CBS stations go dark for DirecTV customers amid contract dispute with AT&T

CBS and AT&T failed to renew their contact, resulting in millions of DirecTV subscribers losing access to CBS programming. CBS television stations in over a dozen U.S. cities, including New York and Los Angeles, went dark for DirecTV customers effective 0200 ET (0600 GMT), CBS said in a statement on Saturday. In a separate statement AT&T said that they “were willing to continue to negotiate and also offered to pay CBS an unprecedented rate increase.” In March, AT&T renewed its contract with Viac


CBS and AT&T failed to renew their contact, resulting in millions of DirecTV subscribers losing access to CBS programming. CBS television stations in over a dozen U.S. cities, including New York and Los Angeles, went dark for DirecTV customers effective 0200 ET (0600 GMT), CBS said in a statement on Saturday. In a separate statement AT&T said that they “were willing to continue to negotiate and also offered to pay CBS an unprecedented rate increase.” In March, AT&T renewed its contract with Viac
CBS stations go dark for DirecTV customers amid contract dispute with AT&T Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, negotiate, blackout, amid, dark, continue, stations, directv, cbs, att, users, customers, contract, dispute, statement


CBS stations go dark for DirecTV customers amid contract dispute with AT&T

CBS and AT&T failed to renew their contact, resulting in millions of DirecTV subscribers losing access to CBS programming.

CBS television stations in over a dozen U.S. cities, including New York and Los Angeles, went dark for DirecTV customers effective 0200 ET (0600 GMT), CBS said in a statement on Saturday.

“While we continue to negotiate in good faith and hope that AT&T agrees to fair terms soon, this loss of CBS programming could last a long time,” CBS added, as the companies blamed one another for the deal’s collapse.

CBS, the network with hit shows like “NCIS” and “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” is directing customers to a website called “KeepCBS.com,” where they are urged to mail, call or post messages onto DirecTV’s social media pages.

In a separate statement AT&T said that they “were willing to continue to negotiate and also offered to pay CBS an unprecedented rate increase.”

In March, AT&T renewed its contract with Viacom avoiding a blackout of MTV, Nickelodeon and Comedy Central for users of the telecom carrier’s pay TV service DirecTV.

CBS had informed its users on Tuesday that they should be prepared for a blackout from June 19, unless an agreement was reached with AT&T.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, negotiate, blackout, amid, dark, continue, stations, directv, cbs, att, users, customers, contract, dispute, statement


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Oil drops more than 3% after State Secretary Pompeo says Iran is ready to negotiate about its missile program

Oil prices turned lower on Tuesday, falling by about $2 a barrel as U.S. President Donald Trump said progress has been made with Iran, signaling tensions could ease in the Mideast. Brent crude futures were down $2.56 or 3.7% at $63.86 a barrel, after hitting a session high of $67.09. West Texas Intermediate crude futures fell by $2.46 or 4.2% to $57.09 a barrel. Tension between the United States and Iran over Tehran’s nuclear program have previously lent support to oil futures, given the potenti


Oil prices turned lower on Tuesday, falling by about $2 a barrel as U.S. President Donald Trump said progress has been made with Iran, signaling tensions could ease in the Mideast. Brent crude futures were down $2.56 or 3.7% at $63.86 a barrel, after hitting a session high of $67.09. West Texas Intermediate crude futures fell by $2.46 or 4.2% to $57.09 a barrel. Tension between the United States and Iran over Tehran’s nuclear program have previously lent support to oil futures, given the potenti
Oil drops more than 3% after State Secretary Pompeo says Iran is ready to negotiate about its missile program Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secretary, progress, pompeo, program, state, drops, production, negotiate, crude, session, oil, data, earlier, iran, missile, futures, ready, prices


Oil drops more than 3% after State Secretary Pompeo says Iran is ready to negotiate about its missile program

Oil prices turned lower on Tuesday, falling by about $2 a barrel as U.S. President Donald Trump said progress has been made with Iran, signaling tensions could ease in the Mideast.

Brent crude futures were down $2.56 or 3.7% at $63.86 a barrel, after hitting a session high of $67.09.

West Texas Intermediate crude futures fell by $2.46 or 4.2% to $57.09 a barrel. The U.S. benchmark hit a session high of $60.06 earlier in the day.

“What were tailwinds have become headwinds,” said Bob Yawger, director of energy futures at Mizuho in New York. He said the same tensions between the United States and Iran that had driven prices higher earlier in the session were putting a damper on the market after Trump’s comments.

Trump said on Tuesday a lot of progress had been made with Iran and that he was not looking for regime change in the country.

Trump, who made the remarks at a Cabinet meeting in the White House, did not give details about the progress, but U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said at the meeting Iran had said it was prepared to negotiate about its missile program.

Tension between the United States and Iran over Tehran’s nuclear program have previously lent support to oil futures, given the potential for a price spike should the situation deteriorate.

Uncertainty about China’s economic prospects also pressured prices lower after data on Monday showed that growth in the country slowed to 6.2% from a year earlier, the weakest pace in at least 27 years.

Additionally, U.S. oil companies on Monday began restoring some of the nearly 74% of production that was shut at platforms in the Gulf of Mexico because of Hurricane Barry.

Workers were returning to the more than 280 production platforms that had been evacuated. It can take several days for full production to resume.

The storm will probably result in a noticeable decline in U.S. crude oil stocks this week, analysts at Commerzbank said.

Inventory data will be published by the American Petroleum Institute on Tuesday evening, and by the U.S. Department of Energy on Wednesday.

However, some say the bullish inventory data is structural, and not attributable only to the storm.

“Beyond the storm we feel we’re in a tightening inventory mode through August,” said Phil Flynn, an analyst with Price Futures Group in Chicago.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secretary, progress, pompeo, program, state, drops, production, negotiate, crude, session, oil, data, earlier, iran, missile, futures, ready, prices


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Oil drops more than 3% after State Secretary Pompeo says Iran is ready to negotiate about its missile program

Oil prices turned lower on Tuesday, falling by about $2 a barrel as U.S. President Donald Trump said progress has been made with Iran, signaling tensions could ease in the Mideast. Brent crude futures were down $2.56 or 3.7% at $63.86 a barrel, after hitting a session high of $67.09. West Texas Intermediate crude futures fell by $2.46 or 4.2% to $57.09 a barrel. The U.S. benchmark hit a session high of $60.06 earlier in the day. Trump said on Tuesday a lot of progress had been made with Iran and


Oil prices turned lower on Tuesday, falling by about $2 a barrel as U.S. President Donald Trump said progress has been made with Iran, signaling tensions could ease in the Mideast. Brent crude futures were down $2.56 or 3.7% at $63.86 a barrel, after hitting a session high of $67.09. West Texas Intermediate crude futures fell by $2.46 or 4.2% to $57.09 a barrel. The U.S. benchmark hit a session high of $60.06 earlier in the day. Trump said on Tuesday a lot of progress had been made with Iran and
Oil drops more than 3% after State Secretary Pompeo says Iran is ready to negotiate about its missile program Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secretary, futures, crude, program, session, progress, ready, state, iran, oil, prices, barrel, earlier, negotiate, pompeo, drops, tensions, missile, high


Oil drops more than 3% after State Secretary Pompeo says Iran is ready to negotiate about its missile program

Oil prices turned lower on Tuesday, falling by about $2 a barrel as U.S. President Donald Trump said progress has been made with Iran, signaling tensions could ease in the Mideast.

Brent crude futures were down $2.56 or 3.7% at $63.86 a barrel, after hitting a session high of $67.09.

West Texas Intermediate crude futures fell by $2.46 or 4.2% to $57.09 a barrel. The U.S. benchmark hit a session high of $60.06 earlier in the day.

“What were tailwinds have become headwinds,” said Bob Yawger, director of energy futures at Mizuho in New York. He said the same tensions between the United States and Iran that had driven prices higher earlier in the session were putting a damper on the market after Trump’s comments.

Trump said on Tuesday a lot of progress had been made with Iran and that he was not looking for regime change in the country.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secretary, futures, crude, program, session, progress, ready, state, iran, oil, prices, barrel, earlier, negotiate, pompeo, drops, tensions, missile, high


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said

China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help


China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help
We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here's what they said

China’s President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Nicolas Asfouri | AFP | Getty Images

With trade negotiations between the U.S. and China stalled and an escalating trade war threatening global markets, President Donald Trump has said that the Chinese are “DREAMING” that he will be defeated by a Democrat in 2020. But Democrats have not said much about their own plans for negotiating with the Chinese. To learn more, CNBC asked the 21 top Democrats running for president about their views. We asked them what they believe is working under Trump — and what they would change. We also asked whether human rights issues in China, where the U.S. has said more than a million Muslims are held in concentration camps, should be part of any trade deal. Lastly, we asked about what they would do about China’s efforts to tighten its military grip on the South China Sea, where more than $3 trillion of trade passes annually. Below, unedited, are our questions and the answers we received from the seven Democrats who responded. Those Democrats are Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., Miramar, Florida, Mayor Wayne Messam and spiritual coach Marianne Williamson. Two other Democrats provided partial responses. A spokesperson for Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., provided an excerpt from the senator’s platform that is included as a response to the first question. An aide to Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke wrote in a statement: “Holding China accountable should not come at the expense of American workers. That is why we must not settle for any deal that does not respect intellectual property, level the playing field in the Chinese market, nor end unfair trade practices. We must advance progress based on shared interests and core democratic values.” Joe Biden, the Democratic front runner, did not respond to CNBC’s survey as of publication time but has dismissed China’s economic competitiveness while on the campaign trail, earning some criticism from his fellow contenders. “China is going to eat our lunch? Come on, man,” Biden told a crowd in Iowa earlier this month. He described himself as a “fair trader” and said he has been “arguing for a long time that we should treat other countries the way in which they treat us, which is, particularly as it relates to China: If they want to trade here, they’re going to be under the same rules.” CNBC provided the questions to each campaign on May 6. What do you think is the best approach to addressing China’s practices with regard to intellectual property theft, technology transfer, industrial subsidies and other matters in which the two countries are at odds. Is it through multinational organizations like the World Trade Organization and the United Nations? Will you take any action unilaterally? If so, what action? Sanders: It is in the interests of the United States to work to strengthen institutions like the WTO and the UN rather than trying to go it alone. American concerns about China’s technology practices are shared in Europe and across the Asia-Pacific. We can place far more pressure on China to change its policies if we work together with the broader international community and the other developed economies. International institutions also offer China a template for reforming its own internal intellectual property and industrial practices. Swalwell: I’m a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, as well as of the Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet, so I’ve seen first-hand the economic espionage that China commits and the adverse impact it has on American businesses. China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. Nor is China transparent on its industrial subsidies. Curbing China’s dishonest practices must be a part of any negotiation; as president, I would hold China accountable. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. In order to combat this we must take a multi-pronged approach — both defensive and offensive. We must have a strong enforcement mechanism with which to hold China accountable for their actions and continue to impose penalties when theft occurs. China has made promises to institute reforms of their policies governing IP rights, technology transfers and cyber-theft of trade secrets in the past but we know these are not being imposed. Read more: Eric Swalwell of California joins 2020 presidential race The legal and diplomatic approaches have not been completely effective, it is critical that we implement other actions such as developing early warning systems, particularly when it comes to the stealing of defense technology. This can be done through private-public partnerships. We must also be ready to take counter action when a theft is detected. It is vital that we continue to have a multinational approach to addressing these issues. We can’t go it alone; we must involve allies — and other victims of China’s practices — such as Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

While the U.S. does not have to go through the World Trade Organization and can invoke Section 301 if they are to impose tariffs against China (even though it still has to file a simultaneous complaint with the WTO), the WTO can still be a useful partner. In fact, the WTO has an obligation to enforce the rules they have set up, otherwise it is left to the United States to impose punishment. We should hold the WTO to its obligation. It is also important that U.S. companies acknowledge when theft is occurring by China. In the past, companies have not wanted to impinge on their business with China so they’ve turned a blind eye. I would ensure that reporting this theft it is a win-win for American companies through fair trade practices. Lastly, government departments must coordinate with each other and with U.S. companies. The departments of Commerce and the Treasury, the U.S. Trade Representative and the U.S. State Department must all be aligned to tackle the problem of IP property theft in coordination with the private sector. I would continue to make sure the Justice Department brings criminal cases against the companies that violate trade agreements and steal our trade secrets and intellectual property. I would boost our Trade Representative’s investigation of China’s activities by adding more staff and funding. Ryan: When it comes to China stealing intellectual property from the United States, there is no doubt that multinational organizations need to play a part in holding them accountable. These actions are a serious national security and economic risk for the United States. At the same time, I think our government must take further action when it comes to creating safeguards against China’s actions. That is why I have cosponsored legislation the Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act, which would hold China accountable and create necessary regulations when it comes to trade with China, including prohibiting the sale of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property to China. Read more: Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan — who once tried to take down Nancy Pelosi — is running for president Delaney: China has acted like pirates, stealing intellectual property, building illegal islands, and not playing by the rules. I will build a broad coalition of U.S. allies and have a unified front against China (this will involve working with multinational organizations but also doing a lot more), I will unify our business community against these practices by preventing them from depositing intellectual property funded by taxpayers into joint ventures with China, and I will re-enter the TPP to compete with China. We can hold China accountable and have a productive relationship with them. Read more: What being a successful businessman taught Rep. John Delaney about politics Moulton: These options aren’t mutually exclusive. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. Protecting our international property is a national security issue, and we need to build a cyberwall to protect against Chinese and Russian attacks. We should start by strengthening the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center created under President Obama and improve the information-sharing between the private sector and government on cyber threats. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help American workers. Donald Trump has shown he knows nothing about trade. An initial analysis of the net effect of the tariffs is that they are costing the United States economy $1.4 billion a month, and the cost of the tariffs is being passed on to U.S. farmers, companies, and consumers. Read more: Seth Moulton is the latest Democrat running for president. Here are his biggest policy priorities, from green jobs to a public option The United States led the 15 years of negotiations that enabled China to join the WTO and we should reap the benefits of that successful diplomatic effort. Our negotiators secured unprecedented changes to China’s economic and trade policies as conditions for membership, including requiring a dramatic opening of China’s telecom, banking, and insurance sectors, along with the lowering of tariffs on key agricultural products to almost zero. The point is: WTO leverage works. China’s membership in the WTO has been a huge boon to the United States, with U.S. exports to China increasing by 500 percent and agricultural exports increasing by 1000 percent since China joined the organization. Going forward, the WTO should absolutely be involved in establishing trust in trade negotiations and in providing the mechanisms for the enforcement of trade agreements. Bennet: Instead of slapping tariffs on our allies and perpetrating a trade war, Michael believes we need to do the hard work of building coalitions to counter Chinese predatory economic practices, like intellectual property theft and economic espionage, that harm American workers, businesses, farmers, and ranchers. In order to compete with and counter an increasingly authoritarian China, Michael believes we must reinvest in our alliances, champion democratic values like the rule of law and human rights, and sharpen our efforts to combat technology threats that undermine U.S. economic and national security.

Messam: The strained trade relations between the U.S. and China is a complex issue that should be confronted with a measured and sober disposition. The combined approach of multinational organizations and unilateral action should be leveraged to protect intellectual property, technology assets, and trade secrets. Before engaging trade wars that could have detrimental impacts to American businesses and our economy, we must seek to solve our trade differences diplomatically. Where multinational organization negotiations don’t work, I would seek specific and direct trade remedies not limited to: • tariffs • blockade on imports of stolen intellectual property Read more: Little-known Florida mayor becomes the latest Democrat vying to take on Trump in 2020 Williamson: The United States Intellectual Property is some of the most valued in the world. According to the USTR, by stealing our intellectual property, China costs American businesses between $225 billion and $600 billion annually. We must use all tools at our disposal to ensure China respects intellectual property law. This will include working with and leveraging the power of the international community to make certain that China engages in fair trade. The U.S. government must also enlist the help and cooperation from American businesses to help solve this problem. Increased internal controls, more robust screening and standardized best practices will make it more difficult for Chinese agents to operate. Many opportunities are a matter of simple theft. More diligence will help curb crimes of opportunity. Lastly, a firm no nonsense stance against China on every front will be necessary to send a clear message that these practices won’t be tolerated. Should a trade deal with China address human rights issues? If not, will your administration address human rights in China and, if so, how? Sanders: Yes. Labor protections are very weak in China, and the rights of workers are an essential component of human rights. The Trump administration has proven itself indifferent to labor rights, and apparently would prefer that American workers are reduced to the position of Chinese workers, rather than that labor everywhere enjoy basic protections and strong standard of living. The Trump administration has also done nothing to pressure China over its abhorrent treatment of the Uighur and Tibetan peoples. Future trade negotiations should, for example, target American corporations that contribute surveillance technologies that enable China’s authoritarian practices. Swalwell: Yes, a trade deal must have a component to address human rights activity. We must be a model for the world and call out countries such as China that violate human rights. Ryan: Yes. As the United States negotiates any future trade deal with China, we must address the human rights violations. The actions we have seen from the Chinese government when it comes to the inhumane treatment of the ethnic minorities is inexcusable. And no future trade agreement can ignore these violations. Delaney: Human rights are a priority to the Delaney Administration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump just made it even harder for any future US government to negotiate with Iran, analyst says

U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday designated a powerful branch of Iran’s state military as a terrorist group, ratcheting up already tense relations between Tehran and Washington. Speaking with CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday, she added that Trump’s unprecedented move will make future negotiations with Iran “more difficult.” “The future U.S. government, if they want to negotiate with Iran or negotiate with the Iranian military in any way, they’re going to have to take the (Islamic Revolutionar


U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday designated a powerful branch of Iran’s state military as a terrorist group, ratcheting up already tense relations between Tehran and Washington. Speaking with CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday, she added that Trump’s unprecedented move will make future negotiations with Iran “more difficult.” “The future U.S. government, if they want to negotiate with Iran or negotiate with the Iranian military in any way, they’re going to have to take the (Islamic Revolutionar
Trump just made it even harder for any future US government to negotiate with Iran, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: shirley tay, pool, press office of iranian supreme leader, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revolutionary, irgc, irans, islamic, negotiate, harder, future, analyst, iran, iranian, state, trump, terrorist, military


Trump just made it even harder for any future US government to negotiate with Iran, analyst says

U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday designated a powerful branch of Iran’s state military as a terrorist group, ratcheting up already tense relations between Tehran and Washington.

That move, however, “creates another tangle of legislation” that both countries will take years to get through, according to Emily Hawthorne, a Middle East and North Africa analyst at geopolitical intelligence firm Stratfor. Speaking with CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday, she added that Trump’s unprecedented move will make future negotiations with Iran “more difficult.”

“The future U.S. government, if they want to negotiate with Iran or negotiate with the Iranian military in any way, they’re going to have to take the (Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps) off of this list,” Hawthorne said. “Otherwise, they would be technically negotiating with a terrorist organization.”

Set up after the 1979 Iranian Revolution, the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corp (IRGC) is the elite security arm of Iran’s armed forces. It has significant influence in Iran’s political system, economy and military.

Monday’s decision — set to officially take effect on April 15 — marks the first time the U.S. Department of State has ever labeled a country’s state military as a terrorist organization and adds yet another layer of sanctions on Iran.

“The IRGC is the Iranian government’s primary means of directing and implementing its global terrorist campaign,” Trump said in a White House statement released Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: shirley tay, pool, press office of iranian supreme leader, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revolutionary, irgc, irans, islamic, negotiate, harder, future, analyst, iran, iranian, state, trump, terrorist, military


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Negotiate your rent in 4 easy steps and potentially save thousands of dollars a year

The average rent for one-bedroom apartments across the country is around $950 a month, and in the country’s biggest cities it can be significantly higher than that. “The single biggest expense for most people is their rent and yet they never take the time to realize you can negotiate this,” Sethi tells CNBC Make It. The national rent index fell slightly month-over-month for the second month in a row, ApartmentList found in its March report. And “if you can negotiate, you can often save hundreds


The average rent for one-bedroom apartments across the country is around $950 a month, and in the country’s biggest cities it can be significantly higher than that. “The single biggest expense for most people is their rent and yet they never take the time to realize you can negotiate this,” Sethi tells CNBC Make It. The national rent index fell slightly month-over-month for the second month in a row, ApartmentList found in its March report. And “if you can negotiate, you can often save hundreds
Negotiate your rent in 4 easy steps and potentially save thousands of dollars a year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steps, conversation, easy, negotiate, expense, save, thousands, month, rent, dollars, bargain, sethi, biggest, potentially, apartments


Negotiate your rent in 4 easy steps and potentially save thousands of dollars a year

If you’re renting, housing is likely your biggest monthly expense. The average rent for one-bedroom apartments across the country is around $950 a month, and in the country’s biggest cities it can be significantly higher than that.

But what if you could bargain with your landlord to get a better deal? Turns out you may well be able to, according to personal finance expert Ramit Sethi.

“The single biggest expense for most people is their rent and yet they never take the time to realize you can negotiate this,” Sethi tells CNBC Make It.

And now may be the best time to have that conversation. The national rent index fell slightly month-over-month for the second month in a row, ApartmentList found in its March report.

Sethi, the best-selling author of “I Will Teach You to be Rich,” says that, when there’s a glut of apartments, you have more opportunity as a renter to bargain. And “if you can negotiate, you can often save hundreds of dollars a month which adds up to thousands of dollars a year,” Sethi says.

Here’s how to approach this type of conversation in five easy steps.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steps, conversation, easy, negotiate, expense, save, thousands, month, rent, dollars, bargain, sethi, biggest, potentially, apartments


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here’s how to negotiate your rent, from the author of ‘I Will Teach You to be Rich’

Here’s how to negotiate your rent, from the author of ‘I Will Teach You to be Rich’4 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Ramit Sethi explains how you can negotiate your rent with your landlord and potentially save hundreds or thousands of dollars.


Here’s how to negotiate your rent, from the author of ‘I Will Teach You to be Rich’4 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Ramit Sethi explains how you can negotiate your rent with your landlord and potentially save hundreds or thousands of dollars.
Here’s how to negotiate your rent, from the author of ‘I Will Teach You to be Rich’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, browser, heres, author, view, negotiate, enabled, site, thousands, rent, teach, try, rich, flash


Here's how to negotiate your rent, from the author of 'I Will Teach You to be Rich'

Here’s how to negotiate your rent, from the author of ‘I Will Teach You to be Rich’

4 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Ramit Sethi explains how you can negotiate your rent with your landlord and potentially save hundreds or thousands of dollars.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, browser, heres, author, view, negotiate, enabled, site, thousands, rent, teach, try, rich, flash


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

How to negotiate for more college financial aid

For every parent like Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin who tried to buy their kid’s way into college, there are a slew of others who can barely afford it. “We are in that funny trap where we don’t qualify for aid but we also don’t have $70,000 a year to spend on private college,” said Robin Coccomo, 42. Her oldest son, Paul, will be a freshman in the fall and she also has two other children not far behind. “What I offer him, I also want to be able to offer the other two.” He is still waiting t


For every parent like Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin who tried to buy their kid’s way into college, there are a slew of others who can barely afford it. “We are in that funny trap where we don’t qualify for aid but we also don’t have $70,000 a year to spend on private college,” said Robin Coccomo, 42. Her oldest son, Paul, will be a freshman in the fall and she also has two other children not far behind. “What I offer him, I also want to be able to offer the other two.” He is still waiting t
How to negotiate for more college financial aid Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: sharon epperson, jessica dickler, source, robin coccomo, -zack perkins, co-founder of collegevine
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aid, wants, negotiate, twopaul, financial, way, tried, college, dont, coccomo, waiting, offer, university


How to negotiate for more college financial aid

For every parent like Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin who tried to buy their kid’s way into college, there are a slew of others who can barely afford it.

“We are in that funny trap where we don’t qualify for aid but we also don’t have $70,000 a year to spend on private college,” said Robin Coccomo, 42. Her oldest son, Paul, will be a freshman in the fall and she also has two other children not far behind.

“What I offer him, I also want to be able to offer the other two.”

Paul Coccomo, 18, wants to study engineering and has already been accepted at eight institutions for next year, including the University of Connecticut in his home state. He is still waiting to hear from seven more colleges, one of which is MIT — his top choice.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: sharon epperson, jessica dickler, source, robin coccomo, -zack perkins, co-founder of collegevine
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aid, wants, negotiate, twopaul, financial, way, tried, college, dont, coccomo, waiting, offer, university


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump administration considers making hospitals publish prices they negotiate with insurers

The Trump administration is considering a rule that would require hospitals to publicize the prices they negotiate with insurers. The policy is part of a broader proposed rule the Health and Human Services Department is pursing on patient data. As of Jan. 1, the Trump administration requires hospitals to post sticker prices for services online. Critics say those aren’t accurate because insurers negotiate those prices down. Forcing hospitals to publish the actual prices would show just how much h


The Trump administration is considering a rule that would require hospitals to publicize the prices they negotiate with insurers. The policy is part of a broader proposed rule the Health and Human Services Department is pursing on patient data. As of Jan. 1, the Trump administration requires hospitals to post sticker prices for services online. Critics say those aren’t accurate because insurers negotiate those prices down. Forcing hospitals to publish the actual prices would show just how much h
Trump administration considers making hospitals publish prices they negotiate with insurers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: angelica lavito, fs productions, tetra images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, insurers, negotiate, trump, publish, hospitals, administration, rule, making, services, proposed, considers, prices


Trump administration considers making hospitals publish prices they negotiate with insurers

The Trump administration is considering a rule that would require hospitals to publicize the prices they negotiate with insurers.

The policy is part of a broader proposed rule the Health and Human Services Department is pursing on patient data. The public comment period closes May 3 and the administration could publish a final rule after that.

The Wall Street Journal first reported news of the proposed rule.

As of Jan. 1, the Trump administration requires hospitals to post sticker prices for services online. Critics say those aren’t accurate because insurers negotiate those prices down. Forcing hospitals to publish the actual prices would show just how much hospitals are actually charging and how much insurers are paying for health care.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: angelica lavito, fs productions, tetra images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, insurers, negotiate, trump, publish, hospitals, administration, rule, making, services, proposed, considers, prices


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘Shark Tank’s’ Kevin O’Leary: This is how to negotiate, from your salary to your cable bill

With something more simple, like your cable bill, play hardball for a better package or fewer fees. They want to know what it’s going to take to keep you as a customer, and you want a reduction in fees. In terms of bigger loans — like a mortgage or business loan — O’Leary says you can try to negotiate your way out of lender’s fees. Start by saying you simply don’t want to pay the fee, O’Leary suggests, and if they don’t budge, offer half of what they are asking for. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary: Th


With something more simple, like your cable bill, play hardball for a better package or fewer fees. They want to know what it’s going to take to keep you as a customer, and you want a reduction in fees. In terms of bigger loans — like a mortgage or business loan — O’Leary says you can try to negotiate your way out of lender’s fees. Start by saying you simply don’t want to pay the fee, O’Leary suggests, and if they don’t budge, offer half of what they are asking for. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary: Th
‘Shark Tank’s’ Kevin O’Leary: This is how to negotiate, from your salary to your cable bill Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tanks, cable, oleary, better, fees, negotiate, loan, simply, dont, going, kevin, shark, youd, salary, bill


'Shark Tank's' Kevin O'Leary: This is how to negotiate, from your salary to your cable bill

With something more simple, like your cable bill, play hardball for a better package or fewer fees. For example, if you are paying for channels you don’t watch, “call up your provider and say, ‘Tell me about your other packages, because if you don’t give me a better deal, I’m leaving,'” O’Leary says.

“I’ve done this my whole life,” he says.

“Believe me, they will hop to. They want to know what it’s going to take to keep you as a customer, and you want a reduction in fees. You’re going to find a happy medium pretty quickly. You’d be surprised.

“Your job is to squeeze a cost cut and a savings out of them,” says O’Leary. “You can do it. It works.”

In terms of bigger loans — like a mortgage or business loan — O’Leary says you can try to negotiate your way out of lender’s fees. Start by saying you simply don’t want to pay the fee, O’Leary suggests, and if they don’t budge, offer half of what they are asking for. You’d be amazed at what you can get simply if you just ask for it, he says.

“You can push back hard on that,” O’Leary says. “They want to loan you the money because the core profit is the interest they charge you.”

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary: This should be your financial deal-breaker in a relationship

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to ABC’s “Shark Tank.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tanks, cable, oleary, better, fees, negotiate, loan, simply, dont, going, kevin, shark, youd, salary, bill


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post