by being “a little undisciplined” in his messaging.
It’s a ‘mistake’ to bring Huawei into trade discussions: CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weakening, president, trade, trump, ceo, security, discussions, negotiating, mistake, washingtons, bring, huawei, position, undisciplined


It's a 'mistake' to bring Huawei into trade discussions: CEO

It’s a ‘mistake’ to bring Huawei into trade discussions: CEO

4 Hours Ago

Frank Lavin of Export Now says Huawei cannot be both a security issue and a trade negotiating chip, and U.S. President Donald Trump is weakening Washington’s position by being “a little undisciplined” in his messaging.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weakening, president, trade, trump, ceo, security, discussions, negotiating, mistake, washingtons, bring, huawei, position, undisciplined


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