Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t


If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders.
Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray.
Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.
It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t
Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there's something they don't want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. The downside? There are few geological secrets anymore. What was once a tribe’s, then a town’s, and eventually a country’s pride and joy is now subject to the whims of the international traveling world — all 1.4 billion of us. Take Norway’s now-famous Trolltunga. Jutting 2,300 feet above the north side of Ringedalsvatnet lake, the natural rock formation resulted from receding glaciers that broke off large, angular blocks from area mountains. It’s easy to see why photos at the site are an instant hit.

Two visitors gaze off Norway’s Trolltunga. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

The serenity. The solitude.

Trolltunga in Hardangerfjord, Norway. Morten Rustad | 500px Prime | Getty Images

The stillness of the remote surroundings. But widen the frame a bit, and that’s not the story.

Tourism explosion at Trolltunga

A decade ago, fewer than 800 people a year traveled to Trolltunga. Next year, that figure’s expected to hit 100,000. Trolltunga was formed roughly 10,000 years before the advent of the internet, but social media has played a major role in its massive influx. A photo there seems to combine everything we’ve come to expect from online travel photos: distant lands, a touch of daredevilism, breath-taking scenery and a soul-searchingly authentic experience.

Trolltunga, from a different angle. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

“Instagram has elevated the interest in the site that really no conventional marketing campaign can do,” said Bo Vibe, head of digital marketing at Fjord Tours. “Getting the ‘selfie’ on the top becomes the end-all for many visitors.” “Facebook has probably had just as much influence as Instagram,” said Jostein Soldal, CEO of Trolltunga Active, citing effective local and national marketing campaigns, word of mouth and the sheer beauty of the area as other factors. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. But that solemn mood conveyed on social media doesn’t match what’s happening just beyond the selfie-frame.

Tourists wait in line to be photographed on Trolltunga. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

As tourist numbers have increased, so have the lines. Visitors who arrive in the summer months have been known to wait longer than three hours to get a photograph on the tongue’s tip. The longest waits often result when good weather follows a long period of rain — and when the average number of visitors increases from 800 to 2,000 per day. Travelers who arrive from June to September should mentally prepare for an average wait of 60 to 90 minutes for a photo opp. “If you are prepared that there will be a line and spend the time just enjoying all the impressive poses many of the tourists are doing, the waiting is not a big issue,” said Soldal. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.

Trolltunga’s saving grace – it’s hard to get there

Consistently ranked one of the best hikes in Norway, the journey to reach Trolltunga isn’t an easy one. From Skjeggedal, it’s a 10- to 12-hour hike that covers 28 kilometers and an 800-meter ascent. Hikers need to be fit and equipped with food, water, headlights, hiking boots and other gear. Efforts to inform tourists of this have helped reduce rescue operations from an all-time high of 40 in 2016 to just 12 in 2018. Built in the early 1900s, a funicular called Mågelibanen once made the journey to Trolltunga considerably easier, but it closed in 2012. To date, the only way to reach it is by foot, a fact that suits the local population just fine, says Soldal. “We don’t want more visitors,” he said with a laugh. “Plus, if it’s a five-minute walk, the Trolltunga will lose some of its ‘I did it’ factor.” There is a steep, private road that takes travelers 400 meters up the mountain, but it’s still eight hours of hiking from there. Only 30 cars are allowed to park at a time, and the hairpin turns on the drive aren’t for the faint of heart.

Trolltunga isn’t alone

Trolltunga isn’t Norway’s only site to achieve Insta-fame. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like this:

Norway’s Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

But with 300,000 visitors a year — roughly three times as many visitors as Trolltunga — it’s better to assume it will look more like this in person.

Hiikers at Preikestolen. Xichao Yu | 500px | Getty Images

The journey to Pulpit Rock is a less-arduous, eight-kilometer hike that can be completed in three to four hours, making it a popular stop on the tourist bus and cruise ship circuit. Instagram is also rife with photos of Kjeragbolten, another picture-perfect geological wonder in Norway.

Woman atop Kjeragbolten. kotangens | iStock | Getty Images

But behind-the-scenes photos show that the line at Kjeragbolten is decidedly less zen.

Hikers wait in line to take a photo at Kjeragbolten. Courtesy of Ali Ronca at amsterdamandbeyond.com

How to avoid the crowds

For a less-congested experience, one option is to book an off-season tour. Winter tours reward visitors with open trails, little to no waits and beautiful snow-covered views, though the hike is more difficult and conditions can be too slick to step out onto the troll’s tongue. Off-season hikes — from October to May — can be dangerous for novices and should not be attempted without a guide. Early morning starts in high season are also possible, though it adds the extra challenge of hiking in darkness.

It’s an area where all logic says is not a place to settle down. And we have managed it for 8,000 years. Jostein Soldal CEO, Trolltunga Active


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


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How to get tickets to a sumo match in Japan

Even in modern Japan, crowds still flock to see the biggest and best in the sport, with sumo wrestlers like Hakuho and Kakuryu established as household names. JIJI PRESS | AFP | Getty ImagesElite sumo is focused on six annual 15-day grand sumo tournaments. A sumo wrestler’s chignon is secured before a summer special event in Tokyo, Japan. A sumo wrestler picks up a handful of salt to throw into the ring before his bout. It opens at 9:30 a.m and is an especially good option for killing time after


Even in modern Japan, crowds still flock to see the biggest and best in the sport, with sumo wrestlers like Hakuho and Kakuryu established as household names.
JIJI PRESS | AFP | Getty ImagesElite sumo is focused on six annual 15-day grand sumo tournaments.
A sumo wrestler’s chignon is secured before a summer special event in Tokyo, Japan.
A sumo wrestler picks up a handful of salt to throw into the ring before his bout.
It opens at 9:30 a.m and is an especially good option for killing time after
How to get tickets to a sumo match in Japan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: rob goss, monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japan, tournaments, sumo, wrestlers, tokyo, sameday, wrestler, arena, seats, match, start, tickets


How to get tickets to a sumo match in Japan

There’s nothing like being there in person. The Japanese sport of sumo has been around for more than 1,000 years. It was originally performed to entertain Shinto deities and then became a court entertainment before gaining popularity among the general public in the Edo era in the 17th and 18th centuries. Even in modern Japan, crowds still flock to see the biggest and best in the sport, with sumo wrestlers like Hakuho and Kakuryu established as household names. An afternoon at the sumo is a tremendous spectacle, from the ceremonial parades of wrestlers to the pre-fight Shinto rituals and posturing. After salt is tossed to purify the elevated ring, each bout is a brief but explosive contest that often ends with a giant wrestler tumbling into the crowd.

Japanese sumo grand champion Kisenosato (R) throws down ozeki-ranked wrestler Terunofuji (L) of Mongolia in a playoff bout to win the Spring Grand Sumo Tournament in Osaka on March 26, 2017. JIJI PRESS | AFP | Getty Images

Elite sumo is focused on six annual 15-day grand sumo tournaments. These take place in Osaka in March, Nagoya in July, Fukuoka in November and in Tokyo — at the Kokugikan arena, the home of sumo — in January, May and September. The exact dates are listed on the Sumo Association’s website. Here’s our guide to getting tickets and making the most of the sumo experience.

Getting tickets

Tickets for the six grand tournaments go on sale about one month before each tournament and often sell out quickly. Tickets can be purchased via the Sumo Association’s English-language website.

A sumo wrestler’s chignon is secured before a summer special event in Tokyo, Japan. Katsumi KASAHARA | Gamma-Rapho | Getty Images

Another option is to get up early for same-day tickets. At the Tokyo tournaments, people start lining up outside the Kokugikan ticket office at around 6 a.m. to snag one of the 400 or so same-day tickets that go on sale at 8:40 a.m. Such an early start may not be necessary; most people who show up by 7 a.m. manage to secure a ticket. The drawback with the same-day tickets is that they are in the uppermost tier at the very back of the arena — far enough away that even sumo look small — and each person in line can only get one ticket. The upside is that those tickets are only 2,200 yen ($20), though the price varies by arena.

Where to sit

Each venue offers arena seats and Japanese-style box seats. The arena seats are conventional seats that are farther away from the dohyo, or ring, while the boxes are square mats closer to the action. Shoes must be removed to sit in the boxes, and seating is on floor cushions, which can be a bit uncomfortable especially for the long-legged. Those sitting in ringside boxes also run the risk of a 300-pound, near naked wrestler landing in their lap.

A sumo wrestler picks up a handful of salt to throw into the ring before his bout. RICHARD A. BROOKS | AFP | Getty Images

Though it varies by venue, box prices start from 9,500 yen per person (and typically accommodate from one to six people) while arena seats start from 2,100 yen.

When to show up

Timing makes a huge difference. Matches for low-ranked wrestlers start in the morning, so those who are extremely keen can have a full day at the sumo. Really, it’s better to go later. At all six tournaments, the arena begins to fill about an hour ahead of the top-ranked bouts that commence at 4 p.m.

Professional sumo wrestler Toyonoshima lifts up junior sumo wrestlers during an exhibition in Tokyo. YOSHIKAZU TSUNO | AFP | Getty Images

Aim to be seated by 3:30 p.m, to see the top wrestlers parade around the dohyo ahead of their fights — that’s when the atmosphere warms up and anticipation begins to build. The bouts, which can last just seconds and rarely go beyond several minutes, end around 6 p.m.

What to do before

Before sumo matches in Tokyo begin, drop into the Edo-Tokyo Museum which is located next to the Kokugikan. It does a superb job of documenting Tokyo’s rise (and occasional falls) from the 1600s to the present. It opens at 9:30 a.m and is an especially good option for killing time after getting same-day tickets.

Where to eat after


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: rob goss, monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japan, tournaments, sumo, wrestlers, tokyo, sameday, wrestler, arena, seats, match, start, tickets


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Four things to do at Australia’s Uluru monolith — besides climb it

They’ve also been vocal about the fact they’d prefer people didn’t climb Uluru, as this was seldom allowed in the past. Eighty percent of tourists to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park respected the request, although the other 20% chose to haul themselves up the rock’s 348-meter (1,141 feet) surface regardless. The climbing ban was marked by a ceremony by the Anangu, the original owners of the land that is now part of Uluru-Kata-Tjuta National Park. Tourism NT/Mitchell CoxWalking all or part of Ulur


They’ve also been vocal about the fact they’d prefer people didn’t climb Uluru, as this was seldom allowed in the past.
Eighty percent of tourists to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park respected the request, although the other 20% chose to haul themselves up the rock’s 348-meter (1,141 feet) surface regardless.
The climbing ban was marked by a ceremony by the Anangu, the original owners of the land that is now part of Uluru-Kata-Tjuta National Park.
Tourism NT/Mitchell CoxWalking all or part of Ulur
Four things to do at Australia’s Uluru monolith — besides climb it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: sue white, monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tjuta, getty, national, legs, art, rock, australias, walk, visitors, park, things, climb, uluru, monolith


Four things to do at Australia's Uluru monolith — besides climb it

Climbing is banned, but there’s plenty to do during a visit to Uluru.

Since Australia’s rusty-red monolith, Uluru, was handed back to its original owners in 1977, the Anangu people have welcomed visitors to walk its 9.4 kilometer (5.8 mile) circumference and soak up its spiritual presence. They’ve also been vocal about the fact they’d prefer people didn’t climb Uluru, as this was seldom allowed in the past. Eighty percent of tourists to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park respected the request, although the other 20% chose to haul themselves up the rock’s 348-meter (1,141 feet) surface regardless. At least 35 climbers died while doing so.

The climbing ban was marked by a ceremony by the Anangu, the original owners of the land that is now part of Uluru-Kata-Tjuta National Park. SAEED KHAN | AFP | Getty Images

Now, there’s no longer a choice. On October 26 of this year, the park’s Board of Management officially banned climbing on Uluru. In the weeks that followed, the chains installed in 1963 to help people climb the steep rock were removed and symbolically handed over to Anangu elders. Regardless of what you call it — Uluru is also known as Ayers Rock — there are dozens of ways to experience all that is sacred about Uluru and the rest of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. Here are just a few options.

Take in Uluru on two legs

Many visitors begin with a free, ranger-guided walk along the two-kilometer (1.2 mile) wheelchair-accessible Mala Walk. However, many Anangu suggest taking a slow exploration of the Tjukurpa Tunnel before setting out. Here, to the sounds of ceremonial songs, visitors can learn about the Anangu’s laws, traditions and art. The guided Mala Walk departs at 8 a.m. or 10 a.m. daily, depending on the season. Photos aren’t allowed for cultural reasons.

Climbing isn’t necessary to appreciate the beauty of Uluru. Tourism NT/Mitchell Cox

Walking all or part of Uluru’s circumference is a memorable experience, not the least for the crevices, caves and rock art found there. Try the geologically-impressive Lungkata Walk for opportunities to touch the rock, while the North-East Face Walk passes a multitude of sacred sites. The Uluru Birds app is a trusty companion that helps bird-watchers identify some of the park’s 178 avian species. Later in the day, weary legs can rest during the free bush tucker journeys (a talk about native bush foods) held daily at Ayers Rock Resort.

Trade two legs for two wheels

Uluru offers plenty of options to swap two legs for two wheels. The most serene is cycling; hire a bike from the mobile truck at the Cultural Centre and pedal to spots like the Mutitjulu Waterhole, one of the few permanent water sources in the area.

Traverse the sandy park paths with Uluru Segway Tours. bennymarty | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

If your legs don’t offer enough power, jump on a Segway, motorized trike or Harley Davidson for a sunrise or sunset spin around the rock.

Take to the sky

Most people come to the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site, for its cultural and natural uniqueness, but for visitors desperate for adventure, Uluru delivers. It’s possible to see both Uluru and the domed formations of nearby Kata Tjuta by plane, or for an added thrill, by helicopter. Those needing an extra adrenaline rush can rock the sky with Skydive Uluru. The company offers dives from 10,000 or 12,000 feet — the latter with a longer free-fall period — for spectacular views of “The Red Centre” of Australia.

Uluru, from above. ullstein bild | ullstein bild | Getty Images

Getting out at night

A lot of time and energy goes into seeing Uluru at sunrise or sunset. But here, darkness doesn’t always signal sleep. Photo buffs can learn the art of astrophotography from award-winning photographers. And, a four-night workshop gives after-hours access to the park.

After dark, learn the art of astrophotography at Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park. swissmediavision | iStock Unreleased | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: sue white, monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tjuta, getty, national, legs, art, rock, australias, walk, visitors, park, things, climb, uluru, monolith


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The Great Wall of China: 4 ideas for day trips — and 1 to avoid altogether

In the early 1980s, a three-man team spent two years preparing to walk the length of the Great Wall of China. If the rise of layover tours are any indication, most travelers today give the Great Wall just one day of their time — or less. A company called Beijing Sideways offers full-day tours of the Great Wall via sidecars attached to Chang Jiang 750 motorcycles. His seven-hour Great Wall tour includes transportation, entrance fees and use of a Mavic Mini drone. “I think the Great Wall is a good


In the early 1980s, a three-man team spent two years preparing to walk the length of the Great Wall of China.
If the rise of layover tours are any indication, most travelers today give the Great Wall just one day of their time — or less.
A company called Beijing Sideways offers full-day tours of the Great Wall via sidecars attached to Chang Jiang 750 motorcycles.
His seven-hour Great Wall tour includes transportation, entrance fees and use of a Mavic Mini drone.
“I think the Great Wall is a good
The Great Wall of China: 4 ideas for day trips — and 1 to avoid altogether Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, walk, ideas, ride, getty, night, trips, wall, day, avoid, altogether, simatai, mutianyu, beijing, great, tour, china


The Great Wall of China: 4 ideas for day trips — and 1 to avoid altogether

In the early 1980s, a three-man team spent two years preparing to walk the length of the Great Wall of China. The team focused on the portion that was built during the Ming Dynasty — the well-preserved part depicted in photographs and travel brochures. The 5,500 mile journey took the trio 508 days. If the rise of layover tours are any indication, most travelers today give the Great Wall just one day of their time — or less. Here are four ways to make a short trip a memorable one.

1. Take a sidecar tour

This option is as much about the journey as it is the destination. A company called Beijing Sideways offers full-day tours of the Great Wall via sidecars attached to Chang Jiang 750 motorcycles. If visions of World War II come to mind, there’s a good reason. The Chang Jiang motorbike is based on the Soviet M-72, which was modeled after the earlier German BMW R71 motorcycle produced (with sidecar attachment) as a military vehicle in the 1930s.

A Chang Jiang 750 motorcycle with sidecar parked at a Beijing street. Fotoholica Press | LightRocket | Getty Images

This wind-in-your-hair ride breezes past tree-lined roads and small villages in the northern Beijing countryside before ascending the mountainous roads leading to the Great Wall. Helmets are available (but not required), as are rain and winter gear for inclement weather. The tour includes a stop at the Silver Pagodas and a French picnic lunch on the Wall. For those who have a love-at-first-ride experience, the company can help make arrangements to ship a custom-made bike to your home. The full-day tour is priced at 2,500 Chinese yuan ($356) per person.

2. Get Insta-worthy aerial shots via drone

Launched in 2016, Airbnb Experiences are designed to be “one-of-a-kind activities hosted by locals.” It’s the medium of choice for Dong Zhao, a Beijing native who’s passionate about nature and photography. His seven-hour Great Wall tour includes transportation, entrance fees and use of a Mavic Mini drone.

Great Wall of China, from above. Sino Images | 500px Asia | Getty Images

Facebook friends may have photos of themselves jumping, doing handstands, dramatically leaning on the ramparts or contemplatively gazing from the watchtowers, but few will have memories of the Great Wall snapped from the heavens above. The tour focuses on lesser-known sections of the Great Wall, which Zhao says are more natural and beautiful than some of the popular tourist spots. “I think the Great Wall is a good location to introduce Chinese history to foreigners,” said Zhao. “That’s the main reason why I created the tour.” Most of Zhao’s customers are from North America or Europe. His tour includes lessons on taking great selfies and creating vlogs. Rates start at $142 per person, with reduced prices for groups of three or more.

3. Go for a night hike

For an ethereal evening experience, visit the Simatai section of the Wall after sunset. It’s not the only section of the Great Wall lit at night, but it is arguable the nicest. Old fashioned lanterns outfitted with LED lights line a section of Simatai, making for a beautiful twilight stroll. Located 75 miles from Beijing, Simatai is a minimally-restored section of the Great Wall, known for being a rather perilous climb. At night, travelers can only ascend the mountain via cable car, which takes tourists most, but not all, of the way to the Wall. From there, guests walk a well-paved, subtly-lit path that extends between several watchtowers. The entire walk — which overlooks picturesque Gubei Water Town — can be completed in less than two hours. Though Simatai is less crowded than Badaling and Mutianyu during the day, the night walk is popular and queues for the cable car are common. Avoid this experience during Chinese festival periods. Natural hot springs are also a major draw to the area, offering an activity complementary to the strenuous wall hikes.

4. Walk in the footsteps of Michelle Obama

Or perhaps more aptly, follow her toboggan trail. While the now-defunct zipline at Simatai may have been the bigger adrenaline rush, the downhill toboggan ride at Mutianyu is decidedly more tourist-friendly.

US First Lady Michelle Obama (L) walks with her daughter Sasha (R) during a visit to the Great Wall at Mutianyu. WANG ZHAO | AFP | Getty Images

In 2014, the former First Lady famously braved the toboggan ride on a visit to Mutianyu, one of the best-preserved areas of the Great Wall. Situated between towers 5 and 6, the toboggan runs all year round (excepting bad weather) and takes travelers on an exhilarating 5,184-foot, zigzagging ride down the mountain, according to Wild Great Wall Adventure Tours.

Toboggan at sunset. luza studios | iStock | Getty Images

While it may sound scary, it’s not. Riders have a brake and can control their speeds down the metal track. Parents can ride with kids on larger toboggans. For the uninitiated, Mutianyu also offers a cable car and open-air chairlifts, or you can simply walk the mountain trails to reach the Wall.

And one to avoid: sleeping on the wall itself

There are plenty of overnight tours of the Great Wall, lasting from a single night to a week or more. But it’s the ones that offer the chance to sleep directly on the wall that cause the most controversy. In August of 2018, Airbnb canceled a contest called “Night at the Great Wall” which offered the chance to win an overnight stay in a watchtower, after public backlash over potential damage to the Wall. Ironically, an aim of the contest was to promote sustainable tourism in China.

Camping on the Great Wall of China. SERGEI MUGASHEV | iStock | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, walk, ideas, ride, getty, night, trips, wall, day, avoid, altogether, simatai, mutianyu, beijing, great, tour, china


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How to retire early and travel around the world

Rather than slowing down, nomadic retirees quit work to travel the world. When it comes to the planning, big events like this year’s Rugby World Cup in Japan are anchored in first, Gail explained. The rules to retiring earlySo you’re probably wondering: As relatively ordinary salaried people, how were they able to retire so young and afford this lifestyle of extensive travel? “If you want to retire early,” Neil joked, “don’t have kids and don’t get divorced!” To retire early, don’t fall into the


Rather than slowing down, nomadic retirees quit work to travel the world.
When it comes to the planning, big events like this year’s Rugby World Cup in Japan are anchored in first, Gail explained.
The rules to retiring earlySo you’re probably wondering: As relatively ordinary salaried people, how were they able to retire so young and afford this lifestyle of extensive travel?
“If you want to retire early,” Neil joked, “don’t have kids and don’t get divorced!”
To retire early, don’t fall into the
How to retire early and travel around the world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-14  Authors: verne maree, monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, france, early, gail, nomadic, south, world, retire, travel, summer, spend, dont


How to retire early and travel around the world

“Where do you live?” is a simple question — but I don’t have a quick answer. Instead of settling down and waiting to get old in one place, my husband and I devised an ongoing travel plan that each year includes France, Singapore, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand — as well as the odd side-trip or cruise along the way. It all started with a boat. After 15 years in Singapore, we decided to retire — my husband from a career in shipping, and I from my job as a magazine editor — and build a barge to explore France every summer via that country’s huge network of waterways. We launched the Karanja, our 49-foot replica Dutch barge built by Piper Boats in England, on the Thames. A year later, we sailed her across the Channel to Calais, down rivers and canals to the south of France — an unforgettably wonderful experience.

Canal du Midi canal in Toulouse, France. pase4 | iStock | Getty Images

Every October, we winterize our boat and leave her in a safe port — for the moment, that’s Moissac on the Canal de Garonne. Then we fly south — like migrating geese — to spend yet another summer between Durban and Perth. We simply don’t do winter.

The nomadic retirement

Now meet South Africans Gail and Neil Greenfield, the epitome of retired nomads. After eight years as expats in the U.K., the U.S., Germany and Singapore, this occupational therapist and accountant couple retired in their late 40s to start living their dream. Every year, they spend about three months each in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas. They have a camper van in Europe for the summer and keep a pick-up truck and an off-road caravan in South Africa, too. “We like to return to favorite spots like Phuket, Italy and South Africa every year, and we try to add a couple of new destinations too,” said Gail. “This year we visited Colombia, Brazil, Panama and Saint Lucia for the first time.”

Rather than slowing down, nomadic retirees quit work to travel the world. Sam Diephuis | Tetra images | Getty Images

Choosing eclectic travel themes — like wine routes, music festivals, bird-watching, Grand Slam tennis tournaments and even barbecue restaurants across America — adds sometimes quirky twists to their travel adventures. When it comes to the planning, big events like this year’s Rugby World Cup in Japan are anchored in first, Gail explained. The monthly plan is finalized about a year in advance, with key flights and reservations booked. Other details fall into place closer to the time. “For example, we’ll rent a car for a road trip across the U.S. about three months ahead, but we won’t set a daily itinerary,” she said. “We like some flexibility.”

The rules to retiring early

So you’re probably wondering: As relatively ordinary salaried people, how were they able to retire so young and afford this lifestyle of extensive travel? “If you want to retire early,” Neil joked, “don’t have kids and don’t get divorced!” More seriously, he added, hard work and a good expat package make saving and investing easier in the last 10 years of your career when income earning potential is at its highest.

To retire early, don’t fall into the trap of living above your means. Sam Edwards | OJO Images | Getty Images

“Expats can fall into the trap of living above their means,” said Gail. “We never skimped on lifestyle or travel, but we didn’t waste money on unnecessary luxury.” Also, they don’t believe in owning multiple properties. “It’s always cheaper to rent,” she said. Like us, Gail and Neil’s best experiences involve the people they meet and the time they spend with family and friends. “No amount of five-star luxury ever beats sitting around a barbecue in your mates’ backyard,” said Neil.

Living life as a nomad

There are umpteen variations on the nomadic lifestyle. Many Brits spend the summer in Europe on boats like ours; some have sold their houses and live year-round on their floating homes. At the other end of the scale are the seriously well-heeled world cruisers. Right now, the luxurious Viking Sun Ultimate World Cruise — said to be the longest cruise ever — is visiting 53 countries over an astounding 245 days.

The author, Verne Maree and her husband Roy, on the boat Karanja at Henley-on-Thames. Courtesy of Verne Maree

Affordability aside, that may not appeal to everyone. Likewise, nomadic retirement is not everyone’s cup of Earl Grey — and it is certainly not for the kind of retiree who is deeply involved in family obligations, such as caring for elders or baby-sitting grandchildren.

The downsides to a life of constant travel


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-14  Authors: verne maree, monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, france, early, gail, nomadic, south, world, retire, travel, summer, spend, dont


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How to ski Zermatt, Niseko, Whistler, Aspen and Northern Iceland in one trip

Start on the slopes of SwitzerlandThe trip begins at the foot of the Matterhorn in the iconic Alpine resort of Zermatt. This tiny, walkable mountain village in Switzerland offers 360 kilometers (224 miles) of ski runs, including those at Matterhorn Glacier Paradise. Guests of this trip stay at the Schweizerhof Zermatt hotel, a mountain retreat that is part of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World collection. Estimated stay: five nights in Whistler, two nights in Vancouver, four nights in remote B


Start on the slopes of SwitzerlandThe trip begins at the foot of the Matterhorn in the iconic Alpine resort of Zermatt.
This tiny, walkable mountain village in Switzerland offers 360 kilometers (224 miles) of ski runs, including those at Matterhorn Glacier Paradise.
Guests of this trip stay at the Schweizerhof Zermatt hotel, a mountain retreat that is part of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World collection.
Estimated stay: five nights in Whistler, two nights in Vancouver, four nights in remote B
How to ski Zermatt, Niseko, Whistler, Aspen and Northern Iceland in one trip Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli, chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, northern, mountain, ski, whistler, niseko, stay, guests, aspen, matterhorn, heliskiing, iceland, including, zermatt, trip, nights


How to ski Zermatt, Niseko, Whistler, Aspen and Northern Iceland in one trip

Covering five countries on three continents in the span of 34 days, a ski trip launching this December lets people experience some of the best glacier runs and off-piste heli-skiing on the planet. The trip is designed for wealthy travelers as well as those seeking new cultural experiences, said Kirsty Edwards, head of operated ski product at Scott Dunn, the luxury tour operator behind the trip. “This itinerary is sandwiched by city stays in a hand-picked selection of fabulous hotels and resorts, and incredible mountain experiences including some of the best heli-ski in the world.”

Skiing with Last Frontier Heliskiing. Reuben Krabbe | Last Frontier Heliskiing

Every tour is bespoke, but the itinerary looks like this:

1. Start on the slopes of Switzerland

The trip begins at the foot of the Matterhorn in the iconic Alpine resort of Zermatt. This tiny, walkable mountain village in Switzerland offers 360 kilometers (224 miles) of ski runs, including those at Matterhorn Glacier Paradise. At 3,883 meters (12,740 feet) above sea level, the area is home to the highest mountain station in Europe; guests reach it by luxury gondolas that can carry 28 people at once.

Zermatt, below the pyramid-shaped Matterhorn peak. Beerpixs | Moment | Getty Images

Skiing here is year-round, though some simply come for the views. From the station at Klein Matterhorn, you can see 14 glaciers and 38 peaks that tower 4,000 meters above sea level or more, including France’s Mont Blanc and, on good days, Italy’s Gran Paradiso.

View from Matterhorn Glacier Paradise, the highest station in the Alps. lowe99 | iStock | Getty Images

Après-ski options at Zermatt are almost as good a reason to go as the snow. Rustic mountain pubs mingle with Michelin-starred restaurants, heralding a new moniker — “the gourmet capital of the Alps” — for the mountain resort. Guests of this trip stay at the Schweizerhof Zermatt hotel, a mountain retreat that is part of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World collection. Estimated stay: four nights

2. Then jump over to Japan

Flying overnight from Zurich to Tokyo, the journey continues to Niseko, located on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido. It’s no easy feat to break into the list of the world’s best ski destinations. But Niseko’s meteoric rise from local ski town to global hotspot is deserving; its champagne powdery slopes (due to the snow’s low water content) and expansive backcountry are prized by skiers and snowboarders alike. Natural onsens, or hot springs, and Japanese hospitality and culinary skills couldn’t have hurt its case either.

Skiing in Niseko. Courtesy of Scott Dunn

Guests stay at the ski in/ski out Aya Niseko before moving to Aman Tokyo, an 87-room urban hotel with towering views of the Imperial Palace East Gardens. “Aman Tokyo is a particular highlight and a great base to explore the city,” says Edwards. “Guests can enjoy Tokyo’s wealth of fantastic restaurants, with more Michelin stars than any other city in the world.” Estimated stay: five nights in Niseko and two nights in Tokyo

3. Experience the best of British Columbia

After Asia, it’s off to North America for an 11-day tour of Canada’s westernmost province. The trip stops for two spots of heli-skiing: first in Whistler, with evenings spent in the luxurious Four Seasons Resort and Residences Whistler, before going off-the-grid with Last Frontier Heliskiing. The latter operates two lodges — log chalets in the Sheena Mountains and a historic hotel on the edge of the Alaskan border — with “exclusive access to the largest single heli-ski area on the planet,” per the company’s website.

Skiing with Last Frontier Heliskiing. Dave Silver | Last Frontier Heliskiing

“Heli-skiing gives guests the chance to access really remote, off-trail locations via helicopter as opposed to ski lifts,” says Edwards. “These are runs that have not been touched by other skiers and snowboarders, allowing guests to forge their own trails down the mountain.” Estimated stay: five nights in Whistler, two nights in Vancouver, four nights in remote British Columbia

4. Revel in the après-ski in Aspen

The Rocky Mountains are the longest mountain range in North America, and Aspen is one of its most chichi towns. Home to festivals — music, film and ideas, yes there’s an Aspen Ideas Festival — and numerous sporting events including the Winter X-Games, Aspen is known for its quintessential ski slopes and the rich and famous that flock to them.

Just off the slopes at Aspen. Jakob Helbig | Image Source | Getty Images

Celebs aside, Aspen boasts one of the best off-slope scenes in the U.S., including a lively arts culture, upscale shopping and social traditions like the nightly Champagne sabering at Mountain Social Bar & Lounge. Guests of the ski trip stay at The Little Nell, a renowned ski-in, ski-out hotel on Aspen Mountain with a 20,000-bottle wine cellar and rooms warmed by gas log fireplaces and heated marble floors and walls. Estimated stay: five nights

5. End on a high note in Northern Iceland

The trip culminates with one of the biggest selling points of the entire adventure — a stay at Deplar Farm on Iceland’s Troll Peninsula.

Skiing in Iceland. Courtesy of Deplar Farm.

A converted sheep farm in the Fljót region, this 13-suite luxury lodge is set among rolling farmlands, dramatic couloirs and crystalline fjords. Adventure travelers can heli-ski and fat-bike by day, while lazing away the evenings in the geo-thermal heated pool, which in the winter “provides front-row seats to view the ghostly Northern Lights,” according to Eleven Experience, the company behind the lodge.

Deplar Farm. Courtesy of Scott Dunn

“Deplar Farm is a brilliant way to end the trip as it offers a range of different activities in a totally remote setting. It is quite unlike anywhere else,” says Edwards. Estimated stay: four nights

When to go:

You can book anytime between December and March.

What it costs:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli, chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, northern, mountain, ski, whistler, niseko, stay, guests, aspen, matterhorn, heliskiing, iceland, including, zermatt, trip, nights


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Singapore Raffles Hotel opens after two-year restoration

After shutting its doors for more than two years, Raffles Singapore officially reopened this month. Raffles Singapore. The Grand Lobby at Raffles Singapore. A Studio Suite at Raffles Singapore. Cucumber with Oscietra caviar from Raffles Singapore.


After shutting its doors for more than two years, Raffles Singapore officially reopened this month.
Raffles Singapore.
The Grand Lobby at Raffles Singapore.
A Studio Suite at Raffles Singapore.
Cucumber with Oscietra caviar from Raffles Singapore.
Singapore Raffles Hotel opens after two-year restoration Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli, vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, singapore, pic, westbeld, opens, suites, twoyear, lobby, suite, hotel, courtesy, tablets, raffles, restoration


Singapore Raffles Hotel opens after two-year restoration

After shutting its doors for more than two years, Raffles Singapore officially reopened this month. Built in 1887 as a 10-room hotel, the property has undergone just two restorations in its 132-year history — a rarity in a city where change is near constant. Synonymous with old world grandeur and colonial tradition, the return of the city-state’s oldest and most iconic hotel has been the talk of the town — and the travel circuit. But is it worth all the hype? Here are five reasons why it may be:

1. All the touches that made Raffles special, still exist

Purists will delight that the hotel’s façade — and the gravel driveway that once welcomed horse-drawn carriages — remain largely the same. Under the watchful wisdom of designer Alexandra Champalimaud, the interior redesign stays true to the property’s illustrious past. Resident historian Leslie Danker gave his first tour 47 years ago, and he’s still part of the team.

Raffles Singapore. Courtesy of Raffles Singapore

Afternoon tea has always been a serious affair at the hotel; it’s now served in the Grand Lobby (and typically booked one month ahead). And, you can still sip a cherry liqueur-laced Singapore Sling while tossing peanut shells over your shoulder at the Long Bar, perhaps the only spot where it’s proper to be a bit uncouth.

The Grand Lobby at Raffles Singapore. Courtesy of Raffles Singapore

Revamped suites, new marble floors and a massive Prague-made chandelier with exactly 8,142 crystals help justify the new rates, which start around 1,300 Singapore dollars ($800) per night.

2. History blends with high tech

Imagine setting mood lighting, adjusting the temperature, closing the curtains, selecting a buckwheat pillow, choosing a movie on Amazon Prime, booking a massage and ordering a glass of Champagne — all from the comfort of your bed. Tablets now control every room within suites and allow communication with suite butlers.

Tablets come standard in every suite at Raffles Singapore. CNBC

But it’s not just tech for tech’s sake; the tablets were purposefully designed to be simple to use. Calling the tablets “very user-friendly,” Raffles Singapore’s General Manager Christian Westbeld says initial feedback from guests is that they are “a wonderful addition” to the hotel’s offerings.

3. It’s bigger and better

The revamped Raffles offers 115 suites (up from 103) in nine categories, from the 495-square-foot Studio Suites to the sprawling 2,800-square-foot Presidential Suites, the latter with living and dining rooms, antiques and private verandas. In fact, every suite has a veranda — where else could one cool off in 19th century Singapore heat?

A Studio Suite at Raffles Singapore. Courtesy of Raffles Singapore

Personality Suites are new and named after famous former guests – from John Wayne and Rudyard Kipling to Elizabeth Taylor, the latter of whom visited with Michael Jackson in tow.

One of two Presidential Suites at Raffles Singapore. Courtesy of Raffles Singapore

With the addition of 24-hour-a-day butler assistance, check-ins are performed within suite. “We don’t even have a front desk in the hotel lobby anymore,” says Westbeld, adding that services such as checking in and out, and concierge inquiries about Singapore art, cultural and historical events are all handled directly by suite butlers.

4. Big names are on the menu

The most visible change to the hotel’s restaurant scene are the collaborations with internationally renowned chefs. The Bar & Billiard Room has been reborn as BBR by Alain Ducasse. It’s the celebrity chef’s first Mediterranean sharing and grill concept and the new home to Raffles popular Sunday Champagne Brunch.

A look inside La Dame de Pic at Raffles Singapore. Courtesy of Raffles Singapore

With seven Michelin stars to her name, Anne-Sophie Pic makes her Asian fine dining debut with La Dame de Pic. Rounding out the mix is “yì by Jereme Leung,” a restaurant that namechecks the Singaporean master of modern Chinese.

Cucumber with Oscietra caviar from Raffles Singapore. Courtesy of Raffles Singapore

5. It’s pure emotional luxury

Online ratings surely matter, but with properties as historically rich as this, the best attributes often can’t be understood until they are experienced in person. Christian says staying at Raffles allows guests to feel that time is ticking in a “different way.” A stay “allows you to actually look at your inner self and think about the world with a different viewpoint. It points out to you what is really important in life,” says Westbeld. “And that’s something that makes this building extremely special.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli, vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, singapore, pic, westbeld, opens, suites, twoyear, lobby, suite, hotel, courtesy, tablets, raffles, restoration


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