WeWork alerts members that at least 1,600 of its office phone booths are tainted with formaldehyde

WeWork is warning members that about 1,600 phone booths across some of its offices are tainted with formaldehyde, according to an email obtained by CNBC. The office-sharing company said the affected phone booths were in some WeWork locations in the U.S. and Canada. It took several phone booths out of service last week and could take another 700 phone booths out of service as a precautionary measure, it said. “After a member informed us of odor and eye irritation, WeWork performed an analysis, in


WeWork is warning members that about 1,600 phone booths across some of its offices are tainted with formaldehyde, according to an email obtained by CNBC. The office-sharing company said the affected phone booths were in some WeWork locations in the U.S. and Canada. It took several phone booths out of service last week and could take another 700 phone booths out of service as a precautionary measure, it said. “After a member informed us of odor and eye irritation, WeWork performed an analysis, in
WeWork alerts members that at least 1,600 of its office phone booths are tainted with formaldehyde Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, service, formaldehyde, booths, members, spokesperson, potentially, 1600, week, office, tainted, alerts, possible, wework, neumann, phone


WeWork alerts members that at least 1,600 of its office phone booths are tainted with formaldehyde

WeWork is warning members that about 1,600 phone booths across some of its offices are tainted with formaldehyde, according to an email obtained by CNBC.

The office-sharing company said the affected phone booths were in some WeWork locations in the U.S. and Canada. It took several phone booths out of service last week and could take another 700 phone booths out of service as a precautionary measure, it said.

“After a member informed us of odor and eye irritation, WeWork performed an analysis, including having an outside consultant conduct a series of tests on a sampling of phone booths,” WeWork said in the email to tenants. “Upon receiving results last week, we began to take all potentially impacted phone booths out of service.”

The “potentially elevated levels of formaldehyde” were caused by an issue with the manufacturer, a WeWork spokesperson said in a statement. The phone booths will be removed “as soon as possible,” the spokesperson added.

“The safety and well-being of our members is our top priority, and we are working to remedy this situation as quickly as possible,” the spokesperson said.

The incident comes as WeWork continues to recover from a number of gaffes in recent months. Late last month, WeWork pulled its IPO filing amid sharp criticism from investors, mounting losses and a dwindling IPO valuation.

Additionally, co-CEOs Artie Minson and Sebastian Gunningham replaced Adam Neumann in September, after he attracted scrutiny for his unusual leadership style and apparent conflicts of interest. According to a report in The Wall Street Journal, Neumann also expressed a desire to become Israel’s prime minister, president of the world, the world’s first trillionaire and to live forever.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, service, formaldehyde, booths, members, spokesperson, potentially, 1600, week, office, tainted, alerts, possible, wework, neumann, phone


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TikTok has moved into Facebook’s backyard and is starting to poach its employees

TikTok, the upstart social media app, has opened an office in Silicon Valley and begun to poach Facebook employees, multiple people familiar with the matter told CNBC. Along with the new office, TikTok and ByteDance have posted numerous job listings for positions in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to LinkedIn. One person said TikTok has been known to offer salaries that are as much as 20% higher than Facebook’s. Besides its new Bay Area office, TikTok is also planning to upgrade its headqu


TikTok, the upstart social media app, has opened an office in Silicon Valley and begun to poach Facebook employees, multiple people familiar with the matter told CNBC. Along with the new office, TikTok and ByteDance have posted numerous job listings for positions in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to LinkedIn. One person said TikTok has been known to offer salaries that are as much as 20% higher than Facebook’s. Besides its new Bay Area office, TikTok is also planning to upgrade its headqu
TikTok has moved into Facebook’s backyard and is starting to poach its employees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, employees, according, tiktok, moved, office, facebooks, told, app, poach, company, facebook, person, backyard, starting


TikTok has moved into Facebook's backyard and is starting to poach its employees

TikTok, the upstart social media app, has opened an office in Silicon Valley and begun to poach Facebook employees, multiple people familiar with the matter told CNBC.

The Chinese-owned company recently moved into an office space in Mountain View, California, that was previously occupied by Facebook’s WhatsApp messaging app, multiple people told CNBC. The new location gives TikTok a presence just miles from the Menlo Park headquarters of Facebook, elevating the rivalry between the two companies from a battle for young users to a competition for talent.

TikTok was released in 2017 by China-based company ByteDance, which makes a Chinese version of the app called Douyin. TikTok lets users watch and create short videos that are usually set to songs. Across its suite of apps and around the globe, ByteDance now claims 700 million daily active users. By way of comparison, Facebook claims more than 2.1 billion people use one of its apps, including Instagram, Messenger or WhatsApp, every day.

Along with the new office, TikTok and ByteDance have posted numerous job listings for positions in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to LinkedIn. Since 2018, the company has hired more than two dozen employees from Facebook.

The appeal to leave Facebook for TikTok stems from a desire to work at a popular social media company as it goes through an extreme growth phase, two former Facebook employees who are now at TikTok told CNBC. Although Facebook offers unrivaled perks, such as free food throughout the day, TikTok is offering salaries that are comparable and competitive to that of its rival. One person said TikTok has been known to offer salaries that are as much as 20% higher than Facebook’s.

TikTok is interested in hiring employees with experience from competitors who have the ability to fix issues that arise with high-growth technology, one person said.

As it’s been poaching from Facebook, TikTok has hired even more people from other tech companies, including Snap, Hulu, Apple, Google’s YouTube and Amazon, according to another person familiar. These people asked for anonymity when discussing confidential business matters.

Besides its new Bay Area office, TikTok is also planning to upgrade its headquarters in Culver City, California, near Los Angeles. The company will move into a new office there in early 2020 with the capacity for 1,000 employees, a person familiar with the company’s plans told CNBC.

Facebook has yet to list TikTok as a competitor on its financial documents as Twitter and Snap have both done, but the company has landed on its radar nonetheless.

Last year, Facebook released Lasso, an app that is nearly identical to TikTok, except when it comes to download stats. TikTok has been downloaded from the Apple App Store and Google Play by 546 million global users since the start of 2019, according to third-party estimates provided to CNBC by Sensor Tower, an app market intelligence firm. By comparison, Lasso has been downloaded by only 420,000 worldwide users, according to Sensor Tower. These figures do not include Android downloads in China.

Facebook’s Instagram is also reportedly working on a new feature called Clips that copies TikTok’s video-creation capabilities. And in a recent meeting with employees, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company plans to compete with TikTok by beating it in markets where it has yet to gain traction, such as Mexico, with Lasso, according to The Verge.

“TikTok … is really the first consumer internet product built by one of the Chinese tech giants that is doing quite well around the world. It’s starting to do well in the U.S., especially with young folks,” Zuckerberg said.

Facebook did not respond to requests for comment.

WATCH: The most valuable startup in the world?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, employees, according, tiktok, moved, office, facebooks, told, app, poach, company, facebook, person, backyard, starting


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Chinese app pushing Xi’s ideology has ‘backdoor’ that could let Beijing snoop on users, report says

This photo illustratration taken on February 20, 2019 shows a phone app called “Xuexi Qiangguo” with an image of China’s President Xi Jinping in Beijing. But a teardown of the Android version of the app by German cybersecurity firm Cure53, which was commissioned by the U.S. government-backed Open Technology Fund, highlighted security holes that could let Beijing snoop on users. An app promoting Chinese leader Xi Jinping’s ideology has flaws that could potentially allow Beijing to control hundred


This photo illustratration taken on February 20, 2019 shows a phone app called “Xuexi Qiangguo” with an image of China’s President Xi Jinping in Beijing. But a teardown of the Android version of the app by German cybersecurity firm Cure53, which was commissioned by the U.S. government-backed Open Technology Fund, highlighted security holes that could let Beijing snoop on users. An app promoting Chinese leader Xi Jinping’s ideology has flaws that could potentially allow Beijing to control hundred
Chinese app pushing Xi’s ideology has ‘backdoor’ that could let Beijing snoop on users, report says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, xis, run, pushing, office, chinese, app, snoop, report, xuexi, beijing, backdoor, state, ideology, let


Chinese app pushing Xi's ideology has 'backdoor' that could let Beijing snoop on users, report says

This photo illustratration taken on February 20, 2019 shows a phone app called “Xuexi Qiangguo” with an image of China’s President Xi Jinping in Beijing.

But a teardown of the Android version of the app by German cybersecurity firm Cure53, which was commissioned by the U.S. government-backed Open Technology Fund, highlighted security holes that could let Beijing snoop on users.

“Study the Great Nation” or “Xuexi Qiangguo” in Chinese is billed by China’s Communist Party as an educational tool and it contains videos and articles about Xi’s ideology, as well as the ability for users to earn points by doing quizzes or commenting on pieces. It is developed by the Chinese government.

An app promoting Chinese leader Xi Jinping’s ideology has flaws that could potentially allow Beijing to control hundreds of millions of users’ smartphones, a new report claims.

Cure53 found code in the app “resembling a backdoor which is able to run arbitrary commands with superuser privileges.”

If that code was deployed, it would grant a person system-wide administrative access, meaning they could download software, modify data or even install a keylogger to see what people were typing.

“And while the investigative method utilized does not allow us to observe the ways in which that backdoor is being exploited (if at all), the audits could find no legitimate reason why an app of this nature would seek to run commands on users’ phones with high privileges levels,” Cure53 noted.

The Xi ideology app also scans for other apps installed on a person’s device which the researchers note is “no way relevant to the purported purpose of the app, which leads us to speculate as to why this mass data collection is needed by the CCP (Communist Party of China).”

The State Council Information Office, responding on behalf of the Chinese government’s propaganda department, told the Washington Post that the app did not have the functions the report suggests.

“We learned from those who run the Study the Great Nation app that there is no such thing as you have mentioned,” the office said.

A spokesperson for the State Council Information Office wasn’t immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, xis, run, pushing, office, chinese, app, snoop, report, xuexi, beijing, backdoor, state, ideology, let


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Former Nasdaq boss Robert Greifeld says we’ll remember WeWork as when the ‘unicorn’ bubble burst

WeWork’s aborted IPO may come to mark the end of the current “unicorn” bubble the way the scuttled merger between Yahoo and eBay signaled the start of the dotcom crash in 2000. As now-deposed WeWork CEO Adam Neumann told Forbes in a 2017 profile, “Our valuation and size today are much more based on our energy and spirituality than it is on a multiple of revenue.” Messianic founders”We want to change the consciousness of the world,” Neumann proclaimed in WeWork’s IPO filing. Unlike Airbnb or Uber


WeWork’s aborted IPO may come to mark the end of the current “unicorn” bubble the way the scuttled merger between Yahoo and eBay signaled the start of the dotcom crash in 2000. As now-deposed WeWork CEO Adam Neumann told Forbes in a 2017 profile, “Our valuation and size today are much more based on our energy and spirituality than it is on a multiple of revenue.” Messianic founders”We want to change the consciousness of the world,” Neumann proclaimed in WeWork’s IPO filing. Unlike Airbnb or Uber
Former Nasdaq boss Robert Greifeld says we’ll remember WeWork as when the ‘unicorn’ bubble burst Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: robert greifeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wework, business, greifeld, bubble, boss, office, burst, neumann, world, unicorn, nasdaq, ipo, remember, robert, weworks, ceo, governance, company


Former Nasdaq boss Robert Greifeld says we'll remember WeWork as when the 'unicorn' bubble burst

WeWork’s aborted IPO may come to mark the end of the current “unicorn” bubble the way the scuttled merger between Yahoo and eBay signaled the start of the dotcom crash in 2000. Having become CEO of Nasdaq in 2003, I saw up close the damage caused by the growth-over-profits philosophy in that earlier era, and WeWork’s spectacular fall — from the year’s most anticipated IPO to a company with a speculative-level credit rating that may run out of funds within a year —rings many bells. Back in the late 1990s, tech CEOs bragged about innovative user interfaces, millions of eyeballs and empowered cultures; what they lacked were business models that could deliver returns for shareholders. WeWork has similarly put a flashy “user interface” on a mundane activity — sub-leasing office space — and wrapped itself in the jargon of world betterment and community to cover a corporate vision that lacks fundamental credibility. Need more parallels? Consider:

Funding feeding frenzy

In the late 1990s, venture capital firms competed to shower dotcoms with millions based on little more than three-page business outlines. The resulting valuations had little connection with realistic expectations of returns. Today, huge private equity and venture funds are similarly chasing a limited pool of investment opportunities, but their bets have ballooned to billions. SoftBank, WeWork’s top investor, has plowed more than $10 billion into the company, which fits snugly into its model of putting rapid scale above profit. WeWork, which lost $4.2 billion since 2016 but boasts of 200%-plus “member” growth in that time, could be a posterchild for SoftBank’s philosophy. As now-deposed WeWork CEO Adam Neumann told Forbes in a 2017 profile, “Our valuation and size today are much more based on our energy and spirituality than it is on a multiple of revenue.”

Messianic founders

“We want to change the consciousness of the world,” Neumann proclaimed in WeWork’s IPO filing. That objective would seem a stretch for a company peddling shared workspaces, but Neumann seems blind to the hubris. WeWork has ventured to transform everything from education (with a start-up aiming to unleash kids’ “superpowers” by teaching them entrepreneurship and farming) to homes (through co-living apartments) to diet (the company banned meat from its office menus) to, perhaps more modestly, surfing (investing in artificial wave company Wavegarden).

Governance is for saps

As ESG (environmental, social and corporate governance) investing gains prominence, the focus tends to fall on sustainable practices on the “E” and “S” fronts. WeWork shows why “G” is the most important element of that formula: good governance may not assure a superior return but bad governance pretty much assures disaster. A litany of governance no-nos have come to light in recent months, from the CEO acting as his company’s landlord by leasing it real estate he owns to putting friends and family in executive positions. But none rankles more than the board agreeing to pay Neumann’s personal company almost $6 million for the “We” trademark — hardly a novel term.

The ho-hum in sexy packaging

In the dotcom era, startups gained colossal valuations by simply adding “.com” to a product category. WeWork likewise hasn’t invented anything. It’s not even the first: Belgium’s IWG (formerly Regus) has been in the same business for decades. Unlike Airbnb or Uber, which introduced genuinely innovative businesses, WeWork became a unicorn by packaging a commonplace offering in fancy décor and language. Its trademarked Physical Social Network is known to the rest of us as… a workplace. Even its office accouterments hark back to the ’90s startup culture, with arcade games, skating ramps and napping couches.

Unsustainable business model


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: robert greifeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wework, business, greifeld, bubble, boss, office, burst, neumann, world, unicorn, nasdaq, ipo, remember, robert, weworks, ceo, governance, company


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This founder says some of her best hires are people who’ve never had a job before—here’s how they got her attention

Katerina Schneider learned early on not to hire people based on their resumes. These days, she doesn’t care for resumes much at all, and she doesn’t hire based on someone’s experience. In fact, she’s said some of her best hires have been people with no work history at all. Interested job-seekers have also stopped by the wellness company’s Los Angeles office to apply for a role in person. “We’ve had people come to the office and drop off their resumes; we’ve had someone make us cookies,” Schneide


Katerina Schneider learned early on not to hire people based on their resumes. These days, she doesn’t care for resumes much at all, and she doesn’t hire based on someone’s experience. In fact, she’s said some of her best hires have been people with no work history at all. Interested job-seekers have also stopped by the wellness company’s Los Angeles office to apply for a role in person. “We’ve had people come to the office and drop off their resumes; we’ve had someone make us cookies,” Schneide
This founder says some of her best hires are people who’ve never had a job before—here’s how they got her attention Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hires, attention, weve, job, schneider, best, whove, founder, office, beforeheres, person, hired, hire, based, jobseekers, resumes


This founder says some of her best hires are people who've never had a job before—here's how they got her attention

Katerina Schneider learned early on not to hire people based on their resumes. The founder and CEO of Ritual, named one of LinkedIn’s top start-ups of 2019, says focusing too much on a candidate’s previous experience hasn’t worked in her favor.

“I’d say, ‘Oh, this person has an MBA and Ph.D. and works for this big company — that’s awesome! They’re probably great,'” she tells CNBC Make It. “And I got burned a couple of times doing that.”

These days, she doesn’t care for resumes much at all, and she doesn’t hire based on someone’s experience. In fact, she’s said some of her best hires have been people with no work history at all.

“Some of the best people we’ve hired have never had a job before: a designer, some marketers, the woman that runs our supply chain now, were all hired right out of college based on their innate abilities,” Schneider says. Instead, she looks for qualities that can’t be taught, like adaptability and perseverance.

The company, which now has upwards of 70 employees, is still small enough that the best way to kick off the interview process is through employee referral. Interested job-seekers have also stopped by the wellness company’s Los Angeles office to apply for a role in person. Schneider credits her marketing team for creating a recognizable, personable brand that spurs interest among consumers and job-seekers alike.

“We’ve had people come to the office and drop off their resumes; we’ve had someone make us cookies,” Schneider adds. “There’s no end in sight.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hires, attention, weve, job, schneider, best, whove, founder, office, beforeheres, person, hired, hire, based, jobseekers, resumes


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Facebook is bringing Portal video chat devices to the office, taking on Zoom and Skype

Facebook is taking its Portal video chat gadgets to the business world, trying to grab a bigger slice of the videoconferencing market, where Zoom, Cisco Webex and Microsoft’s Skype are among the leaders. Facebook announced on Tuesday that Workplace, its communication and collaboration service for companies, will work with Portal devices, which so far have been marketed for consumers. People who own a Portal and use Workplace in the office will be able to combine the two to make video calls to co


Facebook is taking its Portal video chat gadgets to the business world, trying to grab a bigger slice of the videoconferencing market, where Zoom, Cisco Webex and Microsoft’s Skype are among the leaders. Facebook announced on Tuesday that Workplace, its communication and collaboration service for companies, will work with Portal devices, which so far have been marketed for consumers. People who own a Portal and use Workplace in the office will be able to combine the two to make video calls to co
Facebook is bringing Portal video chat devices to the office, taking on Zoom and Skype Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebooks, portal, skype, video, taking, facebook, workplace, work, office, videoconferencing, revenue, ipo, chat, bringing, zoom, devices, market


Facebook is bringing Portal video chat devices to the office, taking on Zoom and Skype

Facebook is taking its Portal video chat gadgets to the business world, trying to grab a bigger slice of the videoconferencing market, where Zoom, Cisco Webex and Microsoft’s Skype are among the leaders.

Facebook announced on Tuesday that Workplace, its communication and collaboration service for companies, will work with Portal devices, which so far have been marketed for consumers. People who own a Portal and use Workplace in the office will be able to combine the two to make video calls to colleagues.

“Even with the first generation of the device, we started seeing a lot of people asking to be able to call in to work calls,” Karandeep Anand, Facebook’s head of Workplace, told CNBC.

The videoconferencing space has received a healthy amount of attention this year, following Zoom’s IPO, which rocketed the company up to a $21 billion market cap. Global Market Insights expects the market to reach $20 billion in revenue by 2024.

While Zoom, in its IPO prospectus, highlighted competition from Cisco, Microsoft, Citrix and Google, it said that “other large established companies like Amazon and Facebook have in the past and may in the future also make investments in video communications tools.” Workplace already allows for video chat within the app on a smartphone or computer.

If you haven’t previously heard of Workplace or Portal, you aren’t alone. The two products are among the newer pieces of Facebook’s portfolio. They’re part of the payments and other fees business segment, which accounted for less than 2% of total revenue in the latest quarter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebooks, portal, skype, video, taking, facebook, workplace, work, office, videoconferencing, revenue, ipo, chat, bringing, zoom, devices, market


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House Democrats subpoena Pentagon, White House budget office for Ukraine documents

The leaders of three House committees on Monday announced they have subpoenaed the Pentagon and the Office of Management and Budget for documents related to the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. Spokespersons for the OMB and the White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s requests for comment on the subpoenas. Last Friday evening, those same Democratic committee leaders — Reps. Adam Schiff of Intelligence, Elijah Cummings of Oversight and Eliot Engel of Foreign Affairs — sub


The leaders of three House committees on Monday announced they have subpoenaed the Pentagon and the Office of Management and Budget for documents related to the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. Spokespersons for the OMB and the White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s requests for comment on the subpoenas. Last Friday evening, those same Democratic committee leaders — Reps. Adam Schiff of Intelligence, Elijah Cummings of Oversight and Eliot Engel of Foreign Affairs — sub
House Democrats subpoena Pentagon, White House budget office for Ukraine documents Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pentagon, ukraine, zelensky, impeachment, aid, budget, leaders, trump, white, documents, office, president, subpoena, democrats, house


House Democrats subpoena Pentagon, White House budget office for Ukraine documents

Mark Esper, U.S. Secretary of Defense, attends a welcoming ceremony for joint chiefs of staff Chairman Mark Milley at Fort Myer in Arlington, Virginia.

The leaders of three House committees on Monday announced they have subpoenaed the Pentagon and the Office of Management and Budget for documents related to the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

The Democratic chairmen of the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees are demanding a slew of documents related to Trump’s request for Ukraine’s president to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, as well as the Trump administration’s decision to delay military aid to Ukraine.

The subpoenas were issued to Defense Secretary Mark Esper and the OMB’s acting director, Russell Vought. They have until Oct. 15 to comply, according to letters sent by the committee leaders Monday.

Spokespersons for the OMB and the White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s requests for comment on the subpoenas. A Pentagon spokeswoman had no immediate comment.

“The Committees are investigating the extent to which President Trump jeopardized U.S. national security by pressing Ukraine to interfere with our 2020 election and by withholding military assistance provided by Congress to help Ukraine counter Russian aggression, as well as any efforts to cover up these matters,” the leaders said in the letters to Esper and Vought.

Last Friday evening, those same Democratic committee leaders — Reps. Adam Schiff of Intelligence, Elijah Cummings of Oversight and Eliot Engel of Foreign Affairs — subpoenaed the White House itself for documents related to the impeachment probe. The White House has until Oct. 18 to comply with that subpoena.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Trump’s personal attorney, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, have also been subpoenaed as part of the impeachment inquiry. Vice President Mike Pence has been issued a request for documents, as well.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the impeachment inquiry last month, on the heels of reporting about a whistleblower complaint that raised fears that Trump, in a July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, was “using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election.”

The whistleblower’s complaint, as well as a five-page memorandum of the call, were made public shortly after Pelosi announced the impeachment inquiry.

In that partial transcript, Trump asks Zelensky if he can “look into” unsubstantiated allegations that Biden pressured Ukraine to fire a prosecutor there in order to protect his son Hunter, who was on the board of a Ukrainian natural gas company while his father was Barack Obama’s vice president.

There is no clear evidence suggesting that Biden wanted Ukraine to fire the prosecutor for personal gain. Many other world leaders had also called on Ukraine to fire that prosecutor, who was widely accused of corruption.

Democrats have also raised suspicions about the Trump administration’s decision to withhold hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid to Ukraine that had been allocated by Congress, without providing a clear explanation for why the money was being held up. The aid was eventually granted to Ukraine, after months of delay.

Trump has recently said he made the decision to withhold that aid because he wanted other countries to pay a larger share of the assistance going to Ukraine. He has maintained that there was no “quid pro quo” tying the aid to his requests to Zelensky.

Text messages shared with Congress by former U.S. special envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker, who testified behind closed doors last week, showed U.S. officials explicitly linking a probe of Trump’s political opponents with Zelensky being granted a White House visit.

— CNBC’s Dan Mangan contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pentagon, ukraine, zelensky, impeachment, aid, budget, leaders, trump, white, documents, office, president, subpoena, democrats, house


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Adam Schiff says Trump asking China to investigate Biden is ‘a fundamental breach’ of his oath of office

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Thursday that President Donald Trump’s request for China to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden constitutes “a fundamental breach of the president’s oath of office.” Trump’s request for a foreign government to investigate Biden, his possible challenger in the 2020 election, spurred Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry. Trump’s allies have raised suspicions about Hunter Biden’s employment on the board of Ukrainian nat


House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Thursday that President Donald Trump’s request for China to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden constitutes “a fundamental breach of the president’s oath of office.” Trump’s request for a foreign government to investigate Biden, his possible challenger in the 2020 election, spurred Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry. Trump’s allies have raised suspicions about Hunter Biden’s employment on the board of Ukrainian nat
Adam Schiff says Trump asking China to investigate Biden is ‘a fundamental breach’ of his oath of office Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, fundamental, china, asking, president, ukraine, breach, vice, oath, hunter, office, trump, schiff, bidens, investigate


Adam Schiff says Trump asking China to investigate Biden is 'a fundamental breach' of his oath of office

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) speaks during a news conference about impeachment proceedings at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, September 25, 2019.

On Thursday morning, Trump told reporters at the White House that ” China should start an investigation into the Bidens, because what happened in China is just about as bad as what happened with Ukraine .” It was not immediately clear what Trump believes “happened in China” related to the Bidens.

“To have a president of the United States suggesting, urging a foreign country to interfere in our presidential elections is an illustration that if this president has learned anything from the two years of [former special counsel Robert Mueller’s] investigation, it’s that he feels he can do anything with impunity,” Schiff told reporters on Capitol Hill.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Thursday that President Donald Trump’s request for China to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden constitutes “a fundamental breach of the president’s oath of office.”

Trump also publicly doubled down on his call for Ukraine to investigate the Bidens — a request he made in a July 25 call to Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky. Trump’s request for a foreign government to investigate Biden, his possible challenger in the 2020 election, spurred Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry.

Schiff made the comments after emerging from a closed-door hearing with Kurt Volker, former special envoy to Ukraine, who appeared for a deposition as part of House Democrats’ impeachment probe into Trump.

“A president of the United States encouraging a foreign nation to interfere again to help his campaign by investigating a rival is a fundamental breach of the president’s oath of office. It endangers our elections, it endangers our national security. It ought to be condemned by every member of this body, Democrats and Republicans alike,” Schiff said.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who formally announced the impeachment inquiry last week, tweeted Thursday afternoon that Trump’s call for another country to probe the Bidens is “just the latest example of him putting his personal political gain ahead of defending the integrity of our elections.”

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, ranking member on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, said after listening to Volker’s testimony that “nothing he said supports the narrative you’ve been hearing from Mr. Schiff.”

Trump called on China to investigate the current Democratic presidential front-runner and his son Hunter, one week before a Chinese delegation is set to arrive in Washington to resume protracted trade negotiations.

“I have a lot of options on China, but if they don’t do what we want, we have tremendous power,” Trump said of the U.S. stance in the talks before he was asked about the Bidens.

Trump’s allies have raised suspicions about Hunter Biden’s employment on the board of Ukrainian natural gas company Burisma Holdings while his father was in office. They suggest that the elder Biden improperly pressured Ukraine to fire a prosecutor there out of concern that he would investigate the company.

But there is no clear evidence that Biden’s actions as vice president were intended to help his son; in fact, many Western leaders had called on Ukraine to fire that prosecutor over allegations of corruption. Hunter Biden has not been accused of illegal wrongdoing related to his work with the company.

The New Yorker delved into some of Hunter Biden’s Chinese connections in a lengthy piece in July. Hunter accompanied his father, then the vice president, on an official trip to that country in 2013.

Still, Vice President Mike Pence said Thursday that Trump is right to want to investigate allegations of wrongdoing against Biden and his son. “The American people have a right to know” whether Biden’s family “profited from his position,” Pence said.

Federal Election Commission Chair Ellen Weintraub, however, took to Twitter on Thursday to once again share a memorandum stating that it is against the law for anyone running for public office to solicit help from a foreign national.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, biden, fundamental, china, asking, president, ukraine, breach, vice, oath, hunter, office, trump, schiff, bidens, investigate


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Prosecutors agree to pause in subpoena for Trump tax returns

The Manhattan District Attorney’s office told a federal judge it has struck a deal with President Donald Trump’s lawyers to press pause on a grand jury subpoena for his tax returns. Prosecutors will hold off trying to enforce the subpoena until Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. In the meantime, Trump’s accounting firm, Mazars USA, will start “gathering and preparing all documents responsive to the subpoena,” the letter to Marrero says. A day earlier, Marrero temporarily blocked enforcement of a grand jury subpoe


The Manhattan District Attorney’s office told a federal judge it has struck a deal with President Donald Trump’s lawyers to press pause on a grand jury subpoena for his tax returns. Prosecutors will hold off trying to enforce the subpoena until Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. In the meantime, Trump’s accounting firm, Mazars USA, will start “gathering and preparing all documents responsive to the subpoena,” the letter to Marrero says. A day earlier, Marrero temporarily blocked enforcement of a grand jury subpoe
Prosecutors agree to pause in subpoena for Trump tax returns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: kevin breuninger dan mangan, kevin breuninger, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, letter, judge, trumps, trump, office, subpoena, prosecutors, marrero, agree, jury, returns, manhattan, pause, president


Prosecutors agree to pause in subpoena for Trump tax returns

US President Donald Trump disembarks after arriving on Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, September 26, 2019, after returning from New York.

The Manhattan District Attorney’s office told a federal judge it has struck a deal with President Donald Trump’s lawyers to press pause on a grand jury subpoena for his tax returns.

In a letter Thursday to Manhattan federal court Judge Victor Marrero, a prosecutor in DA Cyrus Vance Jr.’s office wrote that “the parties have reached a temporary agreement” to “forbear enforcement” of the subpoena to produce years of Trump’s financial documents.

Prosecutors will hold off trying to enforce the subpoena until Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. ET — or until two business days after the judge rules on whether subpoeane should be permanently barred or whether it can be enforced over Trump’s objection.

In the meantime, Trump’s accounting firm, Mazars USA, will start “gathering and preparing all documents responsive to the subpoena,” the letter to Marrero says.

The judge signed the outline of the agreement shortly after it was filed.

A day earlier, Marrero temporarily blocked enforcement of a grand jury subpoena demanding Trump’s personal and corporate income tax returns from Mazars.

Marrero said in a hearing Wednesday that it won’t take him “weeks or months” to decide whether the subpoena should be allowed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: kevin breuninger dan mangan, kevin breuninger, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, letter, judge, trumps, trump, office, subpoena, prosecutors, marrero, agree, jury, returns, manhattan, pause, president


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China trade talks are set to resume on Oct. 10

Trade talks between the U.S. and China are set to resume Oct. 10-11 in Washington, three people close to the talks told CNBC on Thursday. Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will be representing the delegation from Beijing, one of the people told CNBC. But Liu was stripped of that title on a subsequent trip, after Communist Party hardliners balked at some of the concessions to which he had agreed. The White House, the Treasury Department and Office of the U.S. Trade Representative did not respond to CNB


Trade talks between the U.S. and China are set to resume Oct. 10-11 in Washington, three people close to the talks told CNBC on Thursday. Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will be representing the delegation from Beijing, one of the people told CNBC. But Liu was stripped of that title on a subsequent trip, after Communist Party hardliners balked at some of the concessions to which he had agreed. The White House, the Treasury Department and Office of the U.S. Trade Representative did not respond to CNB
China trade talks are set to resume on Oct. 10 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: kevin breuninger kayla tausche, kevin breuninger, kayla tausche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, told, washington, trade, office, china, set, liu, resume, oct, president, title, beijing


China trade talks are set to resume on Oct. 10

Trade talks between the U.S. and China are set to resume Oct. 10-11 in Washington, three people close to the talks told CNBC on Thursday.

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will be representing the delegation from Beijing, one of the people told CNBC.

Liu visited Washington this spring sporting the title “special envoy,” empowering him to negotiate on behalf of President Xi Jinping and pledge in the Oval Office with President Donald Trump to buy American soybeans.

But Liu was stripped of that title on a subsequent trip, after Communist Party hardliners balked at some of the concessions to which he had agreed.

The White House, the Treasury Department and Office of the U.S. Trade Representative did not respond to CNBC’s requests for comment about the date for the resumption of talks.

Trump administration officials have said they expected the stalled talks with Beijing to resume next month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: kevin breuninger kayla tausche, kevin breuninger, kayla tausche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, told, washington, trade, office, china, set, liu, resume, oct, president, title, beijing


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