Trump vows to ‘reciprocate’ against EU tariffs after Harley reports nearly 27% drop in profit

President Donald Trump appeared to reverse course on Harley Davidson on Tuesday, pledging to retaliate against “unfair” European Union tariffs that the company partially blamed for its nearly 27% drop in first-quarter profit. Trump, who called for a boycott against the motorcycle company last year amid a spat over steel, said that the EU tariffs have forced Harley to move U.S. jobs overseas. Harley announced plans last year to move production of its motorcycles destined for the EU to overseas fa


President Donald Trump appeared to reverse course on Harley Davidson on Tuesday, pledging to retaliate against “unfair” European Union tariffs that the company partially blamed for its nearly 27% drop in first-quarter profit. Trump, who called for a boycott against the motorcycle company last year amid a spat over steel, said that the EU tariffs have forced Harley to move U.S. jobs overseas. Harley announced plans last year to move production of its motorcycles destined for the EU to overseas fa
Trump vows to ‘reciprocate’ against EU tariffs after Harley reports nearly 27% drop in profit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: emma newburger, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, nearly, reports, eu, drop, unfair, production, harley, jobs, steel, tariffs, vows, overseas, reciprocate, company, profit


Trump vows to 'reciprocate' against EU tariffs after Harley reports nearly 27% drop in profit

President Donald Trump appeared to reverse course on Harley Davidson on Tuesday, pledging to retaliate against “unfair” European Union tariffs that the company partially blamed for its nearly 27% drop in first-quarter profit.

Trump, who called for a boycott against the motorcycle company last year amid a spat over steel, said that the EU tariffs have forced Harley to move U.S. jobs overseas. “So unfair to U.S. We will Reciprocate!” he said in a tweet.

Harley announced plans last year to move production of its motorcycles destined for the EU to overseas facilities from the U.S. to avoid EU tariffs imposed in retaliation against Trump’s duties on aluminum and steel imports. In response, Trump called for a boycott of the company and threatened higher taxes as retaliation.

The White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment on Tuesday. Harley said it hasn’t moved jobs overseas due to tariffs, but moving production of EU motorcycles to their plant in Thailand, which came on late last year to support customers in the ASEAN region. No jobs were impacted here in the US as a result.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: emma newburger, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, nearly, reports, eu, drop, unfair, production, harley, jobs, steel, tariffs, vows, overseas, reciprocate, company, profit


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Trump touts paid family leave in budget. But questions linger

Last month, Ivanka Trump, advisor to the president, met with Republican senators on Capitol Hill to discuss family leave. The U.S. is one of the few developed countries without a national paid family leave program, according to the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington, D.C.-based think tank. Of all workers who take family leave, just 13 percent take paid leave, while 87 percent take unpaid leave. Most Americans — 74 percent — support 12 weeks of federal paid family leave for new parent


Last month, Ivanka Trump, advisor to the president, met with Republican senators on Capitol Hill to discuss family leave. The U.S. is one of the few developed countries without a national paid family leave program, according to the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington, D.C.-based think tank. Of all workers who take family leave, just 13 percent take paid leave, while 87 percent take unpaid leave. Most Americans — 74 percent — support 12 weeks of federal paid family leave for new parent
Trump touts paid family leave in budget. But questions linger Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: lorie konish, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, federal, program, according, greszler, support, questions, linger, touts, leave, family, budget, trump, benefits, workers, paid


Trump touts paid family leave in budget. But questions linger

The proposal also calls for a $1 billion fund that would be used to help workers and employers create child-care programs.

Last month, Ivanka Trump, advisor to the president, met with Republican senators on Capitol Hill to discuss family leave. That meeting included Sen. Marco Rubio, D-Fla., who previously proposed letting new parents use their Social Security benefit to finance their paid leave.

Democrats, for their part, have put forward their own proposal with the FAMILY Act, which would give families 12 weeks off following the birth of a child or to take care of their own or a family member’s health issues – something that is not addressed in the president’s proposed plan.

More than 24 states are already working on their own family leave policies, according to Vanessa Brown Calder, policy analyst at the Cato Institute, a Washington, D.C., think tank. “That seems to be already playing out with or without the White House getting involved,” Calder said.

The U.S. is one of the few developed countries without a national paid family leave program, according to the Heritage Foundation, a conservative Washington, D.C.-based think tank. Instead, U.S. workers rely mostly on state-based and private paid leave programs.

That leaves many Americans in the lurch, according to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Of all workers who take family leave, just 13 percent take paid leave, while 87 percent take unpaid leave. Accessibility of these benefits also varies depending on a worker’s wages, location and industry, the data show.

A big concern with creating a federal program is how it might affect employers who are already providing these kinds of benefits, said Rachel Greszler, research fellow at the Heritage Foundation.

“A lot of employers would interpret a federal program as providing coverage for family leave, and so they might not opt to start a new program that they otherwise would have, or they might opt to scale back or take back a program they already have,” Greszler said.

Currently, there are between $75 billion and $100 billion in paid family leave benefits provided in the private sector, according to Greszler. Yet those benefits mostly go to upper-income individuals.

Ideally, a federal program would make these benefits more accessible to lower-income individuals without disrupting the private paid leave programs that already exist – and passing on the costs of those benefits to taxpayers, Greszler said.

Americans are also concerned about who will pay for family leave programs, according to a December survey from Cato.

Most Americans — 74 percent — support 12 weeks of federal paid family leave for new parents or individuals with medical conditions, the survey found.

But that support drops falls once costs are mentioned. Cato’s research shows that 54 percent of individuals support a federal paid leave program if it meant they would have to pay $200 more in taxes per year. That falls to 48 percent if they had to pay $450 more in taxes annually and dips to 43 percent if their tax bill increased by $1,200 per year.

A large majority — 76 percent — do not want such a program if it means cutting funding to programs such as Social Security, Medicare or education.

In addition, 57 percent said they are against a federal paid leave program if it means increasing the federal deficit.

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Trump’s budget would end student loan forgiveness program


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: lorie konish, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Trump’s 2020 budget proposal promises paid parental leave, $1 billion childcare investment

The linchpin of the budget’s childcare proposal, as described within the document, is “a one-time, mandatory investment of $1 billion for a competitive fund aimed at supporting underserved populations and stimulating employer investments in child care for working families.” This requirement isn’t meant to alter things like child-to-caregiver ratios, but instead relax things such as zoning requirements that prevent child care centers in residential districts. Trump’s budget also pledged to provid


The linchpin of the budget’s childcare proposal, as described within the document, is “a one-time, mandatory investment of $1 billion for a competitive fund aimed at supporting underserved populations and stimulating employer investments in child care for working families.” This requirement isn’t meant to alter things like child-to-caregiver ratios, but instead relax things such as zoning requirements that prevent child care centers in residential districts. Trump’s budget also pledged to provid
Trump’s 2020 budget proposal promises paid parental leave, $1 billion childcare investment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, parents, billion, child, care, promises, trumps, leave, childcare, budget, parental, investment, proposal, paid


Trump's 2020 budget proposal promises paid parental leave, $1 billion childcare investment

Despite sharp spending cuts to domestic programs like education and environmental protection, President Donald Trump’s 2020 budget proposal, which he sent to Congress on March 11, calls for a sizable sum to be spent improving the availability and affordability of child care.

Trump’s record $4.75 trillion budget request, the largest in federal history, contains increased military spending, an additional $8.6 billion for construction of a border wall with Mexico, as well as $1 billion devoted to expanding childcare access.

The focus on childcare appears to be driven by his daughter and White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump, who held a West Wing listening session at the end of last month where she shared some details of the child care proposal outlined in this budget, according to NPR.

By including the measure, the White House is signaling that it wants in on political debates currently happening around an issue that costs families in 28 states more than a year of college tuition, according to Child Care Aware.

The linchpin of the budget’s childcare proposal, as described within the document, is “a one-time, mandatory investment of $1 billion for a competitive fund aimed at supporting underserved populations and stimulating employer investments in child care for working families.”

Under this plan, states apply for a share of that $1 billion pot and use the money to encourage employers to invest in child care, to support child care providers that operate during non-traditional hours, or provide child care support for parents enrolled in school.

To be successful, states would have to “establish targets for reducing unnecessary regulatory or other requirements that limit the supply or increase the cost of child care,” according to NPR. This requirement isn’t meant to alter things like child-to-caregiver ratios, but instead relax things such as zoning requirements that prevent child care centers in residential districts.

The project would be handled through the Child Care and Development Block Grant program, which Trump allotted $5.3 billion to for fiscal year 2020, or the same amount that Congress set aside in 2019. The $1 billion one-time fund be in additional to this sum.

Trump’s budget also pledged to provide paid parental leave to working parents, which would be another way the government could help parents offset some of the financial burden of childcare.

Listed as part of Trump’s plans for the Department of Labor, the funding of which he wants cut by $1.2 billion, or 9.7 percent, for 2020, is a proposal to give new mothers, fathers and adoptive parents paid family leave so that they can bond with their new child and recover from childbirth.

Despite the President’s backing of the idea, the federal government won’t play a role in shaping the details of such a policy, instead the budget says it will be up to the states to “establish paid parental leave programs in a way that is most appropriate for their workforce and economy.”

There is no mention of a set sum devoted to such goal or a fund, like with the childcare proposal, that states could apply for in order to create such programs.

Of course, while several Congress members share a desire for paid parental leave and more affordable child care, Trump’s “Budget for a Better America” is unlikely to pass the legislative body in its current form. Most presidential budgets are seen as policy statements and frequently ignored by Congress. Even when Republicans controlled both chambers, Trump’s failed to gain traction.

Already Democrat leaders in both the House and Senate have called Trump’s budget a “nonstarter,” thanks to its provision for border wall funding, increased military spending, cuts to Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security, and drastically reduced budgets for the Environmental Protection Agency, State Department, Transportation Department and Department of the Interior.

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Don’t miss: Childcare can cost more than a mortgage payment in 35 states—here are the 10 where it’s most expensive


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Democrats gear up for 2020 hiring blitz in crucial early primary state South Carolina

Democratic presidential hopefuls are on the verge of going on a hiring binge in the crucial early primary state of South Carolina as they look to staff up for a bruising 2020 campaign. “I anticipate in the next two or three weeks we will see an increase in staff,” Trav Roberston, chairman of the South Carolina Democratic Party, told CNBC. “We will be almost one year from a primary in South Carolina at that time. South Carolina is slated to hold its primary Feb. 29, 2020, following the first-in-t


Democratic presidential hopefuls are on the verge of going on a hiring binge in the crucial early primary state of South Carolina as they look to staff up for a bruising 2020 campaign. “I anticipate in the next two or three weeks we will see an increase in staff,” Trav Roberston, chairman of the South Carolina Democratic Party, told CNBC. “We will be almost one year from a primary in South Carolina at that time. South Carolina is slated to hold its primary Feb. 29, 2020, following the first-in-t
Democrats gear up for 2020 hiring blitz in crucial early primary state South Carolina Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: brian schwartz, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, early, blitz, democrats, primary, democratic, south, states, 2020, gear, crucial, strategy, staff, hiring, carolina, state, voting


Democrats gear up for 2020 hiring blitz in crucial early primary state South Carolina

Democratic presidential hopefuls are on the verge of going on a hiring binge in the crucial early primary state of South Carolina as they look to staff up for a bruising 2020 campaign.

One of the major players in the mix is former Vice President Joe Biden, who has yet to declare his candidacy but is considered the early frontrunner.

“I anticipate in the next two or three weeks we will see an increase in staff,” Trav Roberston, chairman of the South Carolina Democratic Party, told CNBC. “We will be almost one year from a primary in South Carolina at that time. I do get occasional questions if I’ve heard of people looking for opportunities. I forward their resumes to whoever I may know of that may work for their respective campaigns.”

South Carolina is slated to hold its primary Feb. 29, 2020, following the first-in-the-nation New Hampshire primary and the Iowa and Nevada caucuses earlier that month. Longtime South Carolina political consultants believe a victory in the state’s primary in 2020 could go a long way in determining the party’s eventual nominee.

“The voting demographics of primary voters in the state are very reflective of many of the state that follow and S.C. will serve as a real test of organizations strategy, bandwidth and staying power,” said Antjuan Seawright, South Carolina Democratic strategist and CEO of the firm Blueprint Strategy. “So we command the best, and that’s why you see candidates running political stop signs, and breaking speed limits to get here.”

The 2016 United States Census Bureau survey shows that a majority of South Carolina’s voting age population ranges from 45 to 64 years old. Sixty-nine percent of election participants are white, while 27 percent are listed as African-American.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: brian schwartz, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, early, blitz, democrats, primary, democratic, south, states, 2020, gear, crucial, strategy, staff, hiring, carolina, state, voting


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Firm owned by longtime Trump bodyguard received $225,000 from RNC

As former Trump campaign aide Michael Caputo told CNN at the time, “I think it’s a responsibility of everyone in the Republican Party to take care of the president and his family first. But unlike McEntee, he did not immediately return to the Trump campaign, where his most recent job outside of government had been. There, on November 7, 2017, Schiller reportedly denied a salacious allegation that Trump interacted with prostitutes during a 2013 trip to Moscow, on which Schiller had accompanied hi


As former Trump campaign aide Michael Caputo told CNN at the time, “I think it’s a responsibility of everyone in the Republican Party to take care of the president and his family first. But unlike McEntee, he did not immediately return to the Trump campaign, where his most recent job outside of government had been. There, on November 7, 2017, Schiller reportedly denied a salacious allegation that Trump interacted with prostitutes during a 2013 trip to Moscow, on which Schiller had accompanied hi
Firm owned by longtime Trump bodyguard received $225,000 from RNC Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-08  Authors: christina wilkie, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images, brendan smialowski, drew angerer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, longtime, bodyguard, schillers, owned, received, firm, rnc, 225000, house, campaign, legal, schiller, trump, committee, group, 2017


Firm owned by longtime Trump bodyguard received $225,000 from RNC

In late summer 2017, after eight months at the White House with Trump, Schiller was ready to move to Florida, make more money and get outside the Beltway, according to former White House aides. Inside the West Wing, Schiller also reportedly chafed under the newly imposed, top-down leadership style of then-chief of staff Gen. John Kelly.

At the same time, on Capitol Hill, the Republican National Committee was coming under pressure from Trump allies who wanted it to use its specially designated legal fund to help pay personal attorney fees for the president and his eldest son, Donald Jr., who were caught up in the early stages of the special counsel’s Russia probe.

As former Trump campaign aide Michael Caputo told CNN at the time, “I think it’s a responsibility of everyone in the Republican Party to take care of the president and his family first. They didn’t sign up for this bogus investigation and it’s our responsibility to protect him as much as we can.”

The RNC agreed to tap the fund. In August and September 2017, it spent more than $427,000 on lawyers for both men. But an uproar ensued when the RNC later reported the payments on its mandatory monthly campaign filings.

Even within the RNC, many staffers reportedly believed that the legal fund, originally created to pay for things like vote recounts, was never intended to pay anyone’s personal legal bills related to a criminal proceeding.

The last legal bill the committee paid for the Trumps was on Sept. 18, 2017, for Don Jr. Yet within days, the RNC quietly started paying three other Trump-related expenses, according to committee filings with the Federal Election Commission.

The first was a salary for John Pence, nephew of Vice President Mike Pence, who was earning around $12,000 a month from Trump’s re-election campaign.

Next came $37,500 a month in rent payable to the Trump Organization for office space in Trump Tower, which was used by the president’s re-election campaign.

Schiller officially left his job at the White House on Sept. 20. But unlike McEntee, he did not immediately return to the Trump campaign, where his most recent job outside of government had been. Instead, he landed at the RNC.

On October 4, 2017, one week after the Trump Tower rent payments started, the RNC cut its first check for $15,000 to Schiller’s KS Global Group for what it called “security services.”

The expense was disclosed by the committee on its next campaign filing in October, as required by law. But it went unnoticed by reporters for another three months.

One month after he was retained by the RNC, Schiller sat for an interview with the House Intelligence Committee, which had launched its own investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

There, on November 7, 2017, Schiller reportedly denied a salacious allegation that Trump interacted with prostitutes during a 2013 trip to Moscow, on which Schiller had accompanied him.

At the time of Schiller’s testimony, records show that KS Global Group had already collected $30,000 in fees from the RNC. Schiller had also moved to Boca Raton, Florida, full time, according to Florida state corporation filings. One week before he testified on Capitol Hill, Schiller had registered KS Global Group in Florida, and listed his home address as an apartment in Boca Raton.

The RNC wasn’t the only pro-Trump group helping Schiller to make ends meet, however. Also not yet reported at the time was the fact that Schiller’s lawyers were being paid, at least in part, by the Trump campaign. Between January and April 2018, the campaign paid more than $94,500 to Schiller’s attorney’s law firm, according to campaign finance reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-08  Authors: christina wilkie, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images, brendan smialowski, drew angerer
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Trump: ‘There’s a good chance we’ll have to’ declare a national emergency to build the wall

President Donald Trump on Friday said, “I think there’s a good chance we’ll have to” declare a national emergency in order to appropriate the funds to build his border wall. Asked Friday if he was concerned about courts halting an emergency declaration, Trump replied, “we have very, very strong legal standing to win,” adding it would be “very hard” for a court to enjoin the declaration. Recent polling shows little public support for Trump using a national emergency to access wall funds. Republic


President Donald Trump on Friday said, “I think there’s a good chance we’ll have to” declare a national emergency in order to appropriate the funds to build his border wall. Asked Friday if he was concerned about courts halting an emergency declaration, Trump replied, “we have very, very strong legal standing to win,” adding it would be “very hard” for a court to enjoin the declaration. Recent polling shows little public support for Trump using a national emergency to access wall funds. Republic
Trump: ‘There’s a good chance we’ll have to’ declare a national emergency to build the wall Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: christina wilkie, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, funding, wall, chance, build, declare, president, good, theres, declaration, emergency, trump, construction, national, funds


Trump: 'There's a good chance we'll have to' declare a national emergency to build the wall

President Donald Trump on Friday said, “I think there’s a good chance we’ll have to” declare a national emergency in order to appropriate the funds to build his border wall.

Trump wouldn’t say he would definitely declare it, but he told reporters that such a declaration “would help the process.”

The remarks came as a specially created committee in Congress is poised to spend the next two weeks trying to reach a compromise on border security before the current short-term government funding bill expires on Feb. 15.

If no deal is reached, then Trump could decide to either partially shut down the government for the second time this year, or potentially sign a bill funding federal agencies, and then use his executive powers to declare a national emergency on the southern border.

This could allow the president to commandeer funds that have already been appropriated by Congress for other purposes, such as disaster relief, and use them to pay for the construction of a wall.

But such a declaration would almost certainly be challenged in court. There, the administration could find it challenging to make the argument that the immigration situation on the southern border, which has not materially changed in several months, merits an emergency declaration only now, after Trump was unable to secure the needed funds from Congress.

Asked Friday if he was concerned about courts halting an emergency declaration, Trump replied, “we have very, very strong legal standing to win,” adding it would be “very hard” for a court to enjoin the declaration.

Trump also declared several times that the wall was already being built. He was presumably referring to stretches of both new wall and replacement wall that were approved and paid for last year with 2018 funding, but which are slated to begin construction later this winter.

“We’re building the wall, and we’re building a lot of wall,” the president said, “but I can do it a lot faster the other way.”

It was unclear what impact statements like these, which imply that the purpose of the national emergency would be merely to speed up construction, might have on the legal argument for a national emergency, if Trump were to declare one and it were to be challenged in court.

Trump has so far drawn a hard line in negotiations with Congress, saying he will not accept anything short of billions of dollars designated for the construction of a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has drawn a line, as well, telling reporters on Thursday, “there’s not going to be any wall money in the legislation.”

Recent polling shows little public support for Trump using a national emergency to access wall funds. According to a respected poll released Monday, only 34 percent of Americans back declaring a national emergency in order to use military funding for the wall, while almost twice as many respondents — 64 percent — oppose the idea.

Republican senators, including Marco Rubio of Florida and Chuck Grassley of Iowa, have also warned the president against declaring a national emergency. On Sunday, Rubio called it a “terrible idea.”

But at least one of Trump’s closest allies in the Senate, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, appeared ready to make the case to his fellow Republicans that a national emergency wasn’t merely an acceptable option, it was Trump’s only option.

“Republicans need to get behind President Trump emergency declaration to build wall/barrier,” Graham tweeted on Friday afternoon. “Looking like he has no other option.”

The building of a border wall was one of Trump’s core campaign promises in 2016, and his failure to do so could damage his support among his deeply loyal base. On the other hand, the past month’s battle over wall funding, and the historically long government shutdown Trump forced when Congress refused to appropriate the funds, have also hurt the president’s broader approval ratings.

— CNBC’s Jacob Pramuk contributed to this article.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: christina wilkie, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Palestinian PM calls out Trump’s disengagement with Palestine, says it’s ‘not encouraging’

Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah called out the international community and President Donald Trump for its weakened engagement with Palestine while at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Wednesday. Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble, the leader described recent U.S. policy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as “not encouraging.” Hamdallah pointed to Jerusalem as what he saw as a key example of the U.S. reneging on its commitments to pursuing a peace deal between Israel and Palestine. Th


Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah called out the international community and President Donald Trump for its weakened engagement with Palestine while at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Wednesday. Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble, the leader described recent U.S. policy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as “not encouraging.” Hamdallah pointed to Jerusalem as what he saw as a key example of the U.S. reneging on its commitments to pursuing a peace deal between Israel and Palestine. Th
Palestinian PM calls out Trump’s disengagement with Palestine, says it’s ‘not encouraging’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: natasha turak, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, referencing, disengagement, embassy, tel, palestinian, saw, policy, jerusalem, trump, trumps, settlement, encouraging, palestine, calls


Palestinian PM calls out Trump's disengagement with Palestine, says it's 'not encouraging'

Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah called out the international community and President Donald Trump for its weakened engagement with Palestine while at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Wednesday.

Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble, the leader described recent U.S. policy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as “not encouraging.”

Hamdallah pointed to Jerusalem as what he saw as a key example of the U.S. reneging on its commitments to pursuing a peace deal between Israel and Palestine. The Trump administration had pledged to accomplish a peace agreement under the leadership of Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner.

“Jerusalem was one final settlement issue, all of a sudden Mr. Trump has removed the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem,” the prime minister said, referencing the holy city over which both Israelis and Palestinians assert claims, and whose control and administration was meant to be negotiated as part of a “final settlement” deal.

In December of 2017, Trump announced he would move the U.S. embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, breaking with decades of U.S. policy and officially recognizing the city as the Israeli capital, a move met by swift criticism from the international community. The embassy’s inauguration in May saw violent clashes between Palestinian protesters and Israeli troops, with more than 50 Palestinians killed.

In addition to the controversial embassy move, Hamdallah cited the cut in support to aid programs for Palestinians.

“He (Trump) stopped funding UNRWA, which was established through the UN mandate,” he noted, referencing the administration’s announcement last August to end funding for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees, which provides social, healthcare, and educational services for more than 5 million people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: natasha turak, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Dow set to rise more than 150 points as United Tech, P&G jump on earnings

U.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open on Wednesday after the release of strong corporate earnings from companies like United Technologies and Procter & Gamble. ET, Dow Jones Industrial Average futures popped 147 points, indicating gain of 159.52 points at the open. Dow members United Technologies and Procter & Gamble rose 4 percent and 3.1 percent in the premarket, respectively, after both companies reported better-than-expected earnings. When commenting on the news, the White House


U.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open on Wednesday after the release of strong corporate earnings from companies like United Technologies and Procter & Gamble. ET, Dow Jones Industrial Average futures popped 147 points, indicating gain of 159.52 points at the open. Dow members United Technologies and Procter & Gamble rose 4 percent and 3.1 percent in the premarket, respectively, after both companies reported better-than-expected earnings. When commenting on the news, the White House
Dow set to rise more than 150 points as United Tech, P&G jump on earnings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: fred imbert, alexandra gibbs, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
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Dow set to rise more than 150 points as United Tech, P&G jump on earnings

U.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open on Wednesday after the release of strong corporate earnings from companies like United Technologies and Procter & Gamble.

Around 7:15 a.m. ET, Dow Jones Industrial Average futures popped 147 points, indicating gain of 159.52 points at the open. Futures on the S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 also pointed to solid gains.

Dow members United Technologies and Procter & Gamble rose 4 percent and 3.1 percent in the premarket, respectively, after both companies reported better-than-expected earnings. IBM, another Dow component, also jumped 6.6 percent on the back of its results.

The trading seen in futures comes after Wall Street closed its previous session lower. On Tuesday, the Dow snapped its four-day winning streak, closing down more than 300 points lower, as global growth fears added jitters to market sentiment.

Earlier this week, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced that it had revised down its estimates for global growth, projecting a 3.5 percent growth rate across the globe in 2019, and 3.6 percent for next year. The fund had already slashed its forecasts back in October, due to trade tensions, however issues still remain as the institution keeps its eye on other topics filled with uncertainty, such as Brexit. Weak economic data out of China didn’t ease fears either.

Meanwhile, investors continue to keep a close eye on trade negotiations with the Asian nation.

In the latest surrounding trade discussions, the White House has appeared to have rejected a trade planning meeting with its Chinese counterparts this week, as outstanding disagreements over the enforcement of intellectual property rules rumble on — this according to a source familiar with the situation.

When commenting on the news, the White House told CNBC Tuesday that “the teams remain in touch in preparation for high level talks with Vice Premier Liu He” at the end of January. Meantime, White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow refuted claims that an official meeting had been called off, adding that no intermediate gatherings had been scheduled other than the visit by Liu.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: fred imbert, alexandra gibbs, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, white, 150, earnings, tech, pg, jump, rise, technologies, dow, futures, points, set, house, week, trade, united


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White House chief economist: We could see ‘zero’ growth in first quarter because of shutdown

The chairman of President Donald Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers said Wednesday the United States could post no economic growth in the first quarter if the federal government does not reopen. “If [the shutdown] extended for the whole quarter, and given the fact that the first quarter tends to be low because of residual seasonality, then you could end up with a number very close to zero in the first quarter,” Kevin Hassett told CNN. Asked whether GDP growth could hit zero in the quarter, Has


The chairman of President Donald Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers said Wednesday the United States could post no economic growth in the first quarter if the federal government does not reopen. “If [the shutdown] extended for the whole quarter, and given the fact that the first quarter tends to be low because of residual seasonality, then you could end up with a number very close to zero in the first quarter,” Kevin Hassett told CNN. Asked whether GDP growth could hit zero in the quarter, Has
White House chief economist: We could see ‘zero’ growth in first quarter because of shutdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: thomas franck, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, trade, zero, united, shutdown, economist, president, house, quarter, hassett, federal, growth, chief, trumps, white


White House chief economist: We could see 'zero' growth in first quarter because of shutdown

The chairman of President Donald Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers said Wednesday the United States could post no economic growth in the first quarter if the federal government does not reopen.

“If [the shutdown] extended for the whole quarter, and given the fact that the first quarter tends to be low because of residual seasonality, then you could end up with a number very close to zero in the first quarter,” Kevin Hassett told CNN.

Asked whether GDP growth could hit zero in the quarter, Hassett said “Yes, we could.”

“But then again, the second-quarter number would be humongous if the government reopened. It would be like 4 or 5 percent,” Hassett said.

In recent decades, GDP growth in the first quarter has been notably weaker than growth in other quarters.

The federal government shutdown was in its 33rd day Wednesday, with little sign of relief for the roughly 800,000 federal workers going without pay. The Senate on Thursday is holding votes on competing GOP and Democratic proposals that would fund the government through Feb. 8. Neither measure is expected to pass because of the parties’ standoff over President Donald Trump’s demand for $5.7 billion for a wall along the Mexican border.

Hassett added later in the CNN interview that he believes the United States and China could reach a trade deal by the March 2 deadline.

Trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing have stretched for months amid their tit-for-tat trade war. The countries reached a truce following Trump’s meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Argentina on Dec. 1.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: thomas franck, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, trade, zero, united, shutdown, economist, president, house, quarter, hassett, federal, growth, chief, trumps, white


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Trump advisor Larry Kudlow: GDP damage from government shutdown is temporary

The Trump administration expects the partial government shutdown to hit gross domestic product growth, but thinks the economy will bounce back quickly after it ends, White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow said Tuesday. The White House now expects the funding lapse to sap 0.1 percentage points from GDP growth every week it lasts, double the administration’s initial estimate of the economic damage. While the effect on fourth-quarter 2018 GDP may prove small, the shutdown could knock a chunk off


The Trump administration expects the partial government shutdown to hit gross domestic product growth, but thinks the economy will bounce back quickly after it ends, White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow said Tuesday. The White House now expects the funding lapse to sap 0.1 percentage points from GDP growth every week it lasts, double the administration’s initial estimate of the economic damage. While the effect on fourth-quarter 2018 GDP may prove small, the shutdown could knock a chunk off
Trump advisor Larry Kudlow: GDP damage from government shutdown is temporary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: jacob pramuk, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kudlow, trump, temporary, gdp, damage, advisor, house, shutdown, slowdown, white, larry, closure, economic, workers


Trump advisor Larry Kudlow: GDP damage from government shutdown is temporary

The Trump administration expects the partial government shutdown to hit gross domestic product growth, but thinks the economy will bounce back quickly after it ends, White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow said Tuesday.

The closure, which started on Dec. 22, is in its 32nd day. About 800,000 federal workers have already lost one paycheck and will miss another on Friday amid an impasse over President Donald Trump’s proposed border wall.

The White House now expects the funding lapse to sap 0.1 percentage points from GDP growth every week it lasts, double the administration’s initial estimate of the economic damage. While the effect on fourth-quarter 2018 GDP may prove small, the shutdown could knock a chunk off first-quarter 2019 growth.

But Kudlow contended the economic disruption would be “temporary stuff.” He tried to tamp down concerns about wider economic problems in the U.S., as fears about a global economic slowdown intensify.

“I do not acknowledge that the fundamental economy has been adversely affect at all” by the shutdown, the National Economic Council director said.

He added: “You will see a snapback right away” when the closure ends.

Polls show Americans increasingly blame Trump for the closure as the economic burden on government workers mounts and services from airport security to food inspections and assistance programs for meals and housing are disrupted. The closure of about a quarter of the government could chip about a half a percentage point off GDP if it lasts the rest of the month, a White House official told CNBC.

In recent weeks, Kudlow has repeatedly shot down the notion of an economic slowdown or looming U.S. recession.

WATCH: Full interview with NEC Director Larry Kudlow


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: jacob pramuk, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kudlow, trump, temporary, gdp, damage, advisor, house, shutdown, slowdown, white, larry, closure, economic, workers


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