During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending

Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England. Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford. In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture o


Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England.
Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford.
In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture o
During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, nato, focus, public, trillion, goods, services, net, spending, european, summit, trade, needs, defense, union


During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending

Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England.

Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford.

Here is what we have now.

By the end of this year, the U.S. is expected to run a quasi-unstoppable gross public debt of $23.2 trillion, with its public sector budget deficits remaining at about 7% of the country’s economy.

On external accounts, the U.S. is showing a trade deficit on goods and services currently running at an annual rate of $529 billion, and a net foreign debt of $10.6 trillion at the end of last June.

In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture of wealth and macroeconomic stability.

At the end of this year’s second quarter, the EU’s gross public debt stood at $14 trillion, with a budget deficit of only 0.9% of the group’s GDP.

Apart from that, the EU is a large net beneficiary on international trade accounts. Its surplus on goods and services trade in the first half of this year ran at an annual rate of $194.3 billion, in large part as a result of its strong net exports to the United States.

So, there it is: A deeply indebted U.S. continues to carry most of the financial burden of a defense alliance – NATO, The North Atlantic Treaty Organization – that guarantees the security of a rich and prosperous European Union.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, nato, focus, public, trillion, goods, services, net, spending, european, summit, trade, needs, defense, union


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NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say

LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape. NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union. U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech


LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape.
NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union.
U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech
NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, survive, change, needs, tech, say, president, posed, nato, taking, global, firm, analysts


NATO needs to change to survive, analysts say

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM – JULY 11: Heads of state and government, including French President Emmanuel Macron (7th L), German Chancellor Angela Merkel (8th L), U.S. President Donald Trump, British Prime Minister Theresa May (5th R), and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (3rd R), mingle after posing for a family picture during the opening ceremony at the 2018 NATO Summit at NATO headquarters on July 11, 2018 in Brussels, Belgium.

LONDON — As NATO members gather in the U.K. to celebrate 70 years since its inception, there are pressing questions about the organization’s future and its relevance on the global landscape.

Leslie Vinjamuri, the head of the U.S. and the Americas Programme at think tank Chatham House, believes there will now be “several years of grappling” to reform the military alliance.

She added that one of the main issues is that the institution is not set up to deal with the current geopolitical landscape. NATO was created in the aftermath of World War II with the overall aim to protect its members against any threats posed by the Soviet Union.

But the rise of the world’s second-largest economy, China, has posed new challenges to the West and trade and political tensions between Beijing and Washington have come to the fore in the last two years. The disagreements have involved the tech sector with the U.S. taking steps to ban the Chinese firm Huawei from selling its technology in the United States.

U.S. officials have expressed concern over the company’s links to the Chinese government and the security threat it could pose — something which the Shenzhen-based tech firm has denied. This issue has sparked division within NATO allies, with Germany and France taking a different stance to the U.S. administration.

“NATO is at a crossroads,” Agathe Demarais, global forecasting director at the research firm The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), highlighted to CNBC Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, survive, change, needs, tech, say, president, posed, nato, taking, global, firm, analysts


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Sundar Pichai will have to step it up to become the wartime CEO Alphabet needs

Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Google Inc., attends a news conference in New Delhi, India, on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017. But after less than five years in the top spot, he reorganized the entire company, turning Google into a subsidiary of a bigger holding company, Alphabet. Page thrust an engineer-turned-manager named Sundar Pichai into the Google CEO role, giving him responsibility for search, Android, YouTube, Chrome, hardware, cloud computing and all of its other core businesses. He


Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Google Inc., attends a news conference in New Delhi, India, on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017.
But after less than five years in the top spot, he reorganized the entire company, turning Google into a subsidiary of a bigger holding company, Alphabet.
Page thrust an engineer-turned-manager named Sundar Pichai into the Google CEO role, giving him responsibility for search, Android, YouTube, Chrome, hardware, cloud computing and all of its other core businesses.
He
Sundar Pichai will have to step it up to become the wartime CEO Alphabet needs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, wartime, alphabet, page, computing, employees, search, step, company, pichai, revenue, entire, needs, ceo, sundar


Sundar Pichai will have to step it up to become the wartime CEO Alphabet needs

Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Google Inc., attends a news conference in New Delhi, India, on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017. Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images

When prominent venture capitalist and Silicon Valley figure Ben Horowitz wrote a notable blog post about “wartime” CEOs in 2011, he predicted Google co-founder Larry Page would take over as the company’s wartime CEO, seizing the reins from Eric Schmidt. “This will be a profound change for Google and the entire high-tech industry,” he wrote. Not exactly. Page indeed took over from Schmidt. But after less than five years in the top spot, he reorganized the entire company, turning Google into a subsidiary of a bigger holding company, Alphabet. Page thrust an engineer-turned-manager named Sundar Pichai into the Google CEO role, giving him responsibility for search, Android, YouTube, Chrome, hardware, cloud computing and all of its other core businesses. Page became Alphabet’s CEO and retreated from the spotlight to focus on esoteric longer-term projects like internet-delivery balloons and self-driving cars, which were reorganized into separate companies and rolled up into a financial segment called “Other Bets.” He disappeared from earnings calls and public appearances, and stopped talking to the press. On Tuesday, four years after the Alphabet reorganization, Pichai got an even bigger job as Page and his co-founder, Alphabet President Sergey Brin, announced they would be stepping down. He will now be the CEO of the entire company, not just Google. Pichai is a mild-mannered political type who’s held the respect of both engineers and non-technical workers — a former engineer with calm, technical expertise and charisma. He has often surprised employees at various team events with a big smile, and many consider him one of them. But the value of being seen as “one of the people” may be coming to an end, as Google faces huge changes that could alter the entire course of the company.

Containing workers

Pichai gave the first clear hint that the scene had changed at a company-wide all-hands meeting in October. “We are genuinely struggling with some issues — transparency at scale,” he said in a video of the event acquired by the Washington Post. The company soon after scaled back those weekly all-hands meetings, turning them into a monthly event instead. That moment was a capstone to more than a year of increasingly vocal employee unrest. It kicked off last fall when the New York Times reported that execs, including Pichai, signed off on a massive $90 million golden parachute paid out to Android co-founder Andy Rubin, despite credible allegations of sexual misconduct, with similar treatment for other favored execs in the past. That triggered a company-wide walkout where 20,000 employees walked out of their respective Google offices last fall. It also started an activism within the company that has protested every problematic policy, government contract and hire since. Over the summer, the company dropped a partnership with the Pentagon called Project Maven after employees protested its use for surveillance tools to analyze drone footage. Then, in October, Google dropped out of the competition for a different Pentagon cloud computing contract that could be worth $10 billion, saying the contract could conflict with its values. Employees also protested the company’s plans to build a censored search tool called Project Dragonfly, which resulted in the company scrapping those plans to re-enter the Chinese market. In the wake of all this activity, the company has shut down its historically “open” lines of communication, such as banning political discussions and canceling its weekly TGIF meetings in favor of monthly meetings and separate forums. Fast forward to today and employee trust is so low, some Googlers are now sleuthing their own human resources department, accusing leaders creating a tool to spy on them, according to a Bloomberg report. Pichai faces the threat of unionization and lawsuits from employees the company fired for allegedly leaking confidential information; they claim they were fired for trying to organize.

Government pressure

Pichai will also have to contend with being under more regulatory scrutiny than ever before. Under Eric Schmidt, Google was able to fend off an FTC probe in 2011 with few lasting repercussions. But today is a very different story as politicians on both sides of the aisle are increasingly teeing off on Silicon Valley. In the last few months, U.S. and foreign antitrust regulators have increasingly scrutinized Google, naming Pichai along the way. The U.S. Department of Justice announced last quarter that it’s opening a broad antitrust review of big tech companies including Google, while the DOJ launched a separate antitrust probe into Google. A potential DOJ case, backed by nearly 50 state attorney generals, multiplies that challenge. Meanwhile, after Google withdrew from Project Maven, and Facebook board member Peter Thiel claimed without evidence that Google might have been infiltrated by Chinese intelligence, President Trump and other conservative leaders began to question the company’s loyalty to the U.S. and the military. Pichai had to move into action, immediately meeting with Trump in attempts to smooth things over. The 2020 presidential candidates have also piled on, mentioning the company by name in the Democratic debates as being too powerful. If Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren, an expected front-runner, gets the nomination and then wins the election, Google will have to contend with a president who promised to break the company into pieces.

The search for Alphabet’s “next act”

While the company isn’t weeks away from bankruptcy the way Apple was when Steve Jobs returned to be its wartime CEO, the company faces its biggest direct business challenge in its history: finding its next act. Alphabet is preparing for a slowdown in its core digital advertising business, which still accounts for the vast majority of its revenue. The company showed slowing ad revenue in its first quarter of 2019 and a decline in profit from the previous year in the third quarter. The company has struggled to reel in material revenue from its hardware line despite several attempts and acquisitions. YouTube is a juggernaut in terms of audience, but the company has never disclosed how much revenue it generates, and the video platform is under constant scrutiny for promoting misleading content, underpaying creators and more. Google also has fumbled around for years in the cloud computing market, where it lags in a distant third behind Microsoft and Amazon. A recent cloud deal with hospital chain Ascension that should have been a triumph instead turned into a public relations debacle, as outsiders questioned how Google would use and safeguard any patient data it collected along the way. Even after Google clarified that it wasn’t using any patient information for its own purposes, the suspicion continued, resulting in more questions from Congress. That same perception is threatening its acquisitions. Privacy groups and congress members are calling on federal regulators to give more examination to Google’s proposed $2 billion purchase of Fitbit, which the company hoped would close in early 2020. CNBC found that people started getting rid of their Fitbit devices as soon as the announcement was made. While casting about for material new businesses, the company has offered strange new business announcements that have little to do with its bottom line, like search algorithm updates and quantum computing milestones.

Meet the new boss…


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, wartime, alphabet, page, computing, employees, search, step, company, pichai, revenue, entire, needs, ceo, sundar


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E-commerce billionaire Michael Rubin: There needs to be ‘more pressure’ on wealthy to give back

Rather than a wealth tax, successful businessman and businesswomen should be pushed to donate more, according to e-commerce billionaire Michael Rubin. “There has to be more pressure on entrepreneurs, when they create great value, to give back,” Rubin told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday. A wealth tax could also stifle American innovation, Rubin added, though he didn’t comment on specific proposals. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, both champions of the left, have proposed different versions of


Rather than a wealth tax, successful businessman and businesswomen should be pushed to donate more, according to e-commerce billionaire Michael Rubin.
“There has to be more pressure on entrepreneurs, when they create great value, to give back,” Rubin told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday.
A wealth tax could also stifle American innovation, Rubin added, though he didn’t comment on specific proposals.
Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, both champions of the left, have proposed different versions of
E-commerce billionaire Michael Rubin: There needs to be ‘more pressure’ on wealthy to give back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
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E-commerce billionaire Michael Rubin: There needs to be 'more pressure' on wealthy to give back

Rather than a wealth tax, successful businessman and businesswomen should be pushed to donate more, according to e-commerce billionaire Michael Rubin.

“There has to be more pressure on entrepreneurs, when they create great value, to give back,” Rubin told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday. “I always bank on an entrepreneur to give back and get great results versus giving that same money to the government.”

Rubin, executive chairman of online sports apparel giant Fanatics, said that while there’s a “responsibility” when it comes to giving back, it’s better to “bet on the entrepreneur who made the money” than on the government. He also has an ownership stake in the Philadelphia 76ers in the NBA and New Jersey Devils in the NHL. His Kynetic firm is the holding company of Fanatics as well as e-commerce brands Rue Gilt Groupe and Shoprunner.

Pointing to his efforts into reforming the U.S. parole and probation system, Rubin said, “I think we’re going to make a lot more progress than the government can with many more times that money. In January, he partnered with rapper Meek Mill and other sports-team owners and businessmen to donate $50 million to push for systematic changes.

A wealth tax could also stifle American innovation, Rubin added, though he didn’t comment on specific proposals.

“America’s a country where you can come, you can be an entrepreneur, you can create great value,” said Rubin, who never attended college but sold his first company, GSI Commerce, to eBay for $2.4 billion. “I don’t think you ever want to deter that from happening because this is a place where so many great businesses get created and started.”

Rubin’s comments come as a handful of billionaires, including J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, ex-Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein and billionaire investor Leon Cooperman, have spoken out against wealth-tax proposals.

Democratic presidential contenders Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, both champions of the left, have proposed different versions of a wealth tax, ramping up the rhetoric around the issue.

Warren’s plan calls for a 2% tax on families’ net worth above $50 million and a 6% tax on household net worth over $1 billion. The wealth tax proposed by Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, would be progressive, starting at 1% for household net worth of more than $32 million and ending at 8% on wealth over $10 billion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, great, tax, net, rubin, entrepreneur, worth, ecommerce, wealth, pressure, million, money, wealthy, needs, billionaire, michael


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Like Trump, China’s Xi needs ‘phase one’ deal for a political win at home, expert says

President Donald Trump (L) shakes hand with China’s President Xi Jinping at the end of a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Chinese President Xi Jinping has had a “horrible couple weeks” politically — and he’s not likely to sign a “phase one” trade deal with U.S. President Donald Trump without any roll back in existing tariffs, one expert said. Any trade deal between the two countries “needs to be a win-win,” Okun said, and delaying new tariffs may n


President Donald Trump (L) shakes hand with China’s President Xi Jinping at the end of a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017.
Chinese President Xi Jinping has had a “horrible couple weeks” politically — and he’s not likely to sign a “phase one” trade deal with U.S. President Donald Trump without any roll back in existing tariffs, one expert said.
Any trade deal between the two countries “needs to be a win-win,” Okun said, and delaying new tariffs may n
Like Trump, China’s Xi needs ‘phase one’ deal for a political win at home, expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expert, deal, chinas, phase, trump, trade, political, tariffs, rule, president, win, worry, politics, okun, needs


Like Trump, China's Xi needs 'phase one' deal for a political win at home, expert says

President Donald Trump (L) shakes hand with China’s President Xi Jinping at the end of a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017.

Chinese President Xi Jinping has had a “horrible couple weeks” politically — and he’s not likely to sign a “phase one” trade deal with U.S. President Donald Trump without any roll back in existing tariffs, one expert said.

“China has politics the same as U.S. has politics. Trump has to play to his base, Xi has to worry about his internal politics, he has to worry about his standing within the party,” Steve Okun, senior advisor at consultancy McLarty Associates, told CNBC’s “Street Signs Asia” on Wednesday.

Any trade deal between the two countries “needs to be a win-win,” Okun said, and delaying new tariffs may not work.

In light of political challenges facing Xi such as Hong Kong, Okun said he can’t see the Chinese leader signing an agreement “in which he gets nothing other than the postponement of new tariffs.”

In addition to the stalemate in the U.S.-China trade negotiations, the protests in Hong Kong could be another major challenge to Xi’s authoritative rule, according to political commentators and media reports.

The former British colony, which returned to Chinese rule in 1997, has seen widespread demonstrations since early June, some of which have led to violent clashes between protesters and the police.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expert, deal, chinas, phase, trump, trade, political, tariffs, rule, president, win, worry, politics, okun, needs


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Asia is facing a food crisis and needs another $800 billion in the next 10 years to solve it

STR | AFP | Getty ImagesAsia is “unable to feed itself” — and needs to invest another $800 billion in the next 10 years to produce more food and meet the region’s needs, according to a report. The population in Asia is growing, and consumers are demanding safer, healthier, and more sustainable food. Food spending will more than double — from $4 trillion in 2019 to over $8 trillion by 2030, said the Asia Food Challenge Report which was released last week. Richard Skinner PwCThat means Asia relies


STR | AFP | Getty ImagesAsia is “unable to feed itself” — and needs to invest another $800 billion in the next 10 years to produce more food and meet the region’s needs, according to a report.
The population in Asia is growing, and consumers are demanding safer, healthier, and more sustainable food.
Food spending will more than double — from $4 trillion in 2019 to over $8 trillion by 2030, said the Asia Food Challenge Report which was released last week.
Richard Skinner PwCThat means Asia relies
Asia is facing a food crisis and needs another $800 billion in the next 10 years to solve it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, population, solve, report, facing, skinner, food, investment, thats, crisis, technology, billion, 800, asia, needs, according


Asia is facing a food crisis and needs another $800 billion in the next 10 years to solve it

Villagers plant rice in a field in Lianyungang, in China’s eastern Jiangsu province on June 4, 2017. STR | AFP | Getty Images

Asia is “unable to feed itself” — and needs to invest another $800 billion in the next 10 years to produce more food and meet the region’s needs, according to a report. The population in Asia is growing, and consumers are demanding safer, healthier, and more sustainable food. Food spending will more than double — from $4 trillion in 2019 to over $8 trillion by 2030, said the Asia Food Challenge Report which was released last week. “If this investment does not materialise, we believe the industry will struggle to keep up with demand, resulting in poorer food outcomes for Asia’s population,” according to the authors of the report which was compiled by PwC, Rabobank, and Singapore investment firm Temasek.

Why Asia is facing a food problem

“Asia is unable to feed itself, relying on imports flowing through long supply chains from the Americas, Europe and Africa,” according to the report that was released Nov. 20. That’s consistent with research from a 2018 United Nations Conference on Trade and Development report. “In general, countries in Latin America, East Africa and South Asia are net food exporters, while most of the rest of Asia and Africa remain net food importers,” the Key Statistics and Trends in International Trade report said.

We’re too dependent on others both for our technology and our food. And if we don’t solve this, there will be problems on our doorstep. Richard Skinner PwC

That means Asia relies heavily on other countries to meet one of its basic needs. “Food, this is a sensitive topic, and many wars and many internal uprisings have been fought over food in located history. And that will probably continue to be the case,” PwC’s Richard Skinner said at a media preview one day before the report was released. “We’re too dependent on others both for our technology and our food. And if we don’t solve this, there will be problems on our doorstep,” Skinner, Asia Pacific deals strategy and operations leader told CNBC’s Squawk Box last week.

Climate change and population growth will also add to the region’s problems by causing supply issues, as well as price volatility. For one, extreme weather could reduce crop yields and change planting structures, said the report. The amount of arable land for each person in Asia is expected to decline by 5% by 2030, it said. Meanwhile, Asia’s population could grow by approximately 250 million in the next decade — “the equivalent of another Indonesia,” according to the report. “When you start to add them all up, whether that’s climate change, increasing population, a more demanding consumer, all of those together is a pretty scary stark picture,” Skinner told CNBC. “If we don’t solve this, we will be in a bad position in 10 years time.”

Where will the $800 billion go?

There’s an $800 billion investment opportunity in Asia’s agri-food industry that needs to be filled in the next decade, said Skinner, adding that technology and innovation, in particular, will be key. About half of that investment could go to China, according to the report. “The biggest opportunity for the agri-food sector in Asia is probably in China,” said Temasek’s Anuj Maheshwari at the media preview on Tuesday. That’s because agricultural companies which use smart automation technologies already exist in the country, he added.

A man controlling a drone to spray pesticides on a farm in Bozhou, central China’s Anhui province. AFP | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, population, solve, report, facing, skinner, food, investment, thats, crisis, technology, billion, 800, asia, needs, according


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Heidi Heitkamp on what needs to be done to lessen the gap in income inequality

Heidi Heitkamp on what needs to be done to lessen the gap in income inequalityOn the campaign trail, Elizabeth Warren says she would only raise taxes on the rich but beyond the wealth tax, Warren has proposed a dozen other tax increases, which would raise rates even on those who haven’t made it really big. Heidi Heitkamp, former senator of North Dakota and founding board member of The One Country Project, and Eric Cantor, vice chairman of Moelis & Co. and former House Majority Leader, join “Squa


Heidi Heitkamp on what needs to be done to lessen the gap in income inequalityOn the campaign trail, Elizabeth Warren says she would only raise taxes on the rich but beyond the wealth tax, Warren has proposed a dozen other tax increases, which would raise rates even on those who haven’t made it really big.
Heidi Heitkamp, former senator of North Dakota and founding board member of The One Country Project, and Eric Cantor, vice chairman of Moelis & Co. and former House Majority Leader, join “Squa
Heidi Heitkamp on what needs to be done to lessen the gap in income inequality Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, warren, inequality, vice, income, trail, needs, raise, heidi, lessen, wealth, gap, taxes, heitkamp, squawk


Heidi Heitkamp on what needs to be done to lessen the gap in income inequality

Heidi Heitkamp on what needs to be done to lessen the gap in income inequality

On the campaign trail, Elizabeth Warren says she would only raise taxes on the rich but beyond the wealth tax, Warren has proposed a dozen other tax increases, which would raise rates even on those who haven’t made it really big. Heidi Heitkamp, former senator of North Dakota and founding board member of The One Country Project, and Eric Cantor, vice chairman of Moelis & Co. and former House Majority Leader, join “Squawk Box” to discuss.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, warren, inequality, vice, income, trail, needs, raise, heidi, lessen, wealth, gap, taxes, heitkamp, squawk


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Doctors say ailing Assange needs medical care in hospital

Julian Assange gestures to the media from a police vehicle on his arrival at Westminster Magistrates court on April 11, 2019 in London, England. More than 60 doctors have written to British authorities asserting that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange urgently needs medical treatment at a university hospital. The doctors said in a letter published Monday that Assange suffers from psychological problems including depression as well as dental issues and a serious shoulder ailment. Assange is in Belm


Julian Assange gestures to the media from a police vehicle on his arrival at Westminster Magistrates court on April 11, 2019 in London, England.
More than 60 doctors have written to British authorities asserting that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange urgently needs medical treatment at a university hospital.
The doctors said in a letter published Monday that Assange suffers from psychological problems including depression as well as dental issues and a serious shoulder ailment.
Assange is in Belm
Doctors say ailing Assange needs medical care in hospital Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25
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Doctors say ailing Assange needs medical care in hospital

Julian Assange gestures to the media from a police vehicle on his arrival at Westminster Magistrates court on April 11, 2019 in London, England.

More than 60 doctors have written to British authorities asserting that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange urgently needs medical treatment at a university hospital.

The doctors said in a letter published Monday that Assange suffers from psychological problems including depression as well as dental issues and a serious shoulder ailment.

Assange is in Belmarsh Prison on the outskirts of London in advance of an extradition hearing set for February. He is sought by the U.S. on espionage charges relating to his WikiLeaks work.

The letter was sent to Home Secretary Priti Patel.

Dr. Lissa Johnson of Australia said an independent medical assessment is needed to determine if Assange is “medically fit” to face legal proceedings.

The letter was distributed by WikiLeaks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-25
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Beijing needs to quit playing around and make a deal: Senator Hawley

Beijing needs to quit playing around and make a deal: Senator HawleySenator Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) joins ‘The Exchange’ to discuss a new bill that aims to protect human rights in Hong Kong and the news that the first phase of a trade deal is not happening.


Beijing needs to quit playing around and make a deal: Senator HawleySenator Josh Hawley (R-Mo.)
joins ‘The Exchange’ to discuss a new bill that aims to protect human rights in Hong Kong and the news that the first phase of a trade deal is not happening.
Beijing needs to quit playing around and make a deal: Senator Hawley Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hawley, quit, senator, rmo, playing, rights, phase, trade, deal, beijing, needs, protect


Beijing needs to quit playing around and make a deal: Senator Hawley

Beijing needs to quit playing around and make a deal: Senator Hawley

Senator Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) joins ‘The Exchange’ to discuss a new bill that aims to protect human rights in Hong Kong and the news that the first phase of a trade deal is not happening.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hawley, quit, senator, rmo, playing, rights, phase, trade, deal, beijing, needs, protect


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Jim Cramer: Vaping regulation needs to be done at a federal level

Jim Cramer: Vaping regulation needs to be done at a federal levelCalifornia and Los Angeles County are suing JUUL Labs, alleging the vaping brand targeted young people through advertising and failed to give warnings about the health risks. CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” crew discuss the headlines.


Jim Cramer: Vaping regulation needs to be done at a federal levelCalifornia and Los Angeles County are suing JUUL Labs, alleging the vaping brand targeted young people through advertising and failed to give warnings about the health risks.
CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” crew discuss the headlines.
Jim Cramer: Vaping regulation needs to be done at a federal level Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, vaping, jim, cramer, needs, suing, level, federal, street, warnings, risks, regulation, targeted, young


Jim Cramer: Vaping regulation needs to be done at a federal level

Jim Cramer: Vaping regulation needs to be done at a federal level

California and Los Angeles County are suing JUUL Labs, alleging the vaping brand targeted young people through advertising and failed to give warnings about the health risks. CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” crew discuss the headlines.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, vaping, jim, cramer, needs, suing, level, federal, street, warnings, risks, regulation, targeted, young


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