Do these 5 things to get your money in order before 2020, says financial expert

Hopefully, these milestones will inspire you to take another look at your 2019 financial resolutions and see where you stand. A few essential questions to ask yourself: Are you on track to meeting your financial goals by the end of 2020? Were there any changes this year in important financial factors such as your income, bills, expenses, insurance, investments, debt and savings? Find out what your fixed (e.g., monthly bills on rent, mortgage, utilities) and variable expenses (e.g. You probably w


Hopefully, these milestones will inspire you to take another look at your 2019 financial resolutions and see where you stand. A few essential questions to ask yourself: Are you on track to meeting your financial goals by the end of 2020? Were there any changes this year in important financial factors such as your income, bills, expenses, insurance, investments, debt and savings? Find out what your fixed (e.g., monthly bills on rent, mortgage, utilities) and variable expenses (e.g. You probably w
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: tiffany aliche
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Do these 5 things to get your money in order before 2020, says financial expert

We’re just a little more than five months away from 2020. Crazy, isn’t it? The year has flown by — along with some major financial milestones: Jay-Z reached billionaire status, Rihanna became America’s richest female musician and tech investor Robert F. Smith pledged to pay off student loans for Morehouse College’s class of 2019. Hopefully, these milestones will inspire you to take another look at your 2019 financial resolutions and see where you stand. Here’s what you need to do:

1. Review your finances

The first step is to do a run-through of your finances and get an idea of how you’re doing so far. A few essential questions to ask yourself: Are you on track to meeting your financial goals by the end of 2020?

Were there any changes this year in important financial factors such as your income, bills, expenses, insurance, investments, debt and savings?

What areas need more focus and improvement?

What will your year-end returns be? Are you satisfied with them?

Are you prepared for tax season?

Are you saving enough for retirement?

2. Refine your budget plan

I’ve seen a lot of people create vague budget plans based on loose commitments. But now is the time to really zoom in on your spending and savings habits so you know what necessary changes need to be made. Find out what your fixed (e.g., monthly bills on rent, mortgage, utilities) and variable expenses (e.g. groceries, entertainment, gas) are. Don’t use estimated numbers — be as specific as possible so you can get a more accurate measure of your progress. You probably won’t be able to lower your fixed expenses by much, so try to focus on your variable expenses. Check your monthly credit and banking statements to see what you’re spending on. Then, identify what you can eliminate or cut back on.

3. Check your credit

Request a free credit report online and review it carefully. For the most part, check for errors that need to be addressed immediately. A few of the most common mistakes include: Incorrect first and last names

Addresses you never lived at

Employers you never worked for

Accounts you don’t recognize

Accounts listed as open even though you already closed them

Incorrect balances Check your credit score, too. Lenders take credit scores seriously when deciding whether someone qualifies for a loan or good interest rate. If you have a low credit score, but plan to take out a mortgage in the near future, figure out what you need to do to improve it before applying for a mortgage.

4. Don’t forget to give

The holidays will be here before you know it, so start making your charitable, tax-deductible donations now. Keep your receipts and contribution forms organized in a folder so you’ll have an easier time filing your taxes. This is also a good time to think about what’s on everyone’s wish list and create your holiday budget. A lot of people get excited about year-end sales, but those deals are typically offered occasionally throughout entire year. Getting your gifts early will allow you more time to comparison shop. Bonus: You get to skip the long lines and overwhelming crowds of shoppers when the holidays come around.

5. Take action immediately


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: tiffany aliche
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Roger Stone avoids jail, banned from major social media after judge rules Trump friend breached gag order in Mueller case

A federal judge on Tuesday banned Republican operative Roger Stone from posting anything at all on major social media platforms after ruling that the longtime confidant of President Donald Trump violated an already strict gag order in his criminal case. Jackson’s finding that Stone violated his gag order “seems clear and correct,” said Carl Tobias, a law professor and federal courts expert at the University of Richmond. “Despite numerous chances to mend his ways, Stone persists in misbehaving in


A federal judge on Tuesday banned Republican operative Roger Stone from posting anything at all on major social media platforms after ruling that the longtime confidant of President Donald Trump violated an already strict gag order in his criminal case. Jackson’s finding that Stone violated his gag order “seems clear and correct,” said Carl Tobias, a law professor and federal courts expert at the University of Richmond. “Despite numerous chances to mend his ways, Stone persists in misbehaving in
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Roger Stone avoids jail, banned from major social media after judge rules Trump friend breached gag order in Mueller case

Roger Stone (R), the former adviser to U.S. President Donald Trump, arrives at the E. Barrett Prettyman United States Court House with his wife Nydia Stone on July 16, 2019 in Washington, DC.

A federal judge on Tuesday banned Republican operative Roger Stone from posting anything at all on major social media platforms after ruling that the longtime confidant of President Donald Trump violated an already strict gag order in his criminal case.

Judge Amy Berman Jackson during a hearing in Washington, D.C., district court walked through a litany of Stone’s recent posts from his Instagram account that appeared to breach his order not to speak publicly about his case.

Jackson barred Stone from posting on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter — but she decided not to revoke Stone’s bail bond or hold him in contempt for violating her order.

“It seems he is determined to make himself the subject of the story,” Jackson said of Stone, according to BuzzFeed News.

Stone’s lawyer argued that his client’s posts did not have an impact on the case, even if he was communicating about it publicly, BuzzFeed reported.

Federal prosecutors didn’t call on Jackson to revoke Stone’s $250,000 criminal release bond — which would have landed Stone in jail pending trial. Instead, they asked for him to be cut off from his social media presence, Politico reported.

Jackson’s finding that Stone violated his gag order “seems clear and correct,” said Carl Tobias, a law professor and federal courts expert at the University of Richmond. “Despite numerous chances to mend his ways, Stone persists in misbehaving in many ways. The punishment seems appropriate to the misconduct in violating her earlier gag order.”

Stone is charged with witness tampering, obstruction of justice and lying to Congress. He has pleaded not guilty.

Stone, 66, a notoriously verbose political operative who has described himself as a “dirty trickster,” had previously been dressed down by the judge for his public statements about the federal criminal case.

Jackson first imposed a partial gag order in February barring Stone from talking to the media about his case, to avoid prejudicing potential jurors.

That measure came after Stone’s arraignment in Florida federal court, where Stone immediately began a media blitz including interviews with right-wing conspiracy website Infowars, public statements to reporters — and even a video on courthouse fashion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: kevin breuninger
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Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to open Rise of Resistance ride later than expected

Disney has finally announced the opening date for Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride — and it’s a little later than expected. While the Orlando, Florida version of the ride is expected to be operational on Dec. 5, its California counterpart won’t open until Jan. 17. Disney had initially projected that both ride locations would be open by the end of 2019. Riders will be recruited to join Rey and General Leia Organa at a secret base, however, along the way they will be captured by the a First


Disney has finally announced the opening date for Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride — and it’s a little later than expected. While the Orlando, Florida version of the ride is expected to be operational on Dec. 5, its California counterpart won’t open until Jan. 17. Disney had initially projected that both ride locations would be open by the end of 2019. Riders will be recruited to join Rey and General Leia Organa at a secret base, however, along the way they will be captured by the a First
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Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge to open Rise of Resistance ride later than expected

Disney has finally announced the opening date for Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride — and it’s a little later than expected.

While the Orlando, Florida version of the ride is expected to be operational on Dec. 5, its California counterpart won’t open until Jan. 17. Disney had initially projected that both ride locations would be open by the end of 2019.

“As soon as work is completed at Walt Disney World, Imagineers will head back to California to complete their mission at Disneyland Resort where Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance will open on Friday, Jan. 17,” the company said Thursday.

CEO Bob Iger teased investors in March that the ride is “the most technologically advanced and immersive attraction” the park has ever seen.

The ride is meant to “blur the lines between fantasy and reality” as it puts guests right in the middle of a battle between the First Order and the Resistance. Riders will be recruited to join Rey and General Leia Organa at a secret base, however, along the way they will be captured by the a First Order Star Destroyer and must escape.

The Orlando Galaxy’s Edge land is due to open to the public on August 29 and, while it won’t have the Rise of Resistance ride just yet, it will have the Millennium Falcon: Smuggler’s Run ride ready for guests. Other experiences like Savi’s Workshop, where fans can make their own lighstabers, the Droid Depot, where parkgoers can craft their own droids, and Oga’s Cantina will also be open.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: sarah whitten
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Trump abandons fight to put citizenship question on census, says he can get data from existing records

And another lawyer who battled the administration over the citizenship question suggested that Trump’s order could have no practical consequences. “The Supreme Court ultimately affirmed our right to ask the citizenship question, and very strongly it was affirmed,” the president said. “Accordingly, the Department will promptly inform the courts that the Government will not include a citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census.” “We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the i


And another lawyer who battled the administration over the citizenship question suggested that Trump’s order could have no practical consequences. “The Supreme Court ultimately affirmed our right to ask the citizenship question, and very strongly it was affirmed,” the president said. “Accordingly, the Department will promptly inform the courts that the Government will not include a citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census.” “We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the i
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: dan mangan tucker higgins, dan mangan, tucker higgins
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Trump abandons fight to put citizenship question on census, says he can get data from existing records

US President Donald Trump waves as he arrives at the White House after a trip to Asia on June 30, 2019 in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump on Thursday dropped a fight to put a citizenship question on the upcoming 2020 census — but ordered federal agencies to give the Commerce Department all records they have that are related to how many citizens and non-citizens live in the United States.

Trump did not, as had he had been expected earlier in the day, issue an executive order mandating that the question to be asked on the census.

Legal experts had said such an order would not likely survive court challenges.

Attorney General William Barr said at the press conference with Trump that the question will not be asked on the census, acknowledging that a recent Supreme Court ruling had made doing so difficult, if not impossible.

“We’re not going to jeopardize our ability to carry out the census,” Barr said.

Trump defended his original plan to have the question asked, and claimed that his order directing agencies to share citizenship data would make the actual count of non-citizen “far more accurate” than it would have been if the question was on the census.

But Dale Ho, director of the ACLU’s Voting Rights Project, who argued the Supreme Court case challenging the citizenship question, said afterwards: “Trump’s attempt to weaponize the census ends not with a bang but a whimper.”

“He lost in the Supreme Court, which saw through his lie about needing the question for the Voting Rights Act,” Ho said. “It is clear he simply wanted to sow fear in immigrant communities and turbocharge Republican gerrymandering efforts by diluting the political influence of Latino communities.”

Ho added: “Now he’s backing down and taking the option that he rejected more than a year ago. Trump may claim victory today, but this is nothing short of a total, humiliating defeat for him and his administration.”

And another lawyer who battled the administration over the citizenship question suggested that Trump’s order could have no practical consequences.

“I don’t know quite what he is referring to because existing law allows, in fact, encourages the Census Bureau to obtain information from other federal agencies,” said John Libby, a partner at the law firm Manatt, who was part of a team that successfully argued against the addition of the question in federal court in California.

“I don’t want to characterize its effectiveness or lack of effectiveness, but it is pretty consistent with existing law.”

Trump repeatedly said during the day Thursday that asking someone what their citizenship was should not be controversial, and was something that the government was entitled to know to function properly.

“The Department of Commerce sensibly decided to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census as has been done many, many times throughout the history of the United States,” Trump said. “Unfortunately this effort was delayed by meritless litigation.”

“The Supreme Court ultimately affirmed our right to ask the citizenship question, and very strongly it was affirmed,” the president said. “But the Supreme Court also ruled that we must provide further explanation that would have produced even more litigation.”

The president said those delays “would have prevented us from completing the census on time.”

He called the situation “deeply regrettable.”

“I am hereby ordering every department and agency in the federal government to provide the Department of Commerce with all requested records regarding the number of citizens and noncitizens in our country,” Trump said.

“They must furnish all legally accessible records in their possession immediately. We will utilize these vast federal databases to gain a full, complete and accurate count of the noncitizen population, including databases maintained by the Department of Homeland Security and the Social Security Administration.”

Justice Department spokesman Kerri Kupec said, in a statement “The Supreme Court held that [Commerce] Secretary [Wilbur] Ross reasonably concluded that including the citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census would provide the most complete and accurate citizenship information, but it invalidated his decision to include that question on other grounds.”

“The Department of Justice disagrees with the Supreme Court’s decision. Today’s Executive Order represents an alternative path to collecting the best citizenship data now available, which is vital for informed policymaking and numerous other reasons,” Kupec said. “Accordingly, the Department will promptly inform the courts that the Government will not include a citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census.”

Earlier in the day, the president had been expected at that press event to announce an executive action mandating that participants in the census be asked if they are a U.S. citizen or not.

The Supreme Court in a decision last month effectively barred the Trump administration from adding such a question to the census, as it had planned to do.

Last week, administration officials said census forms would be printed without the question.

But on the heels of their comments, Trump announced on Twitter that he would not abandon the effort to add the question.

“We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the importance of the answer to this question,” Trump wrote.

He later told reporters, when asked if he would issue an executive order: “We’re thinking about doing that.”

“It’s one of the ways,” he added. “We have four or five ways we can do it. It’s one of the ways and we’re thinking about doing it very seriously.”

Justice Department lawyers told a federal judge last Friday that they would continue legal efforts to add the citizenship question.

But in their filing that offered no explanation of how the Justice Department believed it could win that fight.

Earlier this week, two federal judges dealt the Trump administration a setback by refusing to replace the lawyers who had handled the cases with new attorneys, saying the Justice Department had failed to justify the switch.

— CNBC’s Kevin Breuninger contributed to this report


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: dan mangan tucker higgins, dan mangan, tucker higgins
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Trump says administration preparing an executive order on drug prices

US President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, July 5, 2019. President Donald Trump said Friday he’s preparing an executive order declaring a “favored nations clause” for drug prices, where the U.S. will pay no more than the country with the lowest prescription drug prices. “We’re working on a favored nations clause, where we pay whatever the lowest nation’s price is. Why should other nations — like Canada — why should o


US President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, July 5, 2019. President Donald Trump said Friday he’s preparing an executive order declaring a “favored nations clause” for drug prices, where the U.S. will pay no more than the country with the lowest prescription drug prices. “We’re working on a favored nations clause, where we pay whatever the lowest nation’s price is. Why should other nations — like Canada — why should o
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr angelica lavito, berkeley lovelace jr, angelica lavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, administration, lawn, executive, nations, drug, order, trump, house, prices, white, lowest, pay, preparing, south


Trump says administration preparing an executive order on drug prices

US President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, July 5, 2019.

President Donald Trump said Friday he’s preparing an executive order declaring a “favored nations clause” for drug prices, where the U.S. will pay no more than the country with the lowest prescription drug prices.

“As you know for years and years other nations pay less for drugs than we do,” Trump told reporters on the South Lawn of the White House. “We’re working on a favored nations clause, where we pay whatever the lowest nation’s price is. Why should other nations — like Canada — why should other nations pay less than us? ”

The SPDR S&P Pharmaceuticals ETF, which tracks the pharma industry’s biggest companies, was down 1.4% after Trump’s announcement.

The Trump administration and Democrats in Congress are both trying to bring more transparency to drug prices and, ultimately, lower costs for consumers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr angelica lavito, berkeley lovelace jr, angelica lavito
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Trump says he’s considering an executive order to add citizenship question to census

US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he walks to Marine One prior to departing from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, July 5, 2019. President Donald Trump said Friday that he is considering signing a executive order to include a citizenship question in the 2020 census. So we can start the printing now and maybe do an addendum after we get a positive decision,” Trump said. It’s far from clear whether Trump has any leverage, let alone unilateral power, to mandate the


US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he walks to Marine One prior to departing from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, July 5, 2019. President Donald Trump said Friday that he is considering signing a executive order to include a citizenship question in the 2020 census. So we can start the printing now and maybe do an addendum after we get a positive decision,” Trump said. It’s far from clear whether Trump has any leverage, let alone unilateral power, to mandate the
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Trump says he's considering an executive order to add citizenship question to census

US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he walks to Marine One prior to departing from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, July 5, 2019.

President Donald Trump said Friday that he is considering signing a executive order to include a citizenship question in the 2020 census.

“We’re thinking about doing that. It’s one of the ways – we have four or five ways we can do it. It’s one of the ways that we’re thinking about doing it very seriously,” Trump told reporters outside the White House before departing for his private resort in Bedminster, New Jersey.

“We can also add an addition on. So we can start the printing now and maybe do an addendum after we get a positive decision,” Trump said. “So we’re working on a lot of things, including an executive order.”

It’s far from clear whether Trump has any leverage, let alone unilateral power, to mandate the question’s inclusion in the decennial report. Under Article I of the U.S. Constitution, Congress holds power over the census, not the president.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: kevin breuninger
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Trump is laying groundwork for a new world order built around the US, China and Russia

U.S. President Donald Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping shake hands before their bilateral meeting during the G-20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan on June 29, 2019. An olive branch to ChinaIgnoring complaints of American companies about discriminatory treatment in China, Xi also asked that the Chinese businesses should be treated fairly by U.S. authorities. Some observers have already determined that Trump lost last week in his trade and security confrontation with China. He is a winner and


U.S. President Donald Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping shake hands before their bilateral meeting during the G-20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan on June 29, 2019. An olive branch to ChinaIgnoring complaints of American companies about discriminatory treatment in China, Xi also asked that the Chinese businesses should be treated fairly by U.S. authorities. Some observers have already determined that Trump lost last week in his trade and security confrontation with China. He is a winner and
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
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Trump is laying groundwork for a new world order built around the US, China and Russia

U.S. President Donald Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping shake hands before their bilateral meeting during the G-20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan on June 29, 2019. Kevin Lamarque | Reuters

President Donald Trump showed during last week’s Group of 20 meeting in Osaka, Japan what he meant by repeated off-the-cuff remarks that he wanted to build good relations with Russia and China. He had an apparently friendly and wide-ranging discussion with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin on Friday. The two leaders agreed that American and Russian officials would continue their consultations about global and regional issues, and ways of improving and expanding bilateral political and economic ties. That was followed Saturday by Trump’s meeting with China’s President Xi Jinping who — in a dig at the U.S. — extolled multilateralism and sharply criticized trade protectionism in his opening remarks to the G-20 plenary session. Xi reiterated those views by saying that he wanted cooperation rather than “friction and confrontation.” Eventually, the Trump-Xi meeting ended up on a conciliatory note. Additional trade tariffs will be put to the side, and the two countries’ negotiating teams will pick up where they left off when trade talks were interrupted a month ago.

An olive branch to China

Ignoring complaints of American companies about discriminatory treatment in China, Xi also asked that the Chinese businesses should be treated fairly by U.S. authorities. Trump obliged by allowing American firms to sell technology to Chinese telecom giant Huawei in areas that were not critical to national security. What does that all mean? First and foremost, it signals the beginning of Trump’s firm focus on his reelection campaign, where a scuffle, or worse, with Russia and China would be a devastating event and leave him as a one-term player — even in the context of a rather uninspiring lineup of Democratic competitors. Calming things down with two countries branded by Washington as strategic competitors hell-bent on undermining America’s world order is a priority — “for now,” as Trump likes to say. And, as he also would say, “we shall see later,” presumably after his reelection. Will that fly as a feasible election strategy? Yes it will, because, as said earlier, Trump correctly sees that picking a fight with Russia and China is an existential threat to humanity Americans and the rest of the world would not support. So, Trump looks for peaceful and negotiated solutions with Russia in Syria, Ukraine and Venezuela, with a carrot for Moscow in opening up huge opportunities for American businesses eager to expand their operations in the country’s investment-starved enormous territories. In fact, the American business delegation was one of the largest at the recent economic forum in St. Petersburg, Russia. Moscow’s allegedly key policy influence within the OPEC oil cartel is also seen as a precious help in holding energy prices down, and staying the Federal Reserve’s hand in hiking interest rates to forestall energy-driven inflation pressures.

Trump assist for Japan’s winner

Iran is another issue where Russia has a helpful hand. That’s in sharp contrast with America’s closest allies — the United Kingdom, France and Germany — who not only publicly disagree with the U.S. on Iran, but also actively oppose Washington’s Iran sanctions and have established a special payment facility to do business with Tehran. China is an entirely different problem. While Russia could be an irritant in some global issues and in managing Europe’s centuries-old hatreds, China is already a very credible challenge to American world order — seriously undermining Washington’s increasingly unstable trans-Atlantic and Asian alliances. Some observers have already determined that Trump lost last week in his trade and security confrontation with China. That is a hasty, thoughtless and unworthy assessment. It is true, however, that Trump’s trade armistice with China was dictated by his domestic considerations. It is also true that Trump appeared to be scaling back his ill-advised political overreach under the guise of his unassailable trade case against China. The bottom line, again, for now, is that Trump will have to settle for China’s commitment to cut its American trade surpluses, but he definitely has to forget about interfering in China’s legislative process and economic policies – hot-button issues that China calls “issues of principle.” Trump wasted two-and-a-half years and $1 trillion of American money (rising trade deficits with China) in pursuit of political objectives that he should have known China would never accept. Whoever pushed Trump in that direction deserves his signature “You’re fired!” scream. But Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe deserves kudos. He is a winner and a happy man: Trump pushed China into his lap. Abe, as a result, should be the first to thank Trump for making Japan’s impossible dream come true. Xi, who looked like he was holding his nose during years of photo ops with Abe, last week accepted an invitation to pay a state visit to Japan next spring. Let’s see now how Trump manages Japan, its huge and systematic annual trade surpluses of about $70 billion on American trades, and Washington’s irrevocable obligation to unconditionally defend what is still called America’s key Asian ally. Putting it all together and lifting the sights from here and now, Trump may have started a process of enduring world peace. That concept is based on the idea that the U.S., Russia and China have been staring for years at an underlying security architecture of a uniquely binary choice: The end of humanity, or a new, hopefully American, world order built around those three key players whose economic and civilizational interests call for peaceful co-existence.

Investment thoughts


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
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Trump signs executive order slapping ‘hard-hitting’ sanctions on Iran over drone shootdown

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Monday imposing “hard-hitting” new sanctions on Iran in response to the downing of an unmanned U.S. drone last week. The new sanctions deny Iran Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and his office access to key financial resources, according to NBC News. Trump had announced over the weekend plans to slap additional sanctions on Iran to deter the country from obtaining nuclear weapons. Tensions between the U.S. and Iran have grown since May 2018,


President Donald Trump signed an executive order Monday imposing “hard-hitting” new sanctions on Iran in response to the downing of an unmanned U.S. drone last week. The new sanctions deny Iran Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and his office access to key financial resources, according to NBC News. Trump had announced over the weekend plans to slap additional sanctions on Iran to deter the country from obtaining nuclear weapons. Tensions between the U.S. and Iran have grown since May 2018,
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Trump signs executive order slapping 'hard-hitting' sanctions on Iran over drone shootdown

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Monday imposing “hard-hitting” new sanctions on Iran in response to the downing of an unmanned U.S. drone last week.

“We will continue to increase pressure on Tehran until the regime abandons its dangerous activities,” including its nuclear ambitions, Trump told reporters in the Oval Office.

“We do not seek conflict with Iran or any other country,” Trump added. “I can only tell you we cannot ever let Iran have a nuclear weapon.”

The new sanctions deny Iran Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and his office access to key financial resources, according to NBC News. In addition, the U.S. is sanctioning specific military leaders who were responsible for shooting down the drone, according to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

Trump had announced over the weekend plans to slap additional sanctions on Iran to deter the country from obtaining nuclear weapons. The U.S. already has sanctions on Iran’s oil industry and other sectors.

Tensions between the U.S. and Iran have grown since May 2018, when Trump pulled the U.S. out of the multilateral Iran nuclear deal that had been brokered during the Obama administration. Some sanctions that had been lifted under that deal snapped back into effect after the U.S. pulled out.

Tensions ratcheted up in recent weeks, following attacks on oil tankers near the Strait of Hormuz that the U.S. alleges were executed by Iran. Iran denies that it carried out the attacks. In addition, Iran announced early last week it would no longer abide by limits imposed on its uranium stockpile under the 2015 accord.

Last Thursday, an Iranian surface-to-air missile shot down an American surveillance drone that the U.S. says had been in international airspace. Iran maintains that the drone was flying in its airspace in violation of international law.

Trump approved military strikes against Iran in retaliation for the downing, but he abruptly reversed his decision, saying the expected casualty toll from a U.S. strike would have been disproportionate to Iran’s downing of the unmanned spy drone.

Shortly after Trump signed the order Monday, Mnuchin said some of the Iranian sanctions had been in the works before the drone was shot down. Iran’s Foreign Minister, Javad Zarif, would be sanctioned later this week, he said.

Mnuchin also responded to critics who question the effectiveness of the sanctions.

“We’ve literally locked up tens and tens of billions of dollars,” Mnuchin said in the White House briefing room. “These sanctions are highly effective.”

Earlier Monday, Trump tweeted that other countries that use the Strait of Hormuz “should be protecting their own ships on what has always been a dangerous journey.”

“We don’t even need to be there in that the U.S. has just become (by far) the largest producer of Energy anywhere in the world!” said Trump, who told NBC’s Chuck Todd last week that he doesn’t want war with Iran.

After the new sanctions came into effect, Zarif responded on Twitter that Trump “is 100% right that the US military has no business in the Persian Gulf. Removal of its forces is fully in line with interests of US and the world.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: kevin breuninger dan mangan, kevin breuninger, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, military, shootdown, zarif, order, nuclear, drone, sanctions, trump, irans, hardhitting, signs, iran, slapping, executive, week, downing


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Trump issues executive order increasing transparency in hospital prices, doctor fees

President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Monday issued an executive order designed to pressure insurers, doctors and other health-care providers to disclose more information about their prices. “We are fundamentally changing the nature of the health care marketplace,” Trump said before signing the order. Trump said the lack of price transparency has benefited industry giants “gr


President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Monday issued an executive order designed to pressure insurers, doctors and other health-care providers to disclose more information about their prices. “We are fundamentally changing the nature of the health care marketplace,” Trump said before signing the order. Trump said the lack of price transparency has benefited industry giants “gr
Trump issues executive order increasing transparency in hospital prices, doctor fees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr ashley turner, berkeley lovelace jr, ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doctor, hospital, care, fees, patients, order, president, transparency, trump, increasing, health, promise, issues, insurers, prices, executive, services


Trump issues executive order increasing transparency in hospital prices, doctor fees

President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump on Monday issued an executive order designed to pressure insurers, doctors and other health-care providers to disclose more information about their prices.

The executive order will direct the Department of Health and Human Services to require hospitals and insurers to disclose negotiated rates for services, as well as provide patients with out-of-pocket costs before their procedures.

“We are fundamentally changing the nature of the health care marketplace,” Trump said before signing the order.

Trump said the lack of price transparency has benefited industry giants “greatly” and has cost Americans millions of dollars in health care costs.

Price transparency can “empower” patient choice, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said in a call Monday with reporters.

“The president has a clear vision for American health care,” Azar said. “That’s the promise he’s made to American patients, and today represents a historic step for delivering on that promise.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr ashley turner, berkeley lovelace jr, ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doctor, hospital, care, fees, patients, order, president, transparency, trump, increasing, health, promise, issues, insurers, prices, executive, services


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American Airlines becomes first US airline to order new Airbus plane

American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week. IAG also ordered 14 Airbus XLR planes for its Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines. Neither American Airlines nor Airbus would disclose the financial terms of the deal, but American Airlines president Robert Isom said the XLR will initially cost the airline more than the A321neo. American is the first U.S.-based airline to orde


American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week. IAG also ordered 14 Airbus XLR planes for its Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines. Neither American Airlines nor Airbus would disclose the financial terms of the deal, but American Airlines president Robert Isom said the XLR will initially cost the airline more than the A321neo. American is the first U.S.-based airline to orde
American Airlines becomes first US airline to order new Airbus plane Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: phil lebeau leslie josephs, phil lebeau, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, xlr, airbus, american, plane, airlines, boeing, airline, order, routes, air


American Airlines becomes first US airline to order new Airbus plane

American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week.

The deal for the A321XLR jetliners, announced at the Paris Air Show on Wednesday, makes the Fort Worth-based airline the first major U.S. carrier to agree to buy the longest-range narrowbody plane Airbus now offers. Under the agreement, American will convert 30 of its orders for the smaller Airbus A321neo in favor of the longer-range model, and order an 20 additional A321XLRs.

The planes could replace some older aircraft like Boeing 757s. The new planes are aimed at longer routes where there aren’t enough travelers to support the expense of operating a larger twin-aisle jet.

American’s endorsement of the new Airbus planes comes as Boeing is mulling an all-new double-aisle plane targeting mid-range routes. Analysts had expected Boeing to unveil the new offering at the Paris Air Show. But hopes faded as the Chicago-based company has been hobbled by the crisis left by two fatal crashes of its best-selling 737 Max planes, which have been grounded since mid-March.

Boeing did win a surprise vote of confidence in the 737 Max during this year’s air show with a 200-plane order from British Airways’ parent International Consolidated Airlines Group, the first order for the beleaguered jets since they were grounded three months ago. IAG also ordered 14 Airbus XLR planes for its Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines.

Neither American Airlines nor Airbus would disclose the financial terms of the deal, but American Airlines president Robert Isom said the XLR will initially cost the airline more than the A321neo.

“My feeling is this aircraft certainly gives us much greater utility in the long run and at the end of the day will be worth quite bit more to us,” Isom said in a video discussing the deal released by American Airlines.

The 321XLR is expected to open more routes between the U.S. and smaller, secondary cities in Europe. For example, American could fly it between Philadelphia and Basel, Switzerland. “This opportunity, with the enhancements being made to the XLR are really cool,” said Isom.

Since Airbus announced plans for the plane on Monday, the company has racked up eight orders for more than 160 XLRs. Air Lease Corporation, which leases hundreds of airplanes to airlines around the world, placed the initial order for 27 XLRs. Air Lease CEO John Plueger told CNBC the plane is “a blockbuster.”

American is the first U.S.-based airline to order the newest Airbus plane, but Denver-based Frontier Airlines will also be flying the XLR shortly after deliveries begin in 2023. Frontier’s parent company, private equity firm, Indigo Partners placed an order for 50 XLR planes, with initial plans to put 18 of them into Frontier’s fleet, and the others in its stable of discount carriers in Latin America and Europe.

After the Paris Air Show in June 2011 American Airlines announced a massive 460-plane order that included both Boeing planes and Airbus jets, American’s first order from the European manufacturer in more than 20 years. The Airbus order included 260 planes, half of them for the neo, or new-engine option that provided more fuel efficiency.

A month later, Boeing unveiled the 737 Max, its fuel-saving update to the line of planes that had been flying since the 1960s.

— CNBC’s Meghan Reeder also contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: phil lebeau leslie josephs, phil lebeau, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, xlr, airbus, american, plane, airlines, boeing, airline, order, routes, air


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