Man who jet skis to work in NYC: ‘I’m just a regular guy who was fed up with his commute’

“I’m just a regular guy who was fed up with his commute and found a better way to get to work,” Pike says. Now his commute via jet ski takes as little as 7 minutes from dock to dock, and about 15 minutes total. Social chart title *Spread over three years kiersten schmidt/grow David PikeCommuting via jet ski, sadly, isn’t an option for most workers. Time savings: Whether a bike commute saves you any time depends on the quality of your city’s bike infrastructure. I’m just a regular guy who was fed


“I’m just a regular guy who was fed up with his commute and found a better way to get to work,” Pike says.
Now his commute via jet ski takes as little as 7 minutes from dock to dock, and about 15 minutes total.
Social chart title *Spread over three years kiersten schmidt/grow David PikeCommuting via jet ski, sadly, isn’t an option for most workers.
Time savings: Whether a bike commute saves you any time depends on the quality of your city’s bike infrastructure.
I’m just a regular guy who was fed
Man who jet skis to work in NYC: ‘I’m just a regular guy who was fed up with his commute’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: ben jay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commute, bike, way, guy, ski, man, jet, regular, skis, pike, work, costs, pretax, nyc, minutes, fed


Man who jet skis to work in NYC: 'I'm just a regular guy who was fed up with his commute'

The average American commute was a little more than 27 minutes each way in 2018, according to Census Bureau data. And the government has estimated almost 3% of workers, or about 4 million people, are “supercommuters” who travel 90 minutes or more to work. David Pike, owner of The New York Trolley Company, used to be one of these people. “I would take a shuttle bus to the PATH station in Jersey City,” Pike tells Grow. “I’d take a PATH train over to Manhattan. In Manhattan I’d catch a subway over to Brooklyn. And in Brooklyn, I’d either take a bus or I’d walk the 20 minutes to where my trolleys are parked.” As Pike got tired of chasing buses, he decided there had to be another way. So he bought a jet ski. “I’m just a regular guy who was fed up with his commute and found a better way to get to work,” Pike says.

Video by Jason Armesto The unusual strategy saves Pike both time and money. Although his home in Port Liberte section of Jersey City and his office in Red Hook, Brooklyn, are only about 2.8 miles (and 2.4 nautical miles) apart, Pike’s old commute took a whopping 90 minutes each way. Now his commute via jet ski takes as little as 7 minutes from dock to dock, and about 15 minutes total. Pike spent $1,000 on a used 1996 Yamaha jet ski on eBay. (Sea-Doo later gifted Pike a new jet ski, after word of his unique commute spread.) Even factoring in his start-up costs, he’s saving money. Pike estimates that his old commute, which entailed three different fares each way, cost $85 per week. Now the main expense is about $30 per week for gas, since he’s able to dock at both points for free.

Costly by land, cheaper by sea David Pike cut his commuting costs almost in half by switching to jet skiing to work. Social chart title *Spread over three years kiersten schmidt/grow David Pike

Commuting via jet ski, sadly, isn’t an option for most workers. Here are three more common ways you can save time and money on your way to work.

1. Ride your bike

Money savings: The costs of commuting by bike are almost entirely upfront, so long as you live within cycling distance of work. Maintenance is minimal, and the only fuel is whatever you ate for breakfast. All told, you could spend as little as $400 on a basic setup: $250 for a used bike on Craigslist, $50 for a helmet, $40 each for a basket and chain lock, and $20 for a pair of cheap lights if you plan on riding at night. To compare, a monthly unlimited MetroCard in New York costs $127. If you commuted by bike daily in the city, you’d break even after roughly three months. Even using a public bike share can still be cheaper. An annual membership with New York’s Citi Bike costs $169, or about $14 per month. That’s only about 11% of the cost of a monthly MetroCard. Depending on distance and terrain, your commute might also serve as a decent workout, possibly even enough to make you reconsider your gym membership. Time savings: Whether a bike commute saves you any time depends on the quality of your city’s bike infrastructure. On a typical day, my bike commute from my apartment in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, to midtown Manhattan takes about an hour, while the same trip on the subway could save me 20 minutes.

The author of this post, wishing he could wear spandex to his job in Montreal. Courtesy Ben Jay

Based on factors including safety and accessibility, these are the country’s best bike cities, according a 2018 Bicycling magazine report: Seattle, WA San Francisco, CA Fort Collins, CO Minneapolis, MN Portland, OR Chicago, IL Eugene, OR Madison, WI New York, NY Cambridge, MA

2. Take advantage of pretax commuter benefits

It’s common for companies to offer employees access to commuter benefit programs, which let you use pretax dollars out of your paycheck to cover commuting costs like public transit passes, parking fees, and even ride-sharing like UberPool. In 2019, the IRS-set limit is $265 per month. Let’s say you commute into Philadelphia. If you live in the city, the $96 cost of a monthly SEPTA Key fits well within that limit. Even if you’re commuting in from a South Jersey suburb like Pennsauken or Cherry Hill, the pre-tax benefit would cover the SEPTA pass and $126 in monthly NJ Transit fares. But how much can pretax commuter benefits actually save you? Say you earn $60,000 a year, which puts you in the 15% federal tax bracket. If you have an expensive commute and set aside $265 in pretax dollars each month, you’ll save $40 each month, according to a calculator from benefits administrator WageWorks. Over the course of a year, your savings add up to $477.

I’m just a regular guy who was fed up with his commute and found a better way to get to work. David Pike Owner, The New York Trolley Company

3. Carpool with your coworkers


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: ben jay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commute, bike, way, guy, ski, man, jet, regular, skis, pike, work, costs, pretax, nyc, minutes, fed


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Elaine’s ‘Seinfeld’ apartment building in NYC is on the market for over $8 million — take a look inside

Elaine Benes’ New York City apartment building from “Seinfeld” is on the market for $8.65 million — in reality it’s a townhouse that served as the exterior shot for Elaine’s home. In 1995, the home, which is in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood, was purchased by the current owners for $950,000, according to Realtor.com. “Seinfeld” began airing in 1989, and as the owners told The Wall Street Journal, many of the shots used for the show were taken before they moved in. “Maybe twice a month, someone


Elaine Benes’ New York City apartment building from “Seinfeld” is on the market for $8.65 million — in reality it’s a townhouse that served as the exterior shot for Elaine’s home.
In 1995, the home, which is in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood, was purchased by the current owners for $950,000, according to Realtor.com.
“Seinfeld” began airing in 1989, and as the owners told The Wall Street Journal, many of the shots used for the show were taken before they moved in.
“Maybe twice a month, someone
Elaine’s ‘Seinfeld’ apartment building in NYC is on the market for over $8 million — take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apartment, moved, wall, look, million, street, inside, building, shot, say, told, monson, nyc, owners, townhouse, market, elaines, seinfeld


Elaine's 'Seinfeld' apartment building in NYC is on the market for over $8 million — take a look inside

Elaine Benes’ New York City apartment building from “Seinfeld” is on the market for $8.65 million — in reality it’s a townhouse that served as the exterior shot for Elaine’s home. Elaine was played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

In 1995, the home, which is in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood, was purchased by the current owners for $950,000, according to Realtor.com. “Seinfeld” began airing in 1989, and as the owners told The Wall Street Journal, many of the shots used for the show were taken before they moved in.

“They had to come back and do footage for the final episode of Seinfeld shortly after we moved in because they discovered in their archives they didn’t have a night shot of our house,” one of the owners, Lori Monson, told The Wall Street Journal.

“Maybe twice a month, someone would walk by, and they’d say, ‘Is this Elaine’s house?’ I would go, ‘How would you know that?'” Monson told the Journal. “Maybe, I’d say, about 10 years ago, it stopped.”

The 4,730-square-foot townhouse has six bedrooms and four full bathrooms. Take a look inside.

Yoo Jean Han for Sotheby’s International Realty

Built in 1839, the first floor has hand-carved moldings, mahogany doors with original hardware and marble fireplaces.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apartment, moved, wall, look, million, street, inside, building, shot, say, told, monson, nyc, owners, townhouse, market, elaines, seinfeld


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Inside Elaine’s ‘Seinfeld’ NYC townhouse listed for $8 million

1 Hour AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Take a look inside the $8 million NYC townhouse that was used as the exterior of Elaine Benes’ apartment in “Seinfeld.”


1 Hour AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser.
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Take a look inside the $8 million NYC townhouse that was used as the exterior of Elaine Benes’ apartment in “Seinfeld.”
Inside Elaine’s ‘Seinfeld’ NYC townhouse listed for $8 million Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, browser, site, try, enabled, million, inside, flash, view, plugin, nyc, used, townhouse, listed, elaines, seinfeld


Inside Elaine's 'Seinfeld' NYC townhouse listed for $8 million

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To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Take a look inside the $8 million NYC townhouse that was used as the exterior of Elaine Benes’ apartment in “Seinfeld.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17
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See inside Tommy Hilfiger’s NYC penthouse

See inside Tommy Hilfiger’s NYC penthouse2 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Fashion mogul Tommy Hilfiger and his wife Dee Ocleppo have just sold their Plaza Hotel penthouse in New York City at a deep discount.


See inside Tommy Hilfiger’s NYC penthouse2 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser.
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Fashion mogul Tommy Hilfiger and his wife Dee Ocleppo have just sold their Plaza Hotel penthouse in New York City at a deep discount.
See inside Tommy Hilfiger’s NYC penthouse Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: source, tommy, dee hilfiger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, penthouse, browser, nyc, enabled, try, hilfigers, view, inside, site, sold, york, flash, wife, tommy


See inside Tommy Hilfiger's NYC penthouse

See inside Tommy Hilfiger’s NYC penthouse

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Fashion mogul Tommy Hilfiger and his wife Dee Ocleppo have just sold their Plaza Hotel penthouse in New York City at a deep discount.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: source, tommy, dee hilfiger
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Tommy Hilfiger wanted $80 million for his NYC penthouse but just sold it for $31.25 million—take a look inside

Fashion mogul Tommy Hilfiger and his wife Dee Ocleppo have sold their penthouse at The Plaza hotel in Manhattan at a deep discount. Hilfiger sold the property for $31.25 million. Before Hilfiger sold it, he gave CNBC a tour of the penthouse in 2017. “The plaza is one of the most iconic buildings in New York, maybe the world,” Hilfiger told CNBC during the tour. Hilfiger said he bought two apartments at The Plaza (reportedly for $25.5 million in 2008) and combined them.


Fashion mogul Tommy Hilfiger and his wife Dee Ocleppo have sold their penthouse at The Plaza hotel in Manhattan at a deep discount.
Hilfiger sold the property for $31.25 million.
Before Hilfiger sold it, he gave CNBC a tour of the penthouse in 2017.
“The plaza is one of the most iconic buildings in New York, maybe the world,” Hilfiger told CNBC during the tour.
Hilfiger said he bought two apartments at The Plaza (reportedly for $25.5 million in 2008) and combined them.
Tommy Hilfiger wanted $80 million for his NYC penthouse but just sold it for $31.25 million—take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: christopher dilella
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yearshilfiger, penthouse, nyc, plaza, wanted, inside, tour, million, york, tommy, world, look, sold, hilfiger, milliontake


Tommy Hilfiger wanted $80 million for his NYC penthouse but just sold it for $31.25 million—take a look inside

Fashion mogul Tommy Hilfiger and his wife Dee Ocleppo have sold their penthouse at The Plaza hotel in Manhattan at a deep discount.

The home was originally listed in 2013 for $80 million and had a series of price reductions over the years.

Hilfiger sold the property for $31.25 million.

Before Hilfiger sold it, he gave CNBC a tour of the penthouse in 2017. Take a look inside.

“The plaza is one of the most iconic buildings in New York, maybe the world,” Hilfiger told CNBC during the tour. Hilfiger said he bought two apartments at The Plaza (reportedly for $25.5 million in 2008) and combined them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: christopher dilella
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yearshilfiger, penthouse, nyc, plaza, wanted, inside, tour, million, york, tommy, world, look, sold, hilfiger, milliontake


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How Supreme went from a small NYC skateboard shop to a $1 billion global phenomenon

4 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Apparel brand Supreme started as a small and edgy New York City skateboard shop in 1994, and with word of mouth marketing and a product-scarcity strategy, it has grown into a global brand with a cult following and a billion-dollar valuation.


4 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Apparel brand Supreme started as a small and edgy New York City skateboard shop in 1994, and with word of mouth marketing and a product-scarcity strategy, it has grown into a global brand with a cult following and a billion-dollar valuation.
How Supreme went from a small NYC skateboard shop to a $1 billion global phenomenon Cached Page below :
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How Supreme went from a small NYC skateboard shop to a $1 billion global phenomenon

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To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Apparel brand Supreme started as a small and edgy New York City skateboard shop in 1994, and with word of mouth marketing and a product-scarcity strategy, it has grown into a global brand with a cult following and a billion-dollar valuation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10
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How Supreme went from a small NYC skateboard shop to a $1 billion global phenomenon

Supreme is the rare brand that can inspire the same level of extreme devotion from private equity billionaires and streetwear aficionados. Billing himself as the “world’s #1 Supreme collector” on an Instagram account where he boasts nearly 140,000 followers, Migraine now owns a massive collection of Supreme products. Supreme collector Joe Migraine displays some of the items he’s bought from the brand over several years. Supreme Italia was forced to withdraw from the Italian market, however it is


Supreme is the rare brand that can inspire the same level of extreme devotion from private equity billionaires and streetwear aficionados. Billing himself as the “world’s #1 Supreme collector” on an Instagram account where he boasts nearly 140,000 followers, Migraine now owns a massive collection of Supreme products. Supreme collector Joe Migraine displays some of the items he’s bought from the brand over several years. Supreme Italia was forced to withdraw from the Italian market, however it is
How Supreme went from a small NYC skateboard shop to a $1 billion global phenomenon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brands, nyc, global, billion, skateboard, went, brand, migraine, supremes, items, shop, phenomenon, company, line, small, fashion, products, supreme


How Supreme went from a small NYC skateboard shop to a $1 billion global phenomenon

Supreme is the rare brand that can inspire the same level of extreme devotion from private equity billionaires and streetwear aficionados. The 25-year-old skateboarding and apparel brand is famously shy about publicity and it only has 11 stores (soon to be 12) around the world. But that doesn’t stop throngs of fans and “hypebeasts” (the term for the streetwear-obsessed) from lining up for hours at a time for the mere hint of an opportunity to buy the latest items to have a red and white “Supreme” box logo slapped on them. That’s because the brand has managed to amass a growing following even as it’s come to symbolize the ultimate in underground cool. It’s exactly that sort of rabid loyalty that spurred a reported $500 million investment (for a roughly 50% stake), valuing the company at $1 billion, from The Carlyle Group in 2017. (Supreme is a private company and does not report revenue, but the company was projected to hit $100 million in annual revenue in 2017, the year of the Carlyle investment, Women’s Wear Daily reported at the time. Supreme declined interview requests for this article.) But Carlyle’s investment still had some wondering exactly how a marketing-shy skateboard shop with a cult following fits in the portfolio of a private equity giant that’s previously invested in the likes of car rental giant Hertz, consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton and Dunkin’ Donuts fast-food chain operator Dunkin’ Brands.

Starting small

Supreme launched in 1994, when designer James Jebbia opened an unassuming skateboard shop-slash-clothing store on Lafayette Street in SoHo, the heart of New York City’s hip fashion scene. Jebbia, who had previously worked with skateboarder and designer Shawn Stussy, has said he was drawn to the edgy and effortlessly cool style of the young skaters he knew in the city. The Supreme brand even sponsors a team of professional skaters that originally included skateboarders and actors Justin Pierce and Harold Hunter, who both starred in the 1995 cult classic film “Kids” — a controversial movie that both drew on skating culture and fashion of the mid-90s, while itself influencing both. When the first Supreme store opened, the first employees were extras from the movie “Kids,” according to Vogue. Over the past 25 years, the brand has expanded at a snail’s pace, reluctant to relinquish Supreme’s standing as a symbol of the underground, in-the-know streetwear fashion scene. It was a decade before Supreme opened a second location, in Los Angeles, and today the brand has two stores in New York City, six in Japan and outposts in Paris and London, while a location in San Francisco is planned for later in 2019). Along the way, Supreme’s fashion world street cred has been bolstered by high-profile collaborations with the likes of luxury fashion house Louis Vuitton as well as iconic global brands like Nike, Vans and Levi’s. “Over the years, they’ve worked with all kinds of different artists, all kinds of different brands, and it’s part of what makes the brand so cool,” Justin Gage, a data scientist and streetwear analyst, tells CNBC Make It. Gage adds that Supreme’s collaborations with high-end luxury brands like Louis Vuitton and Gucci “really push the boundaries” of how consumers view skateboarding culture. And whether Supreme is releasing a new line of its own apparel and accessories, or if Jebbia’s company is dropping new items from its latest big-name collaboration, it’s become commonplace for Supreme fans — dubbed “Supreme-heads” — to line up for hours on end outside a store for product release events that sometimes sell out in a matter of minutes. Supreme shoppers at these events will pay anywhere from $30 to $100 for a shirt or a hat, and from $150 to over $450 for a jacket. Joe Migraine (a pseudonym, for privacy reasons) is a Supreme super-fan who also works full-time on the streetwear unit at the website StockX, an online marketplace for re-selling high-end fashion products. Migraine has been collecting clothing and other items made by Supreme since roughly 2011. He recently told CNBC Make It about the rigorous process he had to go through just to secure a spot in line at a recent Supreme product drop event in New York City. “If you want to attend an in-store release … you have to register online for that in-store release,” Migraine says. “Those registries close very, very quickly. It’s very, very difficult to register for a drop, generally because so many people are trying to go for it and they will close the page down as soon as it fills up.” If you do manage to get registered to attend an event, Migraine continues, you’ll likely get a text message confirmation and then Supreme will tell you what time to come to the store to wait in line. “You show up at that time with the credit card and photo I.D. that you used to register. And then you can possibly wait in line for up to three to four hours just to get inside,” Migraine says. In this case, Migraine traveled to New York City from his home in Detroit to wait in line for about six hours on a hot August afternoon. He ended up spending about $3,000, he tells CNBC Make It, on a variety of items that included about eight t-shirts, six bags, seven skateboard decks, a few key chains and pins and one Supreme-branded Pyrex measuring cup. Billing himself as the “world’s #1 Supreme collector” on an Instagram account where he boasts nearly 140,000 followers, Migraine now owns a massive collection of Supreme products.

Supreme collector Joe Migraine displays some of the items he’s bought from the brand over several years. Source: Joe Migraine Instagram @joemigraine

A cult following, inspiring knock-offs

Supreme fans jump through hoops for the opportunity to pay up to $100 for a Supreme t-shirt, nearly $340 for a wool varsity jacket or even almost $200 for a Supreme table tennis set. But what do Supreme-heads do if they can’t secure a spot in the line to get those items before they sell out? That’s where Supreme’s extremely active resale market heats up, with sites like StockX and other resellers listing sold-out items for resale at astronomical markups, like a t-shirt featuring Supreme’s simple red box logo that sells for an average price of more than $900 over the past year on StockX. The shirt previously retailed for just over $30 through Supreme. For Migraine, the reason he obsesses over collecting Supreme items over those released by other fashion brands has to do, in part, with his respect for Supreme’s backstory, growing its clout from a small skateboard shop to a global brand over decades. He’s also enamored with the wide variety of pop culture references touted in many Supreme products, which recently featured shirts paying homage to iconic art-house rockers The Velvet Underground, while past product lines included references to cultural icons ranging from Miles Davis to The Muppets to the artist Jean-Michel Basquiat.

“I really think a great aspect of what they’re doing is they’re educating people. You know, they have a younger audience base and they’re educating people on art, on music and on fashion,” he tells CNBC Make It. “They’re educating the youth of [today] as to what’s cool, what’s relevant and what they need to know about.” In fact, the Supreme brand is so sought after that the company also faces a problem with copyright infringement stemming, in part, from the fact that Supreme was unable to trademark its brand until 2012 due to the brand name’s similarity to too many other products and brands with “Supreme” in the title. (“Supreme wasn’t meant to be a brand … It’s a good name, but it’s a difficult one to trademark,” Jebbia told Interview magazine in 2009.) Supreme also won a lawsuit in Italian court in 2018, against a company called “Supreme Italia,” which sold what trademark lawyers called “legal fake” products that closely resemble Supreme’s products, right down to the red box logos with the word “Supreme.” Supreme Italia was forced to withdraw from the Italian market, however it is still selling knock-off Supreme items in other countries, including Spain and China, according to The Wall Street Journal. Marketing research company SEMrush found that Supreme topped its list of brands with the most online searches for fake and replica products in both 2017 and 2018.

Managing the hype

One explanation for Supreme’s popularity with young consumers — enough so to make them line up for hours at a time — has to do with the idea that the brand’s products are “emblematic of rebellious youth culture,” according to Gage. “I would call it a brand that’s heavily integrated with art and culture that tends to drive demand through consumer desire and consumer passion as opposed to explicit marketing.” In fact, Supreme barely markets itself at all. “Supreme has become successful in marketing their brand, paradoxically, by not marketing their brand,” Gage tells CNBC Make It. “They don’t invest in paid marketing at all to the same degree that most apparel or media companies do. What makes them really successful is the community that they’re part of and that they’ve built.” However, in its own way, Supreme has found a way to use the brand’s own mystique to generate hype that has helped the underground brand gain a global following. “The magic lies in their ability to take word-of-mouth marketing and turn the launches of their products into sort of micro-experiential events,” Cliff Sloan, a branding expert and founder of marketing agency Phil & Co., tells CNBC Make It about Supreme. “And that means that people have to go to places, buy tickets, get on lists, end up lining up outside stores. That ends up generating a lot of buzz, a lot of curiosity to the public.” Supreme also generates buzz with a never-ending lineup of branded curiosities — items no one would normally expect to see sold by a skateboard or streetwear brand, but when slapped with Supreme’s unmistakable red and white logo, they instantly become must-have products for the most ardent Supreme fans. The company has sold everything from Supreme-branded hammers, nunchucks, and kayaks to a Supreme brick (literally a red clay brick stamped with the Supreme logo). Many of those oddball items are still available to buy second-hand online, where a Supreme brick can sell for $130 on StockX. “At some point they realize that their demand is so strong that they can literally manufacture anything and people will still buy it because the brand is so strong,” says Gage. The brand even recently teased a Supreme-branded dirt bike through a partnership with Honda and Fox Racing.

The more random a Supreme item may seem, the more sought after it’s likely to be by the biggest Supreme fans. “Some items are easier to get than others, but the ones that are really fun are those ones where they really go out on a limb, whether it’s a kayak or a motorcycle or a full sized mountain bike,” Migraine tells CNBC Make It about Supreme’s most surprising products. “You know, those are the fun ones.”

Private equity influence?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brands, nyc, global, billion, skateboard, went, brand, migraine, supremes, items, shop, phenomenon, company, line, small, fashion, products, supreme


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Floating NYC art installation shows East River’s pollution level

But a new art installation, which provides real-time data on the cleanliness of the water, is aiming to show that it might not actually be all that bad. They glow blue when the water is safe to swim in, and pink when it’s not. The direction with which the lights illuminate is based the movement of the water’s current, and the speed with which the lights move is determined by the water’s velocity. It’s part of +POOL’s grander ambition of building a public swimming pool within the East River, whic


But a new art installation, which provides real-time data on the cleanliness of the water, is aiming to show that it might not actually be all that bad. They glow blue when the water is safe to swim in, and pink when it’s not. The direction with which the lights illuminate is based the movement of the water’s current, and the speed with which the lights move is determined by the water’s velocity. It’s part of +POOL’s grander ambition of building a public swimming pool within the East River, whic
Floating NYC art installation shows East River’s pollution level Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lights, york, shows, based, pollution, quality, art, installation, level, waters, change, east, rivers, nyc, floating, series, pool, water


Floating NYC art installation shows East River's pollution level

But a new art installation, which provides real-time data on the cleanliness of the water, is aiming to show that it might not actually be all that bad.

The installation, created by PLAYLAB Inc., Family New York and Friends of +POOL and funded by Heineken, The Howard Hughes Corporation and the National Endowment for the Arts, is a 50 x 50-foot plus sign composed of a series of LED lights that change color based on the water quality. They glow blue when the water is safe to swim in, and pink when it’s not. The direction with which the lights illuminate is based the movement of the water’s current, and the speed with which the lights move is determined by the water’s velocity.

The “+” design of POOL+ Light symbolizes “the positive steps we have taken to improve water quality since the Clean Water Act of 1972,” according to the installation’s website, and it’s also “a symbol of inclusivity in that the water that surrounds us belongs to no one single group, but to everyone.”

The sculpture is located off lower Manhattan’s Pier 17. It’s part of +POOL’s grander ambition of building a public swimming pool within the East River, which has faced a series of roadblocks since the idea was initially proposed in 2010.

Friends of +Pool managing director Kara Meyer believes the timing of the installation was fortuitous, given the growing emphasis on how society interacts with the natural resources that surround us, all within the broader conversation about climate change.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lights, york, shows, based, pollution, quality, art, installation, level, waters, change, east, rivers, nyc, floating, series, pool, water


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UMB Bank and DC are offering a new rewards credit card—just in time for NYC Comic Con

It’s perfect timing for UMB Bank and DC to release the DC Power Visa Credit Card, with seven unique cards celebrating iconic characters and DC milestones. The unique designs include DC favorites: Batman, Wonder Woman, the Justice League, Superman, The Flash and Harley Quinn. Source: All DC characters and elements © & ™ DC Comics. (s19)The DC Power Visa Credit Card offers competitive rewards on entertainment spending with 3X points per dollar on popular entertainment categories: movie theaters, s


It’s perfect timing for UMB Bank and DC to release the DC Power Visa Credit Card, with seven unique cards celebrating iconic characters and DC milestones. The unique designs include DC favorites: Batman, Wonder Woman, the Justice League, Superman, The Flash and Harley Quinn. Source: All DC characters and elements © & ™ DC Comics. (s19)The DC Power Visa Credit Card offers competitive rewards on entertainment spending with 3X points per dollar on popular entertainment categories: movie theaters, s
UMB Bank and DC are offering a new rewards credit card—just in time for NYC Comic Con Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, umb, offering, visa, dollar, bank, entertainment, unique, cardjust, rewards, theres, points, credit, comics, nyc, card, comic


UMB Bank and DC are offering a new rewards credit card—just in time for NYC Comic Con

Thousands of fans are getting ready to convene in the city for New York City Comic Con, four days of jam-packed events celebrating comics, anime, movies and more. It’s perfect timing for UMB Bank and DC to release the DC Power Visa Credit Card, with seven unique cards celebrating iconic characters and DC milestones.

Applicants can choose which card design they want during the application process. The unique designs include DC favorites: Batman, Wonder Woman, the Justice League, Superman, The Flash and Harley Quinn. In addition, there’s a limited-edition version of the Batman card that has a vertical design and celebrates the comic’s 80th anniversary.

Source: All DC characters and elements © & ™ DC Comics. (s19)

The DC Power Visa Credit Card offers competitive rewards on entertainment spending with 3X points per dollar on popular entertainment categories: movie theaters, streaming services, digital media (such as books, movies and music) and cable and internet bills. Plus earn 2X points per dollar on dining and gas and 1X points per dollar everywhere else Visa is accepted.

Points can be redeemed for a statement credit, travel, experiences, gift cards, merchandise, entertainment and more.

In addition, there’s a welcome bonus for new cardholders: Receive a $50 Fandango promo code after you spend $500 within 90 days of account opening. This is a great way to cover the cost of upcoming movie tickets.

Cardholders can also benefit from DC-centric perks provided through UltimateHero Rewards:

10% off a DC Universe annual subscription

10% off purchases at ShopDCEntertainment.com

20% off Warner Bros. Studio Tour Hollywood and merchandise

If you’re a DC fan, this card can help you enjoy special discounts on eligible DC purchases while also earning competitive entertainment rewards — all at no annual fee. For more details, see rates and fees.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, umb, offering, visa, dollar, bank, entertainment, unique, cardjust, rewards, theres, points, credit, comics, nyc, card, comic


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Tom Hanks worked as an unpaid intern and slept on a friend’s couch in NYC before he got famous

Hanks started as an unpaid intern and later joined the ranks of the ensemble as an actor alongside Maguire and McGann. “[T]hey were the professionals I admired, examples of the kind of actor I wanted to be — and the kind of human being I hoped to become,” Hanks wrote. “MichaelJohn typed up my résumé on his battleship of a Royal typewriter (which he has since given me),” Hanks wrote. “I had never done my taxes before,” Hanks wrote. Today, at 63, Hanks has won two Academy Awards and was given the


Hanks started as an unpaid intern and later joined the ranks of the ensemble as an actor alongside Maguire and McGann. “[T]hey were the professionals I admired, examples of the kind of actor I wanted to be — and the kind of human being I hoped to become,” Hanks wrote. “MichaelJohn typed up my résumé on his battleship of a Royal typewriter (which he has since given me),” Hanks wrote. “I had never done my taxes before,” Hanks wrote. Today, at 63, Hanks has won two Academy Awards and was given the
Tom Hanks worked as an unpaid intern and slept on a friend’s couch in NYC before he got famous Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, actor, tom, famous, unpaid, maguire, given, hanks, kind, worked, friends, won, moment, slept, wrote, couch, mcgann, nyc, intern, york


Tom Hanks worked as an unpaid intern and slept on a friend's couch in NYC before he got famous

Tom Hanks credits much of his success today to his two friends: George Maguire and MichaelJohn McGann, the actor wrote in a new essay for AARP the Magazine,

The three met working in Cleveland with the Great Lakes Shakespeare Festival ensemble in the late 1970s. Hanks started as an unpaid intern and later joined the ranks of the ensemble as an actor alongside Maguire and McGann.

“[T]hey were the professionals I admired, examples of the kind of actor I wanted to be — and the kind of human being I hoped to become,” Hanks wrote.

Before Hanks became one of the highest-grossing actors of all time, he went through a period of unemployment, and relied on Maguire and McGann for advice. They suggested he move to New York City, as they had done, to pursue his dream career in acting.

So that’s what Hanks did: he sold his car — a 1970 VW Beetle — to pay for the move, and drove east on the I-80 with McGann to New York City. There, he stayed on McGann’s couch for weeks, while auditioning for movies, commercials and off-Broadway and Broadway shows.

“MichaelJohn typed up my résumé on his battleship of a Royal typewriter (which he has since given me),” Hanks wrote.

McGann even co-signed Hanks’ first apartment lease, which was for a “horridly dark and busted-up fourth-floor walk-up in Hell’s Kitchen.” He described this act of kindness as “a moment of risky generosity I will never, ever forget.”

Another adult task that Hanks said he learned from McGann and Maguire: how to file his taxes.

“I had never done my taxes before,” Hanks wrote. His first tax season as an actor, the friends convened at Maguire’s apartment to help him.

“When these two pros showed me how to file my return so I’d get a refund from the IRS for nearly $600, the first moment of solvency in my adult life, I thought I had won the lottery,” he wrote.

Today, at 63, Hanks has won two Academy Awards and was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2016. In January 2020, he will receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award at the Golden Globes.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, actor, tom, famous, unpaid, maguire, given, hanks, kind, worked, friends, won, moment, slept, wrote, couch, mcgann, nyc, intern, york


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