China reportedly sought World Bank funding for surveillance in region with Muslim detainment camps

China tried to get World Bank loans to fund facial recognition technology for the purpose of using it in the Chinese region of Xinjiang, according to a report by news website Axios on Wednesday. The country reportedly wanted to tap on a World Bank loan program in Xinjiang, where Beijing has been widely condemned for human rights abuses and deep surveillance on Muslim minority groups. The Chinese asked for funding to buy facial recognition and night vision cameras, and other surveillance technolo


China tried to get World Bank loans to fund facial recognition technology for the purpose of using it in the Chinese region of Xinjiang, according to a report by news website Axios on Wednesday.
The country reportedly wanted to tap on a World Bank loan program in Xinjiang, where Beijing has been widely condemned for human rights abuses and deep surveillance on Muslim minority groups.
The Chinese asked for funding to buy facial recognition and night vision cameras, and other surveillance technolo
China reportedly sought World Bank funding for surveillance in region with Muslim detainment camps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schools, muslim, china, report, region, bank, funding, detainment, xinjiang, sought, technology, program, reportedly, world, recognition, camps, surveillance


China reportedly sought World Bank funding for surveillance in region with Muslim detainment camps

China tried to get World Bank loans to fund facial recognition technology for the purpose of using it in the Chinese region of Xinjiang, according to a report by news website Axios on Wednesday.

The country reportedly wanted to tap on a World Bank loan program in Xinjiang, where Beijing has been widely condemned for human rights abuses and deep surveillance on Muslim minority groups.

The Chinese asked for funding to buy facial recognition and night vision cameras, and other surveillance technology, for use in Xinjiang schools, the report said, citing official World Bank procurement documents.

The World Bank told Axios that request was not met. Its loan program, which provides $50 million over five years to schools and their partners in the region, has been flagged for possible complicity in China’s repression on Muslim groups.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schools, muslim, china, report, region, bank, funding, detainment, xinjiang, sought, technology, program, reportedly, world, recognition, camps, surveillance


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China reportedly sought World Bank funding for surveillance in region with Muslim detainment camps

China tried to get World Bank loans to fund facial recognition technology for the purpose of using it in the Chinese region of Xinjiang, according to a report by news website Axios on Wednesday. The country reportedly wanted to tap on a World Bank loan program in Xinjiang, where Beijing has been widely condemned for human rights abuses and deep surveillance on Muslim minority groups. The Chinese asked for funding to buy facial recognition and night vision cameras, and other surveillance technolo


China tried to get World Bank loans to fund facial recognition technology for the purpose of using it in the Chinese region of Xinjiang, according to a report by news website Axios on Wednesday.
The country reportedly wanted to tap on a World Bank loan program in Xinjiang, where Beijing has been widely condemned for human rights abuses and deep surveillance on Muslim minority groups.
The Chinese asked for funding to buy facial recognition and night vision cameras, and other surveillance technolo
China reportedly sought World Bank funding for surveillance in region with Muslim detainment camps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, surveillance, recognition, xinjiang, sought, bank, region, detainment, world, china, camps, muslim, report, schools, funding, program, reportedly


China reportedly sought World Bank funding for surveillance in region with Muslim detainment camps

China tried to get World Bank loans to fund facial recognition technology for the purpose of using it in the Chinese region of Xinjiang, according to a report by news website Axios on Wednesday.

The country reportedly wanted to tap on a World Bank loan program in Xinjiang, where Beijing has been widely condemned for human rights abuses and deep surveillance on Muslim minority groups.

The Chinese asked for funding to buy facial recognition and night vision cameras, and other surveillance technology, for use in Xinjiang schools, the report said, citing official World Bank procurement documents.

The World Bank told Axios that request was not met. Its loan program, which provides $50 million over five years to schools and their partners in the region, has been flagged for possible complicity in China’s repression on Muslim groups.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, surveillance, recognition, xinjiang, sought, bank, region, detainment, world, china, camps, muslim, report, schools, funding, program, reportedly


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Official claims people in China’s Muslim detainment camps have ‘graduated’ and are living ‘happy lives’

People who were at vocational training centers in China’s far west Xinjiang have all “graduated” and are living happy lives, an official said Monday. But Uighurs and other predominantly Muslim ethnic minorities from the region say their family members continue to be arbitrarily detained in camps and prisons. Shohrat Zakir, Xinjiang’s Uighur governor, made the remarks during a press briefing as part of a strident propaganda campaign launched following U.S. Congress’ approval last week of the Uigh


People who were at vocational training centers in China’s far west Xinjiang have all “graduated” and are living happy lives, an official said Monday.
But Uighurs and other predominantly Muslim ethnic minorities from the region say their family members continue to be arbitrarily detained in camps and prisons.
Shohrat Zakir, Xinjiang’s Uighur governor, made the remarks during a press briefing as part of a strident propaganda campaign launched following U.S. Congress’ approval last week of the Uigh
Official claims people in China’s Muslim detainment camps have ‘graduated’ and are living ‘happy lives’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, living, chinas, camps, say, detainment, briefing, official, uighurs, uighur, chinese, graduated, vocational, claims, xinjiangs, lives, muslim, happy, zakir, xinjiang, centers


Official claims people in China's Muslim detainment camps have 'graduated' and are living 'happy lives'

This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region.

People who were at vocational training centers in China’s far west Xinjiang have all “graduated” and are living happy lives, an official said Monday. But Uighurs and other predominantly Muslim ethnic minorities from the region say their family members continue to be arbitrarily detained in camps and prisons.

Shohrat Zakir, Xinjiang’s Uighur governor, made the remarks during a press briefing as part of a strident propaganda campaign launched following U.S. Congress’ approval last week of the Uighur Human Rights Policy Act.

“When the lives of people of all ethnic groups in Xinjiang were seriously threatened by terrorism, the U.S. turned a deaf ear,” Zakir said at a press briefing. “On the contrary, now that Xinjiang society is steadily developing and people of all ethnicities are living and working in peace, the U.S. feels uneasy, and attacks and smears Xinjiang.”

The U.S. legislation condemns the mass detentions of an estimated more than 1 million Uighurs, Kazakhs and others. It also raises possible sanctions against Chinese government officials deemed responsible for human rights abuses in Xinjiang.

Former detainees and their relatives have told The Associated Press that the centers for “re-education” were essentially prisons where they were forced to renounce Islam and express gratitude to the ruling Communist Party. They were subject to indoctrination and torture, the detainees said.

While Chinese authorities have described the detentions as a form of vocational training, classified documents recently leaked to a consortium of news organizations revealed a deliberate strategy to lock up ethnic minorities even though they had not committed any crimes.

Xu Hairong, the Communist Party chief of Urumqi city, Xinjiang’s capital, did not dispute the documents’ authenticity. He said, however, that there was no such thing as “detention camps.”

“The reports by The New York Times, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and other foreign media organizations are purely malicious attempts to smear and discredit Xinjiang’s vocational education centers and its counter-terrorism and de-radicalization efforts,” Xu said.

Officials have repeatedly declined to say how many people are in the centers but insist the figure is far less than 1 million. Zakir said Monday the number is “dynamic.”

All those in the centers who were studying Mandarin Chinese, law, vocational skills and deradicalization have “graduated” and found stable employment, Zakir said, adding that others such as village officials, farmers and unemployed high school graduates continue to enroll on a rolling basis in programs that allow them to “come and go freely.”

Some ex-detainees have told AP they were forced to sign job contracts and barred from leaving factory grounds during weekdays, working long hours for low pay. Many Uighurs abroad also say their relatives are in prison, not camps, after being sentenced on vague charges of extremism.

Monday’s briefing was the latest in a slew of public rebuttals from the Chinese government in response to the U.S. Uighur human rights bill, which Beijing has called a violation of international law and interference in China’s internal affairs. The legislation further muddied U.S.-China ties, which were already strained over trade and pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong.

During the briefing, officials played a clip from a documentary released last Friday by CGTN, the international branch of state broadcaster CCTV. The documentary, called “Fighting Terrorism in Xinjiang,” showed old footage of terrorist attacks over the last decade, including bombings and stabbings such as the knife attack that killed 31 people outside a railway station in southern Kunming city in 2014.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, living, chinas, camps, say, detainment, briefing, official, uighurs, uighur, chinese, graduated, vocational, claims, xinjiangs, lives, muslim, happy, zakir, xinjiang, centers


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Chinese state media blasts US bill that pushes for tougher response to Muslim detainment camps

This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region. Chinese official media excoriated the United States and called for harsh reprisals in editorials on Thursday after the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation requiring a stronger response to Beijing’s treatment of its Uighur Muslim minority. The bill still has to be approved by the Republican-controlled Senate before being sen


This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region.
Chinese official media excoriated the United States and called for harsh reprisals in editorials on Thursday after the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation requiring a stronger response to Beijing’s treatment of its Uighur Muslim minority.
The bill still has to be approved by the Republican-controlled Senate before being sen
Chinese state media blasts US bill that pushes for tougher response to Muslim detainment camps Cached Page below :
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, response, bill, tougher, legislation, media, xinjiang, pushes, trump, chinas, detainment, uighurs, uighur, say, blasts, sign, state, camps, muslim, chinese, house


Chinese state media blasts US bill that pushes for tougher response to Muslim detainment camps

This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region.

Chinese official media excoriated the United States and called for harsh reprisals in editorials on Thursday after the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation requiring a stronger response to Beijing’s treatment of its Uighur Muslim minority.

The commentaries follow warnings from China on Wednesday that the legislation could affect bilateral cooperation, including a near-term deal to end the two countries’ trade war.

A front-page editorial in the ruling Communist Party’s People’s Daily newspaper said the passage of the U.S. legislation “harbors evil intent and is extremely sinister”.

“Underestimating the determination and will of the Chinese people is doomed to fail,” it said.

By a vote of 407 to 1, the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday approved the Uighur bill, which would require the Trump administration to toughen its response to China’s crackdown in Xinjiang, a region in China’s far west.

The bill still has to be approved by the Republican-controlled Senate before being sent to U.S. President Donald Trump to sign into law.

The White House has yet to say whether Trump would sign or veto the bill, which contains a provision allowing the president to waive sanctions if he determines that to be in the national interest.

U.N. experts and activists say China has detained possibly one million Uighurs in mass detention camps in Xinjiang.

China says the camps are part of an anti-terror crackdown and are providing vocational training. It denies any mistreatment of Uighurs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05
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US House approves bill that calls for sanctioning Chinese officials over Muslim detainment camps

“In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal. The Uighur bill, which was passed 407-1 in the Democratic-controlled House, requires the U.S. president to condemn abuses against Muslims and call for the closure of mass detention camps in Xinjiang. A person familiar with the Chinese government’s stance on the trade negotiations told Reuters the phase one trade deal could be in jeopardy if the House bill on Uighurs becomes law. U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur


“In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal.
The Uighur bill, which was passed 407-1 in the Democratic-controlled House, requires the U.S. president to condemn abuses against Muslims and call for the closure of mass detention camps in Xinjiang.
A person familiar with the Chinese government’s stance on the trade negotiations told Reuters the phase one trade deal could be in jeopardy if the House bill on Uighurs becomes law.
U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur
US House approves bill that calls for sanctioning Chinese officials over Muslim detainment camps Cached Page below :
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calls, bill, muslim, uighur, xinjiang, china, chinese, told, approves, detainment, officials, deal, trump, talks, trade, camps, house, sanctioning


US House approves bill that calls for sanctioning Chinese officials over Muslim detainment camps

People protest at a Uighur rally on February 5, 2019 in front of the US Mission to the United Nations, to encourage the State Department to fight for the freedom of the majority-Muslim Uighur population. Timothy A. Clary | AFP | Getty Images

U.S. President Donald Trump’s comments that a trade deal with China might have to wait until late 2020 raised fresh doubts on when the dispute might end, while a U.S. House bill targeting camps for Muslims in Xinjiang drew Beijing’s ire. “In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal. But they want to make a deal now, and we’ll see whether or not the deal’s going to be right,” Trump told reporters in London on Tuesday, triggering a sharp fall in stocks and a flight to government bonds. The U.S. House of Representatives’ approval of a bill requiring the Trump administration to toughen its response to China’s crackdown on Uighur Muslims in the western region of Xinjiang could deal another setback to the trade negotiations. The Uighur bill, which was passed 407-1 in the Democratic-controlled House, requires the U.S. president to condemn abuses against Muslims and call for the closure of mass detention camps in Xinjiang. It calls on Trump to impose sanctions for the first time on a member of China’s powerful politburo, Xinjiang Communist Party Secretary Chen Quanguo. Beijing called the bill a malicious attack on China, demanded the United States keep it from becoming law and said it would act to defend its interests as necessary.

A person familiar with the Chinese government’s stance on the trade negotiations told Reuters the phase one trade deal could be in jeopardy if the House bill on Uighurs becomes law. Negotiators for both countries have continued to work on a so-called phase one trade deal, but sources familiar with the talks say Beijing and Washington are still wrangling over the details including whether existing U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods will be removed and how much in additional U.S. agricultural products China will buy. U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC on Tuesday that staff-level trade negotiations with China are continuing but no high-level trade talks have been scheduled. The planned tariffs on remaining Chinese imports will take effect on Dec. 15 if there is no significant progress in the talks or a deal, he said. The Uighur bill still has to be approved by the Republican-controlled Senate before being sent to Trump. The White House has yet to say whether Trump would sign or veto the bill, which contains a provision allowing the president to waive sanctions if he determines that to be in the national interest.

Stronger reaction

Dilxat Raxit, spokesman for the World Uyghur Congress, said in a statement the House bill is an important action opposing “China’s continued push of extreme persecution” and that the organization looks forward to Trump signing it into law.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calls, bill, muslim, uighur, xinjiang, china, chinese, told, approves, detainment, officials, deal, trump, talks, trade, camps, house, sanctioning


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China may ban US officials from region with Muslim detainment camps

This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region. China might ban all U.S. diplomatic passport-holders from entering the country’s western Xinjiang autonomous region, Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin said on Tuesday. U.N. experts and activists say at least 1 million Uighurs, and members of other largely Muslim minority groups, have been detained in camps in the remote Xinjiang reg


This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region.
China might ban all U.S. diplomatic passport-holders from entering the country’s western Xinjiang autonomous region, Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin said on Tuesday.
U.N. experts and activists say at least 1 million Uighurs, and members of other largely Muslim minority groups, have been detained in camps in the remote Xinjiang reg
China may ban US officials from region with Muslim detainment camps Cached Page below :
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China may ban US officials from region with Muslim detainment camps

This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region.

China might ban all U.S. diplomatic passport-holders from entering the country’s western Xinjiang autonomous region, Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin said on Tuesday.

Hu said in a tweet that China is also considering visa restrictions against U.S. officials and lawmakers with “odious performance” on the Xinjiang issue, in retaliation to legislation being prepared by the U.S. Congress. He did not say how he had obtained the information.

U.N. experts and activists say at least 1 million Uighurs, and members of other largely Muslim minority groups, have been detained in camps in the remote Xinjiang region. Top U.S. officials including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo have criticized China publicly on the situation there.

China has denied mistreatment at the camps, which Beijing says provide vocational training to help eliminate religious extremism and teach new skills to people of the region. It has repeatedly demanded that U.S. and other foreign states critical of its policies in Xinjiang end their interference in China’s domestic affairs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ban, camps, xinjiang, vocational, officials, western, china, say, chinas, muslim, xijin, detainment, region


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Jewish and Muslim leaders attack main UK political parties ahead of election

Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis in Downing Street arriving for the Remembrance Sunday service at the Cenotaph memorial in Whitehall, central London. With just over two weeks until the U.K. general election, the country’s chief rabbi has attacked the main opposition Labour party, claiming its leader is “unfit for high office.” Taking an explicitly political stance, the chief rabbi added that people should “vote with their consciences.” Labour has suffered a series of allegations of anti-Semitism, lead


Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis in Downing Street arriving for the Remembrance Sunday service at the Cenotaph memorial in Whitehall, central London.
With just over two weeks until the U.K. general election, the country’s chief rabbi has attacked the main opposition Labour party, claiming its leader is “unfit for high office.”
Taking an explicitly political stance, the chief rabbi added that people should “vote with their consciences.”
Labour has suffered a series of allegations of anti-Semitism, lead
Jewish and Muslim leaders attack main UK political parties ahead of election Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: david reid
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Jewish and Muslim leaders attack main UK political parties ahead of election

Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis in Downing Street arriving for the Remembrance Sunday service at the Cenotaph memorial in Whitehall, central London.

With just over two weeks until the U.K. general election, the country’s chief rabbi has attacked the main opposition Labour party, claiming its leader is “unfit for high office.”

In an interview with The Times newspaper on Tuesday, Ephraim Mirvis claimed that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had failed to eradicate anti-Jewish sentiment from the party and any claims to the contrary were a “mendacious fiction.”

Mirvis who acts as Orthodox chief rabbi of Great Britain and Northern Ireland added that “the overwhelming majority of British Jews are ‘gripped by anxiety’ at the idea of a Labour holding power after the December 12 election.”

Taking an explicitly political stance, the chief rabbi added that people should “vote with their consciences.”

Labour has suffered a series of allegations of anti-Semitism, leading to the suspensions of high-profile figures and the desertion of Jewish lawmakers to other parties.

The intervention by Mirvis comes on the same day that Labour launched a “race and faith manifesto,” which it says aims to tackle prejudice across all faiths.

Corbyn has repeatedly denied accusations of being prejudiced against Jews and said Labour has tackled anti-Semitism by expelling members. The party is still under investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) with results expected next year. On Tuesday, he again stated that anti-Semitism in any form is vile and wrong and it would not be tolerated in his party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jewish, ahead, party, election, leaders, mirvis, leader, antisemitism, labour, attack, parties, political, rabbi, jews, ephraim, muslim, added, main, chief


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Chinese securities regulator names 2 directors of surveillance camera giant Hikvision in investigation

China’s securities regulator is investigating one of the country’s richest men for alleged violation of disclosure rules as a director of surveillance camera giant Hikvision, the company said. Directors Gong Hongjia and Hu Yangzhong had been named as suspects and would cooperate with the investigation by the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC), the firm said in a filing to the stock exchange on Wednesday. Gong is a Hikvision vice chairman and the firm’s largest individual shareholder w


China’s securities regulator is investigating one of the country’s richest men for alleged violation of disclosure rules as a director of surveillance camera giant Hikvision, the company said.
Directors Gong Hongjia and Hu Yangzhong had been named as suspects and would cooperate with the investigation by the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC), the firm said in a filing to the stock exchange on Wednesday.
Gong is a Hikvision vice chairman and the firm’s largest individual shareholder w
Chinese securities regulator names 2 directors of surveillance camera giant Hikvision in investigation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulator, securities, china, surveillance, hikvision, chinese, working, net, directors, giant, worth, firms, camera, person, investigation, muslim, names


Chinese securities regulator names 2 directors of surveillance camera giant Hikvision in investigation

A motorist rides past the Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology logo displayed at the company’s headquarters in Hangzhou, China, on May 28, 2019.

China’s securities regulator is investigating one of the country’s richest men for alleged violation of disclosure rules as a director of surveillance camera giant Hikvision, the company said.

Directors Gong Hongjia and Hu Yangzhong had been named as suspects and would cooperate with the investigation by the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC), the firm said in a filing to the stock exchange on Wednesday. It did not provide any detail of the alleged violations.

Gong is a Hikvision vice chairman and the firm’s largest individual shareholder with a 13.4% stake, according to Refinitiv data. The Forbes China rich list puts his net worth at $9 billion, making him the 26th-richest person in the country.

Hu is Hikvision’s general manager and is ranked by Forbes as the 265th wealthiest person in China with a net worth of $1.5 billion.

Reuters was not immediately able to reach the two directors.

The investigation concerned the “board member individuals” and not the company, a Hikvision spokeswoman said.

Hikvision’s share price fell as much as 4.5% in morning trade, while the broader market was up 0.2%.

Hikvision, the world’s biggest supplier of video surveillance systems, was one of eight firms added to a U.S. blacklist in October aimed at punishing Beijing for its treatment of Muslim minorities in the northwestern region of Xinjiang.

The firm had allegedly provided surveillance equipment to police authorities throughout Xinjiang, where China has been accused by Washington of repression, arbitrary detention and high-technology surveillance against Muslim minority groups.

Hikvision said at the time that it strongly opposed the U.S. decision and was working on contingency plans.

In May, the CSRC said it was working to improve the quality of the country’s listed firms after a series of disclosures stoked investor concerns over poor governance.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-14
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Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate

Former community college professor Ghazala Hashmi just became the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate. Hashmi, a Democrat who ran for public office for the first time, unseated Republican state Sen. Glen Sturtevant on Tuesday to represent the state’s 10th Senate District. In 1991, Hashmi, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgia Southern University and a PhD from Emory University, moved to Richmond, Virginia with her husband. As a representative of the state’s 10th Senate Di


Former community college professor Ghazala Hashmi just became the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate.
Hashmi, a Democrat who ran for public office for the first time, unseated Republican state Sen. Glen Sturtevant on Tuesday to represent the state’s 10th Senate District.
In 1991, Hashmi, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgia Southern University and a PhD from Emory University, moved to Richmond, Virginia with her husband.
As a representative of the state’s 10th Senate Di
Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: courtney connley
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Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia's state Senate

Former community college professor Ghazala Hashmi just became the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate.

Hashmi, a Democrat who ran for public office for the first time, unseated Republican state Sen. Glen Sturtevant on Tuesday to represent the state’s 10th Senate District.

In a series of tweets sent out Tuesday night, Hashmi thanked her supporters for the win and said, “This victory is not mine alone. It belongs to all of you who believed that we need to make progressive change here in Virginia.”

As a child, Hashmi immigrated from India to the U.S. with her family, reports The Hill. According to her campaign website, she was raised in a small town in Georgia where she “saw firsthand how community-building and open dialogue can bridge cultural and socioeconomic divisions.”

In 1991, Hashmi, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgia Southern University and a PhD from Emory University, moved to Richmond, Virginia with her husband. For the past 25 years, she’s devoted her career to being an educator in the state. Before winning her election, she served as the Founding Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Reynolds Community College in Richmond.

The wife and mom of two ran her campaign with a focus on education, healthcare, gun violence prevention, environmental protection and workforce development. In her newly-appointed role, she says she plans to focus on establishing a paid family leave and medical leave program in Virginia that “will provide security for workers who need to temporarily take time away to care for themselves or a loved one.”

As a representative of the state’s 10th Senate District, Hashmi will oversee Richmond, Powhatan County and parts of Chesterfield County in Virginia. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that Hashmi and Sturtevant’s race was among the most competitive in the state, with more than $1.5 million in media buys including TV advertising. Between Oct. 1 and Oct. 24, the two public officials also received more than $1.1 million each in contributions.

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Don’t miss: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib and 13 others who made history in the 2018 midterm election


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: courtney connley
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Trailblazing model Halima Aden tells young people ‘don’t change yourself, change the game’

Aden was also first contestant in the Miss Minnesota USA state pageant to wear a hijab and burkini in the swimsuit competition. Since she signed to a major modelling agency, she has become the first model to feature in Sports Illustrated wearing a hijab and burkini. Speaking about these experiences at the 2019 One Young World summit in London last week she had one key piece of advice for young people — “don’t change yourself, change the game.” Aden also reflected on “painful memories” of being m


Aden was also first contestant in the Miss Minnesota USA state pageant to wear a hijab and burkini in the swimsuit competition.
Since she signed to a major modelling agency, she has become the first model to feature in Sports Illustrated wearing a hijab and burkini.
Speaking about these experiences at the 2019 One Young World summit in London last week she had one key piece of advice for young people — “don’t change yourself, change the game.”
Aden also reflected on “painful memories” of being m
Trailblazing model Halima Aden tells young people ‘don’t change yourself, change the game’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tells, halima, aden, hijab, community, dont, young, organizations, change, minnesota, wearing, muslim, refugee, trailblazing, model, game


Trailblazing model Halima Aden tells young people 'don't change yourself, change the game'

Halima Aden’s career has been a series of firsts. The Somali-American model was the first Muslim homecoming queen of St. Cloud, Minnesota, where she grew up after spending the first seven years of her life at Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya, Africa.

Aden was also first contestant in the Miss Minnesota USA state pageant to wear a hijab and burkini in the swimsuit competition. Since she signed to a major modelling agency, she has become the first model to feature in Sports Illustrated wearing a hijab and burkini.

Aden has also appeared on the covers of Vogue and Elle, in addition to walking the runway for Dolce & Gabbana and rapper Kanye West’s Yeezy label, among others.

Speaking about these experiences at the 2019 One Young World summit in London last week she had one key piece of advice for young people — “don’t change yourself, change the game.”

“Being the first is never easy,” she said, recounting that she has been told she was “not American enough” as well as not “a good Muslim.” Aden also reflected on “painful memories” of being made fun of for wearing a hijab and “hearing terrorist jokes.”

The 22-year-old said she experienced an “unwavering sense of community” both in her early years living in the refugee camp and upon moving to the US.

Aden recalled that in Minnesota her mom did not have the “means and literary capabilities” to own or drive a car but in the middle of blizzard season there were “countless numbers” of people that stopped to help them.

“These were people who looked nothing like us and owed us nothing,” she added. “Minnesota (is) a community comprised of people who don’t all look the same but the place that we found hope.”

The fashion industry can be perceived as a cold and unwelcoming business but this was at odds with Aden’s own experience.

She said that she was “welcomed with open arms”, despite being aware that she may have been the first person that designers, photographers or stylists had worked with wearing a hijab and dressed modestly.

“Fashion (is) a community comprised of people who see the value in differences and aren’t afraid of highlighting the unknown,” said Aden, adding that it had given her hope that many other industries would continue to “include and accept people from all walks of life.”

It was thanks to these positive experiences that Aden said she sought to “pay it forward” by aligning with brands and organizations supporting communities in need of aid. She was recently named an official UNICEF Ambassador, having been on the receiving end of the organization’s services during her time at Kakuma.

She urged young people to do “whatever you needed to be heard, make a difference, leave your footprint and most importantly, never give up hope.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-30  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tells, halima, aden, hijab, community, dont, young, organizations, change, minnesota, wearing, muslim, refugee, trailblazing, model, game


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