International stocks will beat US stocks over next decade: Vanguard Group

Vanguard’s primary concern is that many U.S. investors have built too large an overweight to U.S. stocks. “It’s really a math equation,” said Vanguard CEO Tim Buckley in a CNBC interview later on Tuesday. The Vanguard CEO said investors should expect a balanced portfolio to return 5 percent in the coming years. Vanguard does expect the Fed to continue to raise rates toward 3 percent with a strong labor market and a 30-year low in unemployment. But Vanguard does not see the likelihood of a recess


Vanguard’s primary concern is that many U.S. investors have built too large an overweight to U.S. stocks. “It’s really a math equation,” said Vanguard CEO Tim Buckley in a CNBC interview later on Tuesday. The Vanguard CEO said investors should expect a balanced portfolio to return 5 percent in the coming years. Vanguard does expect the Fed to continue to raise rates toward 3 percent with a strong labor market and a 30-year low in unemployment. But Vanguard does not see the likelihood of a recess
International stocks will beat US stocks over next decade: Vanguard Group Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-27  Authors: eric rosenbaum, lucas jackson, akio kon, bloomberg, getty images, bryan r smith, afp, brendan mcdermid, nicholas kamm, scott mlyn
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International stocks will beat US stocks over next decade: Vanguard Group

Vanguard’s primary concern is that many U.S. investors have built too large an overweight to U.S. stocks. Over the past five years, the U.S. stock market has returned over 10 percent a year on an annualized basis while international stocks have returns about 2 percent. The traditional 60/40 portfolio — 60 percent U.S. stocks and 40 percent U.S. bonds — would now be as high as 70/30 given the 10.8 percent annualized return on equities and 1.8 percent return on bonds.

“It’s really a math equation,” said Vanguard CEO Tim Buckley in a CNBC interview later on Tuesday. “When you start off with higher valuations you are just going to get lower returns going forward. … Markets have come down a bit … We were at frothy valuations to now simply high valuations.”

Vanguard does not expect the U.S. economy to go over a cliff any time soon, but it does expect earnings growth to slow over the next 12 months, and in the short-term, for the recent bout of market volatility to continue, or even accelerate. A deal between the U.S. and China could change that outlook.

Amid concerns about peak earnings that contributed to the recent selloff, Davis said that earnings growth should remain strong over the next year, but after that the benefits of the tax cuts will start to diminish and the U.S. economy will see “standard economic growth” — closer to 2 percent GDP growth — and that will be the primary driver of stock earnings. “So it is going to slow down,” he said.

Buckley said the only way to predict a pace of U.S. stock growth that matches that of recent years is “to imagine serious economic growth and companies that can do extremely well,” but the fiscal stimulus already enacted makes that a hard argument to support. The trade war could settle down and productivity could outperform all expectations, but it would take a hard-to-see combination of events for returns to match the 10 percent annualized rate of recent years. The Vanguard CEO said investors should expect a balanced portfolio to return 5 percent in the coming years.

“If we get a trade deal, we will see a dark cloud lifted,” Davis said. “Uncertainty over trade tensions has had an impact on widening credit spreads and has been a depressing factor for equities.”

Vanguard does expect the Fed to continue to raise rates toward 3 percent with a strong labor market and a 30-year low in unemployment. “We think the Fed still has ammunition unless something else breaks in the economy,” and the central bank will “gradually continue to tighten,” the Vanguard CIO said.

There could even be stronger-than-expected tightening by the Fed if the U.S. unemployment rate drops closer to 3 percent from its current 3.7 percent level. Vanguard currently projects the Fed will do one more hike in December and two in 2019 due to the data on core inflation and labor market tightness.

But Vanguard does not see the likelihood of a recession in 2019, though that risk will increase in early 2020 if the Fed continues to be more restrictive in its policy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-27  Authors: eric rosenbaum, lucas jackson, akio kon, bloomberg, getty images, bryan r smith, afp, brendan mcdermid, nicholas kamm, scott mlyn
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A Santa rally depends on Trump making trade truce and easier tone from Fed

Stocks bounced Monday and Tuesday, but a real year end rally may be elusive unless the market gets positive headlines from President Trump on trade and more dovish comments from the Fed. Now, if you’re long, you’re afraid it’s going to go down more, and if you’re short, you’ve done very well in a very short period of time.” Sohn said it’s possible the market could still rally in the historically strong month of December. Apple did muster a rally Monday,but it was slightly weaker Tuesday after Tr


Stocks bounced Monday and Tuesday, but a real year end rally may be elusive unless the market gets positive headlines from President Trump on trade and more dovish comments from the Fed. Now, if you’re long, you’re afraid it’s going to go down more, and if you’re short, you’ve done very well in a very short period of time.” Sohn said it’s possible the market could still rally in the historically strong month of December. Apple did muster a rally Monday,but it was slightly weaker Tuesday after Tr
A Santa rally depends on Trump making trade truce and easier tone from Fed Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-27  Authors: patti domm, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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A Santa rally depends on Trump making trade truce and easier tone from Fed

Stocks bounced Monday and Tuesday, but a real year end rally may be elusive unless the market gets positive headlines from President Trump on trade and more dovish comments from the Fed.

Much market talk has focused on the upcoming Fed meeting Dec. 19, as well as the meeting between President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit in Buenos Aires at the end of the week. But the market also risks being held back by the fact that the stocks have suffered so much technical damage in the selloff, the third-worst by this point in the fourth quarter in nearly 70 years.

Trump added a new level of nervousness to the market when he said in a Wall Street Journal interview Monday that he would likely proceed with 25 percent tariffs on Chinese goods in January. But comments from top White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow Tuesday helped lift stocks, when he said the White House was in talks with China “at all levels” ahead of Trump’s meeting with Xi on Saturday.

“The frustration levels are rising, regardless of whether this correction goes deeper or morphs into something else, which we think it will, but it’s very much contingent on the outcome of both the Trump, Xi meeting later this week and the Fed in December,” said Julian Emanuel, chief equities and derivatives strategist at BTIG.

Emanuel said there could be a sharp sell off — as much as 14 percent from current levels — if there is no sign of progress on trade.

“Given the fact positioning is so light and people are so defensive, even if there’s a worst case outcome, the downside could be cushioned for now, but it tells a completely different tale for 2019 because a more protracted economic cold war means multiples have to come in,” he said.

Emanuel said the market is frustrating both bulls and bears. “The fact that you’ve had so many gaps in the tape in a sideways market over the past month really just shows the fear of the bulls, which has turned into both fear and frustration,” he said, noting bulls have been expecting a strong year-end rally.

“The bears are getting nervous about their positions as well,” he said. “The fact tech is trying to make a bottom makes everybody nervous…It’s the opposite of what we’ve seen when tech was the momentum darling in 2017, when people got nervous. Now, if you’re long, you’re afraid it’s going to go down more, and if you’re short, you’ve done very well in a very short period of time.”

Even if there is a bigger December bounce coming, unless the market’s internals begin to improve, the market could have a rough road in the beginning of the year. Strategists had expected a rally after the November mid-term elections, but instead there was just more selling that wiped out most of the market’s gains for the year.

Todd Sohn, technical analyst at Strategas. Sohn said it’s possible the market could still rally in the historically strong month of December.

Apple did muster a rally Monday,but it was slightly weaker Tuesday after Trump also said in the interview that he could put tariffs on iPhones. Apple is seen as a battleground stock, and bulls are hoping if it stems losses, the market can move higher.

“You could get a rally into the end of the year, but if the participation concerns don’t subside, that could present some problems for next year,” said Sohn. He said about half the stocks in the S&P 500 are no longer in an uptrend.

Sohn said, as of Monday, about half the stocks in the S&P 500 had their 50-day moving averages below their 200-day moving averages. When that happens, and the market is heading lower, it is seen as a negative trend.

Apple has corrected 27 percent, and shares of Amazon, Google and Facebook have also sold off. “The tough part will be [knowing whether] it’s the low or just an oversold bounce going into the seasonal period,” he said.

As for the major events that could move the market higher, strategists say there has been some improvement on China even if it is superficial, and the Fed needs to sound more cautious about raising rates.

“Investors are expecting at least some softening in the rhetoric between the U.S. and China. That will be a milestone,” said Michael Arone, chief investment strategist at State Street Global Advisors. “If there is an agreement to negotiate and an agreement to hold off on more tariffs, the market could have a strong rally. But if there are more threats and no signs of peace, stocks could see more selling.

Arone said Fed Chairman Jerome Powell could use his speech on Wednesday at the Economic Club of New York to relieve some market anxiety about the Fed. Powell is unlikely to indicate that the Fed will pause in its rate hiking, as some market pros expect, but he could undo some of the aggressive tone from his early October speech when he said the Fed was far from the neutral rate.

“They’re already starting to walk back some of this. I don’t think Powell’s intent in early October was to signal anything about the pace or direction of interest rate hikes, and I think the market overreacted,” Arone said.

He said stocks currently reflect little chance of a trade deal so there could be a bounce once it’s clear which way the meeting between Trump and Xi is going.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-27  Authors: patti domm, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fact, stocks, making, fed, youre, depends, xi, bulls, market, easier, meeting, rally, tone, truce, trade, trump, santa


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Trump says breaking with Saudi Arabia would send oil prices ‘through the roof’

President Donald Trump on Tuesday linked his decision to continue backing Saudi Arabia — despite the murder of a U.S. resident by Saudi agents — to his desire to keep oil prices low. “Saudi Arabia, if we broke with them, I think your oil prices would go through the roof,” Trump told reporters on Tuesday. Trump issued a statement earlier on Tuesday saying the United States stands by Saudi Arabia after agents of the kingdom killed U.S. resident and journalist Jamal Khashoggi in a Saudi consulate i


President Donald Trump on Tuesday linked his decision to continue backing Saudi Arabia — despite the murder of a U.S. resident by Saudi agents — to his desire to keep oil prices low. “Saudi Arabia, if we broke with them, I think your oil prices would go through the roof,” Trump told reporters on Tuesday. Trump issued a statement earlier on Tuesday saying the United States stands by Saudi Arabia after agents of the kingdom killed U.S. resident and journalist Jamal Khashoggi in a Saudi consulate i
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: tom dichristopher, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saying, statement, maybe, trump, breaking, send, arabia, resident, roof, saudi, prices, oil, agents


Trump says breaking with Saudi Arabia would send oil prices 'through the roof'

President Donald Trump on Tuesday linked his decision to continue backing Saudi Arabia — despite the murder of a U.S. resident by Saudi agents — to his desire to keep oil prices low.

“Saudi Arabia, if we broke with them, I think your oil prices would go through the roof,” Trump told reporters on Tuesday. “I’ve kept them down. They’ve helped me keep them down.”

Trump issued a statement earlier on Tuesday saying the United States stands by Saudi Arabia after agents of the kingdom killed U.S. resident and journalist Jamal Khashoggi in a Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey.

The CIA has reportedly concluded that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, an ally to the Trump administration, ordered Khashoggi’s death. On Tuesday, Trump cast doubt on that assessment, saying in his statement “maybe he did and maybe he didn’t!”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: tom dichristopher, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Tariffs are having a negative impact for only about 9 percent of companies, earnings calls show

Seven of the index’s 11 sectors saw a quarterly decline in the number of companies that used the term, while only two showed an increase. Most companies citing tariff issues have been saying they are offsetting them with higher prices or by shifting suppliers. In its so-called Beige Book report, which chronicles business conditions in the central bank’s 12 districts, the Fed mentioned “tariffs” 45 times. “Manufacturers reported raising prices of finished goods out of necessity as costs of raw ma


Seven of the index’s 11 sectors saw a quarterly decline in the number of companies that used the term, while only two showed an increase. Most companies citing tariff issues have been saying they are offsetting them with higher prices or by shifting suppliers. In its so-called Beige Book report, which chronicles business conditions in the central bank’s 12 districts, the Fed mentioned “tariffs” 45 times. “Manufacturers reported raising prices of finished goods out of necessity as costs of raw ma
Tariffs are having a negative impact for only about 9 percent of companies, earnings calls show Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: jeff cox, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Tariffs are having a negative impact for only about 9 percent of companies, earnings calls show

S&P won’t go above 3,000 until we get more clarity on tariffs, says pro 9:33 AM ET Thu, 8 Nov 2018 | 02:50

Only about 9 percent of the companies in the index “noted a negative impact,” said Savita Subramanian, equity and quant strategist at Bank of American Merrill Lynch.

At a sector level, industrials most frequently mentioned the issue, followed by tech, consumer discretionary and materials. Seven of the index’s 11 sectors saw a quarterly decline in the number of companies that used the term, while only two showed an increase.

“The small decline in the number and percentage of companies discussing tariffs in the third quarter relative to the second quarter may be a sign that there is slightly less concern in corporate America about widespread impacts from the tariffs throughout the economy,” wrote John Butters, senior earnings analyst at FactSet.

Most companies citing tariff issues have been saying they are offsetting them with higher prices or by shifting suppliers.

The findings stand in contrast with a recent report from the Federal Reserve, which noted a high level of concern from its business contacts around the country.

In its so-called Beige Book report, which chronicles business conditions in the central bank’s 12 districts, the Fed mentioned “tariffs” 45 times.

“Manufacturers reported raising prices of finished goods out of necessity as costs of raw materials such as metals rose, which they attributed to tariffs,” the report said. “Construction contract prices increased to cover rising costs of labor and materials. Retailers and wholesalers in some Districts raised selling prices as they continued to see increased costs in transportation and also worried about impending cost increases resulting from tariffs.”

Wall Street is wrapping another strong earnings season overall, with 78 percent of companies beating estimates as 90 percent of the S&P has reported. The expected earnings growth is 25.2 percent, best in eight years. Some 61 percent beat on revenue.

WATCH:Twelve US execs explain how Trump’s trade war affects their bottom lines


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: jeff cox, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Calls for open trade to greet Pence as Trump skips Asia summit

The pact involves 16 countries, including China, India, Japan and South Korea, but not the United States. Trump has demanded trade agreements that are fair and enforceable and based on the principle of reciprocity. The United States is also in the midst of a bitter trade war with China which has undermined global markets. Many of the leaders in Singapore will also meet at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Papua New Guinea next weekend. Also, ASEAN members states may announce the suc


The pact involves 16 countries, including China, India, Japan and South Korea, but not the United States. Trump has demanded trade agreements that are fair and enforceable and based on the principle of reciprocity. The United States is also in the midst of a bitter trade war with China which has undermined global markets. Many of the leaders in Singapore will also meet at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Papua New Guinea next weekend. Also, ASEAN members states may announce the suc
Calls for open trade to greet Pence as Trump skips Asia summit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-11  Authors: nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, summit, open, asia, regional, calls, president, singapore, south, leaders, trade, pence, skips, states, china, united, greet


Calls for open trade to greet Pence as Trump skips Asia summit

Asia-Pacific leaders will join the heads of Southeast Asian states this week in Singapore to renew calls for multilateralism and fresh pledges to resolve regional conflicts ranging from the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar to tensions in the South China Sea.

Notably absent when regional powers such as China, Japan and India seek to enlist support for a multilateral trading system will be U.S. President Donald Trump, whose decision to skip the Asia summit has raised questions about his commitment to a regional strategy aimed at checking China’s rise.

Vice President Mike Pence will attend instead of Trump, and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe are among those expected to join leaders from the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

Li is expected to rally support for the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) pact now being negotiated, showcased to be the free trade deal that will encompass more than a third of the world’s GDP.

The pact involves 16 countries, including China, India, Japan and South Korea, but not the United States.

Trump has demanded trade agreements that are fair and enforceable and based on the principle of reciprocity. He has re-negotiated an existing pact with South Korea and the three-way deal with Mexico and Canada, and pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement, which involved four Southeast Asian states.

The United States is also in the midst of a bitter trade war with China which has undermined global markets.

China is pushing the RCEP deal — Assistant Foreign Minister Chen Xiaodong told reporters on Thursday it “will be of great significance for deepening regional cooperation, coping with unilateralism and protectionism, and promoting an open, inclusive and rules-based international trading system.”

However, Li is expected to appeal in Singapore for the need for the world’s two largest economies to work together to resolve trade disputes, reiterating commitment made by Beijing’s top leaders last week for market opening and lowering tariffs.

It was not clear if Li and Pence will hold separate talks on the sidelines of the Singapore meetings, which would be a prelude to a summit scheduled between Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping at the end of the month in Buenos Aires.

The encounter, if it happens, would come on the heels of high-level talks in Washington where the two sides aired their main differences but appeared to attempt controlling the damage to relations that has worsened with tit-for-tat tariffs in recent months.

Many of the leaders in Singapore will also meet at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Papua New Guinea next weekend.

ASEAN, which will hold its own summit on Tuesday before being joined by other leaders, also faces the challenge of working through sharp differences over the handling of the Rohingya minority by Myanmar whose military has been accused of “genocidal intent” by the United Nations.

Leader Aung San Suu Kyi is due to attend the Singapore meetings this week while Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, attending his first multilateral summit since returning to power in May, has served notice he has lost faith in the Nobel peace laureate over the issue.

The Rohingya crisis is one of the biggest man-made disasters involving a member since ASEAN was founded in 1967, and it is one of the thorniest issues yet faced by a group that traditionally works by consensus.

Many diplomats and rights activists say ASEAN’s credibility is at risk if it fails to tackle the matter head-on.

At the meetings, ASEAN and China will try to make headway in negotiations for a code of conduct for the South China Sea, which Beijing claims almost in its entirety while ASEAN members Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia and Brunei claim parts of the area. Taiwan is also a claimant.

But an agreement is unlikely to be announced.

Also, ASEAN members states may announce the successful conclusion of agreements with Russia and the United States on cooperating on cyber security.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-11  Authors: nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Trump says border troops could hit 15K, surprising Pentagon

President Donald Trump says the number of military troops deployed to the U.S.-Mexican border could reach 15,000 — roughly double the number the Pentagon said it currently plans for a mission whose dimensions are shifting daily. The Pentagon says “more than 7,000” troops were being sent to the southwest border to support the Customs and Border Protection agents. Just 24 hours later, Trump thrust new uncertainty into the picture, catching the Pentagon by surprise. We’ll go up to anywhere between


President Donald Trump says the number of military troops deployed to the U.S.-Mexican border could reach 15,000 — roughly double the number the Pentagon said it currently plans for a mission whose dimensions are shifting daily. The Pentagon says “more than 7,000” troops were being sent to the southwest border to support the Customs and Border Protection agents. Just 24 hours later, Trump thrust new uncertainty into the picture, catching the Pentagon by surprise. We’ll go up to anywhere between
Trump says border troops could hit 15K, surprising Pentagon Cached Page below :
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pentagon, immigration, hit, military, reach, trump, executive, border, surprising, 15k, number, troops, citizenship


Trump says border troops could hit 15K, surprising Pentagon

President Donald Trump says the number of military troops deployed to the U.S.-Mexican border could reach 15,000 — roughly double the number the Pentagon said it currently plans for a mission whose dimensions are shifting daily.

The Pentagon says “more than 7,000” troops were being sent to the southwest border to support the Customs and Border Protection agents. Officials said that number could reach a maximum of about 8,000 under present plans.

The troop numbers have been changing at a dizzying pace, with Trump drawing a hard line on immigration in the lead-up to the midterm elections.

Just last week officials were indicating that about 800 to 1,000 might be sent. On Monday, officials announced that about 5,200 were being deployed. The next day, the Air Force general running the operation said more than the initially announced total were going, and he pointedly rejected a news report that it could reach 14,000, saying that was “not consistent with what’s actually being planned.”

Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy, the commander of U.S. Northern Command, told reporters the number would exceed the initial contingent of 5,200, but he offered no estimate of the eventual total.

Just 24 hours later, Trump thrust new uncertainty into the picture, catching the Pentagon by surprise.

With his eyes squarely on Tuesday’s contests, Trump has rushed a series of immigration declarations, promises and actions as he tries to mobilize supporters to retain Republican control of Congress. His own Republican campaign in 2016 concentrated on border fears, and that’s his focus in the final week of the midterm fight.

“As far as the caravan is concerned, our military is out,” Trump said. “We have about 5,800. We’ll go up to anywhere between 10,000 and 15,000 military personnel on top of Border Patrol, ICE and everybody else at the border.”

Later Wednesday, Trump told ABC News, “We have to have a wall of people.”

His comments were the latest twist in a story that has pushed the Pentagon unhappily into the political space, prompting questions about whether Defense Secretary Jim Mattis was allowing the military to be leveraged as a political stunt.

“We don’t do stunts,” Mattis said Wednesday.

Trump rejected the idea he was “fearmongering” or using the issue for political purposes, but his escalating rhetoric in the waning days of the campaign season calls that denial into question. Trump has railed against illegal immigration, including several caravans of migrants from Central America slowly moving on foot toward the U.S. border. The caravan of an estimated 4,000 people is still nearly 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) from the border. Several smaller groups, estimated at a combined 1,200 people, are farther away.

Trump insisted the media is underestimating the caravans. “You have caravans coming up that look a lot larger than it’s reported actually. I’m pretty good at estimating crowd size. And I’ll tell you they look a lot bigger than people would think,” he told ABC.

He has also promised to end so-called catch-and-release policies by erecting tent cities to hold those crossing illegally. And this week he is asserting he could act by executive order to unilaterally end birthright citizenship for the children of non-U.S. citizens.

Trump’s comments left some in the Pentagon scratching their heads. Officials said they had no plans to deploy as many as 15,000 troops. The number conceivably could reach 10,000, counting the 2,100 National Guard soldiers who have been operating along the border for months as part of a separate but related mission. The number of active-duty troops tapped for deployment stood at 7,000 as of Wednesday but could reach 8,000.

A deployment of 15,000 would bring the military commitment on the border to roughly the same level as in war-torn Afghanistan. And it would more than double the number of people thought to be in the caravans.

Trump did not back down Wednesday from his controversial proposal to upend the very concept of American citizenship. In a morning tweet, he said the right to citizenship for babies born to noncitizens on American soil “will be ended one way or the other.”

He also claimed that what he terms “so-called Birthright Citizenship” is “not covered by the 14th Amendment.”

However, the text of the amendment’s opening Citizenship Clause is this: “All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” The citizenship proposal would inevitably spark a long-shot legal battle over whether the president can alter the long-accepted understanding that the 14th Amendment grants citizenship to any child born on U.S. soil, regardless of his parents’ immigration status.

House Speaker Paul Ryan asserted Tuesday that “obviously” Trump could not upend that policy by executive order, drawing a tweeted rebuke from Trump. He said Wednesday that Ryan “should be focusing on holding the Majority rather than giving his opinions on Birthright Citizenship, something he knows nothing about!”

Speaking to reporters before leaving the White House for a campaign rally in Florida, Trump compared his plan to act by executive order to President Barack Obama’s much-maligned decision to use executive action to provide protections from prosecution and a path to work status for some people brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

“If he can do DACA, we can do this by executive order,” Trump said, using the acronym for the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Trump and his Justice Department have argued that Obama action was unlawful.

Trump and many top aides have long seen the immigration issue as the most effective rallying cry for his base of supporters. The president had been expected to announce new actions at the border on Tuesday, but that was scrapped so he could travel instead to Pittsburgh, where 11 people were massacred in a synagogue during Sabbath services.

WATCH: Here are the businesses profiting from immigrations enforcement


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Trump slams the media as ‘the true Enemy of the People’ days after CNN was targeted with mail bombs

In the wake of the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue and a series of mail bombings addressed to prominent Democrats and CNN, President Donald Trump said Monday the “great anger in our Country” is “caused in part” by the “Fake News Media.” “The true Enemy of the People,” Trump said in a tweet, “must stop the open & obvious hostility & report the news accurately & fairly.” Hours earlier, Trump claimed “Fake News” is attempting to “blame Republicans, Conservatives and me for the division and


In the wake of the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue and a series of mail bombings addressed to prominent Democrats and CNN, President Donald Trump said Monday the “great anger in our Country” is “caused in part” by the “Fake News Media.” “The true Enemy of the People,” Trump said in a tweet, “must stop the open & obvious hostility & report the news accurately & fairly.” Hours earlier, Trump claimed “Fake News” is attempting to “blame Republicans, Conservatives and me for the division and
Trump slams the media as ‘the true Enemy of the People’ days after CNN was targeted with mail bombs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: kevin breuninger, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wounded, targeted, slams, bombs, true, days, cnn, synagogue, media, series, fake, pittsburgh, democrats, enemy, addressed, mail, windows, trump


Trump slams the media as 'the true Enemy of the People' days after CNN was targeted with mail bombs

In the wake of the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue and a series of mail bombings addressed to prominent Democrats and CNN, President Donald Trump said Monday the “great anger in our Country” is “caused in part” by the “Fake News Media.”

“The true Enemy of the People,” Trump said in a tweet, “must stop the open & obvious hostility & report the news accurately & fairly.”

Hours earlier, Trump claimed “Fake News” is attempting to “blame Republicans, Conservatives and me for the division and hatred that has been going on for so long in our Country.”

Eleven people were killed and six wounded Saturday at Tree of Life synagogue in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Alleged shooter Robert Bowers had posted anti-Semitic comments on the unmoderated social media network Gab, which has reportedly been taken offline.

Last week, 56-year-old Cesar Sayoc, an avid Trump supporter who had emblazoned his van windows with anti-Democrat and pro-Trump stickers, was arrested in Florida by federal authorities in connection with a series of mail bombs addressed to high-profile Democrats.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: kevin breuninger, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wounded, targeted, slams, bombs, true, days, cnn, synagogue, media, series, fake, pittsburgh, democrats, enemy, addressed, mail, windows, trump


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Trump adopts a ‘nicer’ tone at campaign rally after pipe bomb attacks

President Donald Trump sought to strike a gentler, more positive tone at a campaign rally Wednesday, just hours after authorities intercepted at least seven pipe bombs intended for Trump’s political rivals. Trump began his rally in Mosinee, Wisconsin by decrying the assassination attempts, calling them “an attack on our democracy itself.” Those that are engaged in the political arena must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective.” The media also “has a responsibility to do mo


President Donald Trump sought to strike a gentler, more positive tone at a campaign rally Wednesday, just hours after authorities intercepted at least seven pipe bombs intended for Trump’s political rivals. Trump began his rally in Mosinee, Wisconsin by decrying the assassination attempts, calling them “an attack on our democracy itself.” Those that are engaged in the political arena must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective.” The media also “has a responsibility to do mo
Trump adopts a ‘nicer’ tone at campaign rally after pipe bomb attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-25  Authors: christina wilkie, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nicer, pipe, campaign, crowd, stop, bomb, attacks, adopts, trying, president, false, tone, trumps, wisconsin, trump, rally, political


Trump adopts a 'nicer' tone at campaign rally after pipe bomb attacks

President Donald Trump sought to strike a gentler, more positive tone at a campaign rally Wednesday, just hours after authorities intercepted at least seven pipe bombs intended for Trump’s political rivals.

The bombs were mailed to former President Barack Obama, former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, former CIA director John Brennan, and Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., among others.

Trump began his rally in Mosinee, Wisconsin by decrying the assassination attempts, calling them “an attack on our democracy itself.”

“Such conduct must be fiercely opposed and prosecuted,” Trump said. “There is one way to settle our disagreements, it’s called peacefully, at the ballot box.”

The president was visiting the state, which he won in 2016, in the hopes of boosting support for several Republican candidates who are locked in tight races.

“We want all sides to come together in peace and harmony — we can do it, we can do it. We can do it, it’ll happen,” Trump told the crowd. “There’s much we can do to bring our nation together. Those that are engaged in the political arena must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective.”

“Destructive arguments and disagreements have to stop. No one should carelessly compare political opponents to historical villains, which is done often,” Trump continued. “We’ve got to stop. We should not mob people in public spaces or destroy public property.”

The media also “has a responsibility to do more to set a civil tone,” Trump said, “and to stop the endless hostility and constant, negative, and oftentimes false, attacks and stories. Have to do it. They’ve got to stop.”

Several times during his speech, Trump told the crowd he was “trying to be nice” in light of the assassination attempts on his political rivals.

Indeed, the difference was striking, and the crowd responded in-kind to Trump’s subdued tone.

Several of the attack lines Trump has used during recent campaign rallies were missing from his remarks on Wednesday night, including his false claim that undocumented aliens are trying to vote in the midterm elections, and that Democrats want to destroy the nation’s communities and families.

Yet even as Trump sought to play down his hyper-incendiary tone, he still held fast to several of his most well-worn, and false, claims.

“Liberal Tammy Baldwin wants socialist health care,” Trump falsely claimed about the Wisconsin Democratic senator who is up for reelection this cycle.

“I’m trying to say that very nicely,” Trump added. “Normally I would scream ‘socialist takeover!’ But I’m trying to be nice.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-25  Authors: christina wilkie, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nicer, pipe, campaign, crowd, stop, bomb, attacks, adopts, trying, president, false, tone, trumps, wisconsin, trump, rally, political


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US warning individual Russians over midterm election interference

The American cyber campaign, waged by a component of the Department of Defense, is the first known international cyber operation designed to protect American elections. In a statement, Joseph Holstead, a spokesperson for the Cyber Command, declined to discuss “classified planning or operations.” The Justice Department has obtained indictments against dozens of Russian nationals, and a number of Russian organizations, accusing them of crimes related to election interference. The White House has a


The American cyber campaign, waged by a component of the Department of Defense, is the first known international cyber operation designed to protect American elections. In a statement, Joseph Holstead, a spokesperson for the Cyber Command, declined to discuss “classified planning or operations.” The Justice Department has obtained indictments against dozens of Russian nationals, and a number of Russian organizations, accusing them of crimes related to election interference. The White House has a
US warning individual Russians over midterm election interference Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: tucker higgins, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cyber, russians, operation, russian, elections, interference, command, election, intelligence, american, individual, midterm, warning


US warning individual Russians over midterm election interference

The U.S. Cyber Command has begun contacting individual Russians to deter them from interfering with upcoming American elections, including the November midterms, The New York Times reported on Tuesday, citing officials briefed on the matter.

American defense operatives are telling the Russians that they have been identified and that their work is being tracked. But they are stopping short of issuing direct threats of repercussions, according to the Times.

The limited operation is designed to scare the operatives to prevent election interference without provoking a reprisal from the Russian government that could escalate the situation, such as a cyber-attack on the power grid.

The American cyber campaign, waged by a component of the Department of Defense, is the first known international cyber operation designed to protect American elections. The next national races in the U.S. will take place November 6.

While the operation is seeking to deter disinformation efforts, it is not clear if it is aimed at more overt cybercrimes, like hacking.

During the 2016 presidential election, Russians accused of using several tactics to interfere in American elections, ranging from provocative posts on social media from fake accounts to hacking into the servers owned by the Democratic National Committee. The U.S. intelligence committee says there is no evidence that individual votes were altered due to hacking of election machines.

The defense officials who disclosed the current operation to the Times did not provide details about how the Cyber Command is contacting the Russians it is tracking, or how many individuals it has targeted.

Other officials, according to the newspaper, said that the operation was targeting suspected computer criminals working for organizations funded by wealthy Russians as well as those employed by the country’s intelligence services.

In a statement, Joseph Holstead, a spokesperson for the Cyber Command, declined to discuss “classified planning or operations.”

“The U.S. government leadership has made it clear that it will not accept any foreign interference, or attempts to undermine or manipulate our elections in any way,” he said. “This includes the whole of government effort to protect election infrastructure and prevent malign, covert election influence operations.”

Officials have grown increasingly worried about foreign efforts to sow discord in U.S. elections following an assessment from the intelligence community that concluded that the Russian government interfered with the 2016 presidential election.

The Justice Department has obtained indictments against dozens of Russian nationals, and a number of Russian organizations, accusing them of crimes related to election interference. No verdict has been reached in any of those cases.

Last month, John Bolton, the National Security Advisor, said that the White House had loosened up Obama-era restrictions on American cyber capabilities. In August, Trump signed a secretive order that apparently reversed a number of those restrictions and granted the government more leeway to go on the offense. The White House has also delegated more power to Gen. Paul Nakasone, who took over the Cyber Command in May.

On Friday, the DOJ brought its first case related to election interference in the upcoming midterms. The government accused Elena Khusyaynova of St. Petersburg, Russia, of participating in a conspiracy engaged in “information warfare against the United States” that aimed “create and amplify divisive social media and political content.”

Prosectors claim Khusyaynova is the chief accountant for a Russian company backed by the oligarch Yevgeniy Prigozhin, also known as “Putin’s chef,” and two companies that he controls. Those companies were named in a previous indictment obtained by the Justice Department.

In Congress, oversight of American efforts to rebuff Russian meddling has been led by the Senate Intelligence Committee.

The chair of that committee, Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., and its vice chair, Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., declined on Tuesday to confirm that the Cyber Command operation existed. But Warner said in a statement that the U.S. needs “an effective strategy to counter cyberattacks and influence campaigns conducted by other countries.”

“If carried out in the right way, raising the costs for countries, companies, or individuals who conduct such attacks would certainly fit into such a strategy,” he said.

Read the full story at The New York Times.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-23  Authors: tucker higgins, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cyber, russians, operation, russian, elections, interference, command, election, intelligence, american, individual, midterm, warning


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Trump blasts Democrats on immigration amid migrant caravan crisis

Amid worsening tensions in the White House over refugees from Guatemala and Honduras flocking to the border, Trump took to Twitter and blamed Democrats for being weak on border security. With the November midterms just 17 days away, Trump has become more vocal about the border crisis. I want to build a wall,” Trump told the crowd. Meanwhile, former Vice President Joe Biden was also in Nevada, headlining a get-out-the vote rally for Democrats in Las Vegas. Trump has reportedly become frustrated b


Amid worsening tensions in the White House over refugees from Guatemala and Honduras flocking to the border, Trump took to Twitter and blamed Democrats for being weak on border security. With the November midterms just 17 days away, Trump has become more vocal about the border crisis. I want to build a wall,” Trump told the crowd. Meanwhile, former Vice President Joe Biden was also in Nevada, headlining a get-out-the vote rally for Democrats in Las Vegas. Trump has reportedly become frustrated b
Trump blasts Democrats on immigration amid migrant caravan crisis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-20  Authors: matthew j belvedere, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images, reuters ueslei marcelino tpx
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrant, caravan, democrats, wall, amid, immigration, blasts, house, white, crisis, trump, president, rally, issue, border


Trump blasts Democrats on immigration amid migrant caravan crisis

President Donald Trump on Saturday launched a new salvo in the fierce battle over immigration, blasting Democrats for obstructing his efforts to secure the border as thousands of Central American migrants flooded the dividing line between the U.S. and Mexico.

Amid worsening tensions in the White House over refugees from Guatemala and Honduras flocking to the border, Trump took to Twitter and blamed Democrats for being weak on border security. Calling attention to the “horrors taking place on the border,” the president urged Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-New York, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-California, to work with the White House on a solution.

With the November midterms just 17 days away, Trump has become more vocal about the border crisis. At an election rally on Friday in front of thousands of supporters in Arizona, a state bordered by Mexico.

“Democrats want to throw your borders wide open to criminals. I want to build a wall,” Trump told the crowd. “The Democrats don’t care that a flood of illegal immigration is going to bankrupt our country.”

The president held a rally in rural Nevada on Saturday afternoon. Meanwhile, former Vice President Joe Biden was also in Nevada, headlining a get-out-the vote rally for Democrats in Las Vegas.

The president and Republicans are trying to fire up their base ahead of next month’s hotly-contested election, in an effort to stave off a possible “blue wave” that could see Democrats elected in large numbers.

Trump has reportedly become frustrated by efforts to stymie his tough stance on immigration, an issue that launched his 2016 election bid. Several publications this week reported an expletive-filled shouting match between White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and National Security Adviser John Bolton over the issue, sparking new concerns Kelly could resign.

In September, the president signed a spending bill to keep the government open, despite previously calling the measure “ridiculous” because it did not include funding for a wall along the southern border. White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told CNBC shortly after the House followed the Senate in passing the funding measure that the administration would take up the wall issue after the midterms.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-20  Authors: matthew j belvedere, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images, reuters ueslei marcelino tpx
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrant, caravan, democrats, wall, amid, immigration, blasts, house, white, crisis, trump, president, rally, issue, border


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