Netflix shares are underperforming the market and analysts are starting to show some concern

While analysts are nowhere near throwing in the towel on one of their favorite stocks, many are starting to show concern. Netflix stock has traded down 5% over the past 12 months, lagging behind its technology giant peers and the broader stock market. Thirty-eight of the 40 analysts covering the company have either buy or hold ratings on Netflix shares, according to FactSet. “The battle is really in international” markets, Devitt said, as the media content market in “the U.S. is maturing and get


While analysts are nowhere near throwing in the towel on one of their favorite stocks, many are starting to show concern. Netflix stock has traded down 5% over the past 12 months, lagging behind its technology giant peers and the broader stock market. Thirty-eight of the 40 analysts covering the company have either buy or hold ratings on Netflix shares, according to FactSet. “The battle is really in international” markets, Devitt said, as the media content market in “the U.S. is maturing and get
Netflix shares are underperforming the market and analysts are starting to show some concern Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, devitt, starting, stock, concern, netflix, underperforming, streaming, shares, wall, street, analysts, nbc, content, market


Netflix shares are underperforming the market and analysts are starting to show some concern

With the coming loss of the most popular show on its platform, Netflix needs to show Wall Street it has a content pipeline to keep growing subscribers and satisfy current ones. While analysts are nowhere near throwing in the towel on one of their favorite stocks, many are starting to show concern.

“The Office” will be removed from Netflix by NBC in 2021. The streaming video giant was willing to offer NBC as much as $90 million a year for the rights to continue airing “The Office” but NBC rejected the offer.

“While NFLX retains rights through January 2021, it is nevertheless a blow to lose one of it most watched shows,” Baird analyst William Power said in a recent note to investors.

Netflix stock has traded down 5% over the past 12 months, lagging behind its technology giant peers and the broader stock market. After a fourth-quarter slide, the stock has rocketed back by 41% this year, but still hasn’t been able to overtake the market over the last full year.

Most of the 2019 gains are from a big pop in January. Since then, the stock has faltered. While concerned, Wall Street is sticking by the stock. Thirty-eight of the 40 analysts covering the company have either buy or hold ratings on Netflix shares, according to FactSet.

Stifel analyst Scott Devitt explained that the recent pause in the rally is the result of uncertainty around the company, both in the competitive streaming landscape and Netflix’s content production.

Devitt expects to stick by his buy rating unless the head start Netflix has in streaming begins to erode. “The battle is really in international” markets, Devitt said, as the media content market in “the U.S. is maturing and getting more competitive.”

As Netflix is pouring investment into creating its own content, big media conglomerates like Disney and Comcast are starting their own streaming services and buying back content. But neither of these models are certain, in Devitt’s view.

“Can these other services, that are potential competitors for Netflix, make the economics work where they get paid for their own content? Five years ago that wasn’t the case,” Devitt said. “It’s a relevant topic – it’s not to be swept under the rug – but it’s hard to know whether it’s that much of a problem for Netflix.”

It’s little wonder why Netflix continues to be beloved by investors and analysts, as the stock has climbed nearly 475% in the past five years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, devitt, starting, stock, concern, netflix, underperforming, streaming, shares, wall, street, analysts, nbc, content, market


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Why NBC is paying $500 million to stream ‘The Office,’ a show it already owns

The streaming service is set to shell out $100 million per year for the show, even though it’s technically a property of NBC’s parent company. So, if “The Office” is an NBC show, why is NBC shelling out $500 million to put it on its forthcoming streaming service? In this case, the NBC streaming service is buying the rights to “The Office” from Universal Television. A person familiar with the negotiations said Netflix made an offer to keep “The Office” on its streaming service, but the offer was


The streaming service is set to shell out $100 million per year for the show, even though it’s technically a property of NBC’s parent company. So, if “The Office” is an NBC show, why is NBC shelling out $500 million to put it on its forthcoming streaming service? In this case, the NBC streaming service is buying the rights to “The Office” from Universal Television. A person familiar with the negotiations said Netflix made an offer to keep “The Office” on its streaming service, but the offer was
Why NBC is paying $500 million to stream ‘The Office,’ a show it already owns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, company, television, paying, nbc, service, netflix, stream, office, transfer, 500, streaming, rights, owns


Why NBC is paying $500 million to stream 'The Office,' a show it already owns

NBC is reclaiming “The Office.”

The Comcast company on Tuesday revealed that it has signed an exclusive deal to house the show on its upcoming streaming service for five years, starting in 2021. But just because NBC owns the show, doesn’t mean it won’t have to pay for it.

The streaming service is set to shell out $100 million per year for the show, even though it’s technically a property of NBC’s parent company. Universal Television, a separate division of NBCUniversal, produced the show with Deedle-Dee Productions and Reveille Productions.

“The Office” has been a staple on Netflix, and was far and away the most streamed show on the service in 2018, according to data from Nielsen. Viewers streamed more than 52 million minutes of the show that year — 20 million more than the second most watched show, “Friends.”

The 2005 show, a remake of a U.K. comedy series of the same name, aired on NBC for eight seasons and depicts the everyday lives of employees at the Scranton, Pennsylvania branch of a fictional Dunder Mifflin Paper Company.

The documentary-style show, which featured Steve Carell, Rainn Wilson, John Krasinski, Jenna Fischer and B. J. Novak as main characters, was met with mixed reviews during its first season, but gained acclaim with critics and audiences in the seasons that followed.

So, if “The Office” is an NBC show, why is NBC shelling out $500 million to put it on its forthcoming streaming service?

The answer: Transfer pricing, according to Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter.

When a large company like Comcast is made up of smaller, independently run divisions, each division must pay a transfer price for any products or services of another division, he explained.

In this case, the NBC streaming service is buying the rights to “The Office” from Universal Television.

“You have to have internal transfer pricing to prove where you earned each piece of the pie,” Pachter said.

These types of deals are highly regulated to prevent companies from paying less than market value for a product or service. So NBC had to establish pricing based on similar transactions between unrelated parties. For example, Netflix bought the rights to “Friends” from WarnerMedia for $100 million for one year.

Universal Television had to hold an auction for “The Office” at “arm’s length.” Meaning, the company could not have any relationship with a potential bidder. This ensures that all parties have equal access to information related to the deal and assures no collusion between the buyer and seller.

A person familiar with the negotiations said Netflix made an offer to keep “The Office” on its streaming service, but the offer was rejected. Netflix was willing to pay up to $90 million a year for the rights, but NBC topped the bid.

NBC isn’t just paying the transfer cost, it will also shell out a percentage in royalty fees to profit participants of the series, Pachter said. Writers, actors, producers and creators will get a share of the $500 million, as is the case with any show that enters syndication on cable television.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, company, television, paying, nbc, service, netflix, stream, office, transfer, 500, streaming, rights, owns


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Here’s everything you need to know about the first 2020 Democratic presidential debate in Miami

The stage is set for the first Democratic presidential primary debate for the 2020 election at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. Democratic candidates will take the stage together for the first time Wednesday night as they jockey for position in the race to take on President Donald Trump in 2020. Ten presidential hopefuls will face off on Wednesday from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami. Democrats


The stage is set for the first Democratic presidential primary debate for the 2020 election at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. Democratic candidates will take the stage together for the first time Wednesday night as they jockey for position in the race to take on President Donald Trump in 2020. Ten presidential hopefuls will face off on Wednesday from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami. Democrats
Here’s everything you need to know about the first 2020 Democratic presidential debate in Miami Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, miami, democratic, stage, presidential, center, arts, seconds, 2020, debate, performing, nbc, heres, candidates, know, need


Here's everything you need to know about the first 2020 Democratic presidential debate in Miami

The stage is set for the first Democratic presidential primary debate for the 2020 election at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Democratic candidates will take the stage together for the first time Wednesday night as they jockey for position in the race to take on President Donald Trump in 2020.

Ten presidential hopefuls will face off on Wednesday from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami. Another 10 candidates will meet Thursday as they look for standout moments to gain ground in the field of about two dozen candidates.

The debates, hosted by NBC News, MSNBC and Telemundo, will air live on those networks both nights. CNBC will also stream them.

Jose Diaz-Balart, Savannah Guthrie, Lester Holt, Rachel Maddow and Chuck Todd will moderate the debate. Democrats will get 60 seconds to respond to questions and another 30 seconds for follow-ups, according to NBC News. Candidates will give closing comments but not opening remarks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, miami, democratic, stage, presidential, center, arts, seconds, 2020, debate, performing, nbc, heres, candidates, know, need


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NBC is removing ‘The Office’ from Netflix in 2021 and putting it on its new streaming service

NBC has decided to remove “The Office” from Netflix in 2021 and include the show in the company’s new streaming service. The move bolsters the potential appeal of NBC’s ad-supported streaming service, which is set to launch in the first quarter of 2020. “We can’t wait to welcome the gang from Dunder Mifflin to NBCUniversal’s new streaming service.” Still, the decision may convince more people to sign up for NBC’s streaming service, which will be driven by advertising revenue tied to eyeballs. AT


NBC has decided to remove “The Office” from Netflix in 2021 and include the show in the company’s new streaming service. The move bolsters the potential appeal of NBC’s ad-supported streaming service, which is set to launch in the first quarter of 2020. “We can’t wait to welcome the gang from Dunder Mifflin to NBCUniversal’s new streaming service.” Still, the decision may convince more people to sign up for NBC’s streaming service, which will be driven by advertising revenue tied to eyeballs. AT
NBC is removing ‘The Office’ from Netflix in 2021 and putting it on its new streaming service Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nbc, removing, service, nbcuniversal, million, nbcs, content, offer, streaming, putting, office, 2021, netflix


NBC is removing 'The Office' from Netflix in 2021 and putting it on its new streaming service

‘Valentine’s Day’ Episode 16 of the sitcom The Office. Pictured is the cast of the sitcome: (L to R) Angela Kinsey as Angela Martin, Kate Flannery as Meredith Palmer, Steve Carell as Michael Scott, Phyllis Smith as Phyllis Lapin-Vance, and Jenna Fischer as Pam Beesly.

NBC has decided to remove “The Office” from Netflix in 2021 and include the show in the company’s new streaming service. The deal will be exclusive for five years.

NBC announced the decision to remove “The Office” in a statement on Tuesday. The hit comedy was the most-watched Netflix show in 2018, according to data analytics firm Jumpshot. The move bolsters the potential appeal of NBC’s ad-supported streaming service, which is set to launch in the first quarter of 2020.

A person familiar with the negotiations said Netflix made an offer to keep it, but the offer was rejected. Netflix was willing to pay up to $90 million a year for the rights, but NBC topped that offer and will pay $100 million. ( “The Office” was produced by Universal Television, a different division of NBCUniversal, in association with Deedle-Dee Productions and Reveille Productions.) One idea under consideration was to split the rights, with Netflix being the home for ad-free watching, and NBC’s service being the ad-supported option.

“‘The Office’ has become a staple of pop-culture and is a rare gem whose relevance continues to grow at a time when fans have more entertainment choices than ever before,” said Bonnie Hammer, Chairman of NBCUniversal Direct-to-Consumer and Digital Enterprises in a release. “We can’t wait to welcome the gang from Dunder Mifflin to NBCUniversal’s new streaming service.”

In a tweet, Netflix added that members can “binge watch the show to their hearts’ content ad-free on Netflix until January 2021.”

NBC and other media companies have wrestled with what content to license to third-party services such as Netflix and Amazon. NBC has said it won’t be particularly aggressive with pulling content from streaming services and turning down potentially lucrative contracts.

Still, the decision may convince more people to sign up for NBC’s streaming service, which will be driven by advertising revenue tied to eyeballs. NBC has said the streaming service will be free for subscribers of traditional pay-TV bundles. It will cost about $10 per month for cord cutters, according to people familiar with the matter.

AT&T’s WarnerMedia, which is also launching its own streaming service, is planning eventually to add “Friends” and other shows from Netflix to bolster its streaming service, which it hopes will draw at least 70 million subscribers.

Disclosure: NBC is part of NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nbc, removing, service, nbcuniversal, million, nbcs, content, offer, streaming, putting, office, 2021, netflix


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Popular YouTuber found dead in New York less than a week after reported missing

Etika, a YouTuber known for his popular videos about video games, was found dead in New York Monday less than a week after he was reported missing, authorities said. “We regret to inform that Desmond Amofah aka Etika has been found deceased,” the New York Police Department tweeted Tuesday. Last Thursday, the NYPD requested information on the 29-year-old YouTuber, whose real name is Desmond Amofah. Amofah had uploaded an eight-minute video in which he included suicidal thoughts, NBC reported. You


Etika, a YouTuber known for his popular videos about video games, was found dead in New York Monday less than a week after he was reported missing, authorities said. “We regret to inform that Desmond Amofah aka Etika has been found deceased,” the New York Police Department tweeted Tuesday. Last Thursday, the NYPD requested information on the 29-year-old YouTuber, whose real name is Desmond Amofah. Amofah had uploaded an eight-minute video in which he included suicidal thoughts, NBC reported. You
Popular YouTuber found dead in New York less than a week after reported missing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: mallika mitra, steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, popular, nbc, reported, video, amofah, etika, youtuber, week, twitter, missing, dead, manhattan, youtube, york


Popular YouTuber found dead in New York less than a week after reported missing

Etika, a YouTuber known for his popular videos about video games, was found dead in New York Monday less than a week after he was reported missing, authorities said.

“We regret to inform that Desmond Amofah aka Etika has been found deceased,” the New York Police Department tweeted Tuesday.

Last Thursday, the NYPD requested information on the 29-year-old YouTuber, whose real name is Desmond Amofah. The department said he had last been heard from June 19 at about 8 p.m. by phone and “many people concerned after a recent video.”

Amofah had uploaded an eight-minute video in which he included suicidal thoughts, NBC reported. The video has been removed from YouTube.

Police said his body was recovered from the East River Monday night off Pier 16 in Lower Manhattan, and that some of his belongings were retrieved near the Manhattan Bridge, NBC reports.

YouTube’s Twitter account for creators sent condolences for Amofah via Twitter, saying “We mourn the loss of Etika, a beloved member of our gaming creator community. All of us at YouTube are sending condolences to his loved ones and fans.”

WATCH: YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki faces tough questions at Code Con


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: mallika mitra, steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, popular, nbc, reported, video, amofah, etika, youtuber, week, twitter, missing, dead, manhattan, youtube, york


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‘American Taliban’ John Walker Lindh released from prison after 17 years

– John Walker Lindh, an American captured with the Taliban in November 2001 just weeks after the US launched the war in Afghanistan, is to be released in May 2019 after 17 years in prison. John Walker Lindh, a Californian captured fighting alongside the Taliban in Afghanistan months after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, was released from federal prison Thursday after 17 years, cutting short his sentence by three years. A Federal Bureau of Prisons representative confirmed to CNBC that Lind


– John Walker Lindh, an American captured with the Taliban in November 2001 just weeks after the US launched the war in Afghanistan, is to be released in May 2019 after 17 years in prison. John Walker Lindh, a Californian captured fighting alongside the Taliban in Afghanistan months after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, was released from federal prison Thursday after 17 years, cutting short his sentence by three years. A Federal Bureau of Prisons representative confirmed to CNBC that Lind
‘American Taliban’ John Walker Lindh released from prison after 17 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, producer, walker, prison, internet, lindh, taliban, john, american, released, probation, 17, nbc


'American Taliban' John Walker Lindh released from prison after 17 years

This combination of pictures created on April 17, 2019 shows at left a police file photo made available February 6, 2002 of the “American Taliban” John Walker Lindh and at right a February 11, 2002 photograph of him as seen from the records of the Arabia Hassani Kalan Surani Bannu madrassa (religious school) in Pakistan’s northwestern city of Bannu. – John Walker Lindh, an American captured with the Taliban in November 2001 just weeks after the US launched the war in Afghanistan, is to be released in May 2019 after 17 years in prison.

John Walker Lindh, a Californian captured fighting alongside the Taliban in Afghanistan months after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, was released from federal prison Thursday after 17 years, cutting short his sentence by three years.

A Federal Bureau of Prisons representative confirmed to CNBC that Lindh was released from a facility in Terre Haute, Indiana.

Lindh, 38, had been sentenced to 20 years after he reached a plea deal that spared him from what could have been more than three life terms. He was released early for good behavior, according to NBC News.

As conditions of his release, Lindh will spend three years on probation and will be barred from having devices that access the internet. He is also forbidden from viewing extremist videos, and probation officers will monitor his internet use.

American officials, however, are concerned that Lindh may still pose a risk for terrorism. In 2015, he wrote a letter to an NBC Los Angeles producer in which he said the terror group ISIS was “doing a spectacular job.” In a series of letters to the producer, Lindh called himself Yahya Lindh, referred to himself as a political prisoner and said he was continuing to pursue knowledge of Islam.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, producer, walker, prison, internet, lindh, taliban, john, american, released, probation, 17, nbc


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NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp


The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp
NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


NBC's 2020 streaming service won't be very compelling for cord cutters — and that's by design

The streaming wars — the race to launch subscription video products — has been driven by an underlying concept: The traditional pay-TV bundle is dying as millions of U.S. households cut the cord each year and shift their video consumption to services like Netflix.

This has been a hard pill to swallow for legacy media companies, which derive billions of dollars from traditional pay TV. Yet, many of those media companies are coming to grips with reality and beginning to disrupt their own business models, headlined by Disney’s $6.99 Disney+ offering for this year.

That’s not the case for Comcast’s NBCUniversal (the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com).

NBC doesn’t want you to cut the cord. Maybe this isn’t too surprising since its owner is the largest U.S. cable company. But it’s unusual because it directly contradicts the disruption narrative. Instead of submissively accepting that the pay-TV world is ending, NBC is taking a stand and fighting back.

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring.

NBC’s ad-supported streaming service will be free to all customers who pay for traditional live television — whether through Comcast or any other provider, including virtual pay-TV bundles like Google’s YouTube TV or AT&T’s DirecTV Now, assuming partnership deals are struck, according to people familiar with the matter.

For those who have cut the cord, it will probably be about $10, said the people, who asked not to be named because the discussions on price are still ongoing.

CNBC has also learned that the free version of service for pay-TV subscribers will include live linear channels, same-season episodes and past-season episodes. Customers will be able to watch NBC programming anywhere, on any device, independent of their cable provider’s footprint. NBC will have nonexclusive access to all of the programming it sells to Hulu for the streaming service, as part of the deal with Disney the two companies announced on Tuesday.

But the $10 version for cord cutters won’t include live linear channels and won’t include same-season shows. You’ll get a bunch of reruns, most of which will also be available on Hulu if you already subscribe to that service. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined.

So what are you getting for your $10 a month? Not much at first. And that’s the point.

NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. The company is actively trying to make its cord-cutting streaming service inferior to its pay-TV version. The service is primarily meant as a nice additional benefit for customers who already pay for cable or satellite TV.

NBC’s decision isn’t totally motivated by supporting Comcast’s cable TV business. Now that Disney has full operational control of Hulu, Disney can bundle Hulu (or Hulu with Live TV) with Disney+ to make a compelling streaming offering that should further accelerate cord cutting. NBC is OK with this. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free.

NBC will certainly monitor the take rate of its streaming service among non pay-TV subscribers if cord cutting dramatically accelerates. If necessary, it can move content on and off its service thanks to Tuesday’s deal with Hulu, as well as the impending expiration of streaming-rights deals for popular shows it owns, such as “The Office.” And three years from now, when its content deal with Hulu ends, there’s an easy path for NBC to make its streaming service more compelling by making all its content exclusive to it.

But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a compelling addition for cord cutters. And that’s the point.

Disclosure: Comcast owns NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.

WATCH: Comcast will sell its Hulu stake to Disney, giving Disney full control


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


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North Korea fired two unidentified projectiles, South Korea’s military says

North Korea fired unidentified projectiles on Thursday, according to the South Korean military, less than a week after leader Kim Jong Un oversaw the test-firing of multiple rockets and missiles. “We confirmed that North Korea fired two rounds of missiles towards (an) eastern direction from Northern Pyongan Province at 16:29 p.m. and 16:49 p.m. (local time). Estimated travel distances were 420 km, 270 km, respectively,” a South Korean military official told NBC News. “(The) South Korea military


North Korea fired unidentified projectiles on Thursday, according to the South Korean military, less than a week after leader Kim Jong Un oversaw the test-firing of multiple rockets and missiles. “We confirmed that North Korea fired two rounds of missiles towards (an) eastern direction from Northern Pyongan Province at 16:29 p.m. and 16:49 p.m. (local time). Estimated travel distances were 420 km, 270 km, respectively,” a South Korean military official told NBC News. “(The) South Korea military
North Korea fired two unidentified projectiles, South Korea’s military says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: matt clinch, kham pool, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nbc, pyongan, unidentified, province, projectiles, korean, military, north, korea, koreas, south, official, fired, northern


North Korea fired two unidentified projectiles, South Korea's military says

North Korea fired unidentified projectiles on Thursday, according to the South Korean military, less than a week after leader Kim Jong Un oversaw the test-firing of multiple rockets and missiles.

“We confirmed that North Korea fired two rounds of missiles towards (an) eastern direction from Northern Pyongan Province at 16:29 p.m. and 16:49 p.m. (local time). Estimated travel distances were 420 km, 270 km, respectively,” a South Korean military official told NBC News. The Northern Pyongan Province is an area located to the west of the country.

The South Korean and U.S. authorities are conducting analysis for more detailed information and NBC News also said that the chief national security advisor in South Korea is monitoring the situation.

“(The) South Korea military has reinforced surveillance and vigilance for any more North Korean missile launches, and is maintaining fully preparedness by cooperating with the U.S.,” the official added.

The suspected short-range missiles appear to have been launched from a location near a missile base in Sino-Ri, according to the Dow Jones news agency. This is about 130 miles north of the demilitarized zone.

The new launches come as the U.S. Special Representative for North Korea, Stephen Biegun, travels to Seoul to meet with officials and discuss denuclearization efforts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: matt clinch, kham pool, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nbc, pyongan, unidentified, province, projectiles, korean, military, north, korea, koreas, south, official, fired, northern


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Science: These are the 7 types of interactions we savor the most

There’s more to savor in life than just food. In the same way that we might savor a glass of wine or our favorite dessert, we can also savor meaningful life experiences. A 2018 study from the University of Arizona demonstrates how we savor different types of communication. Communications professor Maggie Pitts surveyed 65 adults, asking them whether they savored their daily interactions in life and, if so, to share a detailed example of an experience they had savored. Her research suggested that


There’s more to savor in life than just food. In the same way that we might savor a glass of wine or our favorite dessert, we can also savor meaningful life experiences. A 2018 study from the University of Arizona demonstrates how we savor different types of communication. Communications professor Maggie Pitts surveyed 65 adults, asking them whether they savored their daily interactions in life and, if so, to share a detailed example of an experience they had savored. Her research suggested that
Science: These are the 7 types of interactions we savor the most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: tom popomaronis, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, meaningful, communication, interactions, science, pitts, types, savor, university, experience, wine, way


Science: These are the 7 types of interactions we savor the most

There’s more to savor in life than just food. In the same way that we might savor a glass of wine or our favorite dessert, we can also savor meaningful life experiences.

A 2018 study from the University of Arizona demonstrates how we savor different types of communication. Communications professor Maggie Pitts surveyed 65 adults, asking them whether they savored their daily interactions in life and, if so, to share a detailed example of an experience they had savored.

“Communication savoring happens when we realize something joyful, important or meaningful is happening in a social interaction with another, and we then try to hold on to and elevate that experience,” Pitts said in an interview with Psych Central.

Her research suggested that there are seven types of communication that humans savor most:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: tom popomaronis, nbc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, meaningful, communication, interactions, science, pitts, types, savor, university, experience, wine, way


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Comcast is in talks to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney

Disney and Comcast are holding talks about working out a deal for Comcast’s 30% stake, according to people familiar with the matter. Hulu last week bought back a 9.5% stake in itself from Time-Warner owner AT&T, in a deal that values Hulu at $15 billion. That 9.5% stake will be split between Disney and Comcast, unless Disney consolidates the entire company. But just as Comcast came off the sidelines, 21st Century Fox agreed to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney. Instead of being an equal owner


Disney and Comcast are holding talks about working out a deal for Comcast’s 30% stake, according to people familiar with the matter. Hulu last week bought back a 9.5% stake in itself from Time-Warner owner AT&T, in a deal that values Hulu at $15 billion. That 9.5% stake will be split between Disney and Comcast, unless Disney consolidates the entire company. But just as Comcast came off the sidelines, 21st Century Fox agreed to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney. Instead of being an equal owner
Comcast is in talks to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: alex sherman, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sell, stake, companys, streaming, owner, 30, hulu, deal, talks, comcast, disney, nbc


Comcast is in talks to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney

Comcast has had a frustrating run as a partial owner of video streaming platform Hulu, but that doesn’t make the decision to sell its minority stake in the company any easier.

Disney and Comcast are holding talks about working out a deal for Comcast’s 30% stake, according to people familiar with the matter. Comcast is now weighing the pros and cons of doing a deal now rather than later, said these people, who asked not to be named because the discussions are private. It’s still unclear if a deal will transpire.

The two companies are the last remaining owners of a company that was originally founded as a joint venture between several media giants. Hulu last week bought back a 9.5% stake in itself from Time-Warner owner AT&T, in a deal that values Hulu at $15 billion. That 9.5% stake will be split between Disney and Comcast, unless Disney consolidates the entire company.

“On Hulu, the relationship with NBC, it’s very much in everybody’s interest to maintain,” Comcast CEO Brian Roberts said Thursday during an interview on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “And we have no new news today on it, other than it’s really valuable. And we’re really glad we own a large piece of it.”

For years, Comcast was barred from having a say in Hulu’s direction — part of a consent decree Comcast agreed to when it acquired NBCUniversal in 2011. (NBCUniversal is the parent company of CNBC.)

Seven years later, Comcast’s ownership in Hulu switched from passive to active, when the consent decree expired in 2018. That gave Roberts and NBC CEO Steve Burke some say in the company’s future.

But just as Comcast came off the sidelines, 21st Century Fox agreed to sell its 30% stake in Hulu to Disney. That deal, which closed last month, effectively silenced Comcast once again. Instead of being an equal owner with Fox and Disney, Comcast now owns a minority stake to Disney’s 60%.

“Fifty years from now will we be in Hulu? No, I don’t think we will,” Burke told Variety in January. “But I don’t think we’ll sell in five minutes.”

As of today, NBC provides about 17% of Hulu’s content. NBC has no plans to remove content from Hulu, which will continue to serve as NBC’s vessel for same-season shows even after the launch of the company’s new streaming service in 2020, according to people familiar with the matter. (NBC’s streaming service will showcase the company’s library of TV shows and movies.)

There are compelling reasons for Comcast to hold and to sell. Here’s what Comcast is debating, according to people familiar with the company’s thinking.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: alex sherman, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sell, stake, companys, streaming, owner, 30, hulu, deal, talks, comcast, disney, nbc


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