It’s Putin’s ‘moment’ all over the Middle East, says Hermitage Fund’s Bill Browder

Asked on CNBC’s “Street Signs Europe” if the Middle East was witnessing “Putin’s moment,” Browder, who is a fierce critic of the Russian leader, replied “Everywhere is his moment.” “He stepped into Libya, into Syria, he’s stepping into Iran and Iraq — he wants to be able to be a kingmaker, even if his country is not all that powerful.” More recently, Russian troops swooped into northern Syria where U.S. forces had been working alongside Kurdish militias fighting ISIS. “What Putin is trying to do


Asked on CNBC’s “Street Signs Europe” if the Middle East was witnessing “Putin’s moment,” Browder, who is a fierce critic of the Russian leader, replied “Everywhere is his moment.”
“He stepped into Libya, into Syria, he’s stepping into Iran and Iraq — he wants to be able to be a kingmaker, even if his country is not all that powerful.”
More recently, Russian troops swooped into northern Syria where U.S. forces had been working alongside Kurdish militias fighting ISIS.
“What Putin is trying to do
It’s Putin’s ‘moment’ all over the Middle East, says Hermitage Fund’s Bill Browder Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, troops, putins, russian, hes, putin, president, bill, syria, funds, trying, middle, hermitage, east, moment, browder


It's Putin's 'moment' all over the Middle East, says Hermitage Fund's Bill Browder

As the U.S. gradually — or in some cases, abruptly — withdraws from foreign interventionism in the Middle East, Russian President Vladimir Putin is taking advantage of the ensuing vacuum to increase his country’s geopolitical footprint, Hermitage Fund CEO Bill Browder said at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on Tuesday, echoing the observations of many regional analysts.

Asked on CNBC’s “Street Signs Europe” if the Middle East was witnessing “Putin’s moment,” Browder, who is a fierce critic of the Russian leader, replied “Everywhere is his moment.”

“He stepped into Libya, into Syria, he’s stepping into Iran and Iraq — he wants to be able to be a kingmaker, even if his country is not all that powerful.”

The conversation followed developments in recent months and years during which Russia expanded its presence in several Middle Eastern countries; most obviously Syria, where Moscow’s military intervention to support Syrian dictator Bashar Assad turned the nine-year-long civil war decisively in Assad’s favor.

More recently, Russian troops swooped into northern Syria where U.S. forces had been working alongside Kurdish militias fighting ISIS. President Donald Trump’s sudden announcement in October to withdraw from that conflict, citing his campaign pledge to bring American troops home from Middle East wars, drew harsh criticism from both Republicans and Democrats but was praised by the Kremlin.

“What Putin is trying to do is he’s putting his foot down in the Middle East wherever he can,” Browder said. “He’s trying to create a situation where he has some leverage — and by Trump, for example, withdrawing from northern Syria, that created the opportunity for Russians to literally take over U.S. bases. Whenever he sees that opportunity, he takes it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, troops, putins, russian, hes, putin, president, bill, syria, funds, trying, middle, hermitage, east, moment, browder


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World leaders in Davos confront a historic moment as critical to the future as the end of WWI

What world leaders coming to Davos know is that history’s course is up for grabs again. As with the end of World War I, the Cold War’s end in 1989 spawned premature declarations of democracy’s triumph. As world leaders gather in Davos next week at the dawn of the 2020s, they confront a similarly decisive historic moment and a comparable set of dashed hopes. A century ago this month, the Treaty of Versailles went into effect, bringing World War I to an end. A century ago, the failure of global le


What world leaders coming to Davos know is that history’s course is up for grabs again.
As with the end of World War I, the Cold War’s end in 1989 spawned premature declarations of democracy’s triumph.
As world leaders gather in Davos next week at the dawn of the 2020s, they confront a similarly decisive historic moment and a comparable set of dashed hopes.
A century ago this month, the Treaty of Versailles went into effect, bringing World War I to an end.
A century ago, the failure of global le
World leaders in Davos confront a historic moment as critical to the future as the end of WWI Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, moment, end, critical, president, world, war, leaders, historic, week, wwi, european, future, confront, davos, global, state


World leaders in Davos confront a historic moment as critical to the future as the end of WWI

In the World Economic Forum’s program notes, it writes: “There are 193 sovereign nations, a proliferation of regional centers of power, and one increasingly obvious fact of life – we’re all in this together… We need to move from geopolitics and international competition to a default of consummate global collaboration. Nations are going to have to change.”

What world leaders coming to Davos know is that history’s course is up for grabs again. Major power competition is heating up, inflamed by a systemic contest between democratic and state capitalism. The world is awash with uncertainty about how new technologies and rising environmental threats could remake our world. The international order of rules and institutions that the U.S. and its partners constructed after World War II is faltering and ill-equipped to navigate these challenges.

As with the end of World War I, the Cold War’s end in 1989 spawned premature declarations of democracy’s triumph. In his 1992 book The End of History and the Last Man, Francis Fukuyama suggested that with Soviet collapse humanity had reached “the end-point of mankind’s ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government.”

As world leaders gather in Davos next week at the dawn of the 2020s, they confront a similarly decisive historic moment and a comparable set of dashed hopes. One can hear the haunting echoes from the 1920s: a U.S. isolationist temptation, bitter European disunity, and growing nationalism and populism within democracies amid rising authoritarianism.

A century ago this month, the Treaty of Versailles went into effect, bringing World War I to an end. Yet the dreams that paved its way were already evaporating. Among them was U.S. President Woodrow Wilson’s vision of “a world made safe for democracy” and his hope that the League of Nations would emerge to prevent future conflict.

The challenge facing today’s leaders in Davos is they must navigate the world to a better place without personal memories of failed settlements or the world spanning catastrophes that resulted, and can again, from lack of common cause.

But what if, far more likely, they don’t?

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it,” wrote the philosopher George Santayana in 1905. The silver lining of World War II’s devastation was that chastened American and European leaders, having witnessed the mistakes of Versailles, did a far better job than their predecessors in shaping the future. For example, Wilson’s young assistant secretary of the Navy, Franklin Roosevelt, had become President, and isolationist arguments drowned at Pearl Harbor.

The challenge facing today’s leaders in Davos is they must navigate the world to a better place without personal memories of failed settlements or the world spanning catastrophes that resulted, and can again, from lack of common cause.

Mussolini’s boast in summer of 1932 that “the liberal state is doomed to perish” has its echoes now in Vladimir Putin’s declaration this year, the “so-called liberal idea has outlived its purpose .”

It took a catastrophic war with millions of dead, followed by a half century of ideological competition between liberal democracy and communism, to prove Mussolini wrong. What will it take this time to answer Putin, and his ilk, following the constitutional change he proposed this week to ensure he can stay in power as long as he may want?

One can only hope that democracies regroup, finding a means of peaceful coexistence and competition with China, Russia and others. Can they agree to rules and remake institutions in a manner that doesn’t surrender fundamental values? Perhaps the best outcome would be an extended contest over time, decided in degrees and not through geopolitical catastrophe.

For those keeping score at this year’s Davos, here are just three questions, among many others, worth asking about this epochal drama.

What is the state of U.S-Chinese relations following this week’s trade agreement?

When President Trump speaks in Davos on Tuesday, even as his Senate impeachment trial begins, he’s likely to make much of his Phase One trade agreement signed this week.

However, despite this “ceasefire,” the two most decisive countries for the global future will continue to grow apart politically, economically and technologically. Though financial markets have been calmed, the more significant story is this decoupling.

A recent Atlantic Council delegation in China found that many Chinese experts and officials welcome the U.S. trade war and technology transfer restrictions as they are spurring China toward greater self-sufficiency.

“Beijing is accelerating its drive for technological ‘autonomy,'” Yuan Yang wrote in a sweeping Financial Times analysis yesterday, “to boost its control over its own supply chain in the face of political risks, such as further US embargoes.”

Can the U.S. and Europe avoid new trade wars – and find common ground regarding Iran?

The good news is that the United States, the European Union and Japan this week proposed new global trade rules for the World Trade Organization, clearly aimed at China, that would curb state subsidies that are distorting the world economy.

The bad news is that the Trump administration continues to consider escalating its trade conflict with Europe when instead it should be forging a new trade and investment agreement.

The transatlantic relationship has been at the core of one of the longest periods of relative peace and prosperity over the past seven decades. It’s time to refocus U.S. and European efforts at recharging those ties.

One good place to start might be Iran. One good outcome from rising U.S.-Iranian tensions could be that Iranians’ steps to break out of its nuclear agreement could trigger closer cooperation between Washington and its European partners to constrain those activities and seek new talks.

Could the Australian fires shock the global community into the sort of common cause that Davos promotes?

“Welcome to a world in which climate change’s economic impact is no longer distant and imperceptible,” writes Greg Ip of the Wall Street Journal. “Climate has muscled to the top of business worries.”

And Davos-regular Laurence Fink, the chairman and CEO of the world’s largest asset manager BlackRock Inc., said this week that climate issues would be a key driver in how he invests more than $7 trillion of his clients’ money.

Yet even as fires burn a patch of Australia the size of Belgium, it’s going to be politicians more than business leaders who have the biggest levers for change. For all the increasing climate rhetoric, emissions continue to increase, and heat rises.

A century ago, the failure of global leaders to foresee and head off future risks ended in the flames of WWII and the Holocaust. Once again, the cost of failure will be paid on a global scale.

Frederick Kempe is a best-selling author, prize-winning journalist and president & CEO of the Atlantic Council, one of the United States’ most influential think tanks on global affairs. He worked at The Wall Street Journal for more than 25 years as a foreign correspondent, assistant managing editor and as the longest-serving editor of the paper’s European edition. His latest book – “Berlin 1961: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Most Dangerous Place on Earth” – was a New York Times best-seller and has been published in more than a dozen languages. Follow him on Twitter @FredKempe and subscribe here to Inflection Points, his look each Saturday at the past week’s top stories and trends.

For more insight from CNBC contributors, follow @CNBCopinion on Twitter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, moment, end, critical, president, world, war, leaders, historic, week, wwi, european, future, confront, davos, global, state


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At age 30, Jeff Bezos thought this would be his one big regret in life

In 1994, Jeff Bezos worked at hedge fund D. E. Shaw, tasked with researching potential business opportunities involving the then brand-new internet landscape. I thought, ‘You know, when I’m 80, I’m not going to think about that. I knew for a fact, I have this idea, and if I don’t try, I’m going to regret having never tried,” he said. “And I know also, if I try and fail, I’ll never regret having tried and failed. Although he had a hunch regarding the growth of the internet, Bezos never expected A


In 1994, Jeff Bezos worked at hedge fund D. E. Shaw, tasked with researching potential business opportunities involving the then brand-new internet landscape.
I thought, ‘You know, when I’m 80, I’m not going to think about that.
I knew for a fact, I have this idea, and if I don’t try, I’m going to regret having never tried,” he said.
“And I know also, if I try and fail, I’ll never regret having tried and failed.
Although he had a hunch regarding the growth of the internet, Bezos never expected A
At age 30, Jeff Bezos thought this would be his one big regret in life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, life, moment, thought, going, big, jeff, regret, bezos, idea, company, tried, internet, age


At age 30, Jeff Bezos thought this would be his one big regret in life

In 1994, Jeff Bezos worked at hedge fund D. E. Shaw, tasked with researching potential business opportunities involving the then brand-new internet landscape. That’s when Bezos found a staggering statistic that sparked an idea to start his own business.

“I found this fact on a website that the web was growing at 2,300 percent per year,” Bezos told CNBC in a 2001 interview. “The idea that sort of entranced me was this idea of building a bookstore online.”

Of course, Amazon grew from an online bookseller to an e-commerce behemoth with a market cap of more than $920 billion.

But at age 30, when Bezos was deciding what to do about his idea — stick with his stable New York City job or give it up to start his own business — he tried to imagine what he would regret more, leaving Wall Street, or staying.

“I pictured myself 80 years old, thinking back on my life in a quiet moment of reflection,” he during a fireside chat in India on Wednesday. “Would I regret leaving this company in the middle of the year? And walking away from my annual bonus?

“All of those things that in the moment can be very confusing. I thought, ‘You know, when I’m 80, I’m not going to think about that. I’m not even going to remember it.'”

Bezos said he was “trying to figure out how to make this decision, because in the moment, personal life decisions, those choices, can be very challenging,” he said Wednesday.

“I wanted not to have regrets. I knew for a fact, I have this idea, and if I don’t try, I’m going to regret having never tried,” he said. “And I know also, if I try and fail, I’ll never regret having tried and failed.

“As soon as I thought about it that way, I knew I had to try.”

At the time it was a risky move, as the internet was not well known, despite its rapid rate of growth.

“Anything growing that fast, even if its baseline usage was tiny, it’s going to be big. I looked at that, and I was like ‘I should come up with a business idea on the internet and let the internet grow around this,'” he said during a September 2018 episode of “The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations.”

He added, “I picked books because books is super unusual in one respect, which is that there are more book items in the book category than there are items in any other category.”

Bezos took the leap of faith, quit his job and moved to the suburbs of Seattle, where he started working on Amazon in his garage.

His decision paid off – Amazon grew quickly, going public in 1997 with $16 million in revenue and 180,000 customers spanning more than 100 countries, according to its SEC filing.

Although he had a hunch regarding the growth of the internet, Bezos never expected Amazon to grow to the extent it has today.

“What’s actually happened over the last 25 years is way beyond my expectations. I was delivering the packages myself, we were selling books. I was hoping to build a company, but not the company you see today,” he said Wednesday.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, life, moment, thought, going, big, jeff, regret, bezos, idea, company, tried, internet, age


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Cramer says Wall Street analysts playing catch-up to market rally: ‘Just a very bullish moment’

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Thursday that research houses on Wall Street underestimated the staying power of the stock market’s 2019 advance and they’re being forced to scramble. So they are trying to raise price targets to where the stocks are, if not beyond. And that’s just a very bullish moment,” Cramer said on “Squawk Box.” He marveled at how stock futures overnight Tuesday into Wednesday were nosediving, only to give way to the S&P 500 and Nasdaq hitting new intraday highs on Wall Street during


CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Thursday that research houses on Wall Street underestimated the staying power of the stock market’s 2019 advance and they’re being forced to scramble.
So they are trying to raise price targets to where the stocks are, if not beyond.
And that’s just a very bullish moment,” Cramer said on “Squawk Box.”
He marveled at how stock futures overnight Tuesday into Wednesday were nosediving, only to give way to the S&P 500 and Nasdaq hitting new intraday highs on Wall Street during
Cramer says Wall Street analysts playing catch-up to market rally: ‘Just a very bullish moment’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, market, street, catchup, rally, wall, moment, president, little, stock, playing, price, cramer, stocks, bullish, analysts


Cramer says Wall Street analysts playing catch-up to market rally: 'Just a very bullish moment'

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Thursday that research houses on Wall Street underestimated the staying power of the stock market’s 2019 advance and they’re being forced to scramble.

“Most of the analysts are catching up. They didn’t see this rally coming. So they are trying to raise price targets to where the stocks are, if not beyond. And that’s just a very bullish moment,” Cramer said on “Squawk Box.”

Cramer’s comments came a day after he said that investors shrugging off Iran’s Tuesday night retaliation for last week’s U.S. killing of a top Iranian general showed how badly people want in.

“The desperation to get into this market is extraordinary,” he said on Wednesday morning. He marveled at how stock futures overnight Tuesday into Wednesday were nosediving, only to give way to the S&P 500 and Nasdaq hitting new intraday highs on Wall Street during regular hours Wednesday.

Early Thursday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average joined the new intraday record parade — and in characterizing the drivers in the market, Cramer said, “I think there’s a little bit of complacency but a little bit of resilience.”

There were more than 10 upgrades or price target increases of major stocks by big investment banks on Thursday. This week has seen a flurry of analyst calls.

Cramer was echoing what he said on “Mad Money” on Wednesday. “So is this market being resilient … or are investors being complacent? Why not both? I think it’s a combination of these two forces.”

“If you were complacent going into the Iran crisis, that complacency paid off when the president demonstrated restraint,” Cramer added Wednesday evening, hours after remarks from President Donald Trump eased concerns on Wall Street about any immediate escalation of U.S.-Iran hostilities.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, market, street, catchup, rally, wall, moment, president, little, stock, playing, price, cramer, stocks, bullish, analysts


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The ‘Lost in Translation’ moment this CEO overcame to build an international business

“There was a huge cultural gap,” Niinami told CNBC’s Christine Tan in a recent episode of “Managing Asia.” When Takeshi Niinami was appointed CEO of Japanese drinks company Suntory Holdings in October 2015, he had a major task on his hands. In particular, Niinami noted a striking difference between the two companies’ business tact. That caused a clash early on, when Beam’s CEO believed he had received approval for his budget while Suntory insisted he had not, said Niinami. For that, the CEO said


“There was a huge cultural gap,” Niinami told CNBC’s Christine Tan in a recent episode of “Managing Asia.”
When Takeshi Niinami was appointed CEO of Japanese drinks company Suntory Holdings in October 2015, he had a major task on his hands.
In particular, Niinami noted a striking difference between the two companies’ business tact.
That caused a clash early on, when Beam’s CEO believed he had received approval for his budget while Suntory insisted he had not, said Niinami.
For that, the CEO said
The ‘Lost in Translation’ moment this CEO overcame to build an international business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suntory, translation, build, ceo, overcame, japan, cultures, lost, moment, company, scarlett, international, task, companies, beam, business, niinami


The 'Lost in Translation' moment this CEO overcame to build an international business

“There was a huge cultural gap,” Niinami told CNBC’s Christine Tan in a recent episode of “Managing Asia.”

The merger marked the blending of two very different companies and cultures — a task Niinami dubbed his “Lost in Translation” moment, referring to the 2003 film in which an unlikely pair of Americans (played by Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson) strike up a friendship after finding themselves feeling isolated in Tokyo, Japan .

Not only was he to be the first non-family member to take the reins in the distiller’s 115-year history, he was also to lead the business’ $16 billion takeover of U.S. spirits maker Beam .

When Takeshi Niinami was appointed CEO of Japanese drinks company Suntory Holdings in October 2015, he had a major task on his hands.

Actors Bill Murray (L) and Scarlett Johansson talk at the 76th Annual Academy Awards Governors Ball at the Kodak Theatre on February 29, 2004 in Los Angeles, California.

In particular, Niinami noted a striking difference between the two companies’ business tact. Beam valued simplicity, while Suntory preferred ambiguity.

That caused a clash early on, when Beam’s CEO believed he had received approval for his budget while Suntory insisted he had not, said Niinami.

“I tried to convince people in Japan to be clear cut, to communicate with Beam people,” he said. “To make it clear whether they agreed or not.”

Those contrasting approaches are typical of the differing cultures in Japan and the West. A nod of the head in the U.S., for example, signals agreement, while it can be less straightforward in Japan.

But they also reflect the companies’ respective legacies as private and public companies. Beam, as a public company, had long been beholden to shareholder demands, and therefore was used to providing clarity in its actions. On the other hand, Suntory, a family-run company, had not.

To resolve the clashes, Niinami set up a Suntory University to enable both sides to gather and share more about their two company’s “founding spirits.”

“That overcame a lot of difficulties because that’s a mutual, shared value,” he said.

The launch played into Niinami’s wider leadership strategy, too. He planned to make Suntory a global name, growing in the U.S., while also targeting new markets in India and China.

For that, the CEO said he is now developing a team of future leaders who can work internationally across different cultures and markets.

“To be praised very highly by every corner of the world, we need more leaders,” said Niinami. “And I want to leave the legacy that Suntory is the right company to create good global leadership.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suntory, translation, build, ceo, overcame, japan, cultures, lost, moment, company, scarlett, international, task, companies, beam, business, niinami


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The ‘Lost in Translation’ moment this CEO overcame to build an international business

“There was a huge cultural gap,” Niinami told CNBC’s Christine Tan in a recent episode of “Managing Asia.” When Takeshi Niinami was appointed CEO of Japanese drinks company Suntory Holdings in October 2015, he had a major task on his hands. In particular, Niinami noted a striking difference between the two companies’ business tact. That caused a clash early on, when Beam’s CEO believed he had received approval for his budget while Suntory insisted he had not, said Niinami. For that, the CEO said


“There was a huge cultural gap,” Niinami told CNBC’s Christine Tan in a recent episode of “Managing Asia.”
When Takeshi Niinami was appointed CEO of Japanese drinks company Suntory Holdings in October 2015, he had a major task on his hands.
In particular, Niinami noted a striking difference between the two companies’ business tact.
That caused a clash early on, when Beam’s CEO believed he had received approval for his budget while Suntory insisted he had not, said Niinami.
For that, the CEO said
The ‘Lost in Translation’ moment this CEO overcame to build an international business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, international, translation, ceo, moment, niinami, companies, suntory, cultures, scarlett, build, beam, company, task, business, lost, overcame, japan


The 'Lost in Translation' moment this CEO overcame to build an international business

“There was a huge cultural gap,” Niinami told CNBC’s Christine Tan in a recent episode of “Managing Asia.”

The merger marked the blending of two very different companies and cultures — a task Niinami dubbed his “Lost in Translation” moment, referring to the 2003 film in which an unlikely pair of Americans (played by Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson) strike up a friendship after finding themselves feeling isolated in Tokyo, Japan .

Not only was he to be the first non-family member to take the reins in the distiller’s 115-year history, he was also to lead the business’ $16 billion takeover of U.S. spirits maker Beam .

When Takeshi Niinami was appointed CEO of Japanese drinks company Suntory Holdings in October 2015, he had a major task on his hands.

Actors Bill Murray (L) and Scarlett Johansson talk at the 76th Annual Academy Awards Governors Ball at the Kodak Theatre on February 29, 2004 in Los Angeles, California.

In particular, Niinami noted a striking difference between the two companies’ business tact. Beam valued simplicity, while Suntory preferred ambiguity.

That caused a clash early on, when Beam’s CEO believed he had received approval for his budget while Suntory insisted he had not, said Niinami.

“I tried to convince people in Japan to be clear cut, to communicate with Beam people,” he said. “To make it clear whether they agreed or not.”

Those contrasting approaches are typical of the differing cultures in Japan and the West. A nod of the head in the U.S., for example, signals agreement, while it can be less straightforward in Japan.

But they also reflect the companies’ respective legacies as private and public companies. Beam, as a public company, had long been beholden to shareholder demands, and therefore was used to providing clarity in its actions. On the other hand, Suntory, a family-run company, had not.

To resolve the clashes, Niinami set up a Suntory University to enable both sides to gather and share more about their two company’s “founding spirits.”

“That overcame a lot of difficulties because that’s a mutual, shared value,” he said.

The launch played into Niinami’s wider leadership strategy, too. He planned to make Suntory a global name, growing in the U.S., while also targeting new markets in India and China.

For that, the CEO said he is now developing a team of future leaders who can work internationally across different cultures and markets.

“To be praised very highly by every corner of the world, we need more leaders,” said Niinami. “And I want to leave the legacy that Suntory is the right company to create good global leadership.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, international, translation, ceo, moment, niinami, companies, suntory, cultures, scarlett, build, beam, company, task, business, lost, overcame, japan


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Iran faces its most critical moment since the 1979 Revolution

DUBAI – Iran faces a time of reckoning, and the stakes couldn’t be higher: potential war with the United States, the reversal of its gains across the Middle East and the future of its revolutionary state. They instead were focused on the crisis in Iran, just 600 miles away from the UAE as the drone flies. This defining moment for Tehran – perhaps the most critical since the Iranian Revolution of 1979 — has been prompted by the Trump administration’s “maximum pressure” campaign of sanctions, Ira


DUBAI – Iran faces a time of reckoning, and the stakes couldn’t be higher: potential war with the United States, the reversal of its gains across the Middle East and the future of its revolutionary state.
They instead were focused on the crisis in Iran, just 600 miles away from the UAE as the drone flies.
This defining moment for Tehran – perhaps the most critical since the Iranian Revolution of 1979 — has been prompted by the Trump administration’s “maximum pressure” campaign of sanctions, Ira
Iran faces its most critical moment since the 1979 Revolution Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revolution, 1979, trump, washington, states, irans, faces, moment, protests, nuclear, tehran, iran, sanctions, united, critical


Iran faces its most critical moment since the 1979 Revolution

DUBAI – Iran faces a time of reckoning, and the stakes couldn’t be higher: potential war with the United States, the reversal of its gains across the Middle East and the future of its revolutionary state.

It would surprise most Americans how little the Arab public and media here – nine time zones from Washington, D.C. – were occupied this week with the congressional hearings on impeaching President Donald Trump. They instead were focused on the crisis in Iran, just 600 miles away from the UAE as the drone flies.

This defining moment for Tehran – perhaps the most critical since the Iranian Revolution of 1979 — has been prompted by the Trump administration’s “maximum pressure” campaign of sanctions, Iran’s dangerously declining economy, and the cumulative effect of Tehran’s domestic malfeasance and regional overstretch.

Growing protests in Iran, Iraq and Lebanon have charged the atmosphere with urgency.

What’s clear is that the growing scale of the challenge makes it difficult for Iran to pursue its earlier approach toward mounting U.S. pressure: hunkering down and waiting out the Trump administration through the November 2020 election in the hope of Democratic victory.

What’s less clear is whether Tehran over the short term will respond to this historic test with more military escalation, diplomatic compromise – or a combination of both.

Diplomats in the Middle East argue that the United States has put itself in a good position to shape that choice. They argue Washington could take advantage of Iran’s increased difficulties by working more closely with European and Mideast allies to frame an offer that would ease sanctions but put in place a process that would block Iran’s path to a nuclear weapon and end its foreign policy of regional meddling.

However, that sounds like wishful thinking in the world of Washington’s distractions, transatlantic distrust and Iranian outrage. Trump administration officials are sanguine, arguing that at the very least the sanctions have cut deeply into the resources Iran can invest in its proxies. Protests at home and abroad are usefully soaking up regime energies.

The danger is that may risk further military escalation to gain attention and leverage, following its June 20 shooting down of the American drone and its Sept. 14 strike on Saudi oil processing facilities. Or it could take further steps away from its nuclear agreement of 2015, having this month resumed low grade uranium enrichment at its underground Fordow nuclear plant to 60% of fissile purity, not far from the 90% level required for nuclear bomb fuel.

It’s hard to imagine Iran entering the expanded talks the U.S. would want without first getting the sanctions relief Trump has thus far refused. Yet it’s just as difficult for Iran to imagine that the status quo is sustainable, amid a collapsing economy and rising protests.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revolution, 1979, trump, washington, states, irans, faces, moment, protests, nuclear, tehran, iran, sanctions, united, critical


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How Howard Schultz conquered self-doubt to build Starbucks into a $100 billion company

Despite having a net worth of more than $4 billion and being the driving force behind Starbucks for more than three decades, Howard Schultz says he’s just an average Joe, like you. I did not go to an Ivy League school,” Schultz tells Masterclass.com in 13-part series teaching business leadership. “I’m just a regular person just like you who had a dream to try and build a great, enduring company.” Today, Starbucks has a market cap over $100 billion. Schultz credits his success with Starbucks to h


Despite having a net worth of more than $4 billion and being the driving force behind Starbucks for more than three decades, Howard Schultz says he’s just an average Joe, like you.
I did not go to an Ivy League school,” Schultz tells Masterclass.com in 13-part series teaching business leadership.
“I’m just a regular person just like you who had a dream to try and build a great, enduring company.”
Today, Starbucks has a market cap over $100 billion.
Schultz credits his success with Starbucks to h
How Howard Schultz conquered self-doubt to build Starbucks into a $100 billion company Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, build, selfdoubt, howard, life, schultz, help, grew, conquered, company, moment, 100, billion, success, jump, tells, starbucks


How Howard Schultz conquered self-doubt to build Starbucks into a $100 billion company

Despite having a net worth of more than $4 billion and being the driving force behind Starbucks for more than three decades, Howard Schultz says he’s just an average Joe, like you.

“I don’t have an MBA. I did not go to an Ivy League school,” Schultz tells Masterclass.com in 13-part series teaching business leadership. “I’m just a regular person just like you who had a dream to try and build a great, enduring company.”

Today, Starbucks has a market cap over $100 billion.

Schultz, who grew up poor and lived in public housing in Brooklyn, New York, bought the Seattle coffee franchise in 1987 for $3.8 million after finding investors (including Bill Gates’ dad) to help him out. He grew the company from 11 stores to more than 3,500 locations in over 75 countries.

Schultz, 66, who now serves as the Starbuck’s chairman emeritus after retiring as executive chairman in June of 2018, says the only difference between him and most people is that he fought off self-doubt and jumped in headfirst.

He says it’s okay to have self-doubt about your ability to succeed, raise money or even attract the right people at times. But under no circumstance can you ever have any self-doubt about “your commitment and conviction to do what you set out to do,” which for him was building Starbucks into an international brand.

Schultz goes on to say that there will be no “magical” moment, time or formula that will help you start your venture, you just have to do it “with great discipline and thoughtfulness.”

“There is no single textbook, there is no mentor, there is no primary tool to get you to jump in that pool other than your own courage and conviction of the idea and this moment in time for you and your family,” he tells Masterclass.com.

Schultz credits his success with Starbucks to his fierce determination and unwavering persistence.

“I willed it to happen,” Schultz writes in his memoir, “Pour Your Heart Into It.” “I took my life in my hands, learned from anyone I could, grabbed what opportunity I could, and molded my success step by step.”

Schultz does knowledge that entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone, but he still encourages people to live life to the fullest and not have any regrets.

“You’ve got to find your position in life. But if [entrepreneurship] is in your blood — and only you know if it is — then jump into the pool.”

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook.

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Billionaire Tim Draper’s first job was selling apples for 5 cents—and it drove him to become a capitalist


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, build, selfdoubt, howard, life, schultz, help, grew, conquered, company, moment, 100, billion, success, jump, tells, starbucks


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Big Tech had its first big debate moment, and Democrats came out swinging

Big Tech had its first big moment in the 2020 presidential election during the latest Democratic debate. The big question came from the debate moderators: Do the largest tech companies need to be broken up? Not all the candidates, including Joe Biden, were called upon to answer the question of how Big Tech companies should be regulated. Elizabeth WarrenWarren’s rhetoric around the Big Tech has steered much of the conversation around how to regulate the industry. We need to enforce our antitrust


Big Tech had its first big moment in the 2020 presidential election during the latest Democratic debate.
The big question came from the debate moderators: Do the largest tech companies need to be broken up?
Not all the candidates, including Joe Biden, were called upon to answer the question of how Big Tech companies should be regulated.
Elizabeth WarrenWarren’s rhetoric around the Big Tech has steered much of the conversation around how to regulate the industry.
We need to enforce our antitrust
Big Tech had its first big debate moment, and Democrats came out swinging Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, harris, tech, came, large, antitrust, companies, swinging, moment, democrats, warren, president, big, debate, yang


Big Tech had its first big debate moment, and Democrats came out swinging

Big Tech had its first big moment in the 2020 presidential election during the latest Democratic debate. The big question came from the debate moderators: Do the largest tech companies need to be broken up? Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s call to break up Facebook, Amazon, Google and Apple framed much of the discussion around tech regulation. While each candidate who responded to the question Tuesday night agreed that unregulated power of these large firms poses a problem, few committed as firmly to break them up. Not all the candidates, including Joe Biden, were called upon to answer the question of how Big Tech companies should be regulated. Here are responses from those candidates who were asked about the question:

Andrew Yang

Yang, a tech entrepreneur himself, has been something of a darling to tech workers. The top three groups of contributors to his campaign are employees from Google parent company Alphabet, Amazon and Microsoft. But even Yang said the industry deserves more oversight. “As usual, Senator Warren is 100% right in diagnosing the problem,” Yang said at the debate. “There are absolutely excesses in technology, and in some cases having them divest parts of their business is the right move. But we also have to be realistic that competition doesn’t solve all of the problems.” Yang said no one “wants to use the fourth-best navigation app” and that breaking up Big Tech companies won’t necessarily “revive Main Street businesses around the country.” Antitrust action also won’t solve health problems that are correlated with children’s early exposure to technology, Yang said. Yang suggested that the current antitrust framework, developed in the 20th century, is not adequate to deal with today’s industries. “We need new solutions and a new toolkit,” he said. Later in the debate, Yang proposed an alternative solution to giving consumers more power in comparison to technology giants. “The best way we can fight back against Big Tech companies is to say our data is our property,” Yang said. “Right now, our data is worth more than oil. How many of you can remember getting your data check in the mail? It got lost, it went to Facebook, Amazon, Google. If we say this is our property and we share in the gains, that’s the best way that we can balance the scales against the Big Tech companies.”

Elizabeth Warren

Warren’s rhetoric around the Big Tech has steered much of the conversation around how to regulate the industry. The senator came out with her plan to “break up Big Tech” back in March and announced prior to the debate Tuesday that she would not accept donations from Big Tech executives over $200, widening the pool of donors from which she won’t accept large contributions. Warren has also said she won’t take large donations from executives at large banks, Big Pharma or fossil fuel companies. “You can’t go behind closed doors and take the money of these executives and then turn around and expect that these are the people who are going to actually finally enforce the laws,” Warren said on the debate stage. Addressing her stance on Big Tech, Warren used Amazon as an example, saying the company “runs the platform, gets all the information, and then goes into competition with those little businesses. Look, you get to be the umpire in the baseball game or you get to have a team, but you don’t get to do both at the same time. We need to enforce our antitrust laws, break up these giant companies that are dominating Big Tech, Big Pharma, Big Oil, all of them.” One area where Warren did not push as hard on tech was over Twitter’s decision to keep President Donald Trump’s tweets and account on the platform. Asked by Sen. Kamala Harris why Warren didn’t join her call for Twitter to suspend his account, Warren said, “I don’t just want to push Trump off Twitter, I want to push him out of the White House.”

Kamala Harris

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) appear on television screens in the Media Center as they go back and forth during the Democratic Presidential Debate at Otterbein University on October 15, 2019 in Westerville, Ohio. Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

Addressing her call for Twitter to suspend Trump’s account, Harris said it is “a grave injustice when rules apply to some but not to all, and in particular when the rules that apply to the powerless don’t apply to the powerful.” Harris wrote a letter to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey earlier this month requesting he consider suspending Trump’s account for allegedly attempting to “target, harass” and “out” the whistleblower who made Trump the subject of an impeachment inquiry. Harris separately addressed a question about Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s claim that splitting up large tech companies would make it harder for those companies to tackle problems like disinformation around elections. “That’s a ridiculous argument he’s making,” Harris said.

Amy Klobuchar

The senator from Minnesota pointed out her position as the ranking member on the Senate Antitrust Subcommittee, which has been heavily involved in the conversation around Big Tech by questioning tech executives about their practices as well as the agency heads investigating the large tech firms. Klobuchar said that in her private sector experience representing companies trying to enter the telecom market, she saw prices go down in the long distance market once more competition was introduced. She called the current moment “another Gilded Age.” Klobuchar suggested taking a different approach to the antitrust conversation. “Start talking about this as a pro-competition issue,” Klobuchar said. “This used to be a Republican and Democratic issue, because America, our founding fathers, actually wanted to have less consolidation, we were a place of entrepreneurship.”

Bernie Sanders

Sanders seemed to take a similar stance to Warren’s, condemning the consolidation of industries including not just tech but also finance and media. “We need a president who has the guts to appoint an attorney general who will take on these huge monopolies, protect small business and protect consumers by ending the price fixing that you see every day,” Sanders said.

Beto O’Rourke

O’Rourke said the key to tech regulation is treating companies like publishers rather than utilities. The former congressman from Texas pointed to the false ad Warren recently ran on Facebook to see how far the company would go in refusing to fact check ads by politicians. “We would allow no publisher to do what Facebook is doing, to publish that ad that Senator Warren has rightfully called out, that CNN has refused to air because it is untrue and tells lies about the vice president,” O’Rourke said. “Treat them like the publisher that they are, that’s what I will do as president.” O’Rourke said he would “be unafraid to break up big businesses if we have to do that,” but he made a subtle jab at Warren by saying he doesn’t believe “it is the role of a president or a candidate for the presidency to specifically call out which companies will be broken up. That’s something that Donald Trump has done in part because he sees enemies in the press and wants to diminish their power, it’s not something that we should do.”

Cory Booker

Booker said the problem with tech is not just potentially anticompetitive behavior, but also how it is used “to undermine our democracy.” “We have a reality in this country where antitrust from pharma to farms is causing trouble. And we have to deal with this,” Booker said. “As president of the United States I will put people in place that enforce antitrust laws.”

Julian Castro

The former secretary of Housing and Urban Development did not specify how he would tackle the Big Tech companies but said “we’re on the right track in terms of updating how we look at monopolistic practices.” He added: “We need to take a stronger stance when it comes to cracking down on monopolistic trade practices, and that’s what I would do as president.”

Tom Steyer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, harris, tech, came, large, antitrust, companies, swinging, moment, democrats, warren, president, big, debate, yang


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The moment of truth for banks approaching

The moment of truth for banks approaching10 Hours AgoBanks set to report earnings later this week. How will financials fare? With CNBC’s Melissa Lee and the Fast Money traders, Tim Seymour, Carter Worth, Steve Grasso and Guy Adami.


The moment of truth for banks approaching10 Hours AgoBanks set to report earnings later this week. How will financials fare? With CNBC’s Melissa Lee and the Fast Money traders, Tim Seymour, Carter Worth, Steve Grasso and Guy Adami.
The moment of truth for banks approaching Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, moment, traders, set, week, truth, report, approaching, money, tim, seymour, worth, banks, steve


The moment of truth for banks approaching

The moment of truth for banks approaching

10 Hours Ago

Banks set to report earnings later this week. How will financials fare? With CNBC’s Melissa Lee and the Fast Money traders, Tim Seymour, Carter Worth, Steve Grasso and Guy Adami.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, moment, traders, set, week, truth, report, approaching, money, tim, seymour, worth, banks, steve


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