Managing China is NATO’s biggest challenge yet

China has emerged as the most formidable challenge that has ever faced NATO. That is true as well for the North American and European economies upon which NATO rests, which account for roughly half of global GDP. Most media focused on the theatrics of this week’s 70th anniversary summit of NATO’s now-29 members. The biggest news – though woefully underreported – was that NATO, history’s most enduring and successful alliance, for the first-time defined China as a strategic challenge. However, alt


China has emerged as the most formidable challenge that has ever faced NATO.
That is true as well for the North American and European economies upon which NATO rests, which account for roughly half of global GDP.
Most media focused on the theatrics of this week’s 70th anniversary summit of NATO’s now-29 members.
The biggest news – though woefully underreported – was that NATO, history’s most enduring and successful alliance, for the first-time defined China as a strategic challenge.
However, alt
Managing China is NATO’s biggest challenge yet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, biggest, european, huaweis, summit, weeks, nato, trump, chinas, managing, united, china, natos, leader


Managing China is NATO's biggest challenge yet

China has emerged as the most formidable challenge that has ever faced NATO. That is true as well for the North American and European economies upon which NATO rests, which account for roughly half of global GDP.

Most media focused on the theatrics of this week’s 70th anniversary summit of NATO’s now-29 members. The biggest news – though woefully underreported – was that NATO, history’s most enduring and successful alliance, for the first-time defined China as a strategic challenge.

That news was drowned out by French leader Emmanuel Macron, who came into town having declared NATO brain dead; by Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who responded that it instead was the French leader’s brain that was lifeless; by Canadian leader Justin Trudeau, who was caught mocking President Trump during allied cocktail hour; and by President Trump, who shrugged in response that the Canadian was two-faced.

As entertaining as all that was, more significant was that NATO allies have belatedly focused on the most significant challenge to world democracies and their market-driven economies in our new era of major power competition. However, although the closing NATO summit statement required unanimity, even more revealing is the ambiguity of its language, reflecting disagreement over whether Beijing is more of an economic opportunity than fundamental challenge.

“We recognize that China’s growing influence and international policies present both opportunities and challenges that we need to address together as an alliance,” it said.

That’s soft stuff considering that this authoritarian, state capitalist country has already become a global center of gravity – the world’s largest by population, ranking second only to the United States in military spending and, depending on what measure you like, is already or will soon be the largest economy on Earth.

The language was also muted compared to new outrage and legislative action in the United States and elsewhere regarding the reported repression of China’s Uighur Muslim minority, following weeks of Hong Kong protests and local elections supporting their cause, and in the face of continued concerns regarding Huawei’s 5G telecom dominance.

One also didn’t have to look far in the news this week to see new evidence of China’s growing partnerships with Russia, NATO’s primary focus for many years, ranging from a new 1,800 mile-long gas pipeline connecting both countries, to Huawei’s expanded relations with at least eight top Russian universities and research institutes.

Writing for Defense One, the Atlantic Council’s Barry Pavel and Ian Brzezinski have usefully called upon NATO to create a NATO-China Council that would collectively engage China on areas of concern. It would be a structural mechanism for dialogue with Russia to raise concerns, avoid misunderstandings and, where possible, foster cooperation.

The list of matters it would deal with is already a lengthy one, write the authors: Huawei’s targeting of European and North American digital infrastructure; increasing ownership of major European seaports critical to NATO; joint exercises with the Russian military, including in the Nordic-Baltic region; and cyber espionage and intellectual property theft.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, biggest, european, huaweis, summit, weeks, nato, trump, chinas, managing, united, china, natos, leader


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Putin fears the US and NATO are militarizing space and Russia is right to worry, experts say

He said the idea of a Space Force had started as a joke but he had then decided it was a “great idea.” “We have the Air Force, we’ll have the Space Force.” At the start of 2019, the U.S. unveiled an overhaul of its missile defense program in its “Missile Defense Review” in which it stated the need for a “comprehensive approach to missile defense against rogue state and regional missile threats.” The review also recognized “space is a new war-fighting domain, with the Space Force leading the way”


He said the idea of a Space Force had started as a joke but he had then decided it was a “great idea.”
“We have the Air Force, we’ll have the Space Force.”
At the start of 2019, the U.S. unveiled an overhaul of its missile defense program in its “Missile Defense Review” in which it stated the need for a “comprehensive approach to missile defense against rogue state and regional missile threats.”
The review also recognized “space is a new war-fighting domain, with the Space Force leading the way”
Putin fears the US and NATO are militarizing space and Russia is right to worry, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, space, nato, program, worry, experts, say, force, right, putin, russia, fears, missile, defense, satellites, military, militarizing


Putin fears the US and NATO are militarizing space and Russia is right to worry, experts say

Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) First Deputy Head Alexander Ivanov, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, and Federal Agency for Special Construction head Alexander Volosov watch a rocket booster carrying satellites blast off from a launch pad at the Vostochny Cosmodrome. Mikhail Metzel | TASS | Getty Images

NATO, the U.S. and Russia have a new domain to compete and conflict over: space. Russian President Vladimir Putin warned Wednesday that the U.S. saw space as as “theater of military operations” and that the development of the U.S. Space Force posed a threat to Russia. “The U.S. military-political leadership openly considers space as a military theater and plans to conduct operations there,” Putin said at a meeting with defense officials in Sochi, according to Russian news agency TASS. “For preserving strategic supremacy in this field the United States is accelerating creation of its space forces, which are already in the process of operative preparations,” Putin said, adding that the world’s leading countries are fast-tracking the development of modern military space systems and dual purpose satellites and that Russia needed to do the same. “The situation requires us to pay increased attention to strengthening the orbital group, as well as the rocket and space industry as a whole.” Russia opposed the militarization of space, Putin insisted, but said “at the same time the march of events requires greater attention to strengthening the orbital group and the space rocket and missile industry in general.”

NATO too

Putin’s comments Wednesday reiterated those he made in late November to his security council, in which he said he was “seriously concerned” about NATO’s “attempts to militarize outer space.” That comment came after NATO had declared space a fifth “operational domain” for the military alliance, alongside air, land, sea and cyber. “Space is part of our daily life here on Earth. It can be used for peaceful purposes. But it can also be used aggressively,” NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said at a meeting of foreign ministers on November 20. “Satellites can be jammed, hacked or weaponized. Anti-satellite weapons could cripple communications and other services our societies rely on, such as air travel, weather forecast or banking,” he said. “Space is also essential to the alliance’s deterrence and defense,” Stoltenberg added, referencing the organization’s ability to navigate, to gather intelligence, and to detect missile launches. “Making space an operational domain will help us ensure all aspects are taken into account to ensure the success of our missions,” he said. “For instance, this can allow NATO planners to make a request for allies to provide capabilities and services, such as satellite communications and data imagery.”

He said that around 2,000 satellites currently orbit the Earth with around half of them owned by NATO countries. Stoltenberg insisted that “NATO has no intention to put weapons in space. We are a defensive alliance.” He added the alliance’s approach to space will remain fully in line with international law. The 1967 Outer Space Treaty is a global agreement considered a foundation stone of international space law. The treaty was first signed by the U.K., U.S. and then-Soviet Union at the height of the Cold War to promote the peaceful exploration of space. It banned the placing of nuclear weapons in space and limited the use of the Moon and all other celestial bodies to peaceful purposes only. It also established that space shall be free for exploration and use by all nations, but that no nation may claim sovereignty on any part of it.

Star Wars

There are other space treaties covering, for example, the rescue of astronauts, the moon, the International Space Station (ISS) and liability for damage caused by space objects. Still, the use of space for defensive activities is likely to be litigious and provocative territory. It’s not the first time that space has been seen as a potential realm for defense though, especially during the Cold War. The “Strategic Defense Initiative” was a program first initiated in 1983 under President Ronald Reagan. The aim of the program was to develop an anti-ballistic missile system that was designed to shoot down nuclear missiles in space, with potential missile attacks from the Soviet Union specifically in mind.

Artist’s concept of interceptor under development for the U.S. Army’s HEDI (High Endoatmospheric Def. Interceptor), a key element of its 1983 Strategic Defense. Initiative (aka Star Wars) Time Life Pictures | The LIFE Picture Collection | Getty Images

It was dubbed “Star Wars” because it envisaged that technologies like space-based x-ray lasers could be used as part of the defensive system. Funding shortages as well as the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 meant that the SDI was never built. The idea of space dominance and defense has gained more traction in recent years, however, and in 2018, President Donald Trump floated the idea of developing another military branch, the “Space Force.” He said the idea of a Space Force had started as a joke but he had then decided it was a “great idea.” “Space is a war-fighting domain, just like the land, air, and sea,” Trump said. “We have the Air Force, we’ll have the Space Force.” In June 2018, he ordered the Pentagon to begin the creation of the new branch. At the start of 2019, the U.S. unveiled an overhaul of its missile defense program in its “Missile Defense Review” in which it stated the need for a “comprehensive approach to missile defense against rogue state and regional missile threats.” The review also recognized “space is a new war-fighting domain, with the Space Force leading the way” and said it would ensure “American dominance in space.” In a speech presenting more detail on the Missile Defense Review, Trump said the U.S. would “invest in a space-based missile defense layer. It’s new technology. It’s ultimately going to be a very, very big part of our defense and, obviously, of our offense,” he said.

U.S. Air Force Space Command Gen. John “Jay” Raymond stands next to the flag of the newly established U.S. Space Command, the sixth national armed service, in the Rose Garden at the White House August 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. Citing potential threats from China and Russia and the nation’s reliance on satellites for defense operations, Trump said the U.S. needs to launch a ‘space force.’ Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images News | Getty Images

“The system will be monitored, and we will terminate any missile launches from hostile powers, or even from powers that make a mistake. It won’t happen. Regardless of the missile type or the geographic origins of the attack, we will ensure that enemy missiles find no sanctuary on Earth or in the skies above.”

Arms race in space?

Russia responded angrily to the comments, saying it was tantamount to the U.S. relaunching the Cold War-era “Star Wars” program. According to a statement from Russia’s foreign ministry, reported by Reuters, Russia condemned the strategy as an act of confrontation and it urged Washington to reconsider its plans. “The strategy, de facto, gives the green light to the prospect of basing missile strike capabilities in space,” the statement said. “The implementation of these ideas will inevitably lead to the start of an arms race in space, which will have the most negative consequences for international security and stability,” it said. “We would like to call on the U.S. administration to think again and walk away from this irresponsible attempt to re-launch, on a new and more high-tech basis, the still-remembered Reagan-era ‘Star Wars’ program,” it said, Reuters reported. Experts say Russia is wary of the U.S., and NATO, opening up a new operational frontier in space as Russia would be easily out-competed by the combined NATO countries’ technological expertise, advances and weaponry in space.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, space, nato, program, worry, experts, say, force, right, putin, russia, fears, missile, defense, satellites, military, militarizing


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Trump abruptly cancels NATO press conference after summit turns sour

Hours before the press conference was set to start, video emerged of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau caught on a hot mic mocking Trump . The presser was scheduled to come after a series of bilateral meetings with NATO members, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte. “We won’t be doing a press conference at the close of NATO because we did so many over the past two days. President Donald Trump on Wednesday abruptly canceled a press conference th


Hours before the press conference was set to start, video emerged of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau caught on a hot mic mocking Trump .
The presser was scheduled to come after a series of bilateral meetings with NATO members, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte.
“We won’t be doing a press conference at the close of NATO because we did so many over the past two days.
President Donald Trump on Wednesday abruptly canceled a press conference th
Trump abruptly cancels NATO press conference after summit turns sour Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, trump, cancels, nato, president, abruptly, conference, press, minister, video, trudeau, turns, summit, sour


Trump abruptly cancels NATO press conference after summit turns sour

US President Donald Trump (L) and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (R) pose for the family photo at the NATO summit at the Grove hotel in Watford, northeast of London on December 4, 2019.

Hours before the press conference was set to start, video emerged of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau caught on a hot mic mocking Trump .

The presser was scheduled to come after a series of bilateral meetings with NATO members, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte.

“We won’t be doing a press conference at the close of NATO because we did so many over the past two days. Safe travels to all!” Trump said.

“When today’s meetings are over, I will be heading back to Washington,” Trump said in a series of tweets.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday abruptly canceled a press conference that was scheduled to cap a contentious trip to England for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s 70th anniversary meeting.

Trump offered a blunt retort when asked Wednesday about Trudeau’s comments.

“He’s two-faced,” Trump said, before adding, “I find him to be a very nice guy but the truth is I called him out on the fact that he’s not paying 2% and I guess he’s not very happy about it.” Trump has long griped about NATO members paying less than their “fair share” toward the alliance, and brought up the issue repeatedly over the two-day anniversary meeting this week.

Trudeau, speaking with French President Emmanuel Macron, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, said that Trump “was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference off the top.”

“You just watched his team’s jaws drop to the floor,” Trudeau said at another point in the video, raising his eyebrows and motioning with his hand for effect.

None of the politicians in the hot-mic video, which emerged on social media Tuesday evening, mentioned Trump by name. But Trudeau reportedly said later Wednesday that it was Trump’s surprise announcement of the location for next year’s Group of Seven summit that made “his team’s jaws drop to the floor.”

Trump revealed Tuesday that the 2020 G-7 summit will be held at Camp David in Maryland, weeks after he retreated from a plan to host it at his own Miami golf resort.

The hot-mic gossip was the latest point of tension at the meeting, but it was far from the only dispute between leaders on display.

Macron defended his recent claim that NATO was suffering from “brain death” from critics including Trump, who had called that comment “very nasty.”

The French leader also called out Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan for his threat to oppose NATO’s plan for defense of Baltic countries if it does not recognize groups the country deems as terrorists. The White House announced Wednesday morning that Trump had met with Erdogan during the NATO event.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, trump, cancels, nato, president, abruptly, conference, press, minister, video, trudeau, turns, summit, sour


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Trump calls Trudeau ‘two-faced’ after video emerges of NATO leaders apparently mocking him

LONDON — President Donald Trump criticized Justin Trudeau Wednesday, calling his Canadian counterpart “two-faced” after footage emerged of world leaders appearing to mock him. “He’s two-faced,” Trump said. The U.S. leader made the remark while taking questions from reporters alongside German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the 2019 NATO summit in London. A video surfaced on social media late Tuesday purporting to show Trudeau, French President Emmanuel Macron, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and D


LONDON — President Donald Trump criticized Justin Trudeau Wednesday, calling his Canadian counterpart “two-faced” after footage emerged of world leaders appearing to mock him.
“He’s two-faced,” Trump said.
The U.S. leader made the remark while taking questions from reporters alongside German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the 2019 NATO summit in London.
A video surfaced on social media late Tuesday purporting to show Trudeau, French President Emmanuel Macron, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and D
Trump calls Trudeau ‘two-faced’ after video emerges of NATO leaders apparently mocking him Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, trump, president, nato, leaders, late, twofaced, press, paying, mocking, minister, video, trudeau, apparently, emerges, calls


Trump calls Trudeau 'two-faced' after video emerges of NATO leaders apparently mocking him

LONDON — President Donald Trump criticized Justin Trudeau Wednesday, calling his Canadian counterpart “two-faced” after footage emerged of world leaders appearing to mock him.

“He’s two-faced,” Trump said. “I find him to be a very nice guy but the truth is I called him out on the fact that he’s not paying 2% (of GDP on Canada’s defense budget) and I guess he’s not very happy about it.”

“He’s not paying 2% and he should be paying 2%. It’s Canada, they have money and they should be paying 2%. So I called him out on that and I’m sure he wasn’t happy about it but that’s the way it is.”

The U.S. leader made the remark while taking questions from reporters alongside German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the 2019 NATO summit in London.

A video surfaced on social media late Tuesday purporting to show Trudeau, French President Emmanuel Macron, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte discussing Trump’s press conference with NATO Secretary Jens Stoltenberg.

In the clip, which the people involved didn’t realize was being taken, Johnson asks Macron: “Is that why you were late?” to which Trudeau steps in and says: “He was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference off the top.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: ryan browne
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Erdogan, Trump have ‘very productive’ meeting at NATO summit: Turkish official

President Donald Trump and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan leave the stage after family photo during the annual NATO heads of government summit at the Grove Hotel in Watford, Britain December 4, 2019. Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan and U.S. President Donald Trump had a “very productive” meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit in Britain on Wednesday, Turkey’s communications director said. Fahrettin Altun made the comment on Twitter and his office said the meeting lasted half an hou


President Donald Trump and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan leave the stage after family photo during the annual NATO heads of government summit at the Grove Hotel in Watford, Britain December 4, 2019.
Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan and U.S. President Donald Trump had a “very productive” meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit in Britain on Wednesday, Turkey’s communications director said.
Fahrettin Altun made the comment on Twitter and his office said the meeting lasted half an hou
Erdogan, Trump have ‘very productive’ meeting at NATO summit: Turkish official Cached Page below :
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Erdogan, Trump have 'very productive' meeting at NATO summit: Turkish official

President Donald Trump and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan leave the stage after family photo during the annual NATO heads of government summit at the Grove Hotel in Watford, Britain December 4, 2019.

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan and U.S. President Donald Trump had a “very productive” meeting on the sidelines of the NATO summit in Britain on Wednesday, Turkey’s communications director said.

Fahrettin Altun made the comment on Twitter and his office said the meeting lasted half an hour. NATO leaders were meeting near London at a summit aiming to tackle sharp disagreements over spending, future threats including China and Turkey’s role in the alliance.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04
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5 things to know before the stock market opens Wednesday

In comments from the NATO summit, President Donald Trump said Wednesday trade talks are going well and he’ll see what happens. ET, investors look to the Institute for Supply Management’s November nonmanufacturing index to see if services are slipping like manufacturing. Sergey Brin, who started Google with Page in 1998, is stepping down as president of Alphabet and that role will be eliminated. Tuesday evening, several NATO leaders were caught in an unguarded exchange on camera apparently gossip


In comments from the NATO summit, President Donald Trump said Wednesday trade talks are going well and he’ll see what happens.
ET, investors look to the Institute for Supply Management’s November nonmanufacturing index to see if services are slipping like manufacturing.
Sergey Brin, who started Google with Page in 1998, is stepping down as president of Alphabet and that role will be eliminated.
Tuesday evening, several NATO leaders were caught in an unguarded exchange on camera apparently gossip
5 things to know before the stock market opens Wednesday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, merkel, know, things, trump, president, stock, nato, report, market, york, impeachment, google, page, trade, opens


5 things to know before the stock market opens Wednesday

1. Dow to rise on encouraging report on US-China trade talks

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange as U.S. President Donald Trump meets with France’s President Emmanuel Macron on the television, shortly after the opening bell, in New York, U.S., December 3, 2019. Lucas Jackson | REUTERS

U.S. stock futures turned around from early morning declines and were pointing to a strong Wall Street open Wednesday after Bloomberg reported the U.S. and China were edging closer to cementing a “phase one” trade deal before new U.S. tariffs go into effect against Chinese goods on Dec. 15. In comments from the NATO summit, President Donald Trump said Wednesday trade talks are going well and he’ll see what happens. The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank for a third straight session Tuesday after Trump suggested he may want to delay a trade agreement with China until after the 2020 presidential election. However, the Dow still remains less than 2.5% away from record highs.

2. First of two major jobs reports is released before the bell

Ahead of the government’s latest monthly employment report on Friday, the ADP’s November private sector data showed job growth at U.S. companies slowing to 67,000 new positions, way below estimates for 150,000. November’s tally also was a sharp decline from the 121,000 in October, which was revised down from an initially reported 125,000. At 10 a.m. ET, investors look to the Institute for Supply Management’s November nonmanufacturing index to see if services are slipping like manufacturing. The service sector has been expanding for 117 straight months.

3. There’s a change at the top of Google-parent Alphabet

Google CEO Larry Page holds a press annoucement at Google headquarters in New York on May 21, 2012. Google announced that it will allocate 22,000 square feet of its New York headquarters to CornellNYC Tech university, free of charge for five years and six month or until the university completes its campus in New York. EMMANUEL DUNAND | AFP | Getty Images

Larry Page is stepping down as CEO of Google-parent Alphabet, with Google head Sundar Pichai taking over as chief executive officer of the entire company in addition to his current duties. Sergey Brin, who started Google with Page in 1998, is stepping down as president of Alphabet and that role will be eliminated. Page became CEO of Alphabet in 2015 when Google reorganized to form the new parent company to oversee its “Other Bets” outside of its main search and digital ads businesses. Both Page and Brin will remain “actively involved” as members of Alphabet’s board.

4. Trump impeachment inquiry moves into a new phase

Democrats publicly released a new report accusing Trump of soliciting Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election for his benefit and obstructing the impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives. The report, written by the Democratic members of the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees, came on the eve of the next phase of the impeachment probe, where the House Judiciary Committee is expected to draft formal articles of impeachment against the president. House Republicans released their own report, asserting Democrats were attempting to tank Trump’s reelection chances and “undo the will of the American people.”

5. Trump meets with Germany’s Angela Merkel at NATO summit

France’s President Emmanuel Macron (2nd L) and Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel (R) look at US President Donald Trump (front L) and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (front R) walking past them during a family photo as part of the NATO summit at the Grove hotel in Watford, northeast of London on December 4, 2019. Christian Hartman | AFP | Getty Images

Trump was meeting Wednesday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the NATO gathering to celebrate 70 years of the military alliance. Tuesday evening, several NATO leaders were caught in an unguarded exchange on camera apparently gossiping about Trump’s behavior. Without mentioning Trump by name, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was seen standing in a huddle with French President Emmanuel Macron, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson seemingly to be talking about Trump’s long and unscheduled question-and-answer session with journalists earlier Tuesday. In comments Wednesday, sitting next to Merkel, Trump called Trudeau “two faced,” adding the Canadian leader is probably upset about being called out on underpaying NATO contributions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: matthew j belvedere
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NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say

LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape. NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union. U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech


LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape.
NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union.
U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech
NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
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NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say

Nato heads of government (front row L-R): Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, US President Donald Trump and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (middle row L-R) France’s President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban, Iceland’s Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir, (top row L-R) Netherland’s Prime Minister Mark Rutte, Norway’s Prime Minister Erna Solberg, Lithuania’s Prime Minister Saulius Skvernelis, Portugal’s Prime Minister Antonio Costaa and Montenegro’s Prime Minister Dusko Markovic pose for the family photo at the NATO summit at the Grove hotel in Watford, northeast of London on December 4, 2019.

LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape.

Leslie Vinjamuri, the head of the U.S. and the Americas Programme at think tank Chatham House, believes there will now be “several years of grappling” to reform the military alliance.

She added that one of the main issues is that the institution is not set up to deal with the current geopolitical landscape. NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union.

But the rise of the world’s second-largest economy, China, has posed new challenges to the West and trade and political tensions between Beijing and Washington have come to the fore in the last two years. The disagreements have involved the tech sector with the U.S. taking steps to ban the Chinese firm Huawei from selling its technology in the United States.

U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech firm has denied. This issue has sparked division within NATO allies, with Germany and France taking a different stance to the U.S. administration.

“NATO is at a crossroads,” Agathe Demarais, global forecasting director at the research firm The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), highlighted to CNBC Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
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During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending

Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England. Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford. In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture o


Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England.
Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford.
In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture o
During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, nato, focus, public, trillion, goods, services, net, spending, european, summit, trade, needs, defense, union


During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending

Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England.

Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford.

Here is what we have now.

By the end of this year, the U.S. is expected to run a quasi-unstoppable gross public debt of $23.2 trillion, with its public sector budget deficits remaining at about 7% of the country’s economy.

On external accounts, the U.S. is showing a trade deficit on goods and services currently running at an annual rate of $529 billion, and a net foreign debt of $10.6 trillion at the end of last June.

In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture of wealth and macroeconomic stability.

At the end of this year’s second quarter, the EU’s gross public debt stood at $14 trillion, with a budget deficit of only 0.9% of the group’s GDP.

Apart from that, the EU is a large net beneficiary on international trade accounts. Its surplus on goods and services trade in the first half of this year ran at an annual rate of $194.3 billion, in large part as a result of its strong net exports to the United States.

So, there it is: A deeply indebted U.S. continues to carry most of the financial burden of a defense alliance – NATO, The North Atlantic Treaty Organization – that guarantees the security of a rich and prosperous European Union.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, nato, focus, public, trillion, goods, services, net, spending, european, summit, trade, needs, defense, union


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NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say

LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape. NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union. U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech


LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape.
NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union.
U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech
NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, survive, change, needs, tech, say, president, posed, nato, taking, global, firm, analysts


NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM – JULY 11: Heads of state and government, including French President Emmanuel Macron (7th L), German Chancellor Angela Merkel (8th L), U.S. President Donald Trump, British Prime Minister Theresa May (5th R), and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (3rd R), mingle after posing for a family picture during the opening ceremony at the 2018 NATO Summit at NATO headquarters on July 11, 2018 in Brussels, Belgium.

LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape.

Leslie Vinjamuri, the head of the U.S. and the Americas Programme at think tank Chatham House, believes there will now be “several years of grappling” to reform the military alliance.

She added that one of the main issues is that the institution is not set up to deal with the current geopolitical landscape. NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union.

But the rise of the world’s second-largest economy, China, has posed new challenges to the West and trade and political tensions between Beijing and Washington have come to the fore in the last two years. The disagreements have involved the tech sector with the U.S. taking steps to ban the Chinese firm Huawei from selling its technology in the United States.

U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech firm has denied. This issue has sparked division within NATO allies, with Germany and France taking a different stance to the U.S. administration.

“NATO is at a crossroads,” Agathe Demarais, global forecasting director at the research firm The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), highlighted to CNBC Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, survive, change, needs, tech, say, president, posed, nato, taking, global, firm, analysts


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Trudeau, Macron, Johnson appear to joke about Trump on hot mic video

The leaders of France, Canada and the U.K. appeared to be gossiping about President Donald Trump at Buckingham Palace on Tuesday, according to video footage circulated of the event. In the video, in which the world leaders don’t appear to realize their conversation is being recorded, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson asks French President Macron: “Is that why you were late?” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau then steps in and says: “He was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference


The leaders of France, Canada and the U.K. appeared to be gossiping about President Donald Trump at Buckingham Palace on Tuesday, according to video footage circulated of the event.
In the video, in which the world leaders don’t appear to realize their conversation is being recorded, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson asks French President Macron: “Is that why you were late?”
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau then steps in and says: “He was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference
Trudeau, Macron, Johnson appear to joke about Trump on hot mic video Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, queen, trump, leaders, minutes, johnson, nato, mic, trudeau, president, appear, macron, joke, minister, hot, prime


Trudeau, Macron, Johnson appear to joke about Trump on hot mic video

LONDON, ENGLAND – DECEMBER 03: Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Jens Stoltenberg, Nato Secretary General, Queen Elizabeth II, Boris Johnson, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada join other Nato leaders for a group photograph at a reception for NATO leaders hosted by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace on December 3, 2019 in London, England.

The leaders of France, Canada and the U.K. appeared to be gossiping about President Donald Trump at Buckingham Palace on Tuesday, according to video footage circulated of the event.

In the video, in which the world leaders don’t appear to realize their conversation is being recorded, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson asks French President Macron: “Is that why you were late?” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau then steps in and says: “He was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference off the top.”

It is not clear who Trudeau was referring to and none of people present — which also includes Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte and Princess Anne — mention Trump by name.

However, Trump’s remarks alongside NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg earlier on Tuesday lasted 53 minutes, according to a White House transcript, when the itinerary had suggested that it would last 20 minutes. The U.S. president was later involved in 38 minutes of remarks alongside Macron.

The footage also features a “jaws drop to the floor” sentence from the Canadian prime minster, potentially referring a team of officials that work in close contact with a world leader. But the words do not appear to be a continuation of Trudeau’s previous comments.

Spokespersons for Johnson and Macron’s offices have both declined to comment on the video.

Leaders of NATO countries are in the U.K. to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the alliance and met the British queen and her family at an evening event on Tuesday. But the celebrations come against a backdrop of division between members on its future direction.

During a press conference Tuesday, Macron and Trump expressed differing views over topics like Turkey, Islamic State fighters and the overall role of the transatlantic institution. During the morning session, Trump strongly denounced comments the French president made earlier this year about NATO.

Macron told The Economist publication in October that the military alliance was experiencing “brain death.” The American leader hit back, saying he could see France “breaking off” from NATO and said Macron’s comments had been “very, very nasty” to the 28 other member states.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, queen, trump, leaders, minutes, johnson, nato, mic, trudeau, president, appear, macron, joke, minister, hot, prime


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