Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti


Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti
Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eve, slogans, indian, soura, kashmirs, holy, jammu, hundreds, chant, india, seething, antiindia, kashmiris, marching, kashmir, region, festival, muslim


Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy.

Hundreds of people protested in Kashmir’s main city of Srinagar on Sunday against India’s decision to curb its autonomy, despite new restrictions on travel and a seventh straight day of communications blackout.

Restrictions that had been temporarily eased on Friday and Saturday — allowing some bakeries, pharmacies and fruit shops to open ahead of the Muslim holy festival of Eid al-Adha — were reinstated in major parts of the city on Sunday afternoon.

Police vans drove around some areas ordering people to shut shop and go home, and most streets were silent by evening, as thousands of troops kept vigil, witnesses said.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government locked down the Muslim-majority region last Sunday, cutting off communications, detaining more than 300 political leaders and activists, and putting a “virtual curfew” into force with numerous roadblocks stopping movement.

Seeking to tighten its grip on the region also claimed by neighboring Pakistan, India announced last Monday that it was scrapping Jammu and Kashmir’s right to frame its own laws and allowed non-residents to buy property there.

Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses.

Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constitutional provision that India revoked last week. A swarm of women and girls in colourful headscarves followed the marching men.

“What do we want? Freedom! When do we want it? Now!” the crowd shouted, marching around the neighborhood.

Some of them held up paper banners, including one that read: “Modi, Kashmir is not your father’s property.”

India’s Home Ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The demonstration in Soura followed a much larger protest in the same area on Friday, when pro-independence youths marched before being repelled by tear gas and pellets.

Leaders in Kashmir had warned of a backlash against the stripping of autonomy in a territory where militants have been fighting Indian rule for nearly 30 years, resulting in the deaths of more than 50,000 people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eve, slogans, indian, soura, kashmirs, holy, jammu, hundreds, chant, india, seething, antiindia, kashmiris, marching, kashmir, region, festival, muslim


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20 dead as bombs target Sunday Mass in Philippine cathedral

Two bombs minutes apart tore through a Roman Catholic cathedral on a southern Philippine island where Muslim militants are active, killing at least 20 people and wounding 111 others during a Sunday Mass, officials said. Witnesses said the first blast inside the Jolo cathedral in the provincial capital sent churchgoers, some of them wounded, to stampede out of the main door. Police said at least 20 people died and 111 were wounded, correcting an earlier toll due to double counting. Troops in armo


Two bombs minutes apart tore through a Roman Catholic cathedral on a southern Philippine island where Muslim militants are active, killing at least 20 people and wounding 111 others during a Sunday Mass, officials said. Witnesses said the first blast inside the Jolo cathedral in the provincial capital sent churchgoers, some of them wounded, to stampede out of the main door. Police said at least 20 people died and 111 were wounded, correcting an earlier toll due to double counting. Troops in armo
20 dead as bombs target Sunday Mass in Philippine cathedral Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-27  Authors: nickee butlangan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, town, bombs, target, 20, troops, region, mass, peace, muslim, militants, jolo, dead, cathedral, wounded, main


20 dead as bombs target Sunday Mass in Philippine cathedral

Two bombs minutes apart tore through a Roman Catholic cathedral on a southern Philippine island where Muslim militants are active, killing at least 20 people and wounding 111 others during a Sunday Mass, officials said.

Witnesses said the first blast inside the Jolo cathedral in the provincial capital sent churchgoers, some of them wounded, to stampede out of the main door. Army troops and police posted outside were rushing in when the second bomb went off about one minute later near the main entrance, causing more deaths and injuries. The military was checking a report that the second explosive device may have been attached to a parked motorcycle.

The initial explosion scattered the wooden pews inside the main hall and blasted window glass panels, and the second bomb hurled human remains and debris across a town square fronting the Cathedral of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, witnesses said. Cellphone signal was cut off in the first hours after the attack. The witnesses who spoke to The Associated Press refused to give their names or were busy at the scene of the blasts.

Police said at least 20 people died and 111 were wounded, correcting an earlier toll due to double counting. The fatalities included 15 civilians and five troops. Among the wounded were 17 troops, two police, two coast guard and 90 civilians.

Troops in armored carriers sealed off the main road leading to the church while vehicles transported the dead and wounded to the town hospital. Some casualties were evacuated by air to nearby Zamboanga city.

“I have directed our troops to heighten their alert level, secure all places of worships and public places at once, and initiate pro-active security measures to thwart hostile plans,” said Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana in a statement.

“We will pursue to the ends of the earth the ruthless perpetrators behind this dastardly crime until every killer is brought to justice and put behind bars. The law will give them no mercy,” the office of President Rodrigo Duterte said in Manila.

It said that “the enemies of the state boldly challenged the government’s capability to secure the safety of citizens in that region. The (Armed Forces of the Philippines) will rise to the challenge and crush these godless criminals.”

Jolo island has long been troubled by the presence of Abu Sayyaf militants, who are blacklisted by the United States and the Philippines as a terrorist organization because of years of bombings, kidnappings and beheadings. A Catholic bishop, Benjamin de Jesus, was gunned down by suspected militants outside the cathedral in 1997.

No one has immediately claimed responsibility for the latest attack.

It came nearly a week after minority Muslims in the predominantly Roman Catholic nation endorsed a new autonomous region in the southern Philippines in hopes of ending nearly five decades of a separatist rebellion that has left 150,000 people dead. Although most of the Muslim areas approved the autonomy deal, voters in Sulu province, where Jolo is located, rejected it. The province is home to a rival rebel faction that’s opposed to the deal as well as smaller militant cells that not part of any peace process.

Western governments have welcomed the autonomy pact. They worry that small numbers of Islamic State-linked militants from the Middle East and Southeast Asia could forge an alliance with Filipino insurgents and turn the south into a breeding ground for extremists.

“This bomb attack was done in a place of peace and worship, and it comes at a time when we are preparing for another stage of the peace process in Mindanao,” said Gov. Mujiv Hataman of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. “Human lives are irreplaceable,” he added, calling on Jolo residents to cooperate with authorities to find the perpetrators of this “atrocity.”

Security officials were looking “at different threat groups and they still can’t say if this has something to do with the just concluded plebiscite,” Oscar Albayalde, the national police chief, told ABS-CBN TV network. Hermogenes Esperon, the national security adviser, said that the new autonomous region, called Bangsamoro, “signifies the end of war for secession. It stands for peace in Mindanao.”

Aside from the small but brutal Abu Sayyaf group, other militant groups in Sulu include a small band of young jihadis aligned with the Islamic State group, which has also carried out assaults, including ransom kidnappings and beheadings.

Abu Sayyaf militants are still holding at least five hostages — a Dutch national, two Malaysians, an Indonesian and a Filipino — in their jungle bases mostly near Sulu’s Patikul town, not far from Jolo.

Government forces have pressed on sporadic offensives to crush the militants, including those in Jolo, a poverty-wracked island of more than 700,000 people. A few thousand Catholics live mostly in the capital of Jolo.

There have been speculations that the bombings may be a diversionary move by Muslim militants after troops recently carried out an offensive that killed a number of IS-linked extremists in an encampment in the hinterlands of Lanao del Sur province, also in the south. The area is near Marawi, a Muslim city that was besieged for five months by hundreds of IS-aligned militants, including foreign fighters, in 2017. Troops quelled the insurrection, which left more 1,100 mostly militants dead and the heartland of the mosque-studded city in ruins.

Duterte declared martial law in the entire southern third of the country to deal with the Marawi siege, his worst security crisis. His martial law declaration has been extended to allow troops to finish off radical Muslim groups and other insurgents but bombings and other attacks have continued.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-27  Authors: nickee butlangan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, town, bombs, target, 20, troops, region, mass, peace, muslim, militants, jolo, dead, cathedral, wounded, main


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Religion and economy will take center stage as Indonesia’s president seeks re-election, experts say

However, religion and identity politics are a “far more salient issue” in this year’s elections, Arifianto said. Religion is playing an increasingly important political role in Indonesia, which has the largest Muslim population in the world. Rallies against Jakarta’s governor in 2016 had cast serious doubt on Widodo’s religious credentials after his ally, Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama, was imprisoned on charges of blasphemy. “Ahok” — the capital’s first Chinese Christian governor — was found gui


However, religion and identity politics are a “far more salient issue” in this year’s elections, Arifianto said. Religion is playing an increasingly important political role in Indonesia, which has the largest Muslim population in the world. Rallies against Jakarta’s governor in 2016 had cast serious doubt on Widodo’s religious credentials after his ally, Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama, was imprisoned on charges of blasphemy. “Ahok” — the capital’s first Chinese Christian governor — was found gui
Religion and economy will take center stage as Indonesia’s president seeks re-election, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-21  Authors: shirley tay, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, religion, indonesias, supporters, prabowo, religious, far, stage, muslim, center, support, politics, population, say, experts, political, reelection, economy, widodos, seeks


Religion and economy will take center stage as Indonesia's president seeks re-election, experts say

However, religion and identity politics are a “far more salient issue” in this year’s elections, Arifianto said. He explained that identity politics — which he defined as the usage of religious and/or ethnic symbols by certain groups of people for their own political ends — could be one of the key deciding factors of Widodo’s election success.

Religion is playing an increasingly important political role in Indonesia, which has the largest Muslim population in the world.

Widodo’s selection of the highly influential Muslim cleric Ma’ruf Amin as his running mate has been seen by many as a move to enhance support from conservative religious groups.

Rallies against Jakarta’s governor in 2016 had cast serious doubt on Widodo’s religious credentials after his ally, Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama, was imprisoned on charges of blasphemy. “Ahok” — the capital’s first Chinese Christian governor — was found guilty of insulting the Quran after making references to the religious text in his rally speech. Those protests quickly spread, with opposition supporters using it as a platform to criticize Widodo’s government.

Some of those Islamic protesters are now backing Prabowo, according to Arifianto.

Although Widodo is leading in double digits in the opinion polls and has far more financial support than Prabowo, the former lieutenant general has far more “hardcore, die-hard supporters — mainly from this Islamist camp,” Arifianto noted.

“They are going to back (Prabowo) no matter what, and they are going to support him in a lot of provinces, like West Java and Banten, that have strong Islamic undertones in their population,” he said, adding that those supporters might be able to turn the tables around.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-21  Authors: shirley tay, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, religion, indonesias, supporters, prabowo, religious, far, stage, muslim, center, support, politics, population, say, experts, political, reelection, economy, widodos, seeks


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US Secretary of State Pompeo urges Gulf states to heal rift

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Sunday that a rift between Qatar and its Arab Gulf neighbors had gone on for too long. The United States, an ally of the six-nation Sunni Muslim GCC, sees the rift as a threat to efforts to contain Iran and has pushed for a united Gulf front. “When we have a common challenge, disputes between countries with shared objectives are never helpful,” he said at a press conference in the Qatari capital Doha. “They never permit you to have as robust a response


U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Sunday that a rift between Qatar and its Arab Gulf neighbors had gone on for too long. The United States, an ally of the six-nation Sunni Muslim GCC, sees the rift as a threat to efforts to contain Iran and has pushed for a united Gulf front. “When we have a common challenge, disputes between countries with shared objectives are never helpful,” he said at a press conference in the Qatari capital Doha. “They never permit you to have as robust a response
US Secretary of State Pompeo urges Gulf states to heal rift Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-13  Authors: mark wilson, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, qatar, heal, gcc, unity, urges, iran, state, states, muslim, gulf, united, pompeo, secretary, common, rift


US Secretary of State Pompeo urges Gulf states to heal rift

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Sunday that a rift between Qatar and its Arab Gulf neighbors had gone on for too long.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and non-Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member Egypt cut diplomatic, transport and trade ties with Qatar in June 2017, accusing it of supporting terrorism and their regional foe Shi’ite Muslim Iran – something Doha denies.

The United States, an ally of the six-nation Sunni Muslim GCC, sees the rift as a threat to efforts to contain Iran and has pushed for a united Gulf front.

“When we have a common challenge, disputes between countries with shared objectives are never helpful,” he said at a press conference in the Qatari capital Doha.

“They never permit you to have as robust a response to common adversaries or common challenges as you might,” he added.

Doha says the boycott aims to undermine its sovereignty.

“We’re hoping that the unity of GCC will increase in the days and weeks and months ahead,” Pompeo said, adding that Gulf unity was essential for a planned Middle East Strategic Alliance that would also include Jordan and Egypt.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-13  Authors: mark wilson, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, qatar, heal, gcc, unity, urges, iran, state, states, muslim, gulf, united, pompeo, secretary, common, rift


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Meet Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, the first Muslim women elected to Congress

Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar made history last night. The two are the first Muslim women elected to serve in Congress. Tlaib, who ran unopposed after securing the Democratic nomination in August, won in Michigan’s 13th Congressional District, and Omar, who faced Republican Jennifer Zielinki, won in Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District. Following the win, Omar took to Twitter to congratulate Tlaib on her victory and to acknowledge the history they made. Tlaib, who was born to Palestinian parent


Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar made history last night. The two are the first Muslim women elected to serve in Congress. Tlaib, who ran unopposed after securing the Democratic nomination in August, won in Michigan’s 13th Congressional District, and Omar, who faced Republican Jennifer Zielinki, won in Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District. Following the win, Omar took to Twitter to congratulate Tlaib on her victory and to acknowledge the history they made. Tlaib, who was born to Palestinian parent
Meet Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, the first Muslim women elected to Congress Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: courtney connley, al goldis, emilie richardson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, omar, won, rashida, meet, ilhan, elected, win, muslim, history, treatment, securing, tlaib, women, president, congress


Meet Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, the first Muslim women elected to Congress

Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar made history last night. The two are the first Muslim women elected to serve in Congress.

Tlaib, who ran unopposed after securing the Democratic nomination in August, won in Michigan’s 13th Congressional District, and Omar, who faced Republican Jennifer Zielinki, won in Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District.

Following the win, Omar took to Twitter to congratulate Tlaib on her victory and to acknowledge the history they made.

Tlaib, who was born to Palestinian parents, first made history in 2008 when she became the first Muslim woman to be elected State Representative. From 2009 to 2014 she served in the Michigan House of Representatives, where she helped secure millions of dollars for free health clinics, Meals on Wheels programs for seniors and before and after school education funding, according to her campaign website.

She is a strong critic of President Trump and was was once kicked out of a ticketed luncheon in Detroit in 2016 after heckling the then-presidential nominee about his policies and past treatment of women. After securing her primary win in August, she vowed to “fight back against every racist and oppressive structure that needs to be dismantled,” and criticized the president for his harsh treatment of immigrants.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: courtney connley, al goldis, emilie richardson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, omar, won, rashida, meet, ilhan, elected, win, muslim, history, treatment, securing, tlaib, women, president, congress


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The West Hoped for Democracy in Turkey. Erdogan Had Other Ideas.

But that was before Mr. Erdogan began amassing supreme powers, and before his brutal crackdown on dissent following an attempted coup two years ago. Whatever was left of the notion that Mr. Erdogan was a liberalizing force has been wholly extinguished. Regional experts contend that visions of Turkey’s leader as an agent of liberal progress were always fantastical. “For us, democracy is a means to an end,” Mr. Erdogan once declared. In Vietnam, Afghanistan and elsewhere, the United States cast fl


But that was before Mr. Erdogan began amassing supreme powers, and before his brutal crackdown on dissent following an attempted coup two years ago. Whatever was left of the notion that Mr. Erdogan was a liberalizing force has been wholly extinguished. Regional experts contend that visions of Turkey’s leader as an agent of liberal progress were always fantastical. “For us, democracy is a means to an end,” Mr. Erdogan once declared. In Vietnam, Afghanistan and elsewhere, the United States cast fl
The West Hoped for Democracy in Turkey. Erdogan Had Other Ideas. Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-19  Authors: peter s goodman, murat kaynak, anadolu agency, getty images, chris goodney, bloomberg, gabjones, source, manheim pennsylvania, glenn daily
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, west, muslim, erdogan, leader, states, democracy, turkeys, western, united, turkey, ideas, mr, hoped


The West Hoped for Democracy in Turkey. Erdogan Had Other Ideas.

In Western capitals a decade ago, Turkey’s now-paramount leader, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, held promise as a potential beacon of democracy for a region rife with religious conflict.

Turkey was a stalwart NATO ally bridging Europe and the volatile Middle East.

As Mr. Erdogan sought to secure a place for his country in the ranks of the European Union, he presented himself as a moderate and modernizing Muslim leader for the post-9/11 age. He catered to perceptions that Turkey was becoming a liberal society governed by tolerance and the rule of law. But that was before Mr. Erdogan began amassing supreme powers, and before his brutal crackdown on dissent following an attempted coup two years ago.

It was before Turkey descended into a financial crisis delivered in no small measure by his authoritarian proclivities and unorthodox stewardship of the economy. Whatever was left of the notion that Mr. Erdogan was a liberalizing force has been wholly extinguished.

For the West, Mr. Erdogan has devolved from a righteous hope — would-be proof that Islam and democracy can peacefully coexist — into another autocrat whose populism, bombast and contempt for the ledger books have yielded calamity. Regional experts contend that visions of Turkey’s leader as an agent of liberal progress were always fantastical.

Mr. Erdogan — who served as Turkey’s prime minister for 11 years before becoming its president in 2014 — forged his political career as an Islamist intent on challenging the strictures of Turkey’s state-imposed secularism. His early democratic reforms and assertion of civilian control over the military were largely about winning the welcome of the European bloc while enabling Turkey’s Muslim populace to practice its religion free of state interference.

“For us, democracy is a means to an end,” Mr. Erdogan once declared.

History is full of examples of Western nations — especially the United States — projecting their aspirations and values onto foreign leaders with their own objectives.

In its effort to prevent China from falling under the control of Communists, Washington backed the Chinese Nationalist general Chiang Kai-shek, celebrating him as a courageous hero even as he brutalized opponents and profited on the spoils of American support. In Vietnam, Afghanistan and elsewhere, the United States cast flawed figures as veritable George Washingtons before writing them off as corrupt tyrants.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-19  Authors: peter s goodman, murat kaynak, anadolu agency, getty images, chris goodney, bloomberg, gabjones, source, manheim pennsylvania, glenn daily
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, west, muslim, erdogan, leader, states, democracy, turkeys, western, united, turkey, ideas, mr, hoped


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Australian senator’s call for Muslim ban is an outlier opinion in the country

Australian Senator Fraser Anning this week reinvigorated long-standing debates about immigration after calling for a national vote to ban people of non-European descent from migrating to the country. Anning, a member of the right-wing Katter’s Australian Party, singled out Muslims in particular, associating their presence with terrorism and claiming they were the group least able to integrate. The speech drew comparisons to Nazism in part because of Anning declaring a vote on a Muslim ban would


Australian Senator Fraser Anning this week reinvigorated long-standing debates about immigration after calling for a national vote to ban people of non-European descent from migrating to the country. Anning, a member of the right-wing Katter’s Australian Party, singled out Muslims in particular, associating their presence with terrorism and claiming they were the group least able to integrate. The speech drew comparisons to Nazism in part because of Anning declaring a vote on a Muslim ban would
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-16  Authors: nyshka chandran, michael dodge – getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ban, australian, country, final, party, vote, solution, opinion, anning, senators, muslim, nazi, outlier, speech, immigration


Australian senator's call for Muslim ban is an outlier opinion in the country

Australian Senator Fraser Anning this week reinvigorated long-standing debates about immigration after calling for a national vote to ban people of non-European descent from migrating to the country.

Delivering his first-ever address to parliament on Tuesday, the politician advocated a return to the “White Australia” policy, which existed in the country for most of the 1900s before being abolished in 1973. Anning, a member of the right-wing Katter’s Australian Party, singled out Muslims in particular, associating their presence with terrorism and claiming they were the group least able to integrate.

His comments prompted an immediate rebuke from Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and major political parties, which quickly branded Anning a racist. Even the leader of the anti-Islam, anti-immigration One Nation Party that Anning previously belonged to criticized the speech, describing it as “straight from Goebbels’ handbook from Nazi Germany.”

The speech drew comparisons to Nazism in part because of Anning declaring a vote on a Muslim ban would be “the final solution to the immigration problem.” (The Final Solution, or the Final Solution to the Jewish Question, was a Nazi plan for the genocide of the Jews during World War Two. Anning has since said he did not know the phrase’s historic connection to the murder of millions.)


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-16  Authors: nyshka chandran, michael dodge – getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ban, australian, country, final, party, vote, solution, opinion, anning, senators, muslim, nazi, outlier, speech, immigration


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Australian PM condemns call for Muslim migration ban

In one of the most divisive speeches seen in parliament since 1996 when far-right politician Pauline Hanson declared incorrectly that Australia was being swamped by Asians, Senator Fraser Anning on Tuesday called for a national vote on whether to ban Muslim migration. Anning said Muslims were responsible for acts of terror and crime and were dependant on welfare. Amid national outrage Turnbull, who will head to the polls within nine months, quickly condemned Anning. “We reject, we condemn racism


In one of the most divisive speeches seen in parliament since 1996 when far-right politician Pauline Hanson declared incorrectly that Australia was being swamped by Asians, Senator Fraser Anning on Tuesday called for a national vote on whether to ban Muslim migration. Anning said Muslims were responsible for acts of terror and crime and were dependant on welfare. Amid national outrage Turnbull, who will head to the polls within nine months, quickly condemned Anning. “We reject, we condemn racism
Australian PM condemns call for Muslim migration ban Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-15  Authors: mark metcalfe, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senator, national, australian, muslims, migration, polls, anning, muslim, condemns, turnbull, told, condemned, parliament, parties, ban


Australian PM condemns call for Muslim migration ban

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and all major political parties on Wednesday condemned a speech by a minor senator who used the term “final solution” in calling for a revival of a “White Australia” restrictive immigration policy.

In one of the most divisive speeches seen in parliament since 1996 when far-right politician Pauline Hanson declared incorrectly that Australia was being swamped by Asians, Senator Fraser Anning on Tuesday called for a national vote on whether to ban Muslim migration.

Anning said Muslims were responsible for acts of terror and crime and were dependant on welfare. Muslims account for less than three percent of Australia’s population, census data shows.

Amid national outrage Turnbull, who will head to the polls within nine months, quickly condemned Anning.

“We reject, we condemn racism in any form, and the remarks by Senator Anning are justly condemned and rejected by us all,” Turnbull told Australia’s parliament.

Opposition Labor party leader Bill Shorten told parliament on Wednesday: “You have to be pretty outrageous to be condemned by everybody in the Australian parliament, but Senator Anning has managed to do just this”.

Australians will return to the polls by May 2019, and recent polls show the majority of the electorate back multiculturalism, but far-right politicians are expected to pose a challenge to the mainstream parties.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-15  Authors: mark metcalfe, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senator, national, australian, muslims, migration, polls, anning, muslim, condemns, turnbull, told, condemned, parliament, parties, ban


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Female Democrats band together to flip the House in 2018

As Democrats push to take back the House from Republicans in 2018, women have been at the forefront of the movement. Minnesota state lawmaker Ilhan Omar is now poised to be one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress. Now, while they hit milestones in their primary elections, many female Democratic candidates are stumping and fundraising for each other as they seek victory this November. Take Michigan state Rep. Rashida Tlaib, who won the Democratic nomination to replace longtime Rep. John


As Democrats push to take back the House from Republicans in 2018, women have been at the forefront of the movement. Minnesota state lawmaker Ilhan Omar is now poised to be one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress. Now, while they hit milestones in their primary elections, many female Democratic candidates are stumping and fundraising for each other as they seek victory this November. Take Michigan state Rep. Rashida Tlaib, who won the Democratic nomination to replace longtime Rep. John
Female Democrats band together to flip the House in 2018 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-14  Authors: emma newburger, al goldis, russell contreras, david weigel, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, women, won, state, band, 2018, elected, muslim, democratic, primary, rep, flip, female, democrats


Female Democrats band together to flip the House in 2018

As Democrats push to take back the House from Republicans in 2018, women have been at the forefront of the movement.

That trend continued in Tuesday’s primaries. Minnesota state lawmaker Ilhan Omar is now poised to be one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress. In Connecticut, Jahana Hayes won her primary and is looking to become her state’s first black congresswoman.

Now, while they hit milestones in their primary elections, many female Democratic candidates are stumping and fundraising for each other as they seek victory this November.

This kind of collaborative approach to politics is not unprecedented. But in an election year that has seen a record number of female candidates, alliances among them have increased in profile and extent.

Take Michigan state Rep. Rashida Tlaib, who won the Democratic nomination to replace longtime Rep. John Conyers, who resigned last year after sexual harassment allegations. A daughter of Palestinian immigrants, she was the first Muslim woman ever elected to Michigan’s legislature and could soon become the first-ever Muslim congresswoman.

Tlaib is running unopposed for the House seat and is using her newfound influence to help others achieve similar success. The 42-year-old Detroit native, who defeated several opponents in the primary, raised over $1 million, mostly from individual donors, according to FEC filings. Tlaib’s next mission is to raise money for other progressives, her campaign told CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-14  Authors: emma newburger, al goldis, russell contreras, david weigel, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, women, won, state, band, 2018, elected, muslim, democratic, primary, rep, flip, female, democrats


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Meet Rashida Tlaib, the first Muslim woman in Congress

Two LGBTQ women currently serve in Congress. “I’m going to push back against everything that’s so un-American that’s coming out of this administration,” she said. On her website, she explains how she will continue to fight against President Trump’s policies, including those pertaining to immigration. On Wednesday morning, Tlaib took to Twitter to thank her voters for their support and to express her excitement about serving in Congress. Don’t miss: Just two LGBTQ women currently serve in Congres


Two LGBTQ women currently serve in Congress. “I’m going to push back against everything that’s so un-American that’s coming out of this administration,” she said. On her website, she explains how she will continue to fight against President Trump’s policies, including those pertaining to immigration. On Wednesday morning, Tlaib took to Twitter to thank her voters for their support and to express her excitement about serving in Congress. Don’t miss: Just two LGBTQ women currently serve in Congres
Meet Rashida Tlaib, the first Muslim woman in Congress Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-08  Authors: courtney connley, al goldis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meet, fight, policies, rashida, treatment, muslim, women, tlaib, thats, president, congress, serve, trump, woman


Meet Rashida Tlaib, the first Muslim woman in Congress

Two LGBTQ women currently serve in Congress. Meet the candidates who could change that 10:31 AM ET Tue, 7 Aug 2018 | 01:17

In her speech following Tuesday night’s win, Tlaib, who was born to Palestinian parents, said she will “fight back against every racist and oppressive structure that needs to be dismantled” and called out President Trump for his harsh treatment of immigrants.

“I’m going to push back against everything that’s so un-American that’s coming out of this administration,” she said. “My grandmother told me never to let a bully tell me, “Can I do this?” or “You can’t do this.”

In 2016, Tlaib was kicked out of a ticketed luncheon in Detroit after heckling Trump, then a presidential nominee, about his policies and past treatment of women. On her website, she explains how she will continue to fight against President Trump’s policies, including those pertaining to immigration.

“I’m the daughter of immigrants to this country, and I want those who come to our borders seeking a better life to have the same opportunities I’ve had,” says Tlaib, who is the oldest of 14 children, on her campaign site. “We must provide a clear pathway to citizenship for all undocumented Americans, we must dismantle our deportation machine and detention centers, and we must enhance access to justice for immigrants availing themselves of our legal system.”

In addition to fighting for immigration reform, the mother of two says that some of her main priorities once elected to Congress will be to raise minimum wage to $15, to fight for equal pay for women and to prevent cuts to social security, medicaid and medicare.

On Wednesday morning, Tlaib took to Twitter to thank her voters for their support and to express her excitement about serving in Congress.

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Don’t miss: Just two LGBTQ women currently serve in Congress — these 6 candidates could change that


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-08  Authors: courtney connley, al goldis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meet, fight, policies, rashida, treatment, muslim, women, tlaib, thats, president, congress, serve, trump, woman


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