Managing China is NATO’s biggest challenge yet

China has emerged as the most formidable challenge that has ever faced NATO. That is true as well for the North American and European economies upon which NATO rests, which account for roughly half of global GDP. Most media focused on the theatrics of this week’s 70th anniversary summit of NATO’s now-29 members. The biggest news – though woefully underreported – was that NATO, history’s most enduring and successful alliance, for the first-time defined China as a strategic challenge. However, alt


China has emerged as the most formidable challenge that has ever faced NATO.
That is true as well for the North American and European economies upon which NATO rests, which account for roughly half of global GDP.
Most media focused on the theatrics of this week’s 70th anniversary summit of NATO’s now-29 members.
The biggest news – though woefully underreported – was that NATO, history’s most enduring and successful alliance, for the first-time defined China as a strategic challenge.
However, alt
Managing China is NATO’s biggest challenge yet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, biggest, european, huaweis, summit, weeks, nato, trump, chinas, managing, united, china, natos, leader


Managing China is NATO's biggest challenge yet

China has emerged as the most formidable challenge that has ever faced NATO. That is true as well for the North American and European economies upon which NATO rests, which account for roughly half of global GDP.

Most media focused on the theatrics of this week’s 70th anniversary summit of NATO’s now-29 members. The biggest news – though woefully underreported – was that NATO, history’s most enduring and successful alliance, for the first-time defined China as a strategic challenge.

That news was drowned out by French leader Emmanuel Macron, who came into town having declared NATO brain dead; by Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who responded that it instead was the French leader’s brain that was lifeless; by Canadian leader Justin Trudeau, who was caught mocking President Trump during allied cocktail hour; and by President Trump, who shrugged in response that the Canadian was two-faced.

As entertaining as all that was, more significant was that NATO allies have belatedly focused on the most significant challenge to world democracies and their market-driven economies in our new era of major power competition. However, although the closing NATO summit statement required unanimity, even more revealing is the ambiguity of its language, reflecting disagreement over whether Beijing is more of an economic opportunity than fundamental challenge.

“We recognize that China’s growing influence and international policies present both opportunities and challenges that we need to address together as an alliance,” it said.

That’s soft stuff considering that this authoritarian, state capitalist country has already become a global center of gravity – the world’s largest by population, ranking second only to the United States in military spending and, depending on what measure you like, is already or will soon be the largest economy on Earth.

The language was also muted compared to new outrage and legislative action in the United States and elsewhere regarding the reported repression of China’s Uighur Muslim minority, following weeks of Hong Kong protests and local elections supporting their cause, and in the face of continued concerns regarding Huawei’s 5G telecom dominance.

One also didn’t have to look far in the news this week to see new evidence of China’s growing partnerships with Russia, NATO’s primary focus for many years, ranging from a new 1,800 mile-long gas pipeline connecting both countries, to Huawei’s expanded relations with at least eight top Russian universities and research institutes.

Writing for Defense One, the Atlantic Council’s Barry Pavel and Ian Brzezinski have usefully called upon NATO to create a NATO-China Council that would collectively engage China on areas of concern. It would be a structural mechanism for dialogue with Russia to raise concerns, avoid misunderstandings and, where possible, foster cooperation.

The list of matters it would deal with is already a lengthy one, write the authors: Huawei’s targeting of European and North American digital infrastructure; increasing ownership of major European seaports critical to NATO; joint exercises with the Russian military, including in the Nordic-Baltic region; and cyber espionage and intellectual property theft.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: frederick kempe
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, challenge, biggest, european, huaweis, summit, weeks, nato, trump, chinas, managing, united, china, natos, leader


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Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with

US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018. Defense spending, againSpending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading. Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again. The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S. In September


US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018.
Defense spending, againSpending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading.
Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again.
The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S.
In September
Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, russia, summit, natos, trump, issue, defense, deal, pressing, alliance, spending, nato, military


Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with

US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018. NurPhoto | NurPhoto | Getty Images

As heads of state and government meet in the U.K. this week for the 70th anniversary of the military alliance NATO, discussions are likely to focus on shifting geopolitical relations and military threats, that thorny issue of defense spending and, crucially, the alliance’s future. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said earlier this year that the summit on Dec. 3 and 4 will give members the opportunity to address “current and emerging security challenges and how NATO continues to invest and adapt to ensure it will remain a pillar of stability in the years ahead.” The summit on the outskirts of London comes at a tricky time for NATO with unsettled relationships countering older insecurities like its relations with Russia. Furthermore, the commitment of its most powerful member, the U.S., to the alliance is now more uncertain than ever. “Rarely has NATO not been under verbal siege over these past few months,” Judy Dempsey, a non-resident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe, said in an editorial piece on Tuesday last week. “The fact that that this meeting will not be called a summit shows how NATO’s seventieth birthday is not being celebrated with great fanfare but instead with a degree of self-doubt, if not anxiety.” That anxiety comes after a tough few years for the alliance, especially when it comes to the issue of who pays the most. NATO agreed at a summit in Wales in 2014 to reverse the trend of declining defense budgets and to raise them over the coming decade, a move that was designed to “further strengthen the transatlantic bond.” Then, members agreed to spend a minimum of 2% of their GDP (gross domestic product) on defense. At last year’s summit in Brussels, President Donald Trump chided other members of the group for not meeting spending targets agreed at the NATO summit in 2014. Experts note that discussions at this NATO “Leaders Meeting,” as it’s being called, will be informed as much by issues not on the formal agenda as those that are. “Member states will be keen to bring their political differences back behind closed doors, whilst emphasizing the military coherence and credibility of their alliance,” Sarah Raine, consulting senior fellow for geopolitics and strategy at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), told CNBC. “The degree to which Europe should do more not just for itself, but also by itself, remains highly contentious. Assessment of the scope of NATO’s engagement on China’s challenge, including the U.S. push to include the issue of 5G within these discussions, risk further highlighting these sensitivities,” she said.

Defense spending, again

Spending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading. NATO estimates for 2019, released in June, show that only the U.S., U.K., Greece, Estonia, Romania, Poland and Latvia have met or surpassed that target. The highest defense spend was made by the U.S., at 3.4% of its GDP, while the lowest spend was by Luxembourg which only spent 0.55%. Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again. Germany has been singled out for especially harsh treatment because of its budget surplus. The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S.

US commitment to NATO

Defense spending, or the lack thereof, has created so much ire in Trump that there are reports that he frequently discussed pulling the U.S. out of the alliance, even with Congressional support. In July, he also likened countries not meeting the defense spend target, like Germany, to delinquents. “We’re the schmucks that are paying for the whole thing,” Trump said at a rally in July. “Frankly, many countries owe us a tremendous amount of money for many years back, where they’re delinquent, as far as I’m concerned, because the United States has had to pay for them,” singling out Germany as “the number one” culprit.

Perhaps the only thing Trump has in common with his predecessor Barack Obama was their shared dismay at the perception that the U.S. bears the brunt of NATO spending. Obama called out “free riders” in NATO that benefit from U.S. military support without contributing enough to defense themselves.

Europe’s commitment to NATO

Ironically, questions over members’ commitment to NATO could come from closer to home (it’s headquartered in Brussels) with increasing talk in Europe about strengthening the EU’s cooperation and coordination on defense. French President Emmanuel Macron has caused a stir ahead of this week’s NATO meeting after he said in early November that “what we are currently experiencing is the brain death of Nato.” Speaking to The Economist magazine, Macron cited the U.S. failure to consult NATO before pulling out of Syria as a reason for his comment, and also questioned NATO’s validity. He argued that Europe should focus on its own defense alliance, although German Chancellor Angela Merkel believes the continent is too weak “for now” to defend itself. Speaking to lawmakers last week, Merkel said that “we rely on this trans-Atlantic alliance, and that is why it is right for us to work for this alliance and take on more responsibility.” IISS’s Raine told CNBC that the short-term priority for the alliance “must be to get NATO’s public messaging back on track.” “That includes the presentation of an alliance that is militarily more capable than ever before, and that is adapting to the evolving security threats its members face, not at the expense of its traditional focus but in addition to it,” she said. The NATO secretary general will be hoping for summit headlines that focus attention away from the state of NATO’s brain, Raine said, “and towards admiration for NATO’s muscles, by highlighting the range and depth of NATO’s operational commitments and capabilities.”

The ‘R’-word

NATO was set up in 1949 as a military alliance between 10 European countries, the U.S. and Canada “to promote cooperation among its members and to guard their freedom,” the alliance says, “within the context of countering the threat posed at the time by the Soviet Union.” Seventy years on, and after several decades of relatively good relations and cooperation, NATO’s relations with Russia are tense. This comes after Moscow’s 2014 annexation of Crimea and its role in a pro-Russian uprising in eastern Ukraine. NATO says that the channels of communication remain open with Russia but that “Russia’s destabilizing actions and policies go beyond Ukraine” citing its “provocative military activities near NATO’s borders stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea.” It has also cited its “irresponsible and aggressive nuclear rhetoric,” its support for the regime in Syria as well as the U.K. nerve agent attack which it said was “a clear breach of international norms.” NATO has said it supported the U.S.’ decision to withdraw from the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty in response to “Russia’s material breach.” On Russia’s part, perhaps the most controversial NATO decision has been the decision to deploy NATO missile defense systems in Romania and Poland (although completion of this Aegis Ashore — a land-based missile defense system — site is delayed to 2020). Along with the deployment of thousands of NATO troops to the Baltic nations and Poland in the last few years, these developments appear to have served only to exacerbate tensions with Russia. Russia has widely criticized the deployment of missile defense shields in its former backyard. The prospect of Ukraine and Georgia, both of which used to be part of the former USSR, joining NATO (and even potentially the European Union) is also an unsavory prospect for Moscow. In September 2019, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said that “NATO approaching our borders is a threat to Russia.” That view was echoed by Russian President Vladimir Putin this month, when he told Russia’s Security Council that he was “seriously concerned about the NATO infrastructure approaching our borders, as well as the attempts to militarize outer space.”

The future?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, russia, summit, natos, trump, issue, defense, deal, pressing, alliance, spending, nato, military


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‘Sometimes allies don’t agree on all issues,’ NATO’s secretary general says

LONDON — With a very public spat taking place between NATO members France and Turkey just ahead of the latest meeting of the military alliance in London, Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC that it’s normal for allies to disagree. “Sometimes NATO allies don’t agree on all issues,” he said, speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble the day before the NATO summit begins at a location just outside London. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan responded by saying Macron should check whether he hims


LONDON — With a very public spat taking place between NATO members France and Turkey just ahead of the latest meeting of the military alliance in London, Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC that it’s normal for allies to disagree.
“Sometimes NATO allies don’t agree on all issues,” he said, speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble the day before the NATO summit begins at a location just outside London.
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan responded by saying Macron should check whether he hims
‘Sometimes allies don’t agree on all issues,’ NATO’s secretary general says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, different, dont, issues, london, allies, brain, weve, turkey, natos, nato, president, military, general, secretary, macron, agree


'Sometimes allies don't agree on all issues,' NATO's secretary general says

LONDON — With a very public spat taking place between NATO members France and Turkey just ahead of the latest meeting of the military alliance in London, Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC that it’s normal for allies to disagree.

“Sometimes NATO allies don’t agree on all issues,” he said, speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble the day before the NATO summit begins at a location just outside London.

“At the same time the strength of NATO is that despite the differences we have seen throughout our history, we’ve always been able to agree around our core task to protect and defend each other.”

French President Emmanuel Macron drew a sharp rebuke from NATO-ally Turkey after he said three weeks ago that the 70-year old military alliance of 29 countries was experiencing “brain death.”

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan responded by saying Macron should check whether he himself was “brain dead.”

“I’m addressing Mr Macron from Turkey and I will say it at NATO: You should check whether you are brain dead first,” Erdogan said on Friday, Reuters reported.

Stoltenberg said the different perspectives on NATO’s existence “reflect the fact that we are 29 allies with different political leaders from both sides of the Atlantic with different history and geography.”

“The reality is that we do more together now than we’ve done in many years,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, different, dont, issues, london, allies, brain, weve, turkey, natos, nato, president, military, general, secretary, macron, agree


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France’s Macron says NATO suffering ‘brain death,’ questions US commitment

Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, speaks ahead of the Balkan summit at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany, on Monday, April 29, 2019. French President Emmanuel Macron, in an interview with British weekly The Economist, warned fellow European countries that they could no longer rely on the United States to defend North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies. “What we are currently experiencing is the brain death of NATO,” Macron was quoted as saying. I’d argue that we should reassess the r


Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, speaks ahead of the Balkan summit at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany, on Monday, April 29, 2019.
French President Emmanuel Macron, in an interview with British weekly The Economist, warned fellow European countries that they could no longer rely on the United States to defend North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies.
“What we are currently experiencing is the brain death of NATO,” Macron was quoted as saying.
I’d argue that we should reassess the r
France’s Macron says NATO suffering ‘brain death,’ questions US commitment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, questions, states, treaty, death, european, nato, suffering, month, president, brain, germany, natos, macron, frances, united, commitment


France's Macron says NATO suffering 'brain death,' questions US commitment

Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, speaks ahead of the Balkan summit at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany, on Monday, April 29, 2019.

French President Emmanuel Macron, in an interview with British weekly The Economist, warned fellow European countries that they could no longer rely on the United States to defend North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies.

“What we are currently experiencing is the brain death of NATO,” Macron was quoted as saying.

Asked whether he still believed in the Article Five “collective defense” stipulations of NATO’s founding treaty – under which an attack against one ally is considered as an attack against all allies – Macron answered: “I don’t know.”

“(NATO) only works if the guarantor of last resort functions as such. I’d argue that we should reassess the reality of what NATO is in the light of the commitment of the United States,” Macron added.

The United States is showing signs of “turning its back on us”, as demonstrated by President Donald Trump’s sudden decision last month to pull troops out of northeastern Syria last month without consulting the allies, the French leader said.

That move caught NATO’s leading European powers – France, Britain and Germany – by surprise and paved the way for Turkey, another NATO member, to launch a cross-border military operation targeting Syrian Kurdish forces.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, questions, states, treaty, death, european, nato, suffering, month, president, brain, germany, natos, macron, frances, united, commitment


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Russian sanctions are helping to prevent another Crimea, NATO’s Stoltenberg says

NATO has defended the use of economic sanctions against Russia, suggesting they could prevent Moscow from invading other countries. In response, the United States and European Union have imposed economic sanctions on Russian companies and individuals. But NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC’s Willem Marx on Friday that the sanctions were necessary to thwart Russian bullying. “Russia has violated the sovereignty and territorial integrity of neighbor Ukraine and has continued to dest


NATO has defended the use of economic sanctions against Russia, suggesting they could prevent Moscow from invading other countries. In response, the United States and European Union have imposed economic sanctions on Russian companies and individuals. But NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC’s Willem Marx on Friday that the sanctions were necessary to thwart Russian bullying. “Russia has violated the sovereignty and territorial integrity of neighbor Ukraine and has continued to dest
Russian sanctions are helping to prevent another Crimea, NATO’s Stoltenberg says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-08  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nato, russian, sanctions, ukraine, eastern, ministers, prevent, willem, russia, natos, helping, economic, stoltenberg, crimea


Russian sanctions are helping to prevent another Crimea, NATO's Stoltenberg says

NATO has defended the use of economic sanctions against Russia, suggesting they could prevent Moscow from invading other countries.

After annexing Crimea from Ukraine in 2014, a move that has not been recognized internationally, Russia said it would not return the region. In response, the United States and European Union have imposed economic sanctions on Russian companies and individuals.

Speaking in Austria on Tuesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin claimed the measures were counterproductive as they had proved harmful to all parties involved.

But NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC’s Willem Marx on Friday that the sanctions were necessary to thwart Russian bullying.

“I think it is at least obvious that if we hadn’t done anything it would have lowered the threshold for Russia to do similar things against other countries,” Stoltenberg said at the close of a two-day meeting of defense ministers in Brussels.

“Russia has violated the sovereignty and territorial integrity of neighbor Ukraine and has continued to destabilize eastern Ukraine. It has to have consequences, it has to have a cost,” he added.

Ukrainian, Russian, German and French foreign ministers are due to meet in Berlin on Monday to discuss the conflict in eastern Ukraine.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-08  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nato, russian, sanctions, ukraine, eastern, ministers, prevent, willem, russia, natos, helping, economic, stoltenberg, crimea


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Trump endorses NATO’s mutual defense pact in Poland, after failing to do so on first Europe trip

President Donald Trump on Thursday explicitly endorsed NATO’s mutual defense clause after failing to do so during his previous European trip. Speaking in Warsaw, Poland, Trump defended his calls for allies in the 28-member North Atlantic Treaty Organization to pay more for their defense. At a NATO summit in May, Trump declined to explicitly endorse Article 5, creating unease among European leaders at the event. He eventually publicly committed the U.S. to the clause during a press conference in


President Donald Trump on Thursday explicitly endorsed NATO’s mutual defense clause after failing to do so during his previous European trip. Speaking in Warsaw, Poland, Trump defended his calls for allies in the 28-member North Atlantic Treaty Organization to pay more for their defense. At a NATO summit in May, Trump declined to explicitly endorse Article 5, creating unease among European leaders at the event. He eventually publicly committed the U.S. to the clause during a press conference in
Trump endorses NATO’s mutual defense pact in Poland, after failing to do so on first Europe trip Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-06  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, nato, states, european, united, defense, world, clause, failing, article, pact, mutual, europe, poland, natos, endorses, trip, trump


Trump endorses NATO's mutual defense pact in Poland, after failing to do so on first Europe trip

President Donald Trump on Thursday explicitly endorsed NATO’s mutual defense clause after failing to do so during his previous European trip.

Speaking in Warsaw, Poland, Trump defended his calls for allies in the 28-member North Atlantic Treaty Organization to pay more for their defense. He then endorsed Article 5, which ensures that allies will come to each other’s defense in the event of an attack.

“To those who would criticize our tough stance, I would point out that the United States has demonstrated — not merely with its words but with its actions — that we stand firmly behind Article 5, the mutual defense commitment,” Trump said.

“Words are easy, but actions are what matters. And for its own protection, Europe — and you know this, everybody knows this, everybody has to know this — Europe must do more.”

Trump, who won the White House with an anti-global message, has repeatedly bashed NATO and the European Union, which have formed the basis of U.S.-Europe cooperation in the decades since World War II. At a NATO summit in May, Trump declined to explicitly endorse Article 5, creating unease among European leaders at the event.

The ceremony in Brussels dedicated a memorial to the only time NATO has invoked that automatic defense clause — after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks — when those same NATO nations came the America’s defense by sending troops to Afghanistan and elsewhere.

Trump’s doubts about committing to Article 5, which started when he was a candidate, came as Russia has become more militarily assertive. He eventually publicly committed the U.S. to the clause during a press conference in June, saying: “I’m committing the United States to Article 5.”

Trump also said Thursday that “a strong Europe is a blessing to the West and the world.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-06  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, nato, states, european, united, defense, world, clause, failing, article, pact, mutual, europe, poland, natos, endorses, trip, trump


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Trump says US committed to NATO’s Article 5 on common defense

Trump said on Friday the United States is committed to Article 5 of the NATO charter, which requires each member of the alliance to come to the defense of any other. “I’m committing the United States and have committed, but I’m committing the United States to Article 5. And certainly we are there to protect,” Trump said at a joint news conference with Romanian President Klaus Iohannis in the White House Rose Garden. U.S. allies were disturbed last month when Trump did not personally affirm his c


Trump said on Friday the United States is committed to Article 5 of the NATO charter, which requires each member of the alliance to come to the defense of any other. “I’m committing the United States and have committed, but I’m committing the United States to Article 5. And certainly we are there to protect,” Trump said at a joint news conference with Romanian President Klaus Iohannis in the White House Rose Garden. U.S. allies were disturbed last month when Trump did not personally affirm his c
Trump says US committed to NATO’s Article 5 on common defense Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-09
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, states, natos, committing, nato, trump, common, white, committed, defense, rose, article, united, summit


Trump says US committed to NATO's Article 5 on common defense

Trump said on Friday the United States is committed to Article 5 of the NATO charter, which requires each member of the alliance to come to the defense of any other.

“I’m committing the United States and have committed, but I’m committing the United States to Article 5. And certainly we are there to protect,” Trump said at a joint news conference with Romanian President Klaus Iohannis in the White House Rose Garden.

U.S. allies were disturbed last month when Trump did not personally affirm his commitment to Article 5 during a NATO summit in Brussels.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-09
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, states, natos, committing, nato, trump, common, white, committed, defense, rose, article, united, summit


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