This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni


She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni
This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

Warren cited data that indicates that more than 70% of black mothers and more than 40% of Latina mothers are the sole breadwinners in their families, compared to less than a quarter of white mothers. She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination.

In a Medium post, the Massachusetts senator writes that if elected, on day one of her presidency she would implement a set of executive actions that would “boost wages for women of color and open up new pathways to the leadership positions they deserve.”

On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks on during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “And it’s getting worse,” writes Warren. “The gap in weekly earnings between white and black women is higher today than it was 40 years ago. ”

To fix this problem, Warren says that as president she would deny federal contracts to companies with a poor track record of diversity and equal pay, implement a minimum wage salary of $15 an hour (since black and brown women disproportionately occupy low-wage jobs), ban companies from asking applicants about their salary and criminal histories, and ban companies from using forced arbitration and non-compete clauses that “make it harder for employees to fight wage theft, discrimination and harassment.”

Additionally, Warren points out that women of color also face a steeper climb to higher-level management positions. “Even though black women and Latinas are often the leaders and decision-makers in their own homes and communities, they hold only one spot on the Fortune 500 CEO list and less than 5% of Fortune 500 Board positions, ” she writes.

Currently, Mary Winston, who was appointed interim CEO of Bed, Bath & Beyond in May, is the only black woman leading a Fortune 500 company.

Warren writes that she would provide companies with resources to attract applicants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities and other minority-serving institutions. She says she would also create paid fellowship programs for federal jobs for minority and low-income candidates and she would require every federal agency to make diversity a core part of its strategic plan. This includes, she says, creating a government-wide mentorship program focused on black and brown employees.

“It’s time to build an America that recognizes the role that women of color play in their families and in the economy,” writes Warren, “that fairly values their work, and that delivers equal opportunity for everyone.”

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Don’t miss: Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


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Nursing mothers are selling and donating their milk using Facebook groups, and experts have mixed views about it

The problem is particularly acute for parents of sick or premature infants, who may not be able to digest formula as well as human milk. So to find parents who wanted it, Davis joined several private groups on Facebook that are dedicated to human breast milk exchange. Others are open pages, like the Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network, which has more than 80,000 likes. No controlsMost of the groups that have popped up on Facebook specialize in donated milk from mothers like Davis. It’s poss


The problem is particularly acute for parents of sick or premature infants, who may not be able to digest formula as well as human milk. So to find parents who wanted it, Davis joined several private groups on Facebook that are dedicated to human breast milk exchange. Others are open pages, like the Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network, which has more than 80,000 likes. No controlsMost of the groups that have popped up on Facebook specialize in donated milk from mothers like Davis. It’s poss
Nursing mothers are selling and donating their milk using Facebook groups, and experts have mixed views about it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, human, davis, mixed, breast, babies, son, mothers, milk, groups, donated, selling, using, san, views, experts, nursing, donor


Nursing mothers are selling and donating their milk using Facebook groups, and experts have mixed views about it

Bojan Fatur | E+ | Getty Images

Within weeks of giving birth, first-time mother Kyra Davis realized she was producing more milk than her baby needed. So she began storing it in her fridge and freezer at her San Francisco home. Davis had heard about the well-documented shortages at donor banks across the country. The problem is particularly acute for parents of sick or premature infants, who may not be able to digest formula as well as human milk. So to find parents who wanted it, Davis joined several private groups on Facebook that are dedicated to human breast milk exchange. Some of these Facebook groups are closed, meaning that outsiders can view them but cannot join without approval, such as Human Milk For Babies, a group that has more than two thousand members and promotes donation rather than sales of milk, and Buy, Sell, and Donate Breast Milk, with more than 5,000 members. Others are open pages, like the Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network, which has more than 80,000 likes.

Kyra Davis and her son Jude Kyra Davis

Davis is now donating her milk to about 7 or 8 families, most of whom she met on Facebook. They’ll pick up 50 ounces or more from her — enough to feed very young babies for at least two days, in most cases — and will often bring small tokens of their appreciation, like a home-cooked meal. Davis does not accept payment for her milk and has donated it in the Bay Area and in Hawaii, where she was recently on vacation. In an interview, Davis said she was driven by a desire to give back. When her infant, Jude, was in the neo-natal intensive care unit at the University of California San Francisco, she was given a “high suction” hospital grade pump to stimulate her supply. She put her energies into that, and her milk came in strongly and quickly. So she thought about donating it to the bank there, but felt overwhelmed by all the logistical hurdles when her son was still in recovery. The American Academy of Pediatrics has made human milk a standard of care for premature babies. But in many cases, the lack of supply has means that the milk is reserved for only the most premature infants. It struck Davis while in the hospital that if she had struggled to produce milk, Jude might not be at the top of the list, as he wasn’t born early.

No controls

Most of the groups that have popped up on Facebook specialize in donated milk from mothers like Davis. But some offer to sell their oversupply for upwards of $3 an ounce. And outside of Facebook, so-called “underground” websites have proliferated that take advantage of the growing demand for breast milk, with some selling it for up to $16 per ounce. That would represent hundreds of dollars a month in out-of-pocket expenses for a family, meaning only wealthy parents could afford it. Davis says she is committed to her own health and well-being, and has stuck to the guidelines about things like alcohol consumption while breastfeeding. She’s also careful about how she stores her milk to prevent contamination. But some medical experts fear that not everyone is as vigilant. Susan Crowe, an obstetrician who sits on the board of a breast milk bank in San Jose, Calif., noted when researchers in 2015 studied samples of breast milk purchased online, they uncovered that about 10 percent had been tainted with cow’s milk. The researchers speculated that it was a way for the sellers to make more money. Crowe said there haven’t been many studies like donated versus sold milk. It’s possible, she noted, that risks are lower for donated milk because the motives are different. But she also explained that at donor banks, breast milk has been pasteurized and tested for infectious diseases, and there are numerous other guardrails in place to ensure it is safe for the infant. With donor milk acquired on Facebook, there are no such guarantees. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics and U.S. Food and Drug administration recommend against internet-based milk-sharing sites, according to the Center for Disease Control, and guide mothers to donation-based human milk banks instead. Meanwhile, some investors are beginning to see an opportunity in the space. Vanessa Larco, a venture capitalist at New Enterprise Associates, experienced her own struggles with breastfeeding after her own son was born. She’s developed an interest in infant nutrition as a result, and has been thinking deeply about opportunities to bridge the gap by making it easier for women to access safe and high-quality donor breast milk when supplies are running low. “I’m deeply passionate about this and have been thinking deeply about the right way to do it,” she said.

‘Breast is best’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, human, davis, mixed, breast, babies, son, mothers, milk, groups, donated, selling, using, san, views, experts, nursing, donor


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The ‘motherhood penalty’ is real, and it costs women $16,000 a year in lost wages

The so-called “motherhood penalty” is alive and well in America. Despite making gains in education and experience, mothers are still facing an uphill battle in the workplace — and a pay gap that has barely budged in 30 years. In fact, it’s costing them $16,000 a year in lost wages, according to an analysis of Census data by the nonprofit advocacy organization National Women’s Law Center in 2018. Mothers in the U.S. get paid 71 cents for every dollar their male counterparts make. “Women, and prim


The so-called “motherhood penalty” is alive and well in America. Despite making gains in education and experience, mothers are still facing an uphill battle in the workplace — and a pay gap that has barely budged in 30 years. In fact, it’s costing them $16,000 a year in lost wages, according to an analysis of Census data by the nonprofit advocacy organization National Women’s Law Center in 2018. Mothers in the U.S. get paid 71 cents for every dollar their male counterparts make. “Women, and prim
The ‘motherhood penalty’ is real, and it costs women $16,000 a year in lost wages Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: michelle fox, image source, getty images, source, linda chau, -joya misra, professor, university of massachusetts amherst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, study, motherhood, lost, working, law, womens, national, wages, mothers, costs, work, women, 16000, skills, education, real, penalty, workplace


The 'motherhood penalty' is real, and it costs women $16,000 a year in lost wages

The so-called “motherhood penalty” is alive and well in America.

Despite making gains in education and experience, mothers are still facing an uphill battle in the workplace — and a pay gap that has barely budged in 30 years. In fact, it’s costing them $16,000 a year in lost wages, according to an analysis of Census data by the nonprofit advocacy organization National Women’s Law Center in 2018. Mothers in the U.S. get paid 71 cents for every dollar their male counterparts make.

They’re also dealing with employers who view them as less devoted to their jobs.

“Employers still have stereotypes about the value of mothers as workers. Their social science research that shows if a woman is a parent, employers are likely to see her as less capable and less committed to work,” Emily Martin, general counsel and vice president for education and workplace justice at the National Women’s Law Center, tells CNBC.

It also extends to coworkers. A recent study by Bright Horizons, which operates over 1,000 early education centers and preschools in the U.S., found that 41 percent of employed Americans perceive working moms to be less devoted to their work. More than one-third judge them for needing a flexible schedule, the study found. And when it comes to announcing pregnancies, the number of women worried about telling their bosses has nearly doubled in five years — from 12 percent in 2014 to 21 percent in the 2019 study.

“Women, and primarily working mothers, are being treated differently,” said Maribeth Bearfield, Bright Horizons’ chief human resources officer. “They feel they are not being given the same type of career opportunities as others but they skills they bring to the table — multi-tasking, discipline — are skills we really need.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: michelle fox, image source, getty images, source, linda chau, -joya misra, professor, university of massachusetts amherst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, study, motherhood, lost, working, law, womens, national, wages, mothers, costs, work, women, 16000, skills, education, real, penalty, workplace


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The ‘motherhood penalty’ is real, and it costs women $16,000 a year in lost wages

The so-called “motherhood penalty” is alive and well in America. Despite making gains in education and experience, mothers are still facing an uphill battle in the workplace — and a pay gap that has barely budged in 30 years. In fact, it’s costing them $16,000 a year in lost wages, according to an analysis of Census data by the nonprofit advocacy organization National Women’s Law Center in 2018. Mothers in the U.S. get paid 71 cents for every dollar their male counterparts make. “Women, and prim


The so-called “motherhood penalty” is alive and well in America. Despite making gains in education and experience, mothers are still facing an uphill battle in the workplace — and a pay gap that has barely budged in 30 years. In fact, it’s costing them $16,000 a year in lost wages, according to an analysis of Census data by the nonprofit advocacy organization National Women’s Law Center in 2018. Mothers in the U.S. get paid 71 cents for every dollar their male counterparts make. “Women, and prim
The ‘motherhood penalty’ is real, and it costs women $16,000 a year in lost wages Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: michelle fox, image source, getty images, source, linda chau, -joya misra, professor, university of massachusetts amherst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lost, costs, working, skills, women, mothers, womens, real, 16000, workplace, study, national, law, wages, education, penalty, motherhood, work


The 'motherhood penalty' is real, and it costs women $16,000 a year in lost wages

The so-called “motherhood penalty” is alive and well in America.

Despite making gains in education and experience, mothers are still facing an uphill battle in the workplace — and a pay gap that has barely budged in 30 years. In fact, it’s costing them $16,000 a year in lost wages, according to an analysis of Census data by the nonprofit advocacy organization National Women’s Law Center in 2018. Mothers in the U.S. get paid 71 cents for every dollar their male counterparts make.

They’re also dealing with employers who view them as less devoted to their jobs.

“Employers still have stereotypes about the value of mothers as workers. Their social science research that shows if a woman is a parent, employers are likely to see her as less capable and less committed to work,” Emily Martin, general counsel and vice president for education and workplace justice at the National Women’s Law Center, tells CNBC.

It also extends to coworkers. A recent study by Bright Horizons, which operates over 1,000 early education centers and preschools in the U.S., found that 41 percent of employed Americans perceive working moms to be less devoted to their work. More than one-third judge them for needing a flexible schedule, the study found. And when it comes to announcing pregnancies, the number of women worried about telling their bosses has nearly doubled in five years — from 12 percent in 2014 to 21 percent in the 2019 study.

“Women, and primarily working mothers, are being treated differently,” said Maribeth Bearfield, Bright Horizons’ chief human resources officer. “They feel they are not being given the same type of career opportunities as others but they skills they bring to the table — multi-tasking, discipline — are skills we really need.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: michelle fox, image source, getty images, source, linda chau, -joya misra, professor, university of massachusetts amherst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lost, costs, working, skills, women, mothers, womens, real, 16000, workplace, study, national, law, wages, education, penalty, motherhood, work


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American mothers have it the worst, and it’s not their fault—here’s why

It should come as no surprise to hear that American mothers are drowning in stress the most — at least when compared to other countries. In her new book, “Making Motherhood Work,” sociologist Caitlyn Collins explains why mothers in the U.S. have it the worst. In her research, Collins interviews 135 middle-class working mothers in the U.S., Germany, Sweden and Italy. “The United States is an outlier among Western Industrialized countries for its lack of support for working mothers,” she writes in


It should come as no surprise to hear that American mothers are drowning in stress the most — at least when compared to other countries. In her new book, “Making Motherhood Work,” sociologist Caitlyn Collins explains why mothers in the U.S. have it the worst. In her research, Collins interviews 135 middle-class working mothers in the U.S., Germany, Sweden and Italy. “The United States is an outlier among Western Industrialized countries for its lack of support for working mothers,” she writes in
American mothers have it the worst, and it’s not their fault—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: amy morin, crience
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, american, work, demands, support, mothers, germany, faultheres, women, collins, working, placed, writes


American mothers have it the worst, and it's not their fault—here's why

It should come as no surprise to hear that American mothers are drowning in stress the most — at least when compared to other countries.

In her new book, “Making Motherhood Work,” sociologist Caitlyn Collins explains why mothers in the U.S. have it the worst. The majority of them experience crushing guilt about not being good enough in their careers and not being available for their families around the clock.

But none of that is their fault, Collins argues, because they have more demands placed on them and fewer support systems to help them. In her research, Collins interviews 135 middle-class working mothers in the U.S., Germany, Sweden and Italy. “The United States is an outlier among Western Industrialized countries for its lack of support for working mothers,” she writes in her book.

In Berlin, for example, mothers feel well-supported by the culture set in place. Policies there allow many to work part-time or telecommute after taking a full year of parental leave. “Germany has 83 million people, and they figured out. There are a lot of smart people here and [the U.S.] can figure it out,” she said in an interview with Psychology Today.

Women’s magazines and TV shows are filled with productivity tips — suggesting that women are overwhelmed because they don’t know how to be efficient. But the truth is, women have too many demands placed on them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: amy morin, crience
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, american, work, demands, support, mothers, germany, faultheres, women, collins, working, placed, writes


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These are the 10 best companies for working mothers

Seventy percent of mothers with children under the age of 18 are in today’s workforce, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. In a tight labor market, it’s a great time for companies to focus on creating work environments that empower working parents. Each year, Working Mother magazine releases a list of the 100 Best Companies for working mothers. To make the cut, companies submit an application that includes more than 400 questions about leave policies, workforce representation, benefits, c


Seventy percent of mothers with children under the age of 18 are in today’s workforce, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. In a tight labor market, it’s a great time for companies to focus on creating work environments that empower working parents. Each year, Working Mother magazine releases a list of the 100 Best Companies for working mothers. To make the cut, companies submit an application that includes more than 400 questions about leave policies, workforce representation, benefits, c
These are the 10 best companies for working mothers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-10  Authors: courtney connley, tara moore, taxi, getty images, carlos osorio toronto star getty images, andrew harrer, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, programs, application, mothers, workforce, best, labor, mother, half, working, companies, policies


These are the 10 best companies for working mothers

Seventy percent of mothers with children under the age of 18 are in today’s workforce, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. In a tight labor market, it’s a great time for companies to focus on creating work environments that empower working parents.

Each year, Working Mother magazine releases a list of the 100 Best Companies for working mothers. To make the cut, companies submit an application that includes more than 400 questions about leave policies, workforce representation, benefits, childcare assistance, advancement programs and flexibility. The application also inquires about whether employees are actually taking advantage of a company’s benefits.

“That all of these programs and policies are offered is just half of it,” Working Mother President Subha Barry tells CNBC Make It. “The other half is that you encourage people to use it, and don’t penalize them.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-10  Authors: courtney connley, tara moore, taxi, getty images, carlos osorio toronto star getty images, andrew harrer, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, programs, application, mothers, workforce, best, labor, mother, half, working, companies, policies


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British cult favorite Elemis is the latest skin-care brand to hit the block, taps Jefferies

British luxury skin-care brand Elemis has tapped investment bank Jefferies Group to explore a sale of the business, sources familiar with the situation tell CNBC. Millennials are now aging and concerned about wrinkles, shifting their focus away from color cosmetics toward skin care. “One of the drivers of the growth in color cosmetics was young millennials teaching their mothers about color cosmetics — mothers didn’t grow up in the age of YouTube, strobing and contouring,” said Andrew Shore, a m


British luxury skin-care brand Elemis has tapped investment bank Jefferies Group to explore a sale of the business, sources familiar with the situation tell CNBC. Millennials are now aging and concerned about wrinkles, shifting their focus away from color cosmetics toward skin care. “One of the drivers of the growth in color cosmetics was young millennials teaching their mothers about color cosmetics — mothers didn’t grow up in the age of YouTube, strobing and contouring,” said Andrew Shore, a m
British cult favorite Elemis is the latest skin-care brand to hit the block, taps Jefferies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-16  Authors: lauren hirsch, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, latest, cosmetics, taps, color, products, cult, favorite, acquired, sales, sale, jefferies, skincare, elemis, hit, mothers, brand, british, beauty, private


British cult favorite Elemis is the latest skin-care brand to hit the block, taps Jefferies

British luxury skin-care brand Elemis has tapped investment bank Jefferies Group to explore a sale of the business, sources familiar with the situation tell CNBC.

Elemis has roughly $50 million in earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, the sources said, asking not to be named because the information is confidential.

Its private equity owner L Catterton told CNBC it does not comment on rumors or speculation. Jefferies also declined to comment.

The upscale brand is the latest skin-care company to put itself up for sale, taking advantage of increased interest and growing sales in the industry. Millennials are now aging and concerned about wrinkles, shifting their focus away from color cosmetics toward skin care. This trend fits with a deeper interest in all forms of wellness, whether it be fitness, diet or beauty.

“One of the drivers of the growth in color cosmetics was young millennials teaching their mothers about color cosmetics — mothers didn’t grow up in the age of YouTube, strobing and contouring,” said Andrew Shore, a managing director at investment bank Moelis.

“Now, early adopters to color cosmetics are coming of age and their mothers are teaching them about skincare.”

The $5.6 billion skin-care industry last year grew 9 percent, according to market researcher The NPD Group, while sales of makeup grew 6 percent.

Elemis distinguishes itself from its niche competitors both by its comparatively larger size and unique sales distribution. The cult favorite sells in airports and on cruises, where it hopes to create new customers as well as serve existing ones.

Nontraditional ways of selling products have become increasingly important as department stores and drugstores lose foot traffic, making spontaneous purchases harder to come by. Leading beauty care retailer Sephora, meantime, is ceding more space to its private label products and brands that are owned by its parent, LVMH, such as Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty cosmetics.

Elemis is also available in more than 1,600 spas, salons and stores and on websites, as well as on shopping network QVC. It recently began selling in Ulta Beauty in the U.S., which it will use as its launching pad into the region.

Its products, including Superfood Facial Oil and Pro-Collagen Marine Cream, claim to combine laboratory-made ingredients with plant-based botanicals.

Elemis was acquired by L Catterton’s predecessor, Catterton, in 2015, when the private equity firm acquired Elemis’ parent, Steiner Leisure, for $925 million, including debt.

A sale would be the latest in a string of deal activity in the industry. Colgate-Palmolive acquired professional skin-care brands PCA Skin and EltaMD last year, and Procter & Gamble acquired prestige skin-care label First Aid Beauty earlier this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-16  Authors: lauren hirsch, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, latest, cosmetics, taps, color, products, cult, favorite, acquired, sales, sale, jefferies, skincare, elemis, hit, mothers, brand, british, beauty, private


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Student loan debt is a hurdle for many would-be mothers

Because of her student loans, Michelle Fernie-Oley has put off children — for now. Together they make more than six figures but Fernie-Oley is also paying back a loan tab that’s just under $80,000. “We discuss kids constantly,” she said, but “I can’t imagine having a child when I have to pay over $600 per month just to my student loans.” Student debt in America has skyrocketed in recent years and now stands at a record $1.5 trillion. In fact, 42 percent of women have more than $30,000 in college


Because of her student loans, Michelle Fernie-Oley has put off children — for now. Together they make more than six figures but Fernie-Oley is also paying back a loan tab that’s just under $80,000. “We discuss kids constantly,” she said, but “I can’t imagine having a child when I have to pay over $600 per month just to my student loans.” Student debt in America has skyrocketed in recent years and now stands at a record $1.5 trillion. In fact, 42 percent of women have more than $30,000 in college
Student loan debt is a hurdle for many would-be mothers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-22  Authors: jessica dickler, source, mikkel paige
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wouldbe, fernieoley, college, women, student, likely, mothers, men, pay, loans, loan, debt, hurdle


Student loan debt is a hurdle for many would-be mothers

Because of her student loans, Michelle Fernie-Oley has put off children — for now.

Fernie-Oley, 33, and her 34-year-old husband, John, have been married for two years and live in New York.

She is a wedding planner and owns her own business. He is a stagehand. Together they make more than six figures but Fernie-Oley is also paying back a loan tab that’s just under $80,000.

“We discuss kids constantly,” she said, but “I can’t imagine having a child when I have to pay over $600 per month just to my student loans.”

“It’s crippling,” she said.

Student debt in America has skyrocketed in recent years and now stands at a record $1.5 trillion. It is a burden that is not shared equally.

Largely because women outnumber men in college these days and are more likely to pursue a graduate degree, they are the ones who end up with the bigger loan balances.

In fact, 42 percent of women have more than $30,000 in college debt, compared with 27 percent of men. Women also are two times more likely than men to think it will take more than 20 years to pay off their loans, according to market research firm ORC International.

Women also earn less over their lifetimes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-22  Authors: jessica dickler, source, mikkel paige
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wouldbe, fernieoley, college, women, student, likely, mothers, men, pay, loans, loan, debt, hurdle


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These 4 Mother’s Day gadgets will help mom all year round

If you or someone in the family is constantly losing their keys, phone or wallet, a device called Tile can help solve that problem. Tile uses Bluetooth technology to keep track of your stuff. When you open the Tile app on their phone, you can make it ring. If the Tile is out of earshot, the app will show you the device’s last known location. Each Tile starts at $20, but you can buy them in packs for a discount, or upgrade to different styles.


If you or someone in the family is constantly losing their keys, phone or wallet, a device called Tile can help solve that problem. Tile uses Bluetooth technology to keep track of your stuff. When you open the Tile app on their phone, you can make it ring. If the Tile is out of earshot, the app will show you the device’s last known location. Each Tile starts at $20, but you can buy them in packs for a discount, or upgrade to different styles.
These 4 Mother’s Day gadgets will help mom all year round Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-11  Authors: erin barry, max user, getty images, justin sullivan, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uses, mom, gadgets, tile, device, phone, youre, wallet, chase, ring, upgrade, mothers, app, day, round, help


These 4 Mother's Day gadgets will help mom all year round

If you or someone in the family is constantly losing their keys, phone or wallet, a device called Tile can help solve that problem. Tile uses Bluetooth technology to keep track of your stuff.

“They’re like a second brain,” said Chase in an interview.

Users attach a device, about a quarter of the size of a Post It note, to an item such as a key ring or a phone. When you open the Tile app on their phone, you can make it ring. If the Tile is out of earshot, the app will show you the device’s last known location.

There is also another use case for parents. “I love attaching it to my kid’s security blankets…because you’re always scrambling in the middle of the night to find it,” Chase added.

Each Tile starts at $20, but you can buy them in packs for a discount, or upgrade to different styles.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-11  Authors: erin barry, max user, getty images, justin sullivan, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uses, mom, gadgets, tile, device, phone, youre, wallet, chase, ring, upgrade, mothers, app, day, round, help


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The best gift for Mother’s Day would be equal pay

It is estimated that women’s earnings drop 20 percent compared to men after the birth of their first child and stays lower over the long run. There is a very similar drop in pay when comparing women who have had at least one child with women who are childless. Having children does not impact men’s pay – men with or without children have roughly the same earnings. We would like to think that mothers are not discriminated against but evidence from experimental studies shows otherwise. There was no


It is estimated that women’s earnings drop 20 percent compared to men after the birth of their first child and stays lower over the long run. There is a very similar drop in pay when comparing women who have had at least one child with women who are childless. Having children does not impact men’s pay – men with or without children have roughly the same earnings. We would like to think that mothers are not discriminated against but evidence from experimental studies shows otherwise. There was no
The best gift for Mother’s Day would be equal pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-10  Authors: e anne york, professor of economics at the meredith college sch, creative touch imaging ltd, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lower, gift, equal, child, resumes, job, men, best, childless, drop, compared, applicant, gender, pay, day, mothers


The best gift for Mother's Day would be equal pay

“It is estimated that women’s earnings drop 20 percent compared to men after the birth of their first child and stays lower over the long run.”

It is estimated that women’s earnings drop 20 percent compared to men after the birth of their first child and stays lower over the long run. There is a very similar drop in pay when comparing women who have had at least one child with women who are childless. Having children does not impact men’s pay – men with or without children have roughly the same earnings.

We would like to think that mothers are not discriminated against but evidence from experimental studies shows otherwise. No two actual applicants or workers are truly equivalent to each other so it is difficult to pinpoint why their labor market outcomes could be different. But in numerous experiments in which, literally on paper, the qualifications of the applicants or workers are the same except for their gender and parental status, discrimination permeates reliably.

One audit study found that resumes where the applicant can be identified as a mother were significantly less likely to get a callback for an actual job interview for entry and mid-level marketing and business job openings compared to childless women.

There was no penalty to an applicant who could be identified as a father versus the male applicant who was childless. The same researchers conducted a laboratory experiment of resume comparisons by gender and parental status for the same type of job opening.

It revealed that raters judged otherwise equivalent mothers to be less competent and less committed to work, were held to stricter performance standards, a higher standard on punctuality, were less likely to be hired, and were offered lower starting salaries than men and childless women.

Another audit study sent fake resumes of law students to law firms to apply for actual internships. The resumes differed in indicators of gender and socioeconomic background. The resume with significantly more callbacks was from the higher-class male applicant, who did much better than the equal higher-class female applicant whose resume’s only difference was a female name.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-10  Authors: e anne york, professor of economics at the meredith college sch, creative touch imaging ltd, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lower, gift, equal, child, resumes, job, men, best, childless, drop, compared, applicant, gender, pay, day, mothers


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