China’s trade expo logs nearly $58 billion of deals: state media

Around $57.83 billion worth of deals were agreed for the year ahead at the China International Import Expo (CIIE), the official China Daily said on Saturday. Deals for intelligence and high-end equipment were set to total $16.46 billion, while those for consumer electronics and home appliances were around $4.33 billion, the paper said on its official Twitter-like Weibo site. Sales agreed for the automobile sector goods hit $11.99 billion, while clothing and consumer goods inked $3.37 billion, an


Around $57.83 billion worth of deals were agreed for the year ahead at the China International Import Expo (CIIE), the official China Daily said on Saturday. Deals for intelligence and high-end equipment were set to total $16.46 billion, while those for consumer electronics and home appliances were around $4.33 billion, the paper said on its official Twitter-like Weibo site. Sales agreed for the automobile sector goods hit $11.99 billion, while clothing and consumer goods inked $3.37 billion, an
China’s trade expo logs nearly $58 billion of deals: state media Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-11  Authors: fu tian, china news service, visual china group via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expo, import, nearly, billion, demonstrate, medical, logs, official, trade, chinas, deals, 58, nov, media, state, paper, goods, worth


China's trade expo logs nearly $58 billion of deals: state media

Around $57.83 billion worth of deals were agreed for the year ahead at the China International Import Expo (CIIE), the official China Daily said on Saturday.

CIIE took place from Nov. 5 to Nov. 10 and closed on Saturday. It brought thousands of foreign companies together with Chinese buyers in a bid to demonstrate the importing potential of the world’s second-biggest economy.

Deals for intelligence and high-end equipment were set to total $16.46 billion, while those for consumer electronics and home appliances were around $4.33 billion, the paper said on its official Twitter-like Weibo site.

Sales agreed for the automobile sector goods hit $11.99 billion, while clothing and consumer goods inked $3.37 billion, and food and agricultural products made $12.68 billion, the paper said.

In addition, $5.76 billion worth of medical devices and medical care goods were sold, the paper added.

The trade expo is designed to demonstrate goodwill amid mounting frictions with the United States and others. On Monday, Chinese President Xi Jinping promised to lower tariffs, broaden market access and import more from overseas.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-11  Authors: fu tian, china news service, visual china group via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expo, import, nearly, billion, demonstrate, medical, logs, official, trade, chinas, deals, 58, nov, media, state, paper, goods, worth


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Billionaires are buying media companies, New York Times not for sale

But no billionaire will buy The New York Times, says its publisher, A.G. Sulzberger. “The New York Times is not for sale,” Sulzberger told Recode’s Kara Swisher. The New York Times, which has had a paywall on digital content since March 2011, currently has 3.5 million subscribers, according to Sulzberger. On Nov. 1, Mark Thompson, president and chief executive officer of The New York Times Company, said that for the third quarter, subscription revenues accounted for nearly two-thirds of the comp


But no billionaire will buy The New York Times, says its publisher, A.G. Sulzberger. “The New York Times is not for sale,” Sulzberger told Recode’s Kara Swisher. The New York Times, which has had a paywall on digital content since March 2011, currently has 3.5 million subscribers, according to Sulzberger. On Nov. 1, Mark Thompson, president and chief executive officer of The New York Times Company, said that for the third quarter, subscription revenues accounted for nearly two-thirds of the comp
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: catherine clifford, jonathan torgovnik, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, sale, weve, billionaires, business, companies, told, billionaire, times, washington, buying, sulzberger, paper, media, york


Billionaires are buying media companies, New York Times not for sale

Billionaire Salesforce founder Marc Benioff bought Time. Billionaire Amazon founder Jeff Bezos bought The Washington Post. The Emerson Collective, a non-profit run by billionaire Laurene Powell Jobs (the widow of Steve Jobs), bought The Atlantic.

But no billionaire will buy The New York Times, says its publisher, A.G. Sulzberger.

“The New York Times is not for sale,” Sulzberger told Recode’s Kara Swisher.

Sulzberger isn’t criticizing the decisions of other publications: “All of us at the New York Times are delighted to see that because quite frankly we need more journalists in this country,” Sulzberger told Swisher, according to a transcript of their conversation published Monday.

“And it is not a zero sum game. And we need a healthy Washington Post in this country. And so we are delighted to see it growing again,” he said.

But the Times is different, he said.

“Washington Post is still a significantly smaller paper than the New York Times, and another paper owned by a billionaire, the Wall Street Journal, another very fine paper owned by a billionaire [Rupert Murdoch] is…is also smaller.”

In order to protect the business, The New York Times Company has a dual-class share structure: Class A shares are publicly traded and widely held (with a nearly $4.5 billion market cap), while the Ochs-Sulzberger family holds a controlling interest of the Class B shares (that do not trade publicly), which entitles them to elect 70 percent of the board, according to the Times. (The company did take a $250 million loan from Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim Helú in 2009 and paid it back in 2011.)

What the Times would do with a billion-dollar infusion from a wealthy titan is “an interesting question in the abstract,” Sulzberger told Swisher, but he still demurred, saying, “We cannot just be reliant on the altruism of people…. We’re going to have to make that billion dollars ourselves.”

The Times’ strategy to be a sustainable business is “to make stuff that’s worth paying for. And it’s that simple,” Sulzberger said.

The New York Times, which has had a paywall on digital content since March 2011, currently has 3.5 million subscribers, according to Sulzberger. On Nov. 1, Mark Thompson, president and chief executive officer of The New York Times Company, said that for the third quarter, subscription revenues accounted for nearly two-thirds of the company’s revenues.

Sulzberger also told Swisher more money would not change the quality of the journalism the publication is producing.

“I do not think for a second that the ownership structure of the New York Times is somehow hindering our ability to invest in great journalism. The last year we’ve expanded our Washington bureau, we’ve expanded our tech coverage. … We’ve expanded our business coverage,” Sulzberger says to Swisher.

“Point to me where someone has just thrown a ton of money at the journalism problem, just thrown a ton of money and it’s worked out well.”

Plus, said the publisher, the paper does not want even the appearance of bias.

“The thing that makes the New York Times special, the thing that I think distinguishes us from almost any other news organization, not any, but among a handful of news organizations, is its independence. That is baked into every fiber of what this institution is,” Sulzberger said.

See also:

Jeff Bezos says this is how he plans to spend the bulk of his fortune

How a cheap plastic camera on a trip to Italy inspired Instagram, according to co-founder Kevin Systrom

Thinx CEO: This is the ‘secret sauce’ to running a successful e-commerce business in an Amazon world


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: catherine clifford, jonathan torgovnik, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, sale, weve, billionaires, business, companies, told, billionaire, times, washington, buying, sulzberger, paper, media, york


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Happy birthday bitcoin: The cryptocurrency is turning ten

Happy birthday bitcoin: The cryptocurrency is turning ten4 Hours AgoTen years ago the bitcoin white paper was released, marking the beginning of a cryptocurrency that would soon dominate the market.


Happy birthday bitcoin: The cryptocurrency is turning ten4 Hours AgoTen years ago the bitcoin white paper was released, marking the beginning of a cryptocurrency that would soon dominate the market.
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ten4, white, cryptocurrency, marking, birthday, turning, soon, market, paper, released, happy, bitcoin


Happy birthday bitcoin: The cryptocurrency is turning ten

Happy birthday bitcoin: The cryptocurrency is turning ten

4 Hours Ago

Ten years ago the bitcoin white paper was released, marking the beginning of a cryptocurrency that would soon dominate the market.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-31
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I tried living a zero waste life for 7 days — here’s what I learned

Truly minimizing waste requires much more substantive lifestyle changes, as I found out firsthand. During my week, I brought reusable containers everywhere – from the Whole Foods hot buffet to the ice cream store to my local lunchtime salad joint. In a sea of people, I was often the only one handing my reusable containers to anyone who would serve me. I learned two major lessons: first, living on zero waste is incredibly challenging and second, our society is nowhere near ready to cater to a zer


Truly minimizing waste requires much more substantive lifestyle changes, as I found out firsthand. During my week, I brought reusable containers everywhere – from the Whole Foods hot buffet to the ice cream store to my local lunchtime salad joint. In a sea of people, I was often the only one handing my reusable containers to anyone who would serve me. I learned two major lessons: first, living on zero waste is incredibly challenging and second, our society is nowhere near ready to cater to a zer
I tried living a zero waste life for 7 days — here’s what I learned Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-31  Authors: andrea kramar
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, life, days, brought, living, waste, containers, reusable, learned, bags, minimizing, paper, zero, incredibly, heres, tried


I tried living a zero waste life for 7 days — here's what I learned

For seven days, I tried to live on as little waste as possible. I’ve always been into recycling, reuse and minimizing my carbon footprint, and I wanted to see how far I could take it.

It turns out grocery shopping with reusable tote bags, using travel canteens at coffee shops and separating plastics from paper and glass are just tips of the zero-waste iceberg. Truly minimizing waste requires much more substantive lifestyle changes, as I found out firsthand.

During my week, I brought reusable containers everywhere – from the Whole Foods hot buffet to the ice cream store to my local lunchtime salad joint. I also carried household silverware in my backpack, refused plastic and paper bags, used washcloths in lieu of paper napkins and brought my compost to the farmer’s market. Everyday habits like chewing gum (a highly packaged food) to ordering in on Seamless (another source of heavy packaging) became off-limits — and incredibly hard to forego.

I felt like a dinosaur almost everywhere I went. In a sea of people, I was often the only one handing my reusable containers to anyone who would serve me. I learned two major lessons: first, living on zero waste is incredibly challenging and second, our society is nowhere near ready to cater to a zero waste lifestyle.

Still, every change counts when it comes toward treating our earth better, and I was happy to tack on a few hacks to my daily routine.

Watch the video above to see how I lived my seven-day zero waste challenge.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: US families waste $1,500 a year throwing out food—here’s how to save more and eat better


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-31  Authors: andrea kramar
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Navigating fintech’s rise: IMF, World Bank launch guide for policymakers

The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank jointly released a paper that will guide policymakers around the world in their handling of the rise of financial technology — commonly known as fintech. The paper, called the Bali Fintech Agenda, was launched on Thursday on the Indonesian island where the IMF and the World Bank are holding their annual meetings. Fintech has the potential to reach the 1.7 billion adults in the world that don’t have access to financial services, IMF Managing Dire


The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank jointly released a paper that will guide policymakers around the world in their handling of the rise of financial technology — commonly known as fintech. The paper, called the Bali Fintech Agenda, was launched on Thursday on the Indonesian island where the IMF and the World Bank are holding their annual meetings. Fintech has the potential to reach the 1.7 billion adults in the world that don’t have access to financial services, IMF Managing Dire
Navigating fintech’s rise: IMF, World Bank launch guide for policymakers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policymakers, navigating, bank, fintechs, technology, financial, work, paper, services, world, launch, fintech, systems, imf, rise, guide


Navigating fintech's rise: IMF, World Bank launch guide for policymakers

The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank jointly released a paper that will guide policymakers around the world in their handling of the rise of financial technology — commonly known as fintech.

The paper, called the Bali Fintech Agenda, was launched on Thursday on the Indonesian island where the IMF and the World Bank are holding their annual meetings.

The paper outlines 12 “elements” or considerations that the IMF, the World Bank and governments can keep in mind when designing policies and regulations that can maximize the benefits of fintech while keeping financial systems sound.

Those “elements” include using fintech to promote financial inclusion, allowing new technology players to have level playing fields with existing companies and having countries work together to protect the global financial system.

Fintech has the potential to reach the 1.7 billion adults in the world that don’t have access to financial services, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said in a statement.

But, new technology could threaten existing financial systems. For example, volatility in the price of cryptocurrencies has raised concerns about investor protection, according to the paper.

“Fintech can have a major social and economic impact for them and across the membership in general. All countries are trying to reap these benefits, while also mitigating the risks,” Lagarde said.

“We need greater international cooperation to achieve that, and to make sure the fintech revolution benefits the many and not just the few,” she added.

World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim said fintech would be particularly helpful to low-income countries, where access to financial services is low.

Both organizations said the paper doesn’t represent current work, nor does it aim to provide specific guidance or policy advice. They will, however, start to develop specific programs on fintech.

The IMF will focus initially on the implications on monetary and financial stability and how international monetary systems and global financial safety nets evolve. The World Bank will work on using fintech to deepen financial markets, enhance responsible access to financial services, and improve cross-border payments and remittance transfer systems.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policymakers, navigating, bank, fintechs, technology, financial, work, paper, services, world, launch, fintech, systems, imf, rise, guide


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Cramer: China is more of a ‘paper tiger’ than people think, and that plays into Trump’s hand on trade

The term “paper tiger” refers to an outwardly powerful or dangerous force that’s actually inwardly weak or ineffectual. Empirically, that’s not the case, particularly when you look at the Chinese stock market, which does matter,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” The U.S. trade war has shown that China is not impervious to the measures being brought to bear by Trump, Cramer said. There’s a school of thought that the volatile Chinese stock market is not an important indicator of the health o


The term “paper tiger” refers to an outwardly powerful or dangerous force that’s actually inwardly weak or ineffectual. Empirically, that’s not the case, particularly when you look at the Chinese stock market, which does matter,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” The U.S. trade war has shown that China is not impervious to the measures being brought to bear by Trump, Cramer said. There’s a school of thought that the volatile Chinese stock market is not an important indicator of the health o
Cramer: China is more of a ‘paper tiger’ than people think, and that plays into Trump’s hand on trade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: matthew j belvedere, nicolas asfouri, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thats, think, trumps, chinese, tiger, plays, trade, stock, paper, china, market, hand, cramer, weak


Cramer: China is more of a 'paper tiger' than people think, and that plays into Trump's hand on trade

President Donald Trump’s approach to levying tariffs on China in hopes of applying enough economic pressure to get Beijing to change its ways on trade has a better chance of working than many people expect, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Monday.

“I think the president is right. I favor tariffs against the Chinese because I think they’re far more of a paper tiger than people realize,” Cramer said, contending the world’s second-largest economy and stock market are more vulnerable than the mainstream media depicts. The term “paper tiger” refers to an outwardly powerful or dangerous force that’s actually inwardly weak or ineffectual.

“The intelligentsia in this country [the U.S.] has decided that China is all-powerful and we’re all weak. Empirically, that’s not the case, particularly when you look at the Chinese stock market, which does matter,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.”

The U.S. trade war has shown that China is not impervious to the measures being brought to bear by Trump, Cramer said. “They may be communist, but they have a capitalist bear market going there.”

There’s a school of thought that the volatile Chinese stock market is not an important indicator of the health of China’s economy because households there don’t have much of their wealth invested.

“We can think that that doesn’t matter but that’s cause we’re being elitist. And I think that’s a big mistake,” Cramer said.

Overnight, the Shanghai composite tanked 3.7 percent on the first trading day back after being closed for a weeklong Chinese holiday. Following weakness last week across Asia, Europe and on Wall Street, that sharp decline was being viewed as a catch-up move. The Shanghai composite has dropped nearly 18 percent year-to-date.

Against a backdrop of persistent trade concerns and a sign that more stimulus is needed, China’s central bank on Sunday cut for the fourth time this year the amount of cash banks need to have on hand.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: matthew j belvedere, nicolas asfouri, afp, getty images
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Britain could be seeking ‘an all-UK customs union with the EU’ — and Ireland backs the idea

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May is reportedly working on a proposal that could see her seek an all-U.K. customs union with the European Union (EU) and has received the tacit backing of Ireland for such a post-Brexit deal, the Financial Times said Thursday. The U.K. could stay within a customs union until a U.K./EU trade deal is finalized, the paper said. The border between Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the U.K.) is one of the biggest stumbling blocks in Brexit talks. The border between


U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May is reportedly working on a proposal that could see her seek an all-U.K. customs union with the European Union (EU) and has received the tacit backing of Ireland for such a post-Brexit deal, the Financial Times said Thursday. The U.K. could stay within a customs union until a U.K./EU trade deal is finalized, the paper said. The border between Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the U.K.) is one of the biggest stumbling blocks in Brexit talks. The border between
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: holly ellyatt, paul faith, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, eu, ireland, union, alluk, border, britain, backs, customs, paper, seeking, deal, idea, northern, uk


Britain could be seeking 'an all-UK customs union with the EU' — and Ireland backs the idea

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May is reportedly working on a proposal that could see her seek an all-U.K. customs union with the European Union (EU) and has received the tacit backing of Ireland for such a post-Brexit deal, the Financial Times said Thursday.

The British newspaper reported that one of the proposals May is working on “is for the whole U.K. to participate in a customs union with the EU,” a scenario that could take effect if no other solution to the Irish border issue is found. The U.K. could stay within a customs union until a U.K./EU trade deal is finalized, the paper said.

Officials in Dublin, not named by the paper, “privately argue it could settle the border question and open the way to a deal” but the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier has rejected the idea. A senior Irish official involved in Brexit talks was cited by the paper as saying, “whether Europe accepts it or not is another conversation.”

Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar and Barnier are meeting later Thursday.

The border between Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the U.K.) is one of the biggest stumbling blocks in Brexit talks. The border between the two countries will become the U.K.’s only land border with the EU after Brexit, which is due to take place in March 2019.

Arguments have centered on how to maintain trade and the free movement of goods and people between the north and south of the country – crucial to the island’s economy, society and the hard-won peace process – while maintaining EU customs rules and checks.

There were suggestions that Northern Ireland could remain part of the EU single market or some kind of customs union but the U.K. (and pro-U.K. politicians in Northern Ireland) refused to allow the country to be treated differently to the rest of the U.K.

Keeping the whole of the U.K. in a customs union with the EU – which mean there would be no tariffs on goods transported between the U.K. and EU (but common external tariffs) – could therefore prevent the need for a hard border, and costly and complicated customs checks.

The “temporary” extension of the customs union would prevent Northern Ireland being carved off from the rest of the U.K. into a separate EU customs territory, the Financial Times report noted. Some British ministers predict the arrangement might in practice extend well into the next decade.

May delivered a keynote speech at the final day of the Conservative Party conference on Wednesday at which she told delegates that Britain’s post-Brexit future is “full of promise” and that the country “has everything we need to succeed.”

Read the original story in the FT here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: holly ellyatt, paul faith, afp, getty images
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Jeff Bezos says his ‘stewardship of the Washington Post’ helps ‘support American democracy’

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos offered some new insight into how he views his ownership of the Washington Post on Thursday, writing that his stewardship helps “support…American democracy.” Bezos bought the Post in 2013. The paper has been a lightning rod of criticism for some conservatives, particularly President Trump, who frequently calls it the ‘Bezos Washington Post’ on social media. Bezos and various editors at the paper have said he does not participate in editorial decisions. Bezos is scheduled


Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos offered some new insight into how he views his ownership of the Washington Post on Thursday, writing that his stewardship helps “support…American democracy.” Bezos bought the Post in 2013. The paper has been a lightning rod of criticism for some conservatives, particularly President Trump, who frequently calls it the ‘Bezos Washington Post’ on social media. Bezos and various editors at the paper have said he does not participate in editorial decisions. Bezos is scheduled
Jeff Bezos says his ‘stewardship of the Washington Post’ helps ‘support American democracy’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: matt rosoff, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, american, amazon, bezos, stewardship, president, sales, paper, views, jeff, post, democracy, washington, helps


Jeff Bezos says his 'stewardship of the Washington Post' helps 'support American democracy'

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos offered some new insight into how he views his ownership of the Washington Post on Thursday, writing that his stewardship helps “support…American democracy.”

The views were expressed in a note Bezos wrote to announce the creation of a $2 billion fund to help fight homelessness and establish high-quality preschools for low-income children.

Bezos bought the Post in 2013. The paper has been a lightning rod of criticism for some conservatives, particularly President Trump, who frequently calls it the ‘Bezos Washington Post’ on social media. It published a number of investigations into President Trump’s business dealings and has been generally critical of the president both during his election campaign and since he took office.

Trump has also criticized Amazon directly, accusing it of not paying its fair share of taxes or postal delivery fees. In fact, Amazon collects sales tax on most sales, although some sales by third-party sellers go untaxed, and the postal service has actually benefited from the increase in deliveries that Amazon has spurred.

Bezos instituted a number of changes at the Post, including setting up a paywall and investing in back-end technology, and the paper went from losing money to turning a profit in 2016, Bezos said in a speech last year. Bezos and various editors at the paper have said he does not participate in editorial decisions.

In the announcement, Bezos mentioned several other projects he’s funded as well:

In addition to Amazon my areas of focus so far have included investment in the future of our planet and civilization through the development of foundational space infrastructure, support of American democracy through stewardship of the Washington Post, and financial contributions to the dedicated and innovative champions of a variety of causes, from cancer research, to marriage equality, to college scholarships for immigrant students, to decreasing political polarization through cross-partisan support of principled, next-generation military vets running for Congress.

Bezos is scheduled to speak at a public dinner on Thursday night in Washington, D.C.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: matt rosoff, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, american, amazon, bezos, stewardship, president, sales, paper, views, jeff, post, democracy, washington, helps


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Print is dead? Not at The Villages retirement community

THE VILLAGES, Fla. — Practically every morning begins with a thud on the driveways of the roughly 50,000 homes here. That newspaper, The Villages Daily Sun, which exhaustively covers this rapidly growing retirement community in Central Florida, is in the midst of a boom that few other papers can even imagine. Just this week, Pittsburgh became the largest city in the United States without a daily print paper when the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette announced it was cutting its print distribution to five


THE VILLAGES, Fla. — Practically every morning begins with a thud on the driveways of the roughly 50,000 homes here. That newspaper, The Villages Daily Sun, which exhaustively covers this rapidly growing retirement community in Central Florida, is in the midst of a boom that few other papers can even imagine. Just this week, Pittsburgh became the largest city in the United States without a daily print paper when the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette announced it was cutting its print distribution to five
Print is dead? Not at The Villages retirement community Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-04  Authors: ted geltner, michael adno, the new york times
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, staff, reporters, dead, newspaper, print, real, paper, community, papers, orlando, retirement, villages, daily


Print is dead? Not at The Villages retirement community

THE VILLAGES, Fla. — Practically every morning begins with a thud on the driveways of the roughly 50,000 homes here. The newspaper has arrived.

That newspaper, The Villages Daily Sun, which exhaustively covers this rapidly growing retirement community in Central Florida, is in the midst of a boom that few other papers can even imagine. According to the Alliance for Audited Media, the Sun’s weekday circulation of 55,700 is up 169 percent since 2003. Over the same time, weekday newspaper circulation across the United States has dropped 43 percent. (The Orlando Sentinel, the region’s largest newspaper, is down 53 percent.)

And The Daily Sun boasts an enviable 92 percent market penetration, a figure that is even higher during the winter months, when the community is at peak capacity.

More from The New York Times:

Can you spot the deceptive Facebook post?

Amazon, following Apple, reaches $1 trillion in value

Make your daughter practice math. She’ll thank you later.

Elsewhere around the country, the industry continues to cough and wheeze its way from print to digital, with layoffs and closings in its wake. Just this week, Pittsburgh became the largest city in the United States without a daily print paper when the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette announced it was cutting its print distribution to five days a week, ending a nearly 100-year history of seven-day-a-week publication.

“The newspaper is one of the things that is promoted when people come to decide if they want to buy a house here,” said Millard Johnson, a retired library executive from Indianapolis who moved to The Villages in 2010. “They see this big newspaper — The Villages Daily Sun is three times the thickness of The Indianapolis Star — so it looks like a real paper, like papers used to look. When you see it in The Villages, the newspaper is one of the things that is an attraction.”

While the rest of the newspaper industry has spent the past few years trying figure out how to move readers from paper to screens — and to make money on both digital subscribers and advertisers — The Daily Sun is proudly, defiantly, a print-first publication.

Its marketing materials are written to sway prospective advertisers toward the benefits of reaching their readers through paper. Subscription and newsstand prices are kept exceedingly low. (A seven-day, 52-week subscription is $76. A similar package for the Orlando Sentinel costs $312 plus tax.)

A recent issue of The Daily Sun included 48 pages of editorial content, 14 more of classified ads, and a 36-page insert that listed the schedules of hundreds of clubs and recreation centers — information that virtually all newspapers now publish only online. The pages were packed with display ads for banks, golf courses, doctors, real estate, restaurants and myriad other retail outlets.

Advertisements for reporter and editor positions boast that new hires will be given the “rare opportunity to focus on journalistic quality without the distraction of digital workflow.”

With its large and growing editorial staff of approximately 50, the Daily Sun newsroom operates in ways that most newspaper journalists can only dream of anymore.

The paper has a special-projects team, and reporters and editors work on in-depth news articles that may take up to a year to complete. In 2016, a five-person investigative team worked for months examining Florida’s death-penalty sentencing policies. The resulting series claimed multiple awards. In addition to reporting, the paper puts considerable resources into design. Last year, The Daily Sun was one of 12 finalists in a competition to be the world’s best-designed newspaper, as chosen by the Society of Newspaper Design.

But the investigative powers of the newspaper have their limits; they are unlikely to be unleashed on The Villages itself. The Daily Sun is published by The Villages Operating Company.

Both the paper’s publisher, Phil Markward, and the executive editor, Bonita Burton, declined to be interviewed for this article, or to comment on its editorial policies.

It may be a thriving example of what a community newspaper can be, but many of The Daily Sun’s employees cannot live where they work.

Many new reporters are hired directly out of college, and the staff has a large proportion of reporters and editors in their 20s or 30s. Since residents of The Villages must be 55 or older in most circumstances, the younger Daily Sun staff members usually live in nearby towns, and drive to Ocala or Orlando for night life and to interact with people in their own age group.

Though the paper sees considerable turnover, The Daily Sun is likely to continue to find willing journalists as long as The Villages is developing new swaths of Florida real estate and more retirees are buying in.

“It’s a different vibe, way more positive,” Nicole Deck, a former reporter for The Daily Sun, said of working at the paper. Ms. Deck, now a communications assistant in North Carolina, worked at other newspapers after she left The Daily Sun in 2014 and suffered through the downsizing now common across the industry.

“You feel more comfortable,” she said. “You know the paper is doing well, so you’re not always worried about getting laid off.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-04  Authors: ted geltner, michael adno, the new york times
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, staff, reporters, dead, newspaper, print, real, paper, community, papers, orlando, retirement, villages, daily


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After a Starbucks opens in town, housing prices tend to rise, Harvard study finds

Each new Starbucks boosts the value of housing prices in a neighborhood. A new Starbucks introduced into a ZIP code is associated with a 0.5 percent increase in housing prices within a year, the paper found. It’s not clear whether housing prices are rising due to the Starbucks opening itself or simply because more affluent customers that would go to the coffee chain have moved into the area. Harvard economics professor Edward Glaeser said Yelp data reveals it may be the latter. The study found t


Each new Starbucks boosts the value of housing prices in a neighborhood. A new Starbucks introduced into a ZIP code is associated with a 0.5 percent increase in housing prices within a year, the paper found. It’s not clear whether housing prices are rising due to the Starbucks opening itself or simply because more affluent customers that would go to the coffee chain have moved into the area. Harvard economics professor Edward Glaeser said Yelp data reveals it may be the latter. The study found t
After a Starbucks opens in town, housing prices tend to rise, Harvard study finds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-04  Authors: thomas franck, newscast, uig, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, harvard, yelp, starbucks, increase, tend, study, town, rise, associated, finds, prices, paper, neighborhood, housing, zip, opens


After a Starbucks opens in town, housing prices tend to rise, Harvard study finds

Each new Starbucks boosts the value of housing prices in a neighborhood. And not by an insignificant amount.

This data point is revealed in a broader study on gentrification by the Harvard Business School that relied on information from Yelp, the online restaurant review platform, and the United States Census.

A new Starbucks introduced into a ZIP code is associated with a 0.5 percent increase in housing prices within a year, the paper found.

It’s not clear whether housing prices are rising due to the Starbucks opening itself or simply because more affluent customers that would go to the coffee chain have moved into the area.

Harvard economics professor Edward Glaeser said Yelp data reveals it may be the latter. The study found that each 10-unit increase in the number of reviews is associated with a 1.4 percent increase in housing prices in the ZIP code.

“The most natural hypothesis to us is that restaurants respond to exogenous changes in neighborhood composition, not that restaurant availability is driving neighborhood change,” the paper concludes.

This is the broader point of the paper, which surmises that gentrification is “strongly associated” with increases in the numbers of grocery stores, cafes, restaurants and bars.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-04  Authors: thomas franck, newscast, uig, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, harvard, yelp, starbucks, increase, tend, study, town, rise, associated, finds, prices, paper, neighborhood, housing, zip, opens


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