There is a good growth path for a lot of FANG names, says CIO

There is a good growth path for a lot of FANG names, says CIO1 Hour AgoBrad Slingerlend, co-founder and investor at NZS Capital, and Matthew Peron, CIO at City National Rochdale, join “Squawk Alley” to discuss tech stocks as they lead the major averages toward new highs.


There is a good growth path for a lot of FANG names, says CIO1 Hour AgoBrad Slingerlend, co-founder and investor at NZS Capital, and Matthew Peron, CIO at City National Rochdale, join “Squawk Alley” to discuss tech stocks as they lead the major averages toward new highs.
There is a good growth path for a lot of FANG names, says CIO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cio, national, nzs, path, tech, stocks, names, lot, peron, good, squawk, slingerlend, rochdale, fang, growth


There is a good growth path for a lot of FANG names, says CIO

There is a good growth path for a lot of FANG names, says CIO

1 Hour Ago

Brad Slingerlend, co-founder and investor at NZS Capital, and Matthew Peron, CIO at City National Rochdale, join “Squawk Alley” to discuss tech stocks as they lead the major averages toward new highs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cio, national, nzs, path, tech, stocks, names, lot, peron, good, squawk, slingerlend, rochdale, fang, growth


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California AG tells businesses like Facebook and Google how they must comply with the state’s new landmark privacy law

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra outlined for the first time Thursday how businesses will need to comply with the state’s new landmark privacy law. Businesses are instructed not to disclose personal information about the customer making a request if they cannot verify their identity. The rules also explain how a business can value its customer data, such as by determining the profit created by the business from collecting or selling customers’ data. Federal lawmakers are looking to the


California Attorney General Xavier Becerra outlined for the first time Thursday how businesses will need to comply with the state’s new landmark privacy law. Businesses are instructed not to disclose personal information about the customer making a request if they cannot verify their identity. The rules also explain how a business can value its customer data, such as by determining the profit created by the business from collecting or selling customers’ data. Federal lawmakers are looking to the
California AG tells businesses like Facebook and Google how they must comply with the state’s new landmark privacy law Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, privacy, law, tells, google, data, california, information, landmark, rules, request, national, companies, facebook, businesses, states, customer, customers, comply


California AG tells businesses like Facebook and Google how they must comply with the state's new landmark privacy law

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra outlined for the first time Thursday how businesses will need to comply with the state’s new landmark privacy law.

The legislation, which will impact tech giants like Facebook and Google all the way down to some small businesses, will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020. An economic impact assessment prepared for the AG’s office found the law could cost companies a total of up to $55 billion in initial compliance costs. With Thursday’s announcement, businesses now have a guideline for what they have to do to become complaint, pending any revisions after a public comment period that closes Dec. 6 at 5 p.m. Pacific Time. According to the law, the attorney general’s office can begin enforcement six months after the final regulations are in place, or by July 1, 2020 the latest.

“Until now, no one has attempted to do anything like this,” Becerra said at a press conference announcing the draft regulations. “But we are at a crossroads. Americans should not have to give up their digital privacy to live and thrive in this digital age.”

The draft rules guide businesses on several key areas of the law. The rules explain how businesses should notify consumers of their rights under CCPA, how they should handle consumer requests about data, including from minors, and verify those requests. It also advises on how to avoid discriminating against customers who don’t agree to allow their data to be collected or sold.

Under the draft regulations, businesses must confirm they received a request to know or delete their data within 10 days of receiving the request and inform the customer of how they will handle it. The business must respond to the request within 45 days, unless it provides a reason to the customer for taking an additional 45 days.

Businesses are instructed not to disclose personal information about the customer making a request if they cannot verify their identity. The regulations mandate businesses consider how sensitive the information could be and how much harm it could cause in the wrong hands when verifying a customer’s identity. Businesses should not disclose certain types of information, like a consumer’s Social Security number or bank account information, the rules say, even if requested.

When customers request their data be deleted, the option to delete all information must be “more prominently presented” than options to delete only part of the data. When they choose to opt-out of the sale of their personal information, businesses have up to 15 days to act and up to 90 days to notify third parties to whom it’s sold the user’s info and notify the customer when it’s completed.

The rules present a number of ways companies could verify parental consent of a child under 13. These include having a parent or guardian call a trained person to provide consent or checking the parent or guardian’s ID.

Finally, the rules describe how businesses should avoid discriminating against customers who exercise their rights under CCPA. Businesses may not provide different prices or financial incentives to customers based on their choice to opt out of data collection or delete their data, unless the price difference “is reasonably related to the value of the consumer’s data.” The rules also explain how a business can value its customer data, such as by determining the profit created by the business from collecting or selling customers’ data.

The law will apply to a large swath of businesses that deal with customer data, though the compliance costs are expected to vary depending on the size of the companies. Companies making over $25 million in gross annual revenue will have to comply with the law and researchers who compiled the economic impact assessment estimated as many as 75% of California businesses earnings less than $25 million in revenue would be impacted. The law will also apply to businesses in the state that derive at least half of their annual revenue from selling customers’ personal information; or that buy, sell or share personal information from at least 50,000 consumers, households or devices.

Federal lawmakers are looking to the fate of the CCPA as a guide as they consider a national privacy law. Researchers noted that California businesses could benefit from having a head start on compliance should a national law go into effect. So far, however, a national bill does not seem imminent.

Tech companies would likely prefer a national standard over state laws to lower the burden of complying with different restrictions. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg visited Washington, D.C. last month to discuss national regulation with lawmakers. But for a state as big as California, many privacy and legal experts believe the CCPA could effectively become a broader standard for companies dealing with data. When Europe instituted its General Data Protection Regulation in 2018, many businesses made changes beyond the geographies subject to the regulation.

-CNBC’s Ylan Mui contributed to this report.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, privacy, law, tells, google, data, california, information, landmark, rules, request, national, companies, facebook, businesses, states, customer, customers, comply


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Judge rules Trump violated the law on wall funding with national emergency

A federal judge ruled Friday that President Donald Trump violated federal law when he used his declaration of a national emergency to get millions for building a wall on the southern border. The ruling is a victory for El Paso County, Texas, and the Border Network for Human Rights, which sued to stop border construction in their community. They argued that Trump had no legal authority to spend more than what Congress appropriated for the wall project. In January the president asked for $5.7 bill


A federal judge ruled Friday that President Donald Trump violated federal law when he used his declaration of a national emergency to get millions for building a wall on the southern border. The ruling is a victory for El Paso County, Texas, and the Border Network for Human Rights, which sued to stop border construction in their community. They argued that Trump had no legal authority to spend more than what Congress appropriated for the wall project. In January the president asked for $5.7 bill
Judge rules Trump violated the law on wall funding with national emergency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: pete williams
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, law, emergency, violated, funding, trump, judge, used, presidents, congress, wall, border, national, rules, president


Judge rules Trump violated the law on wall funding with national emergency

A federal judge ruled Friday that President Donald Trump violated federal law when he used his declaration of a national emergency to get millions for building a wall on the southern border.

The ruling is a victory for El Paso County, Texas, and the Border Network for Human Rights, which sued to stop border construction in their community. They argued that Trump had no legal authority to spend more than what Congress appropriated for the wall project.

In January the president asked for $5.7 billion to build “a steel barrier for the Southwest border,” but Congress approved only $1.375 billion. In February, Trump declared a national emergency and ordered that money for Pentagon construction projects would be used instead for the wall.

Federal District Court Judge David Briones said the president’s order violated a provision of the budget law approved by Congress which said “none of the funds made available in this or any other appropriation may be used to increase” the funding for the wall project.

“The president’s proclamation is unlawful,” Briones wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: pete williams
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, law, emergency, violated, funding, trump, judge, used, presidents, congress, wall, border, national, rules, president


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US reportedly plans to grant licenses for firms to sell goods to blacklisted Huawei

The U.S. government plans to soon issue licenses to American companies to sell certain goods to Chinese technology giant Huawei, the New York Times reported, citing unnamed sources. The U.S. blacklisted the world’s largest telecom-equipment maker earlier this year, and restricted Huawei from doing businesses with American companies. Huawei has been accused of being a national security risk by Washington, which alleged that its equipment could be used to funnel data back to Beijing. That was desp


The U.S. government plans to soon issue licenses to American companies to sell certain goods to Chinese technology giant Huawei, the New York Times reported, citing unnamed sources. The U.S. blacklisted the world’s largest telecom-equipment maker earlier this year, and restricted Huawei from doing businesses with American companies. Huawei has been accused of being a national security risk by Washington, which alleged that its equipment could be used to funnel data back to Beijing. That was desp
US reportedly plans to grant licenses for firms to sell goods to blacklisted Huawei Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, blacklisted, times, reprieve, reportedly, trump, firms, national, sell, plans, huawei, goods, reported, security, licenses, american, grant, york, meeting


US reportedly plans to grant licenses for firms to sell goods to blacklisted Huawei

The U.S. government plans to soon issue licenses to American companies to sell certain goods to Chinese technology giant Huawei, the New York Times reported, citing unnamed sources.

The U.S. blacklisted the world’s largest telecom-equipment maker earlier this year, and restricted Huawei from doing businesses with American companies. Huawei has been accused of being a national security risk by Washington, which alleged that its equipment could be used to funnel data back to Beijing. The Chinese firm has repeatedly denied those allegations.

The administration of President Donald Trump in May granted Huawei a temporary reprieve which allows American firms to provide Huawei with nonsensitive goods as long as they get a specific license from the government. The reprieve was extended for another 90 days on August 19.

However, the government had received over a hundred applications for licenses as of late-August, Reuters reported, though none had been granted. That was despite Trump saying in June at the Group of 20 meeting that he would allow sales to Huawei where there are no national security conflicts.

That could change. The New York Times reported Trump gave the green light for approvals in a meeting last week.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, blacklisted, times, reprieve, reportedly, trump, firms, national, sell, plans, huawei, goods, reported, security, licenses, american, grant, york, meeting


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The salary you need to buy a house in 10 of the largest cities in the US

If you’re in the market for a house, you might want to look outside of California. According to a new report from HSH.com, a site that tracks mortgage rates, the four most expensive metro areas in the country are in the Golden State. HSH.com’s quarterly report estimates the annual income needed to qualify for the median mortgage in the 50 largest metro areas in the U.S. It uses data from the National Association of Realtors, the Mortgage Bankers Association and available property tax and insuran


If you’re in the market for a house, you might want to look outside of California. According to a new report from HSH.com, a site that tracks mortgage rates, the four most expensive metro areas in the country are in the Golden State. HSH.com’s quarterly report estimates the annual income needed to qualify for the median mortgage in the 50 largest metro areas in the U.S. It uses data from the National Association of Realtors, the Mortgage Bankers Association and available property tax and insuran
The salary you need to buy a house in 10 of the largest cities in the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metro, mortgage, annual, house, association, median, payment, largest, national, areas, need, report, cities, price, salary, buy


The salary you need to buy a house in 10 of the largest cities in the US

If you’re in the market for a house, you might want to look outside of California. According to a new report from HSH.com, a site that tracks mortgage rates, the four most expensive metro areas in the country are in the Golden State.

HSH.com’s quarterly report estimates the annual income needed to qualify for the median mortgage in the 50 largest metro areas in the U.S. It uses data from the National Association of Realtors, the Mortgage Bankers Association and available property tax and insurance information to make its calculations.

It also assumes a down payment of 20%, a fixed-rate, 30-year mortgage and an industry standard 28% debt-to-income ratio for buyers.

Across the U.S., the median home price in the second quarter of 2019 — which is what the report is based on — was $279,600, requiring an annual salary of at least $61,123 to afford and a monthly mortgage payment of $1,426.21. But the median price in individual metro areas can be much higher or lower than that national median.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, metro, mortgage, annual, house, association, median, payment, largest, national, areas, need, report, cities, price, salary, buy


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Former UK spymaster plays down national security fears over Huawei

China has not tried to use Huawei network equipment for spying in Britain, a former head of the country’s foreign intelligence service said Wednesday. John Sawers, who served as the chief of MI6 from 2009 to 2014, played down national security concerns over the Chinese tech giant, telling an audience in London that Beijing has not “sought to exploit, or been able to exploit, Huawei equipment in our telecoms national infrastructure” for espionage. Intelligence officials in the U.S. have expressed


China has not tried to use Huawei network equipment for spying in Britain, a former head of the country’s foreign intelligence service said Wednesday. John Sawers, who served as the chief of MI6 from 2009 to 2014, played down national security concerns over the Chinese tech giant, telling an audience in London that Beijing has not “sought to exploit, or been able to exploit, Huawei equipment in our telecoms national infrastructure” for espionage. Intelligence officials in the U.S. have expressed
Former UK spymaster plays down national security fears over Huawei Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spymaster, plays, trade, equipment, chinese, tech, concerns, firm, national, exploit, security, hand, fears, huawei


Former UK spymaster plays down national security fears over Huawei

China has not tried to use Huawei network equipment for spying in Britain, a former head of the country’s foreign intelligence service said Wednesday.

John Sawers, who served as the chief of MI6 from 2009 to 2014, played down national security concerns over the Chinese tech giant, telling an audience in London that Beijing has not “sought to exploit, or been able to exploit, Huawei equipment in our telecoms national infrastructure” for espionage.

Intelligence officials in the U.S. have expressed concerns that the company could set up “backdoors” to help the Chinese government spy on Americans. For its part, Huawei has denied it would ever hand over data to Beijing.

MI6’s current chief, Alex Younger, last year flagged concerns about companies like Huawei, specifically targeting “Chinese ownership of these technologies” as a primary risk. Under Chinese law, companies are obliged to hand over data to assist state intelligence.

The Chinese firm has faced intense scrutiny in the U.S., which has added it to a trade blacklist and is looking to extradite its CFO, Meng Wanzhou, from Canada on bank and wire fraud charges. The company’s CEO — and Meng’s father — Ren Zhengfei recently said he is considering offering an exclusive 5G license to a U.S. carrier.

Washington upped the pressure on China’s tech industry earlier this week. It placed another 28 entities on the trade blacklist, alleging they have been implicated in human rights violations related to minority Muslims in northwest China.

Sawers said that Huawei had become a “point of leverage” in the trade battle between the U.S. and China, and that the President Donald Trump administration would likely make concessions on its tough stance on the firm.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spymaster, plays, trade, equipment, chinese, tech, concerns, firm, national, exploit, security, hand, fears, huawei


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Defense Intelligence Agency worker arrested on charges of leaking top secret information to reporters

Gen. Robert Ashley, director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, testifies during the Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on “Worldwide Threats” on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2018. A counter-terrorism analyst for the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency was arrested Wednesday on federal charges that he leaked top secret and other classified information — including details of a foreign country’s weapons systems — to two reporters in 2018 and this year. One of the journalists who allegedly received se


Gen. Robert Ashley, director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, testifies during the Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on “Worldwide Threats” on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2018. A counter-terrorism analyst for the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency was arrested Wednesday on federal charges that he leaked top secret and other classified information — including details of a foreign country’s weapons systems — to two reporters in 2018 and this year. One of the journalists who allegedly received se
Defense Intelligence Agency worker arrested on charges of leaking top secret information to reporters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reporters, arrested, journalist, national, leaking, frese, intelligence, secret, charges, agency, worker, information, allegedly, security, indictment, defense


Defense Intelligence Agency worker arrested on charges of leaking top secret information to reporters

Gen. Robert Ashley, director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, testifies during the Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on “Worldwide Threats” on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2018.

A counter-terrorism analyst for the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency was arrested Wednesday on federal charges that he leaked top secret and other classified information — including details of a foreign country’s weapons systems — to two reporters in 2018 and this year.

The worker, Henry Kyle Frese, 30, held top-secret clearance at the DIA, where he began as a contractor in January 2017, and eventually became a full-time employee.

One of the journalists who allegedly received secret information from Frese had apparently been involved in a romantic relationship with him, authorities said.

That reporter ended up writing at least eight articles based on at least five compromised intelligence reports leaked by Frese, according to a criminal indictment. Frese re-tweeted a link to the first article that reporter wrote based on information he had allegedly leaked to her, the indictment says.

“Frese was caught red-handed disclosing sensitive national security information for personal gain,” said Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers.

An indictment alleges that Frese accessed classified intelligence reports, some which were not connected to his job duties, in spring 2018 and provided top secret information about another country’s weapons systems to a journalist who lived at the same Alexandria, Virginia, residential address as Frese.

The Justice Department said that it “based on reviews” of the public social media pages of Frese and that reporter, “it appears that they were involved in a romantic relationship for some or all of that period of time” in which Frese allegedly leaked the information to her.

“The unauthorized disclosure of TOP SECRET information could reasonably be expected to cause exceptionally grave harm to the national security of the United States,” the Justice Department said in a press release announcing Frese’s indictment in U.S District Court in Virginia.

A week after Frese allegedly accessed one of the intelligence reports, the first journalist sent Frese a direct message on Twitter asking whether he would speak with another journalist, according to the department.

“Frese stated that he was ‘down’ to help Journalist 2 if it helped Journalist 1 because he wanted to see Journalist 1 ‘progress.’ ”

The identities of the reporters and their employers were not disclosed by authorities.

The indictment against Frese says that on Sept. 24, 2019, surveillance of Frese caught him on a cell phone call transmitting national defense information to the second reporter.

Those disclosures allegedly contained information classified as secret, “meaning that the unauthorized disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to cause serious harm to the national security of the United States,” the department said.

Frese faces a maximum possible sentence of 10 years in prison if convicted of each of the two counts of wilful transmission of national defense information with which he was charged.

“Henry Kyle Frese was entrusted with TOP SECRET information related to the national defense of our country,” said G. Zachary Terwilliger, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia.

“Frese allegedly violated that trust, the oath he swore to uphold, and is charged with engaging in dastardly and felonious conduct at the expense of our country,” Terwilliger said.

“This indictment should serve as a clear reminder to all of those similarly entrusted with National Defense Information that unilaterally disclosing such information for personal gain, or that of others, is not selfless or heroic, it is criminal.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reporters, arrested, journalist, national, leaking, frese, intelligence, secret, charges, agency, worker, information, allegedly, security, indictment, defense


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Switzerland’s central bank is exploring the use of digital currencies for trading

A picture taken on September 25, 2019 in Bern shows the building of the Swiss National Bank (SNB), the central bank of Switzerland. Switzerland’s central bank is working with the country’s stock exchange to examine the possible use of digital currencies in trading. In a statement on Tuesday, Swiss stock exchange operator SIX Group said it was partnering with the Swiss National Bank (SNB) on a proof of concept to “explore how digital central bank money could be used in the settlement of tokenized


A picture taken on September 25, 2019 in Bern shows the building of the Swiss National Bank (SNB), the central bank of Switzerland. Switzerland’s central bank is working with the country’s stock exchange to examine the possible use of digital currencies in trading. In a statement on Tuesday, Swiss stock exchange operator SIX Group said it was partnering with the Swiss National Bank (SNB) on a proof of concept to “explore how digital central bank money could be used in the settlement of tokenized
Switzerland’s central bank is exploring the use of digital currencies for trading Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exploring, national, exchange, central, currencies, snb, switzerlands, group, trading, worlds, swiss, digital, stock, bank


Switzerland's central bank is exploring the use of digital currencies for trading

A picture taken on September 25, 2019 in Bern shows the building of the Swiss National Bank (SNB), the central bank of Switzerland.

Switzerland’s central bank is working with the country’s stock exchange to examine the possible use of digital currencies in trading.

In a statement on Tuesday, Swiss stock exchange operator SIX Group said it was partnering with the Swiss National Bank (SNB) on a proof of concept to “explore how digital central bank money could be used in the settlement of tokenized assets between market participants.”

Such a framework could involve connecting the Swiss mechanism for clearing payments with the proposed digital exchange, or the issuance of an electronic version of the Swiss franc from the SNB.

The research will be carried out at a hub set up by the SNB in partnership with the Bank for International Settlements, an umbrella group for the world’s largest central banks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exploring, national, exchange, central, currencies, snb, switzerlands, group, trading, worlds, swiss, digital, stock, bank


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Marco Rubio says Chinese firms should be delisted from US exchanges if they don’t follow securities laws

Chinese companies should be delisted from American exchanges if they don’t follow U.S. securities laws, Sen. Marco Rubio told CNBC on Tuesday. Delisting Chinese companies has “nothing to do with trade,” the Florida Republican said on “Squawk Alley,” referring to trade negotiations between the U.S. and China. “This is a national security and human rights matter.” Proponents say it would reduce irregularities seen from U.S.-listed Chinese companies, some of which don’t follow the same regulatory r


Chinese companies should be delisted from American exchanges if they don’t follow U.S. securities laws, Sen. Marco Rubio told CNBC on Tuesday. Delisting Chinese companies has “nothing to do with trade,” the Florida Republican said on “Squawk Alley,” referring to trade negotiations between the U.S. and China. “This is a national security and human rights matter.” Proponents say it would reduce irregularities seen from U.S.-listed Chinese companies, some of which don’t follow the same regulatory r
Marco Rubio says Chinese firms should be delisted from US exchanges if they don’t follow securities laws Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, in berkeleylovelace
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, security, sen, marco, firms, negotiations, laws, american, delisted, follow, dont, told, exchanges, trade, securities, rubio, chinese, national, china


Marco Rubio says Chinese firms should be delisted from US exchanges if they don't follow securities laws

Chinese companies should be delisted from American exchanges if they don’t follow U.S. securities laws, Sen. Marco Rubio told CNBC on Tuesday.

Delisting Chinese companies has “nothing to do with trade,” the Florida Republican said on “Squawk Alley,” referring to trade negotiations between the U.S. and China. “This is a national security and human rights matter.”

Rubio, who ran for president in 2016, and Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who dropped out of the 2020 presidential race, are co-sponsors of a bill to increase oversight of Chinese and other foreign companies listed on American stock exchanges. The legislation calls for delisting firms that are out of compliance with U.S. regulators for a period of three years.

Proponents say it would reduce irregularities seen from U.S.-listed Chinese companies, some of which don’t follow the same regulatory rules as American companies.

Opinion: Federal retirement savings should not fund China’s Communist Party

The bill comes as the U.S. and China are set to resume high-level trade negotiations later this week. Multiple outlets reported last month that the Trump administration was exploring ways to limit U.S. investments in China, including a plan to stop Chinese companies listing on American exchanges.

However, White House chief economic advisor Larry Kudlow told reporters on Monday that delisting Chinese firms was “not on the table.”

Rubio denied the legislation was aimed at the trade dispute, saying, “Trade deals are not very good if they require you to give in or jeopardize your national security or your values as a nation.”

He added: “Our capital markets are the deepest and most liquid in the world. But we have high standards for disclosure and transparency.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, in berkeleylovelace
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, security, sen, marco, firms, negotiations, laws, american, delisted, follow, dont, told, exchanges, trade, securities, rubio, chinese, national, china


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US lawmaker introduces bill cutting nicotine in e-cigarettes amid teen vaping epidemic

Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, D-Ill., is introducing a bill that would cap the amount of nicotine in e-cigarettes as lawmakers seek to stem epidemic use among underaged teens. The Ending Nicotine Dependence from Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Act would limit e-cigarettes to no more than 20 milligrams per milliliter of nicotine, about a third of the 59 milligrams per milliliter contained in standard Juul pods. It would allow the Food and Drug Administration to lower the cap even more to make e-


Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, D-Ill., is introducing a bill that would cap the amount of nicotine in e-cigarettes as lawmakers seek to stem epidemic use among underaged teens. The Ending Nicotine Dependence from Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Act would limit e-cigarettes to no more than 20 milligrams per milliliter of nicotine, about a third of the 59 milligrams per milliliter contained in standard Juul pods. It would allow the Food and Drug Administration to lower the cap even more to make e-
US lawmaker introduces bill cutting nicotine in e-cigarettes amid teen vaping epidemic Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: angelica lavito, in angelicalavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, cutting, teen, ecigarettes, krishnamoorthi, addictive, vaping, lawmaker, milliliter, national, bill, milligrams, juul, raja, epidemic, introduces, nicotine, say


US lawmaker introduces bill cutting nicotine in e-cigarettes amid teen vaping epidemic

US Representative Raja Krishnamoorthi, Democrat of Illinois, looks as Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire arrives to testify before a hearing of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on September 26, 2019, in Washington, DC.

Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, D-Ill., is introducing a bill that would cap the amount of nicotine in e-cigarettes as lawmakers seek to stem epidemic use among underaged teens.

The Ending Nicotine Dependence from Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Act would limit e-cigarettes to no more than 20 milligrams per milliliter of nicotine, about a third of the 59 milligrams per milliliter contained in standard Juul pods. It would allow the Food and Drug Administration to lower the cap even more to make e-cigarettes minimally addictive or not addictive at all.

While other countries around the world regulate the amount of nicotine in e-cigarettes, the U.S. does not currently have any restrictions. Supporters say the punch that market leader Juul packs helps smokers transition from traditional cigarettes. Critics say it merely makes Juul incredibly addictive, especially for teenagers.

More than one quarter of U.S. high school seniors use e-cigarettes, according to this year’s federal National Youth Tobacco Survey. Krishnamoorthi and the House Committee on Oversight and Reform’s Economic and Consumer Policy subcommittee are investigating market leader Juul’s possible role in fueling what regulators have declared an “epidemic” of teen vaping.

Juul did not immediately respond to a request for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: angelica lavito, in angelicalavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, cutting, teen, ecigarettes, krishnamoorthi, addictive, vaping, lawmaker, milliliter, national, bill, milligrams, juul, raja, epidemic, introduces, nicotine, say


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