Buy Amazon and Chewy, but sell Netflix if there’s a recession, Nomura Instinet says

The continued growth of digital services should give some technology and digital media companies the ability to outperform during a recession, but not every stock is well-positioned, according to analysts at Nomura Instinet. While e-commerce sales growth slowed during the great financial crisis, the digital companies gained market share from traditional retailers. “Amazon is also well-positioned as a general-purpose retailer,” the analysts wrote, while noting Nomura doesn’t officially cover the


The continued growth of digital services should give some technology and digital media companies the ability to outperform during a recession, but not every stock is well-positioned, according to analysts at Nomura Instinet. While e-commerce sales growth slowed during the great financial crisis, the digital companies gained market share from traditional retailers. “Amazon is also well-positioned as a general-purpose retailer,” the analysts wrote, while noting Nomura doesn’t officially cover the
Buy Amazon and Chewy, but sell Netflix if there’s a recession, Nomura Instinet says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nomura, ecommerce, instinet, sell, netflix, companies, advertising, markets, market, buy, theres, recession, chewy, digital, analysts, media, amazon


Buy Amazon and Chewy, but sell Netflix if there's a recession, Nomura Instinet says

Signage for Chewy is seen on the trading floor ahead of their IPO at the New York Stock Exchange, June 14, 2019.

The continued growth of digital services should give some technology and digital media companies the ability to outperform during a recession, but not every stock is well-positioned, according to analysts at Nomura Instinet.

Fears of a recession in the U.S. rose last week when the main yield curve inverted, a historically reliable indicator of a slowdown. The action in the bond market, combined with continued trade uncertainty and stagnant economies around the globe, has led some economists and financiers to consider a recession in the next year or two.

The tech and digital media sectors have large exposure to advertising and discretionary consumer spending, two areas that are seen as high risk during hard economic times.

However, Nomura analyst Mark Kelley and two colleagues said in a client note Monday that e-commerce companies and those with strong digital advertising businesses should see secular tailwinds that make them winners during a downturn.

The analysts said e-commerce stocks were the “best to own in such an environment,” singling out Amazon and pet retailer Chewy, the latter because demand for pet products has shown resilience during recessions. While e-commerce sales growth slowed during the great financial crisis, the digital companies gained market share from traditional retailers.

“Amazon is also well-positioned as a general-purpose retailer,” the analysts wrote, while noting Nomura doesn’t officially cover the stock.

“We would expect this trend to continue in a future downturn, continuing the decline of legacy brick-and-mortar retailers that have suffered in the ‘retail apocalypse’ in favor of more nimble and online-focused marketplaces. We expect larger e-commerce platforms and niche retailers whose end markets are less discretionary to outperform,” the analysts said.

Advertising also took a big hit during the last recession, but digital advertising, which only accounted for about 15% of total ad budgets at the time, held up better than the industry as a whole. Though digital advertising is a much bigger market now, the analysts believe the digital side should still lift companies such as Alphabet and Facebook.

“We believe the continued transition to digital advertising should equate to digital advertising budgets holding up much better than legacy formats,” the analysts said.

Not every technology and media company can count on the strength of digital markets to bolster them during a downturn, the analysts said, pointing to video game companies as one industry that could be hit hard.

“We would be cautious regarding cash-flow-negative companies, such as Snap and Netflix, and those companies exposed to cyclical or discretionary end markets, such as ANGI Homeservices and the Interactive Entertainment sector, ” the analysts said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nomura, ecommerce, instinet, sell, netflix, companies, advertising, markets, market, buy, theres, recession, chewy, digital, analysts, media, amazon


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BlackRock now has the biggest slice of Sports Illustrated owner Authentic Brands

How the streaming wars between Disney, Netflix and everybody else…Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video and others are about to come head-to-head with the likes of Disney Plus, Apple TV Plus, HBO Max and CNBC’s parent company, NBCUniversal….Technologyread more


How the streaming wars between Disney, Netflix and everybody else…Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video and others are about to come head-to-head with the likes of Disney Plus, Apple TV Plus, HBO Max and CNBC’s parent company, NBCUniversal….Technologyread more
BlackRock now has the biggest slice of Sports Illustrated owner Authentic Brands Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-11  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, illustrated, blackrock, owner, tv, prime, netflix, brands, nbcuniversaltechnologyread, slice, video, authentic, wars, parent, plus, streaming, disney, biggest


BlackRock now has the biggest slice of Sports Illustrated owner Authentic Brands

How the streaming wars between Disney, Netflix and everybody else…

Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video and others are about to come head-to-head with the likes of Disney Plus, Apple TV Plus, HBO Max and CNBC’s parent company, NBCUniversal….

Technology

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-11  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, illustrated, blackrock, owner, tv, prime, netflix, brands, nbcuniversaltechnologyread, slice, video, authentic, wars, parent, plus, streaming, disney, biggest


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Netflix just spent $200 million for ‘Game of Thrones’ creators, but the cost could be greater

Executive Creators and Producers of “Game of Thrones”, David Benioff, George R. R. Martin and D.B Weiss attend the “Game Of Thrones” Season 8 NY Premiere on April 3, 2019 in New York City. Jeff Kravitz | FilmMagic, Inc | Getty Images”Game of Thrones” showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are leaving HBO for a $200 million paycheck from rival streaming service Netflix. These costs come as Netflix is expected to report $20.2 billion in revenue in 2019, according to analysts surveyed by Refiniti


Executive Creators and Producers of “Game of Thrones”, David Benioff, George R. R. Martin and D.B Weiss attend the “Game Of Thrones” Season 8 NY Premiere on April 3, 2019 in New York City. Jeff Kravitz | FilmMagic, Inc | Getty Images”Game of Thrones” showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are leaving HBO for a $200 million paycheck from rival streaming service Netflix. These costs come as Netflix is expected to report $20.2 billion in revenue in 2019, according to analysts surveyed by Refiniti
Netflix just spent $200 million for ‘Game of Thrones’ creators, but the cost could be greater Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, game, creators, spent, 200, tv, cimino, greater, billion, netflix, million, thrones, weiss, benioff, worth, cost


Netflix just spent $200 million for 'Game of Thrones' creators, but the cost could be greater

Executive Creators and Producers of “Game of Thrones”, David Benioff, George R. R. Martin and D.B Weiss attend the “Game Of Thrones” Season 8 NY Premiere on April 3, 2019 in New York City. Jeff Kravitz | FilmMagic, Inc | Getty Images

“Game of Thrones” showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are leaving HBO for a $200 million paycheck from rival streaming service Netflix. The deal is one of many that Netflix has made in the last year to bring in top-tier talent to make TV shows and films exclusive to the platform to better compete with rival streaming services like Hulu and Amazon Prime as well as up-and-coming ones like Disney+ and Comcast’s yet-to-be-named service. However, analysts wonder if these deals are worth the money for Netflix. Netflix has been burning through cash for the last decade, signing names like Guillermo del Toro ( “Shape of Water”), Ryan Murphy (“Glee”) and Shonda Rhimes (“Grey’s Anatomy”). Last year, Netflix shelled out more than $12 billion to purchase, license and produce content. This year, that figure will rise to $15 billion. It will spend $2.9 billion more on marketing. These costs come as Netflix is expected to report $20.2 billion in revenue in 2019, according to analysts surveyed by Refinitiv.

While Benioff and Weiss were the shepherds of the Emmy Award-winning “Game of Thrones,” there has been criticism about their writing on the show in later seasons, when the pair no longer had author George R. R. Martin’s source material to work from. “Either [Benioff and Weiss] are the next Steven Spielberg or they are the next Michael Cimino,” Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter said. While Spielberg has continued to thrive in the industry, Cimino famously wrote and directed “Heaven’s Gate,” a film that flopped so badly at the box office it caused Transamerica to shutter its film production and sell its studio to MGM. This was just two years after Cimino made the Academy Award-winning “Deer Hunter.” “I’d say somewhere in between,” Pachter said. “They might be good enough to justify the price, but they might not be. Remember, they still have to produce something, and if it’s not great, it isn’t worth it.” And that’s been an issue for Netflix. While someone like Murphy, whom they paid a reported $300 million for a five-year contract, has said he has 10 greenlit projects in the pipeline for Netflix — three documentaries, four TV shows and three movies — only one has been given a release date. “The Politician” is an eight-episode show about the lengths the super rich will go to stay on top, including paying to get their children into elite colleges. The show, whose premise predates the college cheating scandal, is due out at the end of September.

“Stranger Things” season three picks up in the summer of 1985. The Hawkins crew are on the cusp of adulthood and faced with enemies old and new. Netflix


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, game, creators, spent, 200, tv, cimino, greater, billion, netflix, million, thrones, weiss, benioff, worth, cost


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HBO’s controversial ‘Confederate’ is likely dead after ‘Game of Thrones’ creators Benioff and Weiss sign Netflix deal

“Confederate,” which would have depicted an alternate universe in which the Confederacy successfully seceded from the Union, is likely dead in the water at HBO now that showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have signed a $200 million deal with Netflix. “Confederate” was initially expected to launch in 2018 or 2019, after Benioff and Weiss were done with “Game of Thrones.” However, the project was shelved and this new deal between Benioff, Weiss and Netflix likely wipes it off the books comple


“Confederate,” which would have depicted an alternate universe in which the Confederacy successfully seceded from the Union, is likely dead in the water at HBO now that showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have signed a $200 million deal with Netflix. “Confederate” was initially expected to launch in 2018 or 2019, after Benioff and Weiss were done with “Game of Thrones.” However, the project was shelved and this new deal between Benioff, Weiss and Netflix likely wipes it off the books comple
HBO’s controversial ‘Confederate’ is likely dead after ‘Game of Thrones’ creators Benioff and Weiss sign Netflix deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, benioff, 2018, likely, hbo, game, dead, showrunners, hbos, netflix, weiss, creators, signed, deal, thrones, sign


HBO's controversial 'Confederate' is likely dead after 'Game of Thrones' creators Benioff and Weiss sign Netflix deal

D.B. Weiss (L) and David Benioff (R) present th Britannia Award for British Artist of the Year at the 2018 British Academy Britannia Awards presented by Jaguar Land Rover and American Airlines at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on October 26, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California.

“Confederate,” which would have depicted an alternate universe in which the Confederacy successfully seceded from the Union, is likely dead in the water at HBO now that showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have signed a $200 million deal with Netflix.

The show faced harsh criticism when it was announced in 2017, including a withering condemnation from writer Ta-Nehisi Coates. The plot would have centered around slavery being legal in modern times.

“Confederate” was initially expected to launch in 2018 or 2019, after Benioff and Weiss were done with “Game of Thrones.” However, the project was shelved and this new deal between Benioff, Weiss and Netflix likely wipes it off the books completely.

“I think anything they have with us would likely not go forward,” HBO President of Programming Casey Bloys told Deadline back in July, hinting that any projects the showrunners had with HBO would be cancelled if they signed with another network.

HBO did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

It’s not entirely surprising that “Confederate” was put on hold or that it wouldn’t come to fruition. Benioff and Weiss have been in high demand following their success with “Game of Thrones.” The pair are currently writing and producing a trilogy of “Star Wars” films for Disney. The first film in that series is due in theaters in 2022.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, benioff, 2018, likely, hbo, game, dead, showrunners, hbos, netflix, weiss, creators, signed, deal, thrones, sign


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Hedge funds are betting Amazon and Netflix will get burned in this market sell-off

Hedge funds are upping their bets against some of the biggest technology stocks. The moves followed the biggest stock market plunge of the year on Monday. Hedge funds are expecting stocks such as Amazon, Google-parent Alphabet and Netflix to be among the biggest losers. Hedge funds that were ready for Monday’s drop reaped the profits of betting against shares of multiple technology companies. Short positions also saw gains of $100 million or more each from declines in the stock of Netflix, Aliba


Hedge funds are upping their bets against some of the biggest technology stocks. The moves followed the biggest stock market plunge of the year on Monday. Hedge funds are expecting stocks such as Amazon, Google-parent Alphabet and Netflix to be among the biggest losers. Hedge funds that were ready for Monday’s drop reaped the profits of betting against shares of multiple technology companies. Short positions also saw gains of $100 million or more each from declines in the stock of Netflix, Aliba
Hedge funds are betting Amazon and Netflix will get burned in this market sell-off Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biggest, selloff, funds, stock, shorts, hedge, netflix, short, shares, burned, amazon, profits, betting, positions, technology, market, saw


Hedge funds are betting Amazon and Netflix will get burned in this market sell-off

Hedge funds are upping their bets against some of the biggest technology stocks.

Investors added $1.7 billion to short-selling positions on Monday and Tuesday, according to estimates from Ihor Dusaniwsky, S3 Partners’ head of predictive analytics. The moves followed the biggest stock market plunge of the year on Monday.

Short selling is a term used to describe betting against shares of a company. Shorts saw mark-to-market profits of $16.7 billion over the period that began with an escalating trade war with China as well as other macroeconomic data.

Hundreds of millions of dollars over the last two days flowed into new bets. Hedge funds are expecting stocks such as Amazon, Google-parent Alphabet and Netflix to be among the biggest losers. All three tech giants rank among the top 10 with the largest short position increases.

Hedge funds that were ready for Monday’s drop reaped the profits of betting against shares of multiple technology companies. Shorts against Apple brought in mark-to-market profits of just over $300 million in the last two days as the stock dropped 5.2%. Short positions also saw gains of $100 million or more each from declines in the stock of Netflix, Alibaba, Square, Tesla, Visa and Amazon.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biggest, selloff, funds, stock, shorts, hedge, netflix, short, shares, burned, amazon, profits, betting, positions, technology, market, saw


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Disney won’t hurt Netflix by stealing subscribers — but it will make it harder for Netflix to raise prices

Disney probably isn’t going to kill Netflix by stealing subscribers. While tempting to ask “will consumers rather have Disney’s bundle or Netflix?,” that probably isn’t the right question. Video streaming isn’t going to be a zero-sum game. But Disney’s pricing could undercut a core part of the Netflix narrative — that Netflix can turn customer growth into earnings growth by raising prices once subscribers plateau. But with Disney, Netflix will now face a direct streaming competitor at a competit


Disney probably isn’t going to kill Netflix by stealing subscribers. While tempting to ask “will consumers rather have Disney’s bundle or Netflix?,” that probably isn’t the right question. Video streaming isn’t going to be a zero-sum game. But Disney’s pricing could undercut a core part of the Netflix narrative — that Netflix can turn customer growth into earnings growth by raising prices once subscribers plateau. But with Disney, Netflix will now face a direct streaming competitor at a competit
Disney won’t hurt Netflix by stealing subscribers — but it will make it harder for Netflix to raise prices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, isnt, subscribers, price, traditional, streaming, probably, raise, prices, hurt, disney, consumers, netflix, services, wont, harder, stealing


Disney won't hurt Netflix by stealing subscribers — but it will make it harder for Netflix to raise prices

Disney probably isn’t going to kill Netflix by stealing subscribers. But it may give it a chronic illness.

Disney announced Wednesday it will bundle Disney+, ad-supported Hulu and ESPN+ together for $12.99 per month. That’s the same price as Netflix charges for its standard plan.

While tempting to ask “will consumers rather have Disney’s bundle or Netflix?,” that probably isn’t the right question.

Video streaming isn’t going to be a zero-sum game. Consumers will pick and choose among offerings and may end up with four or five services on average. Netflix has more than 151 million global subscribers. The idea that Disney or any other service will “kill” Netflix by causing millions of people to switch services is unreasonable.

But Disney’s pricing could undercut a core part of the Netflix narrative — that Netflix can turn customer growth into earnings growth by raising prices once subscribers plateau.

When a customer’s price-to-value consumption decision is based on Netflix vs. traditional pay-TV, increasing Netflix’s price by $1 or $2 per month seems insignificant. Netflix costs about one-eighth as much as a traditional pay-TV subscription, which runs about $100 per month.

But with Disney, Netflix will now face a direct streaming competitor at a competitive price. That could make price increases less palatable to consumers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, isnt, subscribers, price, traditional, streaming, probably, raise, prices, hurt, disney, consumers, netflix, services, wont, harder, stealing


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Steepest drop in 10-year yield since S&P downgrade of US

Disney’s real threat to Netflix is limiting how much it can raise…Video streaming isn’t going to be a zero-sum game. But Disney’s pricing may hinder part of the long-term Netflix narrative — that Netflix can turn customer growth into…Technologyread more


Disney’s real threat to Netflix is limiting how much it can raise…Video streaming isn’t going to be a zero-sum game. But Disney’s pricing may hinder part of the long-term Netflix narrative — that Netflix can turn customer growth into…Technologyread more
Steepest drop in 10-year yield since S&P downgrade of US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: robert hum
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zerosum, narrative, threat, raisevideo, disneys, pricing, streaming, yield, downgrade, turn, drop, 10year, real, netflix, steepest, sp


Steepest drop in 10-year yield since S&P downgrade of US

Disney’s real threat to Netflix is limiting how much it can raise…

Video streaming isn’t going to be a zero-sum game. But Disney’s pricing may hinder part of the long-term Netflix narrative — that Netflix can turn customer growth into…

Technology

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: robert hum
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zerosum, narrative, threat, raisevideo, disneys, pricing, streaming, yield, downgrade, turn, drop, 10year, real, netflix, steepest, sp


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Analyst lays out six reasons why Disney+ will eat Netflix’s lunch

The new Disney+ streaming service will lure customers from Netflix and win the direct-to-consumer streaming wars, according to Needham. Netflix’s service starts at $8.99 a month. This price difference between the most basic versions of Netflix and Disney+ is one of the main reasons Disney is set to attract Netflix’s customers, according to Needham. The five other reasons the firm listed are:Disney will have most Pixar, Star Wars, Marvel and Disney princess films available at launch. WATCH: Disne


The new Disney+ streaming service will lure customers from Netflix and win the direct-to-consumer streaming wars, according to Needham. Netflix’s service starts at $8.99 a month. This price difference between the most basic versions of Netflix and Disney+ is one of the main reasons Disney is set to attract Netflix’s customers, according to Needham. The five other reasons the firm listed are:Disney will have most Pixar, Star Wars, Marvel and Disney princess films available at launch. WATCH: Disne
Analyst lays out six reasons why Disney+ will eat Netflix’s lunch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: jesse pound, kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eat, earnings, analyst, reasons, lunch, lays, netflixs, streaming, wars, service, billion, customers, according, disney, netflix


Analyst lays out six reasons why Disney+ will eat Netflix's lunch

The new Disney+ streaming service will lure customers from Netflix and win the direct-to-consumer streaming wars, according to Needham.

The firm said customers will “mostly come” from Netflix because “US consumers have shown a reluctance to add” more streaming services.

Disney, which is launching the service in November, announced Tuesday it will offer a bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu for $12.99 per month, the same price as Netflix’s standard plan.The stand-alone Disney+ will cost $6.99 per month or $69.99 for a year. Netflix’s service starts at $8.99 a month.

This price difference between the most basic versions of Netflix and Disney+ is one of the main reasons Disney is set to attract Netflix’s customers, according to Needham. The five other reasons the firm listed are:

Disney will have most Pixar, Star Wars, Marvel and Disney princess films available at launch.

Disney’s current customer base lowers customer acquisition costs.

The bundle with ESPN+ and Hulu will lower churn.

Disney’s strong balance sheet and cash flow gives it “more staying power” than Netflix.

Disney already has several content studios.

Needham maintained its hold rating on Disney, citing concern about how the $71 billion acquisition of Fox will affect earnings in the near term. Disney on Tuesday missed expectations on the top and bottom lines for its fiscal third quarter, and shares were down 5.5% Wednesday morning.

The company generated $1.35 in earnings per share on $20.25 billion in revenue as it continues to integrate Fox’s entertainment assets. Analysts expected $1.75 in earnings per share and $21.47 billion in revenue, according to Refinitiv.

WATCH: Disney’s Iger on earnings miss and company’s role in streaming wars


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: jesse pound, kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eat, earnings, analyst, reasons, lunch, lays, netflixs, streaming, wars, service, billion, customers, according, disney, netflix


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Disney CEO Bob Iger says it’s a coincidence the Disney+ bundle costs the same as a Netflix subscription

The price for that three-piece bundle is $12.99 per month — the same price as a Netflix standard plan. According to Disney CEO Bob Iger, the fact that the two companies landed on the same price is a coincidence. “I know there’s a lot that’s been speculated about us going after them,” Iger said in an interview with CNBC’s Julia Boorstin. That’s a growth opportunity for the company and growth in terms in terms of consumption.” “We’ve always believed there’s plenty of room for both of us to thrive


The price for that three-piece bundle is $12.99 per month — the same price as a Netflix standard plan. According to Disney CEO Bob Iger, the fact that the two companies landed on the same price is a coincidence. “I know there’s a lot that’s been speculated about us going after them,” Iger said in an interview with CNBC’s Julia Boorstin. That’s a growth opportunity for the company and growth in terms in terms of consumption.” “We’ve always believed there’s plenty of room for both of us to thrive
Disney CEO Bob Iger says it’s a coincidence the Disney+ bundle costs the same as a Netflix subscription Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, tuesdaythe, thrive, iger, company, coincidence, subscription, netflix, disney, bob, thats, price, terms, costs, theres, bundle, ceo


Disney CEO Bob Iger says it's a coincidence the Disney+ bundle costs the same as a Netflix subscription

Disney is set to release its own streaming service, Disney+, on Nov. 12, and on the same day it will offer a deal bundling Disney+, ESPN+ and Hulu, the company announced on Tuesday.

The price for that three-piece bundle is $12.99 per month — the same price as a Netflix standard plan.

According to Disney CEO Bob Iger, the fact that the two companies landed on the same price is a coincidence.

“I know there’s a lot that’s been speculated about us going after them,” Iger said in an interview with CNBC’s Julia Boorstin. “We’re not, we’re looking to occupy space. That’s a growth opportunity for the company and growth in terms in terms of consumption.”

“We’ve always believed there’s plenty of room for both of us to thrive in this marketplace,” Iger continued.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, tuesdaythe, thrive, iger, company, coincidence, subscription, netflix, disney, bob, thats, price, terms, costs, theres, bundle, ceo


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Streamers such as Netflix have a lot to gain from competitive reality shows

A reality competition show about glassblowing was probably not going to be your go-to weekend binge. “Blown Away” is not only a visually appealing look at how a glassblowing competition can get dangerous (with a 2,000-degree furnace) or dramatic (as contestants race a ticking clock) — it’s also an example of what streamers can gain from reality competition shows. Netflix reported it lost more than 100,000 subscribers in the U.S., even though it was expected to gain more than 300,000. Reality com


A reality competition show about glassblowing was probably not going to be your go-to weekend binge. “Blown Away” is not only a visually appealing look at how a glassblowing competition can get dangerous (with a 2,000-degree furnace) or dramatic (as contestants race a ticking clock) — it’s also an example of what streamers can gain from reality competition shows. Netflix reported it lost more than 100,000 subscribers in the U.S., even though it was expected to gain more than 300,000. Reality com
Streamers such as Netflix have a lot to gain from competitive reality shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: mallika mitra
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, visually, released, competitive, competition, shows, netflix, gain, reality, race, media, nadler, lot, streamers


Streamers such as Netflix have a lot to gain from competitive reality shows

A reality competition show about glassblowing was probably not going to be your go-to weekend binge. But Netflix may have changed that when it dropped “Blown Away” on July 12.

The new Canadian show features glassblowers fighting to impress a panel of judges with their artistic skills over a 10-episode season. The stakes: getting eliminated or nabbing a $60,000 cash prize and a residency at the Corning Museum of Glass. It was released the same month Netflix scored its first Emmy nomination in the “Outstanding Competition Program” category for baking show “Nailed It” — ending the 14-year streak for Bravo’s “Project Runway.”

“Blown Away” is not only a visually appealing look at how a glassblowing competition can get dangerous (with a 2,000-degree furnace) or dramatic (as contestants race a ticking clock) — it’s also an example of what streamers can gain from reality competition shows.

The show was on Netflix’s top 10 reality shows in the United Kingdom during the week of July 20, according to Radio Times, and has gotten buzz on social media — mostly driven by a divide about the winner.

Netflix was “sort of the most likely home for the show,” said Matt Hornburg, Marblemedia’s co-CEO and executive producer. Marblemedia produced the show in association with Netflix and Canadian broadcasting company Blue Ant Media and had distributed “Tales of Light,” a documentary reality show about photography that Netflix bought.

“We knew that visually rich projects are very appealing” to Netflix, Hornburg said. “They were very excited about the project.”

The streaming giant’s second-quarter earnings released in mid-July showed the company needs to gain more dedicated watchers. Netflix reported it lost more than 100,000 subscribers in the U.S., even though it was expected to gain more than 300,000.

Reality competition shows may be a way for Netflix to appeal to a wider audience, said James Nadler, chair of Ryerson University’s School of Creative Industries.

“The reality shows and competition shows still cut across all the demographics,” Nadler said, adding that shows such as CBS’ “Survivor” and “The Amazing Race” and NBC’s “The Voice” are ones families often watch together.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: mallika mitra
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, visually, released, competitive, competition, shows, netflix, gain, reality, race, media, nadler, lot, streamers


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