How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H


After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H
How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. “I have a teaching degree but (teaching) won’t pay the bills for a family of five – it’s just not an option,” she told CNBC. “I thought about nursing, but the biggest drawback was that it required going back to school for two years to get another degree – I didn’t have two years, I have kids and bills to pay.” Despite being a self-confessed technophobe, Lance decided to learn computer coding after a suggestion from her brother-in-law, taking the plunge into an entirely new career path. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. In an interview with CNBC, she shared her tips on achieving success in a new career.

Value your ‘soft skills’

Although a career change can set you back in terms of direct industry experience, Lance urged others not to underestimate the value of basic core capabilities that appeal to employers — like strong communication or leadership skills. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. “(That was) combined with having just coming out of a great program which gave me all the right tech skills.”

Be willing to learn

As well as considering how your skillset could be transferred to a new industry, Lance told CNBC that having the right attitude was a real asset when it came to landing a job with no direct experience. She said she was upfront about what she could and couldn’t do, taking the approach: “I don’t know a lot about it, but I do know a little bit – and I’m willing to learn more.” According to Lance, embracing those knowledge gaps and showcasing a desire for self-improvement could be just as valuable as experience to some employers. “For the job I got, the company was starting a new team that would be using new technology, so we’d all be learning whether they hired somebody with experience or not,” she said. “They wanted people who were capable of learning quickly and who could work and learn under pressure. Going through Coding Dojo proved I had those capabilities and that desire to keep learning.”

Work your own way

Although Lance didn’t feel intellectually limited while learning to code, she said comparing her own pace of work to others’ sometimes led to unnecessary frustration and could impact her confidence. “One challenge was the amount of time it took to get through everything. I don’t think I had trouble with the actual program, but I didn’t have any tech background, so every assignment would take me one and a half times as long as everyone else,” she told CNBC. “Some of the people in my group had played on computers since they were 12 — so the assignments only took 20 to 30 minutes for them to complete.” She said it was important to find your own way to get work done, rather than sticking to the chronological or seemingly “correct” method. Her coding program was organized into three sections, and when she initially attempted to do each assignment in order, Lance found herself falling behind. “I’d have to skip forward and go back again – that’s not a good strategy,” she said. Instead, she got through all of the reading and learning materials for each topic before attempting to complete an assignment. “Make sure you do the reading and homework way before you start struggling with (graded assignments and technical work),” she said. “And make sure you allow yourself enough time outside of class to get stuff done.” Lance also advised those considering a career change not to overestimate their own academic ability. “I was pretty good in school and didn’t have to study a lot,” she said. “I went into Coding Dojo thinking I could get it done quicker, underestimating how much time it would consume. (You have to let it) take as long as it takes.”

Seek support to switch career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


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Why this 32-year-old mom who won $400,000 on ‘Deal or No Deal’ said she’ll give a ‘hefty portion’ away

I want to take hefty portion of the money” and create a nonprofit that provides low-cost housing for homeless veterans and the elderly. ‘I convinced myself I had the winning briefcase’Miller knew that however much money she won, she’d dedicate it to those in need. But after eliminating several high amounts, there were only three options left: a case worth $400,000, a case worth $200 and an offer from the banker worth $167,000. It was worth $400,000, plus, a new 2018 Chrysler Pacifica. “Growing u


I want to take hefty portion of the money” and create a nonprofit that provides low-cost housing for homeless veterans and the elderly. ‘I convinced myself I had the winning briefcase’Miller knew that however much money she won, she’d dedicate it to those in need. But after eliminating several high amounts, there were only three options left: a case worth $400,000, a case worth $200 and an offer from the banker worth $167,000. It was worth $400,000, plus, a new 2018 Chrysler Pacifica. “Growing u
Why this 32-year-old mom who won $400,000 on ‘Deal or No Deal’ said she’ll give a ‘hefty portion’ away Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 32yearold, hefty, youre, away, mom, responsible, shell, won, 400000, winning, deal, portion, worth, going, money, case, shed


Why this 32-year-old mom who won $400,000 on 'Deal or No Deal' said she'll give a 'hefty portion' away

Now, equipped with $400,000 she won on “Deal or No Deal,” Miller wants to change the lives of those less fortunate than her: “There are people out here who could use my help. I want to take hefty portion of the money” and create a nonprofit that provides low-cost housing for homeless veterans and the elderly. “Too many people go homeless and there’s something I can do about it. ”

‘I convinced myself I had the winning briefcase’

Miller knew that however much money she won, she’d dedicate it to those in need. And she had a feeling she’d win big: “I didn’t really have a strategy because I convinced myself I had the winning briefcase. I almost went across the board, ” choosing cases, like, “one, two, three.” But after eliminating several high amounts, there were only three options left: a case worth $400,000, a case worth $200 and an offer from the banker worth $167,000. Miller rejected the offer and opted for another case. It was worth $400,000, plus, a new 2018 Chrysler Pacifica.

‘I’m definitely going to be responsible’

Miller isn’t bummed about not winning $1 million, either: “No regrets. I’m extremely grateful.” And if there is one thing she could’ve done differently, she said jokingly, “I would’ve have fist-bumped Howie [Mandel]. I was just too nervous … but I hope I get a second chance to do that one day. ”

All in all, though, “I had an amazing experience. The energy was awesome and everybody was supportive. And as for the money, she said, “I’m definitely going to be responsible with it. ” “Growing up in poverty can make you live according to how you think you’re going to survive or how you’re going to get by. But because I had a childhood where I had to grow up fast and be responsible fast, it’s going to help me appreciate this experience like 10 times more.”

‘I just feel like it’s my calling’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 32yearold, hefty, youre, away, mom, responsible, shell, won, 400000, winning, deal, portion, worth, going, money, case, shed


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Esther Wojcicki, the mom of 2 Silicon Valley CEOs and a doctor, shares key advice for raising successful kids

Esther Wojcicki knows what it takes to raise successful children. Two of her daughters are powerful players in Silicon Valley: Susan Wojcicki is CEO of Google’s YouTube and Anne Wojcicki is co-founder and CEO of DNA testing company 23andMe. Her daughter, Janet Wojcicki, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco. For one, you need to let your kids fail, she told CNBC. If you take a course and you don’t do so well, it’s OK,” said Wojcicki, author of the new book


Esther Wojcicki knows what it takes to raise successful children. Two of her daughters are powerful players in Silicon Valley: Susan Wojcicki is CEO of Google’s YouTube and Anne Wojcicki is co-founder and CEO of DNA testing company 23andMe. Her daughter, Janet Wojcicki, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco. For one, you need to let your kids fail, she told CNBC. If you take a course and you don’t do so well, it’s OK,” said Wojcicki, author of the new book
Esther Wojcicki, the mom of 2 Silicon Valley CEOs and a doctor, shares key advice for raising successful kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, kids, shares, course, successful, help, need, mom, ok, silicon, ceo, wojcicki, key, valley, esther, fail, raising


Esther Wojcicki, the mom of 2 Silicon Valley CEOs and a doctor, shares key advice for raising successful kids

Esther Wojcicki knows what it takes to raise successful children.

Two of her daughters are powerful players in Silicon Valley: Susan Wojcicki is CEO of Google’s YouTube and Anne Wojcicki is co-founder and CEO of DNA testing company 23andMe. Her daughter, Janet Wojcicki, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco.

So what’s her secret?

For one, you need to let your kids fail, she told CNBC.

“When you’re playing a sport, of course, you fail sometimes. You aren’t as good as you wish you would be. If you take a course and you don’t do so well, it’s OK,” said Wojcicki, author of the new book, “How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results.”

“Maybe you want to do it again or take the exercise again, or do whatever it is, but it’s OK not to like everything,” she added.

However, that doesn’t necessarily mean you shouldn’t help your children if they are struggling. The trick is to do it wisely, Wojcicki said in a recent interview with “Power Lunch.” “They need to come to you and ask for help,” she explained, saying that it’s something she uses in her classroom at Palo Alto High School in California, where she she teaches journalism.

“My general response to all kids in class when they ask for help is like, ‘Well, did you try to do it yourself?”” she said, urging them to perhaps to seek help online or to talk to a friend. “‘Let’s see whether you can’t figure it out without my intervention.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, kids, shares, course, successful, help, need, mom, ok, silicon, ceo, wojcicki, key, valley, esther, fail, raising


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Living with your parents to save money might dim your chances of becoming a homeowner

Nearly 22% of them, or more than 14 million young adults, still live with one or both parents, according to real estate website Zillow. “When the housing market went bust and the economy unraveled into a recession, young adults increasingly returned to their childhood home.” Rents are very high right now, as well, so moving to a rental doesn’t help young people save to buy. Young adults who lived with their parents between the ages of 25 and 34 were actually less likely to become homeowners afte


Nearly 22% of them, or more than 14 million young adults, still live with one or both parents, according to real estate website Zillow. “When the housing market went bust and the economy unraveled into a recession, young adults increasingly returned to their childhood home.” Rents are very high right now, as well, so moving to a rental doesn’t help young people save to buy. Young adults who lived with their parents between the ages of 25 and 34 were actually less likely to become homeowners afte
Living with your parents to save money might dim your chances of becoming a homeowner Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: diana olick erica posse, diana olick, erica posse
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennials, money, chances, zillow, homeowner, living, thats, young, adults, save, mom, dim, payment, parents


Living with your parents to save money might dim your chances of becoming a homeowner

Millennials have been in no rush to move out on mom and dad. Nearly 22% of them, or more than 14 million young adults, still live with one or both parents, according to real estate website Zillow. That is the highest share for this age group since at least 2000. Millennials, especially older ones , have had a harder time moving out because they came of working age during the last recession and had difficulty finding well-paying jobs. They also have high levels of student loan debt . “While it might be tempting to stereotype these young adults as lazy millennials bumming off of Mom, the data paints a different picture, ” said Zillow senior economist Sarah Mikhitarian. “When the housing market went bust and the economy unraveled into a recession, young adults increasingly returned to their childhood home.” This doesn’t mean they don’t want to be homeowners. Various surveys show millennials do aspire to homeownership , just as previous generations did, but they have trouble saving for a down payment. Rents are very high right now, as well, so moving to a rental doesn’t help young people save to buy.

The pros and cons of living with parents

Housing expenses such as rent and insurance add nearly three years to the time it takes a typical renter to save up for a 20% down payment on a median-priced home. That’s according to home and apartment rental site Hotpads, which is owned by Zillow. That’s because the typical renter spends about 34% of his or her income on housing. It takes the typical renter about eight years to save for a down payment, if they are able to sock away about 16% of their income each year. And of course, in some locations that’s easier to do than in others.

If you live with mom and dad, and they don’t charge you rent, you can save for that same down payment in about five years. That’s the plus side.

More from Invest in You:

Gen Z or millennial and want to be rich? Here’s how

Do this once a year to ratchet up your financial security

What every women needs to know about investing

But it’s not all home-cooked meals and getting mom to do your laundry. Living in your parents’ home has consequences. Young adults who lived with their parents between the ages of 25 and 34 were actually less likely to become homeowners after 10 years than those who didn’t.

Even if they did buy a home, they didn’t carry any less mortgage debt than those who moved out earlier, all this according to a study by the Urban Institute, which concluded that living with your parents does not actually put you in a better financial position for homeownership.

Homeownership is a critical source of future wealth. Because homes generally gain value, living with your parents — and thereby reducing your odds of earlier homeownership — could actually hurt you in the end.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: diana olick erica posse, diana olick, erica posse
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennials, money, chances, zillow, homeowner, living, thats, young, adults, save, mom, dim, payment, parents


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Lesson ‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary learned from mom, gave to kids

“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college


“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college
Lesson ‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary learned from mom, gave to kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, tell, learned, tank, kids, thing, thats, lesson, kevin, mom, work, company, software, oleary, theyre, fly, gave, shark


Lesson 'Shark Tank' star Kevin O'Leary learned from mom, gave to kids

“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘What’s that mean, mom?’ She said, ‘It means no more checks.’

“I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ She said, ‘No, no, no, no. I’ve done my work. Now you do yours.’

“And that was very important to me.”

Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. He ultimately built that company into a huge business, later called The Learning Company, which he and his co-founders sold to the Mattel Toy Company for $4.2 billion in 1999.

The value of making it on your own is now something O’Leary now preaches too.

O’Leary recalls that after he became successful, he asked his mom if he could pay her back for the financial support she had given him throughout high school and college.

“She said, ‘No, I owed you that. And you should think about that for your children. Pass it on and pass it forward. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says.

“And that’s exactly what I told my kids.”

Indeed, O’Leary famously made his kids fly coach while he flew business class when they were growing up, and he cut them off financially after college.

“And [my kids] said the same thing to me: ‘That sucks,'” O’Leary says. “But now they’re off on their own, and they’re figuring it out. And I’m so proud of what my mother taught me.”

Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college admissions scandal: ‘I’ll tell you who you really screwed: Your kid’

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, tell, learned, tank, kids, thing, thats, lesson, kevin, mom, work, company, software, oleary, theyre, fly, gave, shark


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Child abuse charges against YouTube channel’s mom underscore lack of oversight for kids

It was a recipe that worked for “Fantastic Adventures,” a hit YouTube family comedy series created by an Arizona family and shut down this week amid allegations of child abuse off-screen. Before YouTube terminated it, the family’s channel had attracted nearly 800,000 subscribers and amassed more than 2 million views — potentially netting upwards of $20,000 per sponsored video. “It’s the wild, Wild West,” said Anne Henry, co-founder of BizParentz Foundation, a nonprofit serving families with chil


It was a recipe that worked for “Fantastic Adventures,” a hit YouTube family comedy series created by an Arizona family and shut down this week amid allegations of child abuse off-screen. Before YouTube terminated it, the family’s channel had attracted nearly 800,000 subscribers and amassed more than 2 million views — potentially netting upwards of $20,000 per sponsored video. “It’s the wild, Wild West,” said Anne Henry, co-founder of BizParentz Foundation, a nonprofit serving families with chil
Child abuse charges against YouTube channel’s mom underscore lack of oversight for kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: elizabeth chuck, artur debat, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youtube, children, child, family, underscore, lack, abuse, young, mom, channels, wild, charges, say, terminated, videos, kids, week, oversight


Child abuse charges against YouTube channel's mom underscore lack of oversight for kids

The lighthearted videos appeared to be scripted, edited and neatly produced, and featured their young stars engaging in wholesome mischief as playful music hummed in the background.

It was a recipe that worked for “Fantastic Adventures,” a hit YouTube family comedy series created by an Arizona family and shut down this week amid allegations of child abuse off-screen. Before YouTube terminated it, the family’s channel had attracted nearly 800,000 subscribers and amassed more than 2 million views — potentially netting upwards of $20,000 per sponsored video.

But while some production aspects of the series echoed traditional show business, the criminal charges reveal a worst-case scenario of how a lack of oversight in mom-and-pop-produced videos can play out, child safety advocates say. Mother Machelle Hackney is accused of neglecting and physically abusing the seven adopted children who starred in the videos.

When it comes to seemingly harmless videos of young people on its platform, YouTube has no purview over what is happening behind the scenes to those children.

“It’s the wild, Wild West,” said Anne Henry, co-founder of BizParentz Foundation, a nonprofit serving families with children in the professional entertainment industry that has advocated for more oversight of minors who star in YouTube videos.

“I hate to say it, but if this family ends up being made an example of that would be great because I think it will save other children from exploitation,” Henry added.

Family channels on YouTube come in a variety of formats, such as toy reviews, baking how-to shows or the adventures of family vloggers. Some feature children and are designed for a younger audience, while others are meant to educate or inspire discussion. YouTube does not say how many exist; dozens of the biggest family-focused channels attract millions of followers.

The video site has made clear that it wants to protect children, and will take down any account that appears to show child abuse, as it did in May 2017 when it removed a family channel called DaddyOFive that involved a couple allegedly abusing and humiliating their children.

In a statement this week, YouTube said it works with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children to arrest and convict anyone whose account depicts harm to children, adding that last year, it terminated and reported 46,000 offender accounts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: elizabeth chuck, artur debat, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youtube, children, child, family, underscore, lack, abuse, young, mom, channels, wild, charges, say, terminated, videos, kids, week, oversight


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Stephen Curry says the best advice he ever got came from his mom when he was 13 years old

In 2001, 13-year-old Stephen Curry’s AAU basketball team lost a big game. It was that night, in a Holiday Inn Express in Tennessee, that his mom gave him a memorable piece of advice. She said something along the lines of: “NO ONE gets to write your story but you,” Curry, now 30, recalls. To this day, “it’s the best advice I’ve ever gotten,” Curry writes. Before establishing himself as one of the greatest basketball players in the world, Curry was overlooked by virtually every big Division I coll


In 2001, 13-year-old Stephen Curry’s AAU basketball team lost a big game. It was that night, in a Holiday Inn Express in Tennessee, that his mom gave him a memorable piece of advice. She said something along the lines of: “NO ONE gets to write your story but you,” Curry, now 30, recalls. To this day, “it’s the best advice I’ve ever gotten,” Curry writes. Before establishing himself as one of the greatest basketball players in the world, Curry was overlooked by virtually every big Division I coll
Stephen Curry says the best advice he ever got came from his mom when he was 13 years old Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-09  Authors: kathleen elkins, -steph curry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mom, advice, basketball, write, recalls, players, team, college, played, ive, 13, old, stephen, best, writes, curry, came


Stephen Curry says the best advice he ever got came from his mom when he was 13 years old

In 2001, 13-year-old Stephen Curry’s AAU basketball team lost a big game. “We lost badly, and I played worse,” he writes on the Players’ Tribune. “It really felt like a wake-up call … that I just wasn’t good enough.”

It was that night, in a Holiday Inn Express in Tennessee, that his mom gave him a memorable piece of advice.

She said something along the lines of: “NO ONE gets to write your story but you,” Curry, now 30, recalls. “Not some scouts. Not some tournament. Not these other kids, who might do this better or that better. … None of those people, and none of those things, gets to be the author of your story. Just you. So think real hard about it.

“Take your time. And then you go and write what you want to write. But just know that this story — it’s yours.”

To this day, “it’s the best advice I’ve ever gotten,” Curry writes. “And anytime I’ve needed it — anytime I’ve been snubbed, or underrated, or even flat-out disrespected — I’ve just remembered those words, and I’ve persevered.”

Before establishing himself as one of the greatest basketball players in the world, Curry was overlooked by virtually every big Division I college basketball program, including Virginia Tech, where his dad Dell Curry played before his successful NBA career. He ended up at Davidson College, a small liberal arts school in North Carolina, where the team “shared a practice court with the volleyball team” and was constantly reminded that “we were not playing Big-Time College Hoops,” recalls Curry.

Even after making a splash at Davidson and leading the team on a remarkable March Madness run to the sweet sixteen, NBA draft analysts doubted him when he entered the 2009 draft.

It was during those times in particular when Curry would repeat to himself: “This is no one’s story to write but mine. It’s no one’s story but mine.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-09  Authors: kathleen elkins, -steph curry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mom, advice, basketball, write, recalls, players, team, college, played, ive, 13, old, stephen, best, writes, curry, came


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Why the 29-year-old who won over $233,000 on ‘Deal or No Deal’ is only keeping half

The pressure was rising, the chances of winning six figures were getting more remote, and Jade Thomas, a 29-year-old former U.S. marine, was starting to feel worried under the bright lights of the “Deal or No Deal” stage. “When Howie brought my mom on stage, I felt a lot of stress and anxiety float away,” Thomas tells CNBC Make It. Thomas and her mom, Cheryl Myles, have always shared a special bond, even in a family of seven children. That’s why whatever amount of money she won, Thomas says, she


The pressure was rising, the chances of winning six figures were getting more remote, and Jade Thomas, a 29-year-old former U.S. marine, was starting to feel worried under the bright lights of the “Deal or No Deal” stage. “When Howie brought my mom on stage, I felt a lot of stress and anxiety float away,” Thomas tells CNBC Make It. Thomas and her mom, Cheryl Myles, have always shared a special bond, even in a family of seven children. That’s why whatever amount of money she won, Thomas says, she
Why the 29-year-old who won over $233,000 on ‘Deal or No Deal’ is only keeping half Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-26  Authors: shawn m carter, -jade thomas, deal or no deal winner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stage, feel, close, 233000, felt, keeping, deal, thomas, half, mom, relationship, howie, 29yearold, won


Why the 29-year-old who won over $233,000 on 'Deal or No Deal' is only keeping half

The pressure was rising, the chances of winning six figures were getting more remote, and Jade Thomas, a 29-year-old former U.S. marine, was starting to feel worried under the bright lights of the “Deal or No Deal” stage. Then host and executive producer Howie Mandel invited Thomas’s mother to join her.

“When Howie brought my mom on stage, I felt a lot of stress and anxiety float away,” Thomas tells CNBC Make It. “I got very emotional because my mom and I are so close and I think he saw the relationship we have is very genuine.”

The company helped: “Having that comfort so close to me,” she says, “just made me feel reassured, like, ‘OK, you can do this. You’ve got this.'”

Thomas and her mom, Cheryl Myles, have always shared a special bond, even in a family of seven children. That’s why whatever amount of money she won, Thomas says, she knew would split: “Half for my mom, half for me.”

“I’ve always felt like we’ve had that close relationship,” Thomas says. “At the end of the day … I know if my mom ever needs anything, she can depend on me.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-26  Authors: shawn m carter, -jade thomas, deal or no deal winner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stage, feel, close, 233000, felt, keeping, deal, thomas, half, mom, relationship, howie, 29yearold, won


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Killing her kid’s lice led this mom to start a business bringing in millions

“I went over and took a look at her, and there were these little bugs crawling all over her head.” Head lice affect an estimated 6 million to 12 million U.S. children a year. Horowitz spent months in 1996 trying to rid Eve of lice, combing through her hair, searching for eggs. Soon Horowitz concocted a conditioner with baking soda, and that, combined with the right comb, solved Eve’s lice problem. “There’s such a big stigma to lice, but my friends eventually figured it out,” she remembers, laugh


“I went over and took a look at her, and there were these little bugs crawling all over her head.” Head lice affect an estimated 6 million to 12 million U.S. children a year. Horowitz spent months in 1996 trying to rid Eve of lice, combing through her hair, searching for eggs. Soon Horowitz concocted a conditioner with baking soda, and that, combined with the right comb, solved Eve’s lice problem. “There’s such a big stigma to lice, but my friends eventually figured it out,” she remembers, laugh
Killing her kid’s lice led this mom to start a business bringing in millions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: jane wells
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lice, eve, remembers, hair, led, killing, theres, started, millions, start, mom, thats, horowitz, kids, bringing, million, business, comb


Killing her kid's lice led this mom to start a business bringing in millions

Still, Horowitz never expected to be her own boss. “I was always running other people’s businesses.”

That changed in 1996 when her daughter, Eve, came home from school one day. “My sister said to me, ‘Why is Eve scratching her head?'” she recalls. “I went over and took a look at her, and there were these little bugs crawling all over her head.”

Horowitz was horrified. She called her pediatrician, who prescribed a shampoo. “It was full of poisonous pesticides,” she says. Horowitz decided not to put it on her child’s head. “I told my husband, ‘There’s gotta be another way.'”

Head lice affect an estimated 6 million to 12 million U.S. children a year. They only like human hair, Horowitz says, who adds they don’t fly or jump, they crawl, so you need to have head-to-head, hair-to-hair contact (one reason more moms than dads end up catching lice from their kids). “It wraps its legs around the hair, then takes a little bite, and that’s what’s itchy, and lays an egg,” says Horowitz. “If you miss one egg, the whole thing starts all over again.”

Horowitz spent months in 1996 trying to rid Eve of lice, combing through her hair, searching for eggs. She ended up going to the library (yes, that’s what you did 22 years ago) to research natural ways to kill lice. Eventually, Horowitz found a woman in Germany who sold a special comb. The comb arrived with a small white packet. “I said, ‘What is this?'” she remembers. It was baking soda.

Soon Horowitz concocted a conditioner with baking soda, and that, combined with the right comb, solved Eve’s lice problem. “There’s such a big stigma to lice, but my friends eventually figured it out,” she remembers, laughing. “Every time they came to my house, they saw me bent over my daughter, and then they ran out and slammed the door.”

However, with a solution in hand, she started offering to help others, and suddenly some of them started to pay her. “I kept saying, ‘Why isn’t there a business to take care of this? There’s a business for everything else.’ Finally, by the end of the summer, I realized, ‘Oh, girl, you’re it.'”

That’s how Horowitz became a professional nitpicker.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: jane wells
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lice, eve, remembers, hair, led, killing, theres, started, millions, start, mom, thats, horowitz, kids, bringing, million, business, comb


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Red Sox star Mookie Betts was too small to make a Little League team—so his mom started her own

But two decades ago, the Tennessee-born Betts had trouble finding any Little League baseball team that would take him. When he was 5, according to The Tennessean, Collins had trouble securing him a spot on one of the local Little League teams. I’ve got enough small kids and I’m trying to balance my team out,'” Collins says the coach told her. “I’m like, ‘Oh no, you’re going to play,'” Collins says she told Betts before realizing that he wasn’t the only child without a team. “It’s kind of a littl


But two decades ago, the Tennessee-born Betts had trouble finding any Little League baseball team that would take him. When he was 5, according to The Tennessean, Collins had trouble securing him a spot on one of the local Little League teams. I’ve got enough small kids and I’m trying to balance my team out,'” Collins says the coach told her. “I’m like, ‘Oh no, you’re going to play,'” Collins says she told Betts before realizing that he wasn’t the only child without a team. “It’s kind of a littl
Red Sox star Mookie Betts was too small to make a Little League team—so his mom started her own Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: tom huddleston jr, rodin eckenroth, filmmagic via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mom, baseball, told, league, little, small, team, betts, wanted, teamso, sox, star, mookie, collins, started, kids, red


Red Sox star Mookie Betts was too small to make a Little League team—so his mom started her own

When Mookie Betts takes the field for the Boston Red Sox on Tuesday night in the first game of the 2018 World Series, the 26-year-old outfielder will do so as one of the world’s best baseball players.

The Red Sox phenom is a three-time All-Star who many experts believe will be voted this season’s American League MVP after he put together a historic season that helped lead his team to its current World Series matchup against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

At this point, any MLB team would love to have Betts on the roster. But two decades ago, the Tennessee-born Betts had trouble finding any Little League baseball team that would take him. In fact, if it wasn’t for some quick thinking and motherly devotion from Betts’ mom, Diana Collins, his baseball career might have ended before it ever began.

“Mookie was very small-framed, a very underweight small kid,” Collins tells CNBC Make It about her son, who is still considered relatively small for a professional athlete, standing at just 5 feet 9 inches.

When he was 5, according to The Tennessean, Collins had trouble securing him a spot on one of the local Little League teams. Collins took Betts to a Little League sign-up event where they lived in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, only to have the first coach she talked to tell her that her son was too small for his team.

“He said, ‘No, I don’t really think [so]. I really need some bigger kids. I’ve got enough small kids and I’m trying to balance my team out,'” Collins says the coach told her.

She tried introducing Betts to the league’s other coaches, but they were also holding open roster spots only for larger kids who might prove more athletic on the baseball field.

“I said, ‘Give him a chance, because he really can play,'” Collins says she argued, but to no avail.

Collins had been playing catch with Betts in their backyard for a few years already. She knew he could catch a baseball as well as other kids his age, but she wanted him to learn more about the game through actual competition.

“Mookie was getting kind of discouraged,” Collins tells CNBC Make It. “You know how kids are when they see somebody say ‘No.'”

She told him not to worry, and that they’d find him a team. “He said, ‘Nobody wants to have me.'”

“I’m like, ‘Oh no, you’re going to play,'” Collins says she told Betts before realizing that he wasn’t the only child without a team. “I looked over and all of these other kids had the same [discouraged] look … other parents were kind of panicking that nobody wanted to play [their kids].”

Thinking quickly, Collins approached one of the Little League officials and asked if they could add more teams to the league, because there seemed to be enough kids without a team to field their own. She was told that was fine, but she’d need to line up a coach. Collins volunteered herself and that’s how she became the first baseball coach of a future MLB All-Star.

“It’s kind of a little sad story, but we just gathered up everybody that nobody wanted and we just formed our own team,” Collins says. “It didn’t matter, I wanted my kid to play ball.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: tom huddleston jr, rodin eckenroth, filmmagic via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mom, baseball, told, league, little, small, team, betts, wanted, teamso, sox, star, mookie, collins, started, kids, red


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