Netflix not concerned about lower prices, except in one huge market

If there’s a market where Netflix is concerned about plan pricing as Disney begins its big push into the video streaming market, it’s not the U.S. The struggle to get the Indian market right is not a new issue for Netflix, but it is one the company’s management team openly addressed on its Tuesday earnings call. Netflix is still one of the most expensive video streaming options in India. The Netflix Indian subscriber based has estimated by industry sources at 1 million, though the company has sa


If there’s a market where Netflix is concerned about plan pricing as Disney begins its big push into the video streaming market, it’s not the U.S. The struggle to get the Indian market right is not a new issue for Netflix, but it is one the company’s management team openly addressed on its Tuesday earnings call. Netflix is still one of the most expensive video streaming options in India. The Netflix Indian subscriber based has estimated by industry sources at 1 million, though the company has sa
Netflix not concerned about lower prices, except in one huge market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: noah higgins-dunn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, streaming, lower, netflix, huge, market, earnings, company, india, concerned, video, indian, million, prices


Netflix not concerned about lower prices, except in one huge market

If there’s a market where Netflix is concerned about plan pricing as Disney begins its big push into the video streaming market, it’s not the U.S. It’s India.

Netflix has raised its prices on plans in the U.S. and recently announced intentions to do the same in Brazil, Mexico and some countries in Europe, but it is struggling to lower its price tier in India as it looks to add more subscribers in a country that has more than 460 million internet users.

The struggle to get the Indian market right is not a new issue for Netflix, but it is one the company’s management team openly addressed on its Tuesday earnings call.

“We’re quite certain that we should do something to find a price tier that’s lower than the existing lowest price tier to broaden that accessibility,” said Netflix’s Chief Product Officer Greg Peters on the company’s Q1 earnings call. “We think that they’ll be important to adding members in India.”

Netflix is still one of the most expensive video streaming options in India. According to a recent Reuters report, the three Netflix monthly plans in India range from 500 rupees ($7.20) to 800 rupees ($11.50), significantly above the price points of Amazon Prime Video’s plan ($14 a year) and roughly twice as much as Hotstar, the country’s largest video streaming service, owned by Disney.

The Netflix Indian subscriber based has estimated by industry sources at 1 million, though the company has said it is aiming for 100 million subscribers in India.

In March, Netflix began offering a mobile-only test plan at roughly $3.60, based on current exchange rates. During the earnings call, Peters acknowledged that the plan is something the company is trying out, but isn’t “positive that’s the right model.”

Now upcoming streaming services could threaten to take a larger share of the market, like Disney and Apple. Netflix officials said on the earnings call that the increasing competition in the U.S. isn’t something the company can worry about too much.

Among the comments from Netflix CEO Reed Hastings on the earnings call:

“We can’t get obsessed about any one company.”

“It’s a mix of yes it’s competition, that hurts, but on the other hand it gets internet viewing more popular with everyone.”

“There is a lot of new and strengthening competition with Disney entering the market, HBO getting additional funding. … It is what it is; we’re not going to be able to change it.”

“There’s a ton of competition out there, and Disney and Apple add a little bit more, but frankly, I doubt it will be material because, again, there’s already so many competitors for entertainment time.”

Last year Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandostold CNBC that Asia’s young and increasingly digital population presents an “incredible opportunity” to ramp up the company’s international subscribers. The company hopes to add 100 million subscribers in India alone, which has proved its desire for video streaming by turning en masse to YouTube and other similar video services, Sarandos said.

A report by global management consulting firm Boston Consulting Group predicted the over-the-top, or OTT, market in India will grow to $5 billion in 2023, although last year it was estimated to be $500 million. Kanchan Samtani, a partner and managing director at BCG, noted the country has a price sensitive market and it’s challenging to break through the clutter.

Netflix has continued to push original content in India, and Sarandos said it was “super encouraged,” with Netflix India originals like “Sacred Games,” “Delhi Crime” and “Love Per Square Foot,” which have gained a lot of viewers in the country. On Monday, the company announced it would be adding 10 more original films to its roster that will be produced by Indian companies, and plans to release 15 total by the end of 2020.

International markets have spearheaded Netflix’s growth as it begins to slow down in domestic markets. The company beat estimates by adding 7.86 million international paid subscriber additions compared to the 1.74 million domestic additions. It has focused on localizing its content and moving away from dubbing.

The company has continued to spend on original content and has investors concerned over its free cash flow. The company reported a negative $380 million net cash flow, $93 million more than the same period last year, and the company expects its 2019 free cash flow deficit to be greater than the negative $3 billion previously expected.

“As we sort of have that ongoing content investment and we’re really providing stories that Indian consumers really love, it’s an opportunity for us to look at how we broaden the accessibility of the service then to more and more Indian consumers,” Peters said.

Shares of Netflix fell about 1% after reporting its first-quarter earnings after the bell Tuesday and teetered between positive and negative territory Wednesday morning. The company’s Q1 revenue, earnings and subscriber numbers beat Wall Street expectations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: noah higgins-dunn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, price, streaming, lower, netflix, huge, market, earnings, company, india, concerned, video, indian, million, prices


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If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users


While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users
If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


If you are a 'Game of Thrones' fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

“Skorverdon zaldrīzoti Daenerys ēza?”

Translation: How many dragons does Daenerys have? It’s not a ridiculous question if you’re a fan of the HBO hit series “Game of Thrones,” which returns for its eighth and final season on Sunday. The language? It’s called High Valyrian, the tongue of the ruined Valyrian Freehold empire, and it’s one of four languages created by linguist David J. Peterson spoken on the show.

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app.

Duolingo first offered lessons in High Valyrian in 2017 and, since then, 1.2 million people have started the course. In the last two weeks leading up to the premier of the final season, Duolingo has seen a near 65% increase in people taking the course, said Sam Dalsimer, a spokesman for Duolingo.

High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. Star Trek fans can find Klingon, a language constructed by Marc Okrand and centered around spacecraft, warfare and weaponry.

To offer languages on Duolingo, the company usually relies on hundreds of volunteers and employees to develop course material and monitor users’ experiences. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free.

“We teach over 30 languages and most have thousands of people who speak them and are capable of helping us teach them.” Dalsimer said. “There’s only one person on planet Earth who knows the language, and that’s David Peterson.”

The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. Martin. Peterson won a contest to develop the more common language used on “Game of Thrones” called Dothraki but was asked to build High Valyrian later in the series. His goal was to create a classic language that could give birth to many others, similar to Romance languages, and Peterson noted it had to fit with the names Martin created for the book, such as Daenerys, Viserys and Rhaella.

There are now 824 words of High Valyrian that users can learn on Duolingo, and that number continues to grow. Peterson said there are now 2,000 words in the full version of the language he maintains.

“With every single language I create I keep working on it for the rest of my life or until I’m not happy with it,” said Peterson, who has created more than 50 languages. “It will basically just be another one of my languages, it’s not like it’s going to get any special treatment.”

When Peterson first encountered Duolingo, he felt it could revolutionize the way people learned languages. It had a great interface, it was free and, as a linguist, it’s the dream for people like him to create languages people would have access to, although he didn’t foresee how popular High Valyrian would become.

Today, High Valyrian has 822,000 active learners, or those who have used the course in the last 12 months. That’s more than Czech, Norwegian, Vietnamese and Hungarian.

“I imagined it would attract casual interest, but I never imagined there would be that many people who would actually be interested in taking the course,” Peterson said.

There is one statistic Peterson is particularly proud of: 44% of users who came to Duolingo to learn High Valyrian went on to practice other languages. While users may not perfect High Valyrian, Peterson sees the language as a “gateway drug” to learners discovering other cultures.

“As we become more economically focused, people view language as a tool as opposed to an art piece in and of itself or cultural history,” Peterson said.

More than 40% of the world speaks one of eight languages, although there are more than 7,000 worldwide. UNESCO, The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, has labeled 2,680 languages in danger as it celebrates the International Year of Indigenous Languages, designed to raise awareness to disappearing languages.

“It’s nice that the UN is putting this emphasis on indigenous languages because people need to start addressing this issue,” Peterson said. “We’re losing them and we’re losing them quickly, and once they’re lost, they’re lost.”

Duolingo has worked with communities and volunteers like Peterson to develop courses in endangered languages, such as offering lessons in Hawaiian, Irish and Navajo, Dalsimer said.

“Those courses are driven entirely by volunteer contributors and for them it’s more about a desire to preserve their language and their culture because they see it as being endangered, and it is,” Dalsimer said. “Languages die every year and Duolingo can help them preserve it.”

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“I remember thinking that if David Peterson ever taught the ‘Game of Thrones’ language I would definitely check it out,” said Andrew Feinberg, a volunteer for Duolingo who has used the app since its beta version nearly seven years ago.

Except when Duolingo announced it would offer High Valyrian courses, Feinberg thought it was a joke. He helped Duolingo develop its Norwegian and Japanese platforms, and he’s witnessed the company’s pranks in the past, like when it offered pirate and zombie languages.

But Feinberg noticed the only contributor to the course was Peterson. That’s when he realized it wasn’t a joke.

Peterson, dubbed by the Los Angeles Times as “Hollywood’s go-to language guy” has created languages for many film and television projects, including the movies “Thor: The Dark World” and “Doctor Strange.”

“I had sort of stalked him on YouTube and watched all those videos on how he created those languages,” Feinberg said. “I was really excited for it. I knew that he was a serious linguist who had complimented Duolingo before.”

Now Feinberg manages learning groups on Facebook for Japanese, Chinese, Norwegian and, a day after its introduction, High Valyrian, which has amassed over 200 members learning alongside Peterson himself, who encourages people to use and develop the language in conversation with each other even if that means moving beyond what he imagined.

“It’s always a little different since I did create High Valyrian and, in a sense, there is an arbiter to determine what is right and what is wrong,” Peterson said. “But as long as I’m here I feel like not only do I want to, but I should be there to try to help people out.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


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Older workers are fastest-growing labor pool, and the least protected

The fastest-growing segment of the American workforce is employees age 65 and older. It is difficult for older workers to master the difficult interview process, and make discrimination claims once in a job. Older workers are encountering widespread age discrimination, according to AARP. “When it comes to age discrimination — stereotyping and comments — they seem too common.” Applicants and employees age 40 and older are protected from age discrimination in employment under the Age Discriminatio


The fastest-growing segment of the American workforce is employees age 65 and older. It is difficult for older workers to master the difficult interview process, and make discrimination claims once in a job. Older workers are encountering widespread age discrimination, according to AARP. “When it comes to age discrimination — stereotyping and comments — they seem too common.” Applicants and employees age 40 and older are protected from age discrimination in employment under the Age Discriminatio
Older workers are fastest-growing labor pool, and the least protected Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, klaus tiedge blend images, getty images, -shannon liss-riordan, boston-based employment lawyer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fastestgrowing, workplace, supreme, older, employment, discrimination, protected, pool, labor, workers, age, employees, way, study


Older workers are fastest-growing labor pool, and the least protected

The fastest-growing segment of the American workforce is employees age 65 and older. The reasons are many. Over the past decade, real wage growth has stagnated, pensions have disappeared, workers are delaying claiming Social Security benefits to maximize payouts, and lifespans are longer, leaving seniors worried they will burn through their retirement savings way too soon.

According to a Gallup 2018 survey of 1,015 adults age 18 and older across the United States, 41 percent of participants who are not retired plan to leave the job market at age 66 or older, a figure that has risen from 12 percent in the 1995 study and 26 percent in 2004. This number will likely keep growing.

Yet this hasn’t changed the way most companies talk about their hiring priorities.

Many firms today focus more intently on how to recruit and retain millennials, and they base success on the percentage of their workers that now come from this younger generation.

Some job postings mention a “maximum number of years experience” or use a date-of-birth dropdown menu without an applicant’s birth year listed. Words like “overqualified” can be code for too expensive. A corporate culture described as “fun” can suggest a workplace for the young. It is difficult for older workers to master the difficult interview process, and make discrimination claims once in a job.

Older workers are encountering widespread age discrimination, according to AARP. According to its 2018 Multicultural Work and Jobs Study, 61 percent of respondents over the age of 45 reported seeing or experiencing age-based discrimination in the workplace. What’s more, senior workers are in a weakened position when it comes to a crucial workplace protection based on a recent Supreme Court decision and the legal safeguards that shield against wrongful termination or demotion, like claims covered under the Civil Rights Act.

“It’s an open secret, and everyone knows it happens all the time, but few people stand up and say it’s wrong,” said Cathy Ventrell-Monsees, a senior attorney at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. “When it comes to age discrimination — stereotyping and comments — they seem too common.”

Applicants and employees age 40 and older are protected from age discrimination in employment under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, or ADEA, which was created in 1967 as an extension of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which doesn’t cover age discrimination.

A 2009 Supreme Court ruling in “Gross v. FBL Financial Services, Inc.,” however, set a higher bar for employees to prove that age was the deciding factor in an age discrimination claim that wasn’t applied similarly to race, color, religion, sex or national origin.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, klaus tiedge blend images, getty images, -shannon liss-riordan, boston-based employment lawyer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fastestgrowing, workplace, supreme, older, employment, discrimination, protected, pool, labor, workers, age, employees, way, study


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Snap’s improved quarter can’t hide ‘a deeper, way bigger issue’

Doug Anmuth, a J.P. Morgan internet analyst, cited management retention as one of the issues for caution over Snap’s future. She knows the company really well, has been with us for a long-time. So I think the teams really evolved and I think ready for the next stage of growth.” Spiegel replied, “On the senior team, we are really focused on the CFO role and also on the marketing role. In terms of Snap’s ability to recruit talent in the highest ranks of its company, Cappelli noted the company coul


Doug Anmuth, a J.P. Morgan internet analyst, cited management retention as one of the issues for caution over Snap’s future. She knows the company really well, has been with us for a long-time. So I think the teams really evolved and I think ready for the next stage of growth.” Spiegel replied, “On the senior team, we are really focused on the CFO role and also on the marketing role. In terms of Snap’s ability to recruit talent in the highest ranks of its company, Cappelli noted the company coul
Snap’s improved quarter can’t hide ‘a deeper, way bigger issue’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, matt winkelmeyer, getty images, source, marlene awaad, bloomberg, frederick florin, afp, todd haselton, albin lohr-jones
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, improved, hide, think, issue, wrote, bigger, snap, look, deeper, leadership, team, company, snaps, quarter, role, really, cant


Snap's improved quarter can't hide 'a deeper, way bigger issue'

Leadership turnover was not the No. 1 issue for analysts on the earnings call. There are core business challenges that remain, including Snap’s competition against Facebook apps. And its list of competitors is growing, according to the company’s own filings.

Bank of America’s Justin Post wrote after the earnings that the improvement was an important step but still “far from a victory.” He added, “Our survey work suggests Snap still has high levels of churn, while we continue to think Instagram and Whataspp will be difficult to displace in international markets even with an improved app.”

Leadership didn’t come up on the call until the tenth analyst in the queue got a chance to pose a question.

Doug Anmuth, a J.P. Morgan internet analyst, cited management retention as one of the issues for caution over Snap’s future. He asked Spiegel about Snap’s recruiting and retention efforts given recent departures.

On the continuing CFO search, Spiegel said, “I think as we look forward to CFO roles, a critical role for us, I think we are really fortunate to have Lara in the interim role right now. She knows the company really well, has been with us for a long-time. So that really gives us the flexibility to take our time with the search and really get it right.” He added, “I think if we look at this, the development over the leadership team over the last year, it’s made a massive difference in the business and also for me personally because now I’m freed up to do the things I really love to do on the product side. So I think the teams really evolved and I think ready for the next stage of growth.”

Snap declined to comment to CNBC beyond Spiegel’s answers on the call.

Jefferies’ Thill wasn’t satisfied by the Snap CEO’s answer, and he pressed the question about turnover later on the call.

“I just want to go back to the developing team and culture, there have been a lot of changes. I’m just curious if you could comment on what percent of the change you think you’re through in the senior team?”

Spiegel replied, “On the senior team, we are really focused on the CFO role and also on the marketing role. So those are the two priorities for me. Most of the changes we made over the past year, year and half as we look sort of forward towards the business scaling, I’m really happy with the way the teams come together and the way they’re working together. So those are related to focus areas for us.”

While the stock has doubled from its 52-week low, even with the rally on Wednesday Snap shares remain far below its $17 per share IPO offering price, and below its stock market high of $26 on its first day of trading after its March 2017 IPO.

Peter Cappelli, a professor of management and director of the center for human resources at The Wharton School, wrote in an email that a revolving door on the leadership level could signal lack of agreement between people in power. However, the skills needed to turn a start-up company into a mid-sized company can be different, and some could simply outgrow their leaders.

In terms of Snap’s ability to recruit talent in the highest ranks of its company, Cappelli noted the company could have some advantages over competitors. “I think the benefit for any executive is being able to work on something that is new and emerging and also to be able to put your stamp on something, to show that what you did really mattered,” Capelli wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, matt winkelmeyer, getty images, source, marlene awaad, bloomberg, frederick florin, afp, todd haselton, albin lohr-jones
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, improved, hide, think, issue, wrote, bigger, snap, look, deeper, leadership, team, company, snaps, quarter, role, really, cant


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American Airlines will let you stream Apple Music over in-flight Wi-Fi for free

The company announced Tuesday a partnership with American Airlines that will allow Apple Music subscribers to stream songs, playlists and music videos on any domestic flight equipped with ViaSat satellite Wi-Fi for free. This makes American the first commercial airline to provide exclusive access to Apple Music through complimentary Wi-Fi. “With the addition of Apple Music on American flights, we are excited that customers can now enjoy their music in even more places.” Earlier in January, Veriz


The company announced Tuesday a partnership with American Airlines that will allow Apple Music subscribers to stream songs, playlists and music videos on any domestic flight equipped with ViaSat satellite Wi-Fi for free. This makes American the first commercial airline to provide exclusive access to Apple Music through complimentary Wi-Fi. “With the addition of Apple Music on American flights, we are excited that customers can now enjoy their music in even more places.” Earlier in January, Veriz
American Airlines will let you stream Apple Music over in-flight Wi-Fi for free Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-30  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, special to cnbccom, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revenue, wifi, services, music, service, subscribers, let, free, app, stream, apple, airlines, american, inflight


American Airlines will let you stream Apple Music over in-flight Wi-Fi for free

Apple Music is taking flight in more ways than one.

The company announced Tuesday a partnership with American Airlines that will allow Apple Music subscribers to stream songs, playlists and music videos on any domestic flight equipped with ViaSat satellite Wi-Fi for free. This makes American the first commercial airline to provide exclusive access to Apple Music through complimentary Wi-Fi.

“For most travelers, having music to listen to on the plane is just as important as anything they pack in their suitcases,” said Oliver Schusser, vice president of Apple Music in a press release. “With the addition of Apple Music on American flights, we are excited that customers can now enjoy their music in even more places.”

Those who subscribe to Apple Music will be able to access the service on Apple devices equipped with the platform, including iPhones, iPads, Macs and Android phones. Those who don’t have a subscription, however, could sign up for a free three-month trial once on board. The new deal begins Friday.

“Our guests want to make the most of their time when flying us. That’s why we’re investing in faster Wi-Fi, a variety of entertainment options, and why we’re so excited to introduce Apple Music to more of our customers,” said Janelle Anderson, vice president of global marketing at American, in the press release.

Apple Music’s partnership with American comes months after integrating the service with the Amazon Echo. Earlier in January, Verizon announced its plans to include Apple Music subscriptions in some of its top-tier U.S. data plans.

Apple Music’s subscriber count still lags behind Spotify’s 87 million subscribers recorded last November. While Spotify has a free version of their service, Apple Music only has a three-month free trial.

During the company’s most recent earnings call, CEO Tim Cook said iTunes reached its highest quarterly revenue thanks to Apple Music, which now has over 50 million paid subscribers. The app helped Apple’s services revenue reach $10.9 billion in the December quarter, which is up 19 percent from the previous year.

“We not only generated our highest global services revenue ever, but we also had all-time records across multiple categories of services including the App Store, Apple Pay, cloud services and our App Store search ad business and we had a December quarter record for AppleCare,” Cook said during the call.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-30  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, special to cnbccom, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revenue, wifi, services, music, service, subscribers, let, free, app, stream, apple, airlines, american, inflight


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