Glossier founder keeps a gratitude journal, dabbled in the keto diet and froze her eggs to be a mom when she’s ready

For Glossier CEO Emily Wiess, it includes gratitude journaling, walking to work, toying with a buzzy diet and freezing her eggs, according to a new interview with Vanity Fair. As far as diet trends go, Weiss said she briefly tried the ketogenic diet, a low-carb high-fat diet, “but it made me feel kind of dead inside,” she told Vanity Fair. Weiss told Vanity Fair the process of injecting herself with hormones, which is standard in order to stimulate the ovaries before an egg-retrieval procedure,


For Glossier CEO Emily Wiess, it includes gratitude journaling, walking to work, toying with a buzzy diet and freezing her eggs, according to a new interview with Vanity Fair. As far as diet trends go, Weiss said she briefly tried the ketogenic diet, a low-carb high-fat diet, “but it made me feel kind of dead inside,” she told Vanity Fair. Weiss told Vanity Fair the process of injecting herself with hormones, which is standard in order to stimulate the ovaries before an egg-retrieval procedure,
Glossier founder keeps a gratitude journal, dabbled in the keto diet and froze her eggs to be a mom when she’s ready Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eggs, told, weiss, ready, mom, keto, gratitude, journal, founder, keeps, according, diet, vanity, shes, glossier, froze, company, beauty


Glossier founder keeps a gratitude journal, dabbled in the keto diet and froze her eggs to be a mom when she's ready

What does the founder of a unicorn beauty start-up do for her wellness routine? For Glossier CEO Emily Wiess, it includes gratitude journaling, walking to work, toying with a buzzy diet and freezing her eggs, according to a new interview with Vanity Fair.

Weiss told the magazine she has a gratitude practice that involves writing in a journal for five minutes each day, and that actually has mental health benefits: Studies have shown that gratitude can counteract depression, boost sleep, lower stress levels and improve relationships.

Weiss also lives so close to Glossier’s New York City office that she can see it from her living room window, so she sleeps in since she’s not a morning person and walks to work.

In the past, Weiss has talked about taking long walks, barre class at Physique57 and Katonah yoga class, a gentle form of yoga that emphasizes holding postures rather than flowing through them, at the studio Sky Ting for exercise.

As far as diet trends go, Weiss said she briefly tried the ketogenic diet, a low-carb high-fat diet, “but it made me feel kind of dead inside,” she told Vanity Fair.

When it comes to work-balance, Weiss admits she is privileged. The 34-year-old froze her eggs in May.

“I plan on being a great mom, but I’m not ready now, and I certainly wasn’t ready in my twenties,” she said in a May 15 Instagram post. She calls the choice a “luxury not only from a price perspective, but from a family planning—timing—perspective.”

While it is expensive — egg-freezing procedures cost $30,000 to $40,000 on average, according to FertilityIQ — harvesting and storing eggs for later fertilization and implantation does not guarantee an eventual pregnancy. The chances of getting pregnant this way are about 30% to 60%, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Weiss told Vanity Fair the process of injecting herself with hormones, which is standard in order to stimulate the ovaries before an egg-retrieval procedure, was challenging.

“I was super bloated and looked four months pregnant. I gained 10 pounds during a three-week period,” she said.

Weiss launched Glossier five years ago in October 2014, after running a successful beauty blog called “Into The Gloss.” In March 2019, the beauty company raised $100 million in Series D funding (led by Sequoia Capital) at a valuation $1.2 billion, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Today, Glossier has two brick-and-mortar stores in New York and Los Angeles, and hosts pop-up stores in other cities around the States and in the United Kingdom.

When asked about whether Glossier is a tech company or a beauty company, Weiss often says both, she told Vanity Fair. As a founder, it’s important for her to maintain that duality, she added.

“Women are so hungry to have more role models who have achieved what they want in their careers,” she told Vanity Fair.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eggs, told, weiss, ready, mom, keto, gratitude, journal, founder, keeps, according, diet, vanity, shes, glossier, froze, company, beauty


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This single mom paid off $77,281 of debt in eight months—here are 5 steps she followed

Love, who is a single mom to a 6-year-old son, started her blog, The Budget Mom, in 2016 to document her debt journey. Paycheck method: Create a plan for how you spend your income each month, based on when you get paid. This exercise creates a sense of urgency, rather than fear, which is what “typically hinders our ability to really have a passion to tackle [debt],” Love says. Track your expensesIn order to create a budget that works, you should first track your expenses, Love says. Another appr


Love, who is a single mom to a 6-year-old son, started her blog, The Budget Mom, in 2016 to document her debt journey. Paycheck method: Create a plan for how you spend your income each month, based on when you get paid. This exercise creates a sense of urgency, rather than fear, which is what “typically hinders our ability to really have a passion to tackle [debt],” Love says. Track your expensesIn order to create a budget that works, you should first track your expenses, Love says. Another appr
This single mom paid off $77,281 of debt in eight months—here are 5 steps she followed Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expenses, single, pay, steps, followed, create, monthshere, debt, love, spending, method, plan, mom, paid, 77281, budget, personal


This single mom paid off $77,281 of debt in eight months—here are 5 steps she followed

When Kumiko Love, 33, got divorced in 2015, she was left with thousands in debt between student loans, credit card spending and car payments. But once she decided to get serious about her finances and create a plan that worked for her, she was able to pay off $77,281 in just eight months and declare herself debt-free in January 2019. Love, who is a single mom to a 6-year-old son, started her blog, The Budget Mom, in 2016 to document her debt journey. Since then, she’s built a community of around 400,000 unique monthly blog visitors and 238,000 Instagram followers by walking her readers through user-friendly strategies for tackling debt, setting a budget, tracking expenses and more. “My mission is to inspire women and people to live a life they love on a budget they can understand and afford,” Love tells CNBC Make It.

But prior to starting The Budget Mom, Love didn’t know much about personal finance, despite eight years worth of experience as a financial counselor. Back in 2011, when Love landed her first finance job, she remembers her boss sitting her down on her first day and making her create a personal budget. “It’s funny. Here I was, a graduate with a finance degree, but I knew nothing about personal finance,” Love says. “No one in my life had ever asked me to do something like that.” Love now helps her readers create personal budgets. Her signature method, which helped her pay off her own debt, rolls three budgeting techniques into one: the calendar method, the cash envelope system and the paycheck method. Here’s how she uses each: Calendar method : List out all of your expenses on a calendar, plus the date you get paid, and use it to set a plan for how to use your income that month.

List out all of your expenses on a calendar, plus the date you get paid, and use it to set a plan for how to use your income that month. Cash envelope system : Divide your cash among several envelopes that are each labeled for different spending categories, such as groceries, gas and dining out. Because you only have a set amount allocated for each category, you can avoid overspending in certain areas.

Divide your cash among several envelopes that are each labeled for different spending categories, such as groceries, gas and dining out. Because you only have a set amount allocated for each category, you can avoid overspending in certain areas. Paycheck method: Create a plan for how you spend your income each month, based on when you get paid. “Instead of boxing yourself in using a monthly format, [this method] allows you to pay bills, plan for upcoming holidays and events and appointments based on your paycheck date,” Love says. But Love learned that paying off debt is about more than creating a budget. For her, it took years’ worth of discipline: “I was able to pay off a majority of that debt in eight months because I had built up a successful company over three years, and worked two full-time jobs while also raising my son by myself.” “It’s not something that you just snap your fingers and happens,” Love adds. Read on for the five steps that helped her actually stick to her plan.

1. Get over being scared

“With debt, it’s a matter of getting over being scared,” Love says. “And not only that, it’s about looking at the big picture.” That means being honest enough to get all of your numbers out in front you, including every little thing you owe. “The main reason I did not get serious about tackling my debt is because I didn’t want to know,” Love says. “I knew it was bad, but I didn’t want to know how bad. I was scared to death of the actual number.” Love recognizes that this step is usually easier said than done. “This is the No. 1 thing that I have noticed as to why budgets have failed, ” she says. “At the very beginning, people will sit down and create a budget based on what they want to spend, not [based on] what’s realistically happening and what they are realistically spending.” Instead, Love says it’s important to write down your “true, true balance.” That means recording every single bit of debt or money you owe, including interest and due dates. This exercise creates a sense of urgency, rather than fear, which is what “typically hinders our ability to really have a passion to tackle [debt],” Love says.

2. Find your motivation

The next step to reaching your financial goals is to get motivated. For Love, it’s all about mindset. “You have to get to a place where you finally say ‘No more. I’m done just making minimum payments,'” she says. “You have to feel that anger. You have to get mad at your debt. You have to have those feelings and that passion to truly be motivated to pay it off.” But Love doesn’t want people to focus on the specific amount they owe. Instead, think about why you want to pay off your debt. “I only share my numbers with readers because I want them to know what’s possible,” Love says. “It’s more important that they understand that there was a method and a process behind paying off my debt.”

For added motivation, Love recommends organizing your finances in a way you find inspiring. Because she is “100% a visual learner,” that means writing everything down. “My method and steps are all truly based around awareness and using visual things, like the things you see on my Instagram, ” Love says.

3. Track your expenses

In order to create a budget that works, you should first track your expenses, Love says. “I always tell my readers to not even think about creating a budget until you have tracked your spending and have that full awareness,” she explains. That’s because, “if you’re tracking your spending, realistically tracking every dollar, and you’re creating that plan for your money every single time you get paid, you are then aware of where you can cut expenses and throw more money toward your debt or financial goals,” Love says. Love’s expense tracking method takes one month. The first step is to document everything you spend for a full 30 days. Once you’ve done that, it’s time to reflect on your spending habits. Love finds it helpful to highlight her expenses by category using colored pens. For example, dining might be highlighted in orange and travel in blue. Each month, she totals up the amount for each color to see how her budget is breaking down overall. She is able to quickly see where her money is going, which helps her set realistic category limits. “It’s easier for me to digest data using pictures, graphs and colors,” Love writes on her blog. “Having a bunch of data on a page wasn’t helpful, even though all of the information I needed was there, so I decided to create a system using colors.”

4. Pay your bills in a logical order

As you create a budget that makes sense for you, think about how to pay your bills in a logical order. Rather than acting out of stress and handling your bills at random, Love says it’s better to step back and create a purposeful payment plan. “Often, when we want to get out of debt, we start throwing all of our extra income to all of these different debt buckets, whether it’s a car payment, student loan, mortgage, credit cards, personal loans,” she says. Instead, Loves says to start by drafting up a step-by-step plan for all of your bills. Then, begin making decisions about where your money should go and when.

Often, when we want to get out of debt, we start throwing all of our extra income to all of these different debt buckets, whether it be a car payment, student loan, mortgage credit cards, personal loans. Kumiko Love founder of The Budget Mom

To determine which debt is most important, ask yourself whether you want to pay off the debt with the highest interest rate first, or start with the smallest account balance. When Love tackled her own debt, she decided to first pay off all of her bills with the smallest balances first. This approach to debt recovery is commonly referred to as the snowball method, and is backed by researchers at the Harvard Business Review because of how motivating it can be for people to tick off debts as they go. Another approach to debt repayment is the avalanche method, which involves paying down you debt with the highest interest rate first. While it may not be as motivating as the snowball effect, it arguably makes better financial sense because it cuts down on the total amount of interest you’ll end up paying.

5. Determine why you are spending

Once you’ve created a plan for tackling your existing debt, it’s important to address the root of the problem. Love’s debt started back in college. “I was one of those students that accepted more financial aid than I needed, and with that, came student loan debt,” she writes on her blog. Her situation got even worse following her divorce. Love struggled with low self-esteem and found herself overspending on superficial things. “I compared myself to others and I didn’t truly love who I was,” she says. “It was causing me to make really bad spending decisions and things never truly fixed the inside, and it caused a lot of the credit card debt.” In paying off her debt, Love learned that if you ever find yourself emotionally spending, it’s helpful to pause and think about your budget, needs and why you are really spending. “You have to ask yourselves the hard questions,” Love says. “I was spending because I didn’t genuinely like myself, but that took me years to figure out.” Love tells readers to take a deep breath before making any purchase that may seem frivolous: “Ask yourself, ‘Why am I standing at this checkout right now knowing full well that I can’t pay it off?’ There is an underlying reason, a deep down emotional reason why you are spending that way.” Don’t miss: The budget breakdown of a couple who lives ‘comfortably’ on $200,000 a year in San Francisco Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expenses, single, pay, steps, followed, create, monthshere, debt, love, spending, method, plan, mom, paid, 77281, budget, personal


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How this mom went from ‘super broke’ to Kim Kardashian’s trainer

4 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Melissa Alcantara lost over 40 pounds when she used the Insanity workout videos to lose the baby weight. Her transformation caught the eye of Kim Kardashian, who ultimately signed her on as her personal trainer.


4 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Melissa Alcantara lost over 40 pounds when she used the Insanity workout videos to lose the baby weight. Her transformation caught the eye of Kim Kardashian, who ultimately signed her on as her personal trainer.
How this mom went from ‘super broke’ to Kim Kardashian’s trainer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kim, broke, enabled, kardashians, workout, went, super, weight, flash, trainer, used, mom, ultimately, videos, try, view, browser


How this mom went from 'super broke' to Kim Kardashian's trainer

4 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Melissa Alcantara lost over 40 pounds when she used the Insanity workout videos to lose the baby weight. Her transformation caught the eye of Kim Kardashian, who ultimately signed her on as her personal trainer.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kim, broke, enabled, kardashians, workout, went, super, weight, flash, trainer, used, mom, ultimately, videos, try, view, browser


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Mom who sued transgender daughter over medical treatment takes case to the Supreme Court

Gay rights activist Vin Testa of DC waves a flag outside the U.S. Supreme Court building on June 25, 2013 in Washington, DC. A mother in Minnesota who sued her transgender daughter for emancipating herself and then obtaining gender transition care is bringing her case to the Supreme Court, though her daughter is no longer a party to the case. Anmarie Calgaro, represented by the conservative Thomas More Society, filed a petition on Wednesday alleging that her “parental Due Process Clause rights”


Gay rights activist Vin Testa of DC waves a flag outside the U.S. Supreme Court building on June 25, 2013 in Washington, DC. A mother in Minnesota who sued her transgender daughter for emancipating herself and then obtaining gender transition care is bringing her case to the Supreme Court, though her daughter is no longer a party to the case. Anmarie Calgaro, represented by the conservative Thomas More Society, filed a petition on Wednesday alleging that her “parental Due Process Clause rights”
Mom who sued transgender daughter over medical treatment takes case to the Supreme Court Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-24  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, court, transgender, county, sued, takes, supreme, daughter, ejk, transition, calgaro, gender, case, providers, school, treatment, mom, medical


Mom who sued transgender daughter over medical treatment takes case to the Supreme Court

Gay rights activist Vin Testa of DC waves a flag outside the U.S. Supreme Court building on June 25, 2013 in Washington, DC.

A mother in Minnesota who sued her transgender daughter for emancipating herself and then obtaining gender transition care is bringing her case to the Supreme Court, though her daughter is no longer a party to the case.

Anmarie Calgaro, represented by the conservative Thomas More Society, filed a petition on Wednesday alleging that her “parental Due Process Clause rights” were violated by St. Louis County, medical providers and the St. Louis County School District.

Her daughter, identified in court papers as E.J.K., moved out in 2015 and at 15 years old obtained a letter from a legal clinic that concluded E.J.K. was “legally emancipated.”

Using that letter, E.J.K. was able to obtain gender transition care, described in the petition “as life-altering elective medical services for gender transformation, including potential surgery,” and prescription medication from two medical providers. When Calgaro attempted to intervene, the medical providers rebuffed her. So too did E.J.K.’s high school, when Calgaro sought to obtain her daughter’s educational records.

A district court ruled against Calgaro and a three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the ruling in March. Circuit Judge Steven Colloton, writing for the panel, noted that E.J.K. had turned 18 and finished high school, and thus Calgaro’s claims were moot.

“Unbelievably, Minnesota statutes authorize a county to deem a minor ’emancipated’ to receive welfare payments to live on their own and allow medical providers to void parental input if it determines the minor is living apart from the parents and is managing his or her own personal financial affairs,” Erick Kaardal, an attorney for the Thomas More Society, said in a statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-24  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, court, transgender, county, sued, takes, supreme, daughter, ejk, transition, calgaro, gender, case, providers, school, treatment, mom, medical


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How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H


After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H
How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. “I have a teaching degree but (teaching) won’t pay the bills for a family of five – it’s just not an option,” she told CNBC. “I thought about nursing, but the biggest drawback was that it required going back to school for two years to get another degree – I didn’t have two years, I have kids and bills to pay.” Despite being a self-confessed technophobe, Lance decided to learn computer coding after a suggestion from her brother-in-law, taking the plunge into an entirely new career path. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. In an interview with CNBC, she shared her tips on achieving success in a new career.

Value your ‘soft skills’

Although a career change can set you back in terms of direct industry experience, Lance urged others not to underestimate the value of basic core capabilities that appeal to employers — like strong communication or leadership skills. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. “(That was) combined with having just coming out of a great program which gave me all the right tech skills.”

Be willing to learn

As well as considering how your skillset could be transferred to a new industry, Lance told CNBC that having the right attitude was a real asset when it came to landing a job with no direct experience. She said she was upfront about what she could and couldn’t do, taking the approach: “I don’t know a lot about it, but I do know a little bit – and I’m willing to learn more.” According to Lance, embracing those knowledge gaps and showcasing a desire for self-improvement could be just as valuable as experience to some employers. “For the job I got, the company was starting a new team that would be using new technology, so we’d all be learning whether they hired somebody with experience or not,” she said. “They wanted people who were capable of learning quickly and who could work and learn under pressure. Going through Coding Dojo proved I had those capabilities and that desire to keep learning.”

Work your own way

Although Lance didn’t feel intellectually limited while learning to code, she said comparing her own pace of work to others’ sometimes led to unnecessary frustration and could impact her confidence. “One challenge was the amount of time it took to get through everything. I don’t think I had trouble with the actual program, but I didn’t have any tech background, so every assignment would take me one and a half times as long as everyone else,” she told CNBC. “Some of the people in my group had played on computers since they were 12 — so the assignments only took 20 to 30 minutes for them to complete.” She said it was important to find your own way to get work done, rather than sticking to the chronological or seemingly “correct” method. Her coding program was organized into three sections, and when she initially attempted to do each assignment in order, Lance found herself falling behind. “I’d have to skip forward and go back again – that’s not a good strategy,” she said. Instead, she got through all of the reading and learning materials for each topic before attempting to complete an assignment. “Make sure you do the reading and homework way before you start struggling with (graded assignments and technical work),” she said. “And make sure you allow yourself enough time outside of class to get stuff done.” Lance also advised those considering a career change not to overestimate their own academic ability. “I was pretty good in school and didn’t have to study a lot,” she said. “I went into Coding Dojo thinking I could get it done quicker, underestimating how much time it would consume. (You have to let it) take as long as it takes.”

Seek support to switch career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


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Why this 32-year-old mom who won $400,000 on ‘Deal or No Deal’ said she’ll give a ‘hefty portion’ away

I want to take hefty portion of the money” and create a nonprofit that provides low-cost housing for homeless veterans and the elderly. ‘I convinced myself I had the winning briefcase’Miller knew that however much money she won, she’d dedicate it to those in need. But after eliminating several high amounts, there were only three options left: a case worth $400,000, a case worth $200 and an offer from the banker worth $167,000. It was worth $400,000, plus, a new 2018 Chrysler Pacifica. “Growing u


I want to take hefty portion of the money” and create a nonprofit that provides low-cost housing for homeless veterans and the elderly. ‘I convinced myself I had the winning briefcase’Miller knew that however much money she won, she’d dedicate it to those in need. But after eliminating several high amounts, there were only three options left: a case worth $400,000, a case worth $200 and an offer from the banker worth $167,000. It was worth $400,000, plus, a new 2018 Chrysler Pacifica. “Growing u
Why this 32-year-old mom who won $400,000 on ‘Deal or No Deal’ said she’ll give a ‘hefty portion’ away Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 32yearold, hefty, youre, away, mom, responsible, shell, won, 400000, winning, deal, portion, worth, going, money, case, shed


Why this 32-year-old mom who won $400,000 on 'Deal or No Deal' said she'll give a 'hefty portion' away

Now, equipped with $400,000 she won on “Deal or No Deal,” Miller wants to change the lives of those less fortunate than her: “There are people out here who could use my help. I want to take hefty portion of the money” and create a nonprofit that provides low-cost housing for homeless veterans and the elderly. “Too many people go homeless and there’s something I can do about it. ”

‘I convinced myself I had the winning briefcase’

Miller knew that however much money she won, she’d dedicate it to those in need. And she had a feeling she’d win big: “I didn’t really have a strategy because I convinced myself I had the winning briefcase. I almost went across the board, ” choosing cases, like, “one, two, three.” But after eliminating several high amounts, there were only three options left: a case worth $400,000, a case worth $200 and an offer from the banker worth $167,000. Miller rejected the offer and opted for another case. It was worth $400,000, plus, a new 2018 Chrysler Pacifica.

‘I’m definitely going to be responsible’

Miller isn’t bummed about not winning $1 million, either: “No regrets. I’m extremely grateful.” And if there is one thing she could’ve done differently, she said jokingly, “I would’ve have fist-bumped Howie [Mandel]. I was just too nervous … but I hope I get a second chance to do that one day. ”

All in all, though, “I had an amazing experience. The energy was awesome and everybody was supportive. And as for the money, she said, “I’m definitely going to be responsible with it. ” “Growing up in poverty can make you live according to how you think you’re going to survive or how you’re going to get by. But because I had a childhood where I had to grow up fast and be responsible fast, it’s going to help me appreciate this experience like 10 times more.”

‘I just feel like it’s my calling’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: shawn m carter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 32yearold, hefty, youre, away, mom, responsible, shell, won, 400000, winning, deal, portion, worth, going, money, case, shed


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Esther Wojcicki, the mom of 2 Silicon Valley CEOs and a doctor, shares key advice for raising successful kids

Esther Wojcicki knows what it takes to raise successful children. Two of her daughters are powerful players in Silicon Valley: Susan Wojcicki is CEO of Google’s YouTube and Anne Wojcicki is co-founder and CEO of DNA testing company 23andMe. Her daughter, Janet Wojcicki, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco. For one, you need to let your kids fail, she told CNBC. If you take a course and you don’t do so well, it’s OK,” said Wojcicki, author of the new book


Esther Wojcicki knows what it takes to raise successful children. Two of her daughters are powerful players in Silicon Valley: Susan Wojcicki is CEO of Google’s YouTube and Anne Wojcicki is co-founder and CEO of DNA testing company 23andMe. Her daughter, Janet Wojcicki, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco. For one, you need to let your kids fail, she told CNBC. If you take a course and you don’t do so well, it’s OK,” said Wojcicki, author of the new book
Esther Wojcicki, the mom of 2 Silicon Valley CEOs and a doctor, shares key advice for raising successful kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, kids, shares, course, successful, help, need, mom, ok, silicon, ceo, wojcicki, key, valley, esther, fail, raising


Esther Wojcicki, the mom of 2 Silicon Valley CEOs and a doctor, shares key advice for raising successful kids

Esther Wojcicki knows what it takes to raise successful children.

Two of her daughters are powerful players in Silicon Valley: Susan Wojcicki is CEO of Google’s YouTube and Anne Wojcicki is co-founder and CEO of DNA testing company 23andMe. Her daughter, Janet Wojcicki, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco.

So what’s her secret?

For one, you need to let your kids fail, she told CNBC.

“When you’re playing a sport, of course, you fail sometimes. You aren’t as good as you wish you would be. If you take a course and you don’t do so well, it’s OK,” said Wojcicki, author of the new book, “How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results.”

“Maybe you want to do it again or take the exercise again, or do whatever it is, but it’s OK not to like everything,” she added.

However, that doesn’t necessarily mean you shouldn’t help your children if they are struggling. The trick is to do it wisely, Wojcicki said in a recent interview with “Power Lunch.” “They need to come to you and ask for help,” she explained, saying that it’s something she uses in her classroom at Palo Alto High School in California, where she she teaches journalism.

“My general response to all kids in class when they ask for help is like, ‘Well, did you try to do it yourself?”” she said, urging them to perhaps to seek help online or to talk to a friend. “‘Let’s see whether you can’t figure it out without my intervention.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, kids, shares, course, successful, help, need, mom, ok, silicon, ceo, wojcicki, key, valley, esther, fail, raising


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Living with your parents to save money might dim your chances of becoming a homeowner

Nearly 22% of them, or more than 14 million young adults, still live with one or both parents, according to real estate website Zillow. “When the housing market went bust and the economy unraveled into a recession, young adults increasingly returned to their childhood home.” Rents are very high right now, as well, so moving to a rental doesn’t help young people save to buy. Young adults who lived with their parents between the ages of 25 and 34 were actually less likely to become homeowners afte


Nearly 22% of them, or more than 14 million young adults, still live with one or both parents, according to real estate website Zillow. “When the housing market went bust and the economy unraveled into a recession, young adults increasingly returned to their childhood home.” Rents are very high right now, as well, so moving to a rental doesn’t help young people save to buy. Young adults who lived with their parents between the ages of 25 and 34 were actually less likely to become homeowners afte
Living with your parents to save money might dim your chances of becoming a homeowner Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: diana olick erica posse, diana olick, erica posse
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennials, money, chances, zillow, homeowner, living, thats, young, adults, save, mom, dim, payment, parents


Living with your parents to save money might dim your chances of becoming a homeowner

Millennials have been in no rush to move out on mom and dad. Nearly 22% of them, or more than 14 million young adults, still live with one or both parents, according to real estate website Zillow. That is the highest share for this age group since at least 2000. Millennials, especially older ones , have had a harder time moving out because they came of working age during the last recession and had difficulty finding well-paying jobs. They also have high levels of student loan debt . “While it might be tempting to stereotype these young adults as lazy millennials bumming off of Mom, the data paints a different picture, ” said Zillow senior economist Sarah Mikhitarian. “When the housing market went bust and the economy unraveled into a recession, young adults increasingly returned to their childhood home.” This doesn’t mean they don’t want to be homeowners. Various surveys show millennials do aspire to homeownership , just as previous generations did, but they have trouble saving for a down payment. Rents are very high right now, as well, so moving to a rental doesn’t help young people save to buy.

The pros and cons of living with parents

Housing expenses such as rent and insurance add nearly three years to the time it takes a typical renter to save up for a 20% down payment on a median-priced home. That’s according to home and apartment rental site Hotpads, which is owned by Zillow. That’s because the typical renter spends about 34% of his or her income on housing. It takes the typical renter about eight years to save for a down payment, if they are able to sock away about 16% of their income each year. And of course, in some locations that’s easier to do than in others.

If you live with mom and dad, and they don’t charge you rent, you can save for that same down payment in about five years. That’s the plus side.

More from Invest in You:

Gen Z or millennial and want to be rich? Here’s how

Do this once a year to ratchet up your financial security

What every women needs to know about investing

But it’s not all home-cooked meals and getting mom to do your laundry. Living in your parents’ home has consequences. Young adults who lived with their parents between the ages of 25 and 34 were actually less likely to become homeowners after 10 years than those who didn’t.

Even if they did buy a home, they didn’t carry any less mortgage debt than those who moved out earlier, all this according to a study by the Urban Institute, which concluded that living with your parents does not actually put you in a better financial position for homeownership.

Homeownership is a critical source of future wealth. Because homes generally gain value, living with your parents — and thereby reducing your odds of earlier homeownership — could actually hurt you in the end.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: diana olick erica posse, diana olick, erica posse
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennials, money, chances, zillow, homeowner, living, thats, young, adults, save, mom, dim, payment, parents


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Lesson ‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary learned from mom, gave to kids

“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college


“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college
Lesson ‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary learned from mom, gave to kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, tell, learned, tank, kids, thing, thats, lesson, kevin, mom, work, company, software, oleary, theyre, fly, gave, shark


Lesson 'Shark Tank' star Kevin O'Leary learned from mom, gave to kids

“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘What’s that mean, mom?’ She said, ‘It means no more checks.’

“I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ She said, ‘No, no, no, no. I’ve done my work. Now you do yours.’

“And that was very important to me.”

Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. He ultimately built that company into a huge business, later called The Learning Company, which he and his co-founders sold to the Mattel Toy Company for $4.2 billion in 1999.

The value of making it on your own is now something O’Leary now preaches too.

O’Leary recalls that after he became successful, he asked his mom if he could pay her back for the financial support she had given him throughout high school and college.

“She said, ‘No, I owed you that. And you should think about that for your children. Pass it on and pass it forward. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says.

“And that’s exactly what I told my kids.”

Indeed, O’Leary famously made his kids fly coach while he flew business class when they were growing up, and he cut them off financially after college.

“And [my kids] said the same thing to me: ‘That sucks,'” O’Leary says. “But now they’re off on their own, and they’re figuring it out. And I’m so proud of what my mother taught me.”

Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college admissions scandal: ‘I’ll tell you who you really screwed: Your kid’

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Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, tell, learned, tank, kids, thing, thats, lesson, kevin, mom, work, company, software, oleary, theyre, fly, gave, shark


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Child abuse charges against YouTube channel’s mom underscore lack of oversight for kids

It was a recipe that worked for “Fantastic Adventures,” a hit YouTube family comedy series created by an Arizona family and shut down this week amid allegations of child abuse off-screen. Before YouTube terminated it, the family’s channel had attracted nearly 800,000 subscribers and amassed more than 2 million views — potentially netting upwards of $20,000 per sponsored video. “It’s the wild, Wild West,” said Anne Henry, co-founder of BizParentz Foundation, a nonprofit serving families with chil


It was a recipe that worked for “Fantastic Adventures,” a hit YouTube family comedy series created by an Arizona family and shut down this week amid allegations of child abuse off-screen. Before YouTube terminated it, the family’s channel had attracted nearly 800,000 subscribers and amassed more than 2 million views — potentially netting upwards of $20,000 per sponsored video. “It’s the wild, Wild West,” said Anne Henry, co-founder of BizParentz Foundation, a nonprofit serving families with chil
Child abuse charges against YouTube channel’s mom underscore lack of oversight for kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: elizabeth chuck, artur debat, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youtube, children, child, family, underscore, lack, abuse, young, mom, channels, wild, charges, say, terminated, videos, kids, week, oversight


Child abuse charges against YouTube channel's mom underscore lack of oversight for kids

The lighthearted videos appeared to be scripted, edited and neatly produced, and featured their young stars engaging in wholesome mischief as playful music hummed in the background.

It was a recipe that worked for “Fantastic Adventures,” a hit YouTube family comedy series created by an Arizona family and shut down this week amid allegations of child abuse off-screen. Before YouTube terminated it, the family’s channel had attracted nearly 800,000 subscribers and amassed more than 2 million views — potentially netting upwards of $20,000 per sponsored video.

But while some production aspects of the series echoed traditional show business, the criminal charges reveal a worst-case scenario of how a lack of oversight in mom-and-pop-produced videos can play out, child safety advocates say. Mother Machelle Hackney is accused of neglecting and physically abusing the seven adopted children who starred in the videos.

When it comes to seemingly harmless videos of young people on its platform, YouTube has no purview over what is happening behind the scenes to those children.

“It’s the wild, Wild West,” said Anne Henry, co-founder of BizParentz Foundation, a nonprofit serving families with children in the professional entertainment industry that has advocated for more oversight of minors who star in YouTube videos.

“I hate to say it, but if this family ends up being made an example of that would be great because I think it will save other children from exploitation,” Henry added.

Family channels on YouTube come in a variety of formats, such as toy reviews, baking how-to shows or the adventures of family vloggers. Some feature children and are designed for a younger audience, while others are meant to educate or inspire discussion. YouTube does not say how many exist; dozens of the biggest family-focused channels attract millions of followers.

The video site has made clear that it wants to protect children, and will take down any account that appears to show child abuse, as it did in May 2017 when it removed a family channel called DaddyOFive that involved a couple allegedly abusing and humiliating their children.

In a statement this week, YouTube said it works with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children to arrest and convict anyone whose account depicts harm to children, adding that last year, it terminated and reported 46,000 offender accounts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: elizabeth chuck, artur debat, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youtube, children, child, family, underscore, lack, abuse, young, mom, channels, wild, charges, say, terminated, videos, kids, week, oversight


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