Gymboree brand will stage a comeback in 2020 thanks to Children’s Place

The Gymboree clothing brand for boys and girls will be back online and in some stores next year, thanks to The Children’s Place. The Children’s Place had paid $76 million for the rights associated with both Gymboree and its Crazy 8 brand earlier this year, after Gymboree filed for bankruptcy protection back in January. On Tuesday morning, The Children’s Place announced in a press release it will relaunch Gymboree.com in 2020 and add Gymboree shops inside 200 of its stores across the U.S. and Can


The Gymboree clothing brand for boys and girls will be back online and in some stores next year, thanks to The Children’s Place. The Children’s Place had paid $76 million for the rights associated with both Gymboree and its Crazy 8 brand earlier this year, after Gymboree filed for bankruptcy protection back in January. On Tuesday morning, The Children’s Place announced in a press release it will relaunch Gymboree.com in 2020 and add Gymboree shops inside 200 of its stores across the U.S. and Can
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rights, place, childrens, comeback, stores, 2020, kids, gymboree, stage, parents, brand, market, gymboreecom, thanks


Gymboree brand will stage a comeback in 2020 thanks to Children's Place

The Gymboree clothing brand for boys and girls will be back online and in some stores next year, thanks to The Children’s Place.

The Children’s Place had paid $76 million for the rights associated with both Gymboree and its Crazy 8 brand earlier this year, after Gymboree filed for bankruptcy protection back in January. At the time, Gymboree had 800 locations, all of which shuttered. It marked the second time Gymboree had gone bankrupt in under two years.

On Tuesday morning, The Children’s Place announced in a press release it will relaunch Gymboree.com in 2020 and add Gymboree shops inside 200 of its stores across the U.S. and Canada.

“The goal is to provide a Gymboree brand experience that reconnects mom to the branded product that she love,” Claudia Lima-Guinehut, senior vice president of global merchandising for The Children’s Place, said in a statement.

The Children’s Place said it will launch a new loyalty program for Gymboree customers as well, and that shoppers will be able to order from both Gymboree.com and TheChildrensPlace.com using a shared shopping cart.

Gymboree’s liquidation had presented parents with a more fragmented landscape to shop for kids clothing.

Target had been gaining market share with its private labels, while Gap was also winning more parents, having acquired the rights to Janie & Jack, which sells kids clothing a bit more on the pricier side.

Shares of The Children’s Place have fallen more than 16% this year. The company has a market cap of about $1.2 billion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lauren thomas
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You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here’s how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi


Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ivana pino, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
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You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here's how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. That’s a mistake, says Nikhol Bentley, a math teacher at Gilbert Stuart Middle School in Providence, Rhode Island. “People tend to sell kids short,” says Bentley. “They are extremely smart, and letting them be part of the financial conversations at home is a good way to make sure that they’re able to make smarter financial choices when they’re older.” Teaching your child concepts like spending, saving, and earning can help them establish good financial habits that can last them the rest of their lives. And there are age-appropriate ways to get started early on. The National Education Association (NEA) provides lesson plans for teaching financial literacy to children as young as 4, and there are ways to lay the groundwork with even younger kids.

Counting

Around age 2, your child may be able to sound out different numbers, recognize numerals, or count out a sequence of numbers that they’ve heard over and over again. By age 4, most children are counting up to 10 or even beyond, according to LeapFrog, which helps parents use technology as a learning tool. Counting is the first step in building and strengthening math skills in the classroom. It’s basic but absolutely necessary. Parents can help reinforce this skill by encouraging their child count everyday items like crayons or the number of apples or bananas you pick up at the grocery store.

Spending and earning

Children can loosely understand the concept of income early on, says Bentley: As soon as they start school, or even before, they can grasp how currency works. Though they’re not actually exchanging goods for money, they can show they understand value by trading Pokemon cards with each other, for example. “They learn to share, trade cards or toys for things that they want, or some teachers will have some sort of ticket system that reinforces this concept of saving up your tickets for rewards or what it means to not have enough,” says Bentley. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Any type of reward system helps emphasize this idea of currency, and kids will pick up on the fact that there are certain things they need to do or behaviors they need to manage in order to earn that extra ‘income,'” explains Bentley. The goal isn’t to teach them not to spend but to show them how to spend wisely so they end up feeling satisfied. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. “Maybe it’s letting them pick out a reasonably priced souvenir on a family vacation. They are capable of understanding and retaining these things.”

Saving

Two in three parents give their child an allowance, shelling out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save what they get. Encouragement from parents, though, can make a difference.

Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money. Marguerita Cheng chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth

Bentley suggests one helpful exercise to help even younger children get used to saving: Let your child pick out a toy at the store. Explain how much it costs, and emphasize that they’ll need to save up their own money if they want to take it home. However old your child is when you start offering an allowance, make sure to give them a consistent amount on a consistent basis, “because it’s like getting a paycheck,” Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education told Grow earlier this year.

Avoiding conversations about money can cost you


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ivana pino, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
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3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th


If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th
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3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. Consider getting them a savings jar or even opening them a bank account. Two in three parents give their child an allowance. They dole out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and in many cases the money is linked to the completion of household chores. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” Nearly all, or 92%, of parents say it’s important for their child to learn how to manage money, and helping your kids become savers early on is a great way to make that happen. By saving a third of a $30 weekly allowance, your child would be able to sock away over $500 every year. “It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money,” says Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education. “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. They’re the front line of defense.”

Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster Money

Here are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make the most of it over time.

1. Set kids up to be savers

Encouraging your kid to save even part of their allowance can help them establish healthy financial habits. Start by conditioning your kids to automatically save a certain amount each month because “then they don’t miss it,” says Golden. With younger children, Golden suggests using a savings jar so they can see the money building up. Then, once your child starts asking about how banks work, consider opening a savings account. Pay attention to their cues and take advantage of their interest, he says. “Once you’ve started with the habit of saving when you’re young, you start seeing what saving [money] actually does for you,” Clark D. Randall, a certified financial planner and the founder of Financial Enlightenment in Dallas, Texas, told Grow earlier this year. Parents are usually the No. 1 money influence on their kids. In a recent survey of “supersavers,” or people who put an impressive share of their income away for retirement, 80% gave credit to their parents for positively influencing their savings habits.

It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money. Paul Golden Managing director, National Endowment for Financial Education

2. Teach them to budget

Instead of saving, kids, like many adults, put money toward the things they want in the moment. In the AICPA’s survey, parents reported that kids spend most of their allowance money on outings with friends (47%) followed by digital devices and downloads (37%) and toys (33%). Learning to budget, though, will allow your child to think about all what they want to prioritize in the coming week, month, or year. If there’s something expensive your child really wants, you can drive home the connection between spending and earning by explaining how budgeting can help them meet their goals. Let’s say they want a $200 tablet but they end up blowing their allowance each week going out with friends. By setting aside, say, $20 of their $30 allowance, they can count on getting what they want in only 10 weeks. If they want it sooner, they can sock away the full $30 each week. And if they continue to splurge instead of save, don’t get mad. “It’s OK to make mistakes,” says Golden. “That starts to condition us as adults. There’s not some fairy that will come down and get you through till the next paycheck” when you’re an adult, either. So the best time for kids to trip up is when parents are there to guide and counsel them, and help them figure out what to do better going forward.

3. Help them differentiate between wants and needs

By helping them learn to budget for short- and long-term goals at a young age, you’re setting your kids up to tell the difference between wants and needs, explains Golden. Older kids may have to cover bills for the first time. “Once you have teens, they have to start prioritizing things they’ve never done [before], like putting gas in the car or paying for auto insurance,” he says. Condition kids to put money aside by encouraging them to save and budget starting at a young age, and they’ll be prepared to put their needs first. That, in turn, can help them avoid certain pitfalls of overspending, like winding up without money for gas.

Bonus advice: How much to give and how to set an example


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: alizah salario, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
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Your kid makes $1,500 a year in allowance. Here’s how to turn that into a money lesson

But most of them won’t be able to make a big buy with allowance money. “We as parents have to teach them what’s in it for them [to save],” Almonte said “Why shouldn’t they buy that toy today? Three out of four adults say the most important purpose of an allowance is to teach children the value of money and financial responsibility. Show them where the money goesOpen a bank account with your child so they see where their money ends up. “It’s really hard for someone to be like ‘here’s $10 for your


But most of them won’t be able to make a big buy with allowance money. “We as parents have to teach them what’s in it for them [to save],” Almonte said “Why shouldn’t they buy that toy today? Three out of four adults say the most important purpose of an allowance is to teach children the value of money and financial responsibility. Show them where the money goesOpen a bank account with your child so they see where their money ends up. “It’s really hard for someone to be like ‘here’s $10 for your
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: mallika mitra, jill cornfield
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Your kid makes $1,500 a year in allowance. Here's how to turn that into a money lesson

Jose Luis Pelaez Inc | DigitalVision | Getty Images

Children are pocketing an average of $30 a week in allowance — enough to rack up around $1,500 in a year. But most of them won’t be able to make a big buy with allowance money. Only 3% of parents say their kids primarily save their cash, according to a new telephone survey from the American Institute of CPAs. The organization polled 1,002 adults from Aug. 22 to Aug. 28. Of these, 273 identified as a parent or guardian of at least one child aged 25 or younger who is living at home. “Once you put money in someone’s hands, it feels like it’s just burning a hole there and they have to do something about it,” said David Almonte, CPA and member of the American Institute of CPAs’ financial literacy commission.

Close to half of the parents said their children’s allowances go toward outings with friends, while 37% said their kids spend the money on digital devices or downloads. A third of parents said their kids use the cash to buy toys. “We as parents have to teach them what’s in it for them [to save],” Almonte said “Why shouldn’t they buy that toy today? Whats the benefit of waiting?” Three out of four adults say the most important purpose of an allowance is to teach children the value of money and financial responsibility. Here are some tips on how to do that.

Make them earn it

SDI Productions | E+ | Getty Images

Nothing is free — not even that weekly allowance. “If you just give someone money, you help them resolve a short-term need,” Almonte said. “If you teach someone to earn money, you set them up for financial success for the rest of their life.” One way to do this is through chores. This teaches children the real world lesson that, “if you don’t show up and put in the effort, you don’t get a paycheck,” Almonte said. Another option is to reward them for saving by matching dollars for dollars — this allows them to turn $20 of savings, for example, into $40.

Show them where the money goes

Open a bank account with your child so they see where their money ends up. Bring your kids to the bank and explain to them what happens to their money when they keep it in a savings account instead of spending it. “It’s really hard for someone to be like ‘here’s $10 for your allowance,’ then take it back to put it into savings,” Almonte said. “As a kid, you’re like ‘where did my money go?”

If you teach someone to earn money, you set them up for financial success for the rest of their life. David Almonte CPA and member of the American Institute of CPAs’ financial literacy commission

Because a lot of banking is now done digitally, this can also be done online. Cristina Guglielmetti, a certified financial planner and founder of Future Perfect Planning in New York, does this with her 9-year-old son. “I log into the bank and show him ‘this is where our interest is, this is how much we had last month and this is how much we have this month,'” Guglielmetti said. Seeing and understanding bank statements can help children track the increase in their savings and the decrease in their spending. Another way to show them where their money goes is to tell them that for every dollar they save, you’ll donate 10% to an organization of their choice. You and your child can hand-deliver the donation, Almonte said.

Talk about money early and often

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: mallika mitra, jill cornfield
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The FAFSA opens today—here’s how to complete it, in 6 simple steps

Making a list of target schools is a good way for students to inspire and motivate themselves to complete the FAFSA. To log into the site, students and parents need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID, which will require making a username and password. Parent demographics: Parents’ marital status; parents’ names, social security numbers and birthdays; parents’ email address and household information, such as who lives with them. (Note: If the student is an independent, they will not need to


Making a list of target schools is a good way for students to inspire and motivate themselves to complete the FAFSA. To log into the site, students and parents need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID, which will require making a username and password. Parent demographics: Parents’ marital status; parents’ names, social security numbers and birthdays; parents’ email address and household information, such as who lives with them. (Note: If the student is an independent, they will not need to
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The FAFSA opens today—here's how to complete it, in 6 simple steps

Every year, the Department of Education distributes $150 billion in federal student aid through grants, loans and work-study. Most students qualify, but in order to get their share of these funds for college they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, otherwise known as the FAFSA. Students can begin completing the FAFSA for the 2020-2021 school year on October 1st, and because FAFSA funds are distributed on a first-come, first-serve basis, they will want to complete the form as soon as possible. While the process of applying for federal student aid may feel overwhelming, recent updates to the FAFSA have made it simpler and more stream-lined. CNBC Make It filled out the FAFSA ourselves to see what it takes. Here is a step-by-step guide:

Step 1: Make a list of schools

Students will need to share their FAFSA with schools they are interested in applying to. For this reason, students should make a list of schools they are potentially interested in before they even begin filling out the form. As part of completing their application, students will be able to look up the federal school codes of colleges and universities they are interested in sending their information to. Making a list of target schools is a good way for students to inspire and motivate themselves to complete the FAFSA.

Step 2: Gather financial documents

The FAFSA determines how much financial assistance students qualify for, which is why applicants must submit documentation about their family’s financial status. Before starting the FAFSA, applicants should be sure to gather all of the forms and documents they’ll need. To complete the FAFSA, students will need: A Social Security number

An Alien Registration number (For non-U.S. citizens)

Federal income tax returns, W-2s, and other records of money earned (Thanks to the newly-updated IRS data retrieval tool, applicants may be able to automatically transfer their tax return information instead.)

Bank statements and records of any investments

Records of any untaxed income

@eddie_rios via Twenty20

Step 3: Create a Federal Student Aid ID

Having prepared a list of schools and documentation, the next step is for applications to visit the FAFSA website (https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa) or the myStudentAid app.

To log into the site, students and parents need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID, which will require making a username and password. Once applicants have created an FSA ID, they can start the FAFSA, save their progress and log in and out as they wish.

Step 4: Start the FAFSA for the desired year

Each year there is a nine-month period during which students can submit financial aid applications for both the current year and future years. Students should carefully select which year’s FAFSA application they would like to complete: Students attending college from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020 can file the 2019 – 2020 FAFSA between October 1st, 2018 and June 30th, 2020 using their 2017 tax information.

Students attending college from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021 can file the 2020 – 2021 FAFSA between October 1st, 2019 and June 30th, 2021 using their 2018 tax information.

Step 5: Follow the instructions carefully

The FAFSA itself is broken into seven sections: student demographics, school selection, dependency status, parent demographics, financial information, sign and submit, and confirmation. Complete each of these sections carefully, making sure that the information is accurate: Student demographics: The student’s name, social security number, date of birth, address, email, gender, telephone number, driver’s license number (if the student has a driver’s license), marital status, citizenship status, education history and interest in work-study.

The student’s name, social security number, date of birth, address, email, gender, telephone number, driver’s license number (if the student has a driver’s license), marital status, citizenship status, education history and interest in work-study. School selection: The name and location of the high school the student attended and the colleges they’re interested in applying to.

The name and location of the high school the student attended and the colleges they’re interested in applying to. Dependency status: Whether the student has children or dependents and the size of their household.

Whether the student has children or dependents and the size of their household. Parent demographics: Parents’ marital status; parents’ names, social security numbers and birthdays; parents’ email address and household information, such as who lives with them. (Note: If the student is an independent, they will not need to complete this section.)

Parents’ marital status; parents’ names, social security numbers and birthdays; parents’ email address and household information, such as who lives with them. (Note: If the student is an independent, they will not need to complete this section.) Financial information: Applicants can either use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool or input information from their W-2s manually.

Applicants can either use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool or input information from their W-2s manually. Sign and submit: Applicant’s signature.

Applicant’s signature. Confirmation: Applications will receive a confirmation when their FAFSA has been completed.

Step 6: Submit


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How and when to talk about the cost of college with your kids

Nearly three-quarters of parents now talk to their kids about how much money it costs, according to a 2018 survey from T. Rowe Price. The average price tag for tuition, room and board, and fees for an undergraduate at a public four-year college was $19,080 during the 2018-2019 academic year, according to The College Board. The average jumps to $46,680 for a private nonprofit four-year college. Setting expectations early will help your kids figure out what kind of college may be right for them, a


Nearly three-quarters of parents now talk to their kids about how much money it costs, according to a 2018 survey from T. Rowe Price. The average price tag for tuition, room and board, and fees for an undergraduate at a public four-year college was $19,080 during the 2018-2019 academic year, according to The College Board. The average jumps to $46,680 for a private nonprofit four-year college. Setting expectations early will help your kids figure out what kind of college may be right for them, a
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How and when to talk about the cost of college with your kids

College is a major expense. Nearly three-quarters of parents now talk to their kids about how much money it costs, according to a 2018 survey from T. Rowe Price. Researchers surveyed 1,014 parents with children ages 8-14, and 1,000 young adults ages 18-24.

For most families, though, these conversations don’t happen all that often, even though there’s a lot of ground to cover.

Try talking about the cost of college regularly and starting earlier, experts suggest. Having ongoing conversations helps students better understand the financial aid process and prepares them to make thoughtful choices. They can “think about what they’re attending college for and [if] that will get [them] a job, as opposed to just attending college because everyone else is,” says Victoria Fillet, a certified financial planner at Roosevelt Wealth Management in New York City.

You could even begin during your child’s freshman year of high school, says Sean T. Keating, a certified financial planner at Patriot Financial Advisors in Long Branch, New Jersey.

The average price tag for tuition, room and board, and fees for an undergraduate at a public four-year college was $19,080 during the 2018-2019 academic year, according to The College Board. The average jumps to $46,680 for a private nonprofit four-year college. It’s important to remember, though, that university “sticker prices” do not account for scholarships, grants, or tax benefits — and some states offer free or reduced tuition for families who make below a certain amount.

Setting expectations early will help your kids figure out what kind of college may be right for them, and how they can pay for it. Here are three guidelines experts suggest you following in discussing the costs of college with your kids.


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Chinese parents spend big on education and travel

Domestic travel destinations were popular among Chinese tourists during the Golden Week holiday this year. “We see online education on the eve of disruption,” analysts Sheng Zhong and Elsie Sheng said in a July 24 report. Traveling abroad has become a hallmark of Chinese self-identifying as middle class, according to a survey by Chinese travel booking site Ctrip. We see online education on the eve of disruption. Sheng Zhong and Elsie Sheng analysts, Morgan StanleyIt’s impossible to sum up all th


Domestic travel destinations were popular among Chinese tourists during the Golden Week holiday this year. “We see online education on the eve of disruption,” analysts Sheng Zhong and Elsie Sheng said in a July 24 report. Traveling abroad has become a hallmark of Chinese self-identifying as middle class, according to a survey by Chinese travel booking site Ctrip. We see online education on the eve of disruption. Sheng Zhong and Elsie Sheng analysts, Morgan StanleyIt’s impossible to sum up all th
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: evelyn cheng
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Chinese parents spend big on education and travel

Tourists view the Qiantang River Tide at Haining during the National Day holiday on Oct. 7, 2017 in Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province, China. Domestic travel destinations were popular among Chinese tourists during the Golden Week holiday this year. VCG | Getty Images

BEIJING — The biggest spenders of China’s rising middle class may be the parents. Last year, Shanghai resident Guo Kai said his family spent about 80,000 yuan ($11,428) on more than five extracurricular classes ranging from Chinese calligraphy to physics for their 13-year-old daughter. Most of the classes are one-on-one or held in small groups. But for math, physics and chemistry, Guo said to cut down on travel time, they switched last year to online courses with Xueersi (which operates under the New York-traded TAL Education). Morgan Stanley analysts predicted in a report this summer that the online tutoring market for kindergarten to 12th grade will grow 23 times, to $160 billion in 2030, spurred by advances in technology and government mandates that at least 8% of education budgets go toward digitalization.

“We see online education on the eve of disruption,” analysts Sheng Zhong and Elsie Sheng said in a July 24 report. They expect TAL and Koolearn, online tutoring subsidiary of New Oriental Education, have the strongest offline business that can drive online growth. As Chinese families grow more affluent, they are also stepping up spending beyond education. Guo said the family travels overseas at least once a year, and domestically multiple times, bringing the annual travel budget to 60,000 yuan a year. Traveling abroad has become a hallmark of Chinese self-identifying as middle class, according to a survey by Chinese travel booking site Ctrip. The report also showed that between 2018 and the first half of this year, respondents were spending between 10% to 30% more on travel, with average expenditure of 6,000 yuan to 9,000 yuan per person.

We see online education on the eve of disruption. Sheng Zhong and Elsie Sheng analysts, Morgan Stanley

It’s impossible to sum up all the nuanced business approaches to the Chinese consumer in one or two articles. Even as some platforms like messaging app WeChat or e-commerce sites like JD.com and Taobao now dominate, many industry leaders note the Chinese market is one characterized by rapid change – in consumer trends and government policy. Take the unexpected rise of group-buying site Pinduoduo, for example.

Keeping up with China’s changing population trends


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, parents, chinese, big, guo, education, sheng, online, spend, yuan, zhong, travel, analysts


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This is the best tone of voice parents should use to motivate their kids, researchers say

Researchers from Cardiff University tested two styles of speaking that have been shown to motivate people in different ways: controlling and “autonomous supportive.” A controlling tone is used to coerce someone to do something, whereas an autonomous supportive one encourages someone to make their own decisions. The researchers had 1,000 British children ages 14 to 15 years listen to mothers of adolescents read 30 sentences that were meant to be motivational instructions. Not surprisingly, they s


Researchers from Cardiff University tested two styles of speaking that have been shown to motivate people in different ways: controlling and “autonomous supportive.” A controlling tone is used to coerce someone to do something, whereas an autonomous supportive one encourages someone to make their own decisions. The researchers had 1,000 British children ages 14 to 15 years listen to mothers of adolescents read 30 sentences that were meant to be motivational instructions. Not surprisingly, they s
This is the best tone of voice parents should use to motivate their kids, researchers say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, words, controlling, parents, kids, adolescents, teens, best, supportive, feeling, motivate, study, tone, mothers, researchers, voice


This is the best tone of voice parents should use to motivate their kids, researchers say

The tone that a parent uses when telling their kid to do something can go a long way.

When mothers use a tone that’s supportive rather than controlling, teens are more likely to follow through and have success with the task at hand, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Developmental Psychology.

Researchers from Cardiff University tested two styles of speaking that have been shown to motivate people in different ways: controlling and “autonomous supportive.” A controlling tone is used to coerce someone to do something, whereas an autonomous supportive one encourages someone to make their own decisions.

The researchers had 1,000 British children ages 14 to 15 years listen to mothers of adolescents read 30 sentences that were meant to be motivational instructions. The statements included, “It’s time now to go to school,” “You will read this book tonight,” and “You will do well on this assignment.”

(Since only mothers were used in the study, it’s unclear whether the findings would be different for father-child relationships.)

Then, the teens completed a survey about how they would feel if their mother spoke to them like the women they just listened to. Not surprisingly, they said they were more willing to put effort into completing tasks that were communicated using a supportive tone. They also reported feeling closer to speakers who adopted this tone.

When spoken to with more controlling and neutral tones, the teens said they felt the opposite way, and even reported feeling negative emotions.

“If parents want conversations with their teens to have the most benefit, it’s important to remember to use supportive tones of voice,” Netta Weinstein, an author of the study and a psychology lecturer at Cardiff University, said in a press release. “It’s easy for parents to forget, especially if they are feeling stressed, tired, or pressured themselves.”

Of course, tone is just one piece of the communication puzzle. The words a parent uses can also significantly affect a child’s willingness to listen. A 2005 study, for example, found that specific words and phrases, such as “you should” and “you have to,” can come off as controlling to adolescents. A more supportive way to frame instructions might be “I ask” or “I propose.”

“These findings elucidate how mothers’ spoken communications can impact adolescents, with implications for the quality of parent-child relationships, adolescents’ well-being and engagement,” the authors of the study wrote.

Past research has also shown that when parents give kids autonomy and support, they’re more motivated in school, get better grades and feel more competent.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, words, controlling, parents, kids, adolescents, teens, best, supportive, feeling, motivate, study, tone, mothers, researchers, voice


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4 of the top money lessons a CPA learned from his CPA dad

David Almonte, a certified public accountant and a member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission, grew up playing with money. He and his four brothers were raised in Rhode Island by their dad Ernie, who is also a CPA, and their mom Kathy, a secretary at an accounting firm. If you borrow money, you have to pay it back and then someThe Almonte kids learned from experience that borrowing can lead to debt. David Almonte. David Almonte CPA and member of the AICPA Financial Literacy CommissionIt’s


David Almonte, a certified public accountant and a member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission, grew up playing with money. He and his four brothers were raised in Rhode Island by their dad Ernie, who is also a CPA, and their mom Kathy, a secretary at an accounting firm. If you borrow money, you have to pay it back and then someThe Almonte kids learned from experience that borrowing can lead to debt. David Almonte. David Almonte CPA and member of the AICPA Financial Literacy CommissionIt’s
4 of the top money lessons a CPA learned from his CPA dad Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: lisa ferber, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, lessons, cpa, david, ernie, brothers, dad, learned, money, parents, almonte, kids


4 of the top money lessons a CPA learned from his CPA dad

David Almonte, a certified public accountant and a member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission, grew up playing with money. He and his four brothers were raised in Rhode Island by their dad Ernie, who is also a CPA, and their mom Kathy, a secretary at an accounting firm. They were taught to focus on financial wellness at a young age, in part because Ernie had seen firsthand the negative repercussions of poor financial planning, and he wanted to make sure his sons had good financial knowledge. They started by playing simple math games at the dinner table, like, “You have two meatballs, then you have one,” David recalls. Then the games and questions got more advanced. The kids carried these financial lessons into adulthood: Three of David’s brothers also work in the accounting industry. Here are some of the top money management tips the Almonte children learned:

1. If you borrow money, you have to pay it back and then some

The Almonte kids learned from experience that borrowing can lead to debt. “We had to do chores to get our allowance,” David says. When he and his brothers wanted to buy something that cost more than they had, they would take out a loan from their parents — with interest. Ernie says all the financial lessons were conducted to replicate reality. “By charging these boys interest on loans, I was trying to teach them about the reality of life,” he says. He also emphasized the importance of saving, though: David says that his dad would match, dollar-for-dollar, the amount the kids put into their savings accounts. And one Christmas, David says, Ernie gave the boys a piece of paper canceling all their loans: “It was the greatest day ever.”

David Almonte. Courtesy FountainHead RI

2. Create a budget as soon as you start earning

Before he moved away for a job after graduation, David told his dad his new salary. “He wanted to make sure I was set up financially, and he was like, ‘You’re basically going from zero to $40-45,000, and making up a budget is unbelievably important before you get that check in the bank,'” David says. The costs of life’s necessities totaled a bit more than David expected: “He sat me down and pretty much made me cry.” With his dad’s help, he realized, “when you’re paying electric and gas it can add up. … I was trying to find things I could weed out like, ‘I don’t need the lights on … all day.’ When I got my first paycheck I’m like, ‘I’m rich!’ And when I called him at the end of the month, I’m like, ‘I’m broke.'”

From a very early age our parents would teach us about the importance and difference between needs vs. wants. David Almonte CPA and member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission

It’s crucial to live within or below your means, he learned. “From a very early age our parents would teach us about the importance and difference between needs vs. wants,” David says. “They would put this into practice when my brothers or I would be interested in a new toy or added expense.” His parents never told the kids not to buy something. Instead, they helped shape the way the children thought about spending. Ernie says that by teaching his kids about budgeting, he was teaching them how to take control of their financial lives. “With a proper plan that they created and they followed, they would know what the outcome would be now and in the future,” he says.

3. Don’t invest without doing your homework

When it came to the stock market, Ernie made sure his kids did their research. “I was teaching the boys how to invest with play money so they could learn the rules of investing and that this was not gambling,” he says. David says his father set the kids up with a million dollars of fake money to put in a play portfolio. The kids chose their stocks, and the father traded for them on AOL. “It was similar to trading portfolios on Yahoo Finance today where you can open up a free account and track live stock performance via a fake portfolio in terms of dollars,” he says. “No real dollars traded hands. “You could only buy and sell at the end of the day. If someone got a tip and we were in school, they couldn’t trade,” says David. Their dad encouraged the kids to make informed choices about their stock purchases. “Let’s say it’s Apple: You’d have to tell my mom and dad what product Apple makes, and a fun fact like where their headquarters are so you’re not just buying,” David says. “He would make you support that decision.”

4. Take advantage of retirement accounts and the employer match


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: lisa ferber, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, lessons, cpa, david, ernie, brothers, dad, learned, money, parents, almonte, kids


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Nearly half of parents still financially support adult children

As parents know all too well, just because your children have moved out, it doesn’t mean you’re off the hook. Whether it’s $100 a month for food or $500 toward a student loan bill, nearly 40% of empty nesters are still financially supporting their children in some way, according to a new report by 55places, an adult community comparison site. On top of carrying most of the $1.5 trillion in student loan debt, their wages are lower than their parents’ earnings when they were in their 20s. About 15


As parents know all too well, just because your children have moved out, it doesn’t mean you’re off the hook. Whether it’s $100 a month for food or $500 toward a student loan bill, nearly 40% of empty nesters are still financially supporting their children in some way, according to a new report by 55places, an adult community comparison site. On top of carrying most of the $1.5 trillion in student loan debt, their wages are lower than their parents’ earnings when they were in their 20s. About 15
Nearly half of parents still financially support adult children Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, children, adult, bill, nesters, half, financially, loan, support, nearly, report, student, financial, millennials, parents


Nearly half of parents still financially support adult children

As parents know all too well, just because your children have moved out, it doesn’t mean you’re off the hook.

Whether it’s $100 a month for food or $500 toward a student loan bill, nearly 40% of empty nesters are still financially supporting their children in some way, according to a new report by 55places, an adult community comparison site.

To that end, the average parent shells out $254 each month, the report found.

“There’s always been this notion that, once your children start their career, you are home free, and many empty nesters have found that that’s not the case,” said Bill Ness, the CEO and founder of 55places.

“Enough empty nesters realize that there are a lot of expenses that their children will incur and it will be very difficult if not impossible.”

In fact, millennials face financial challenges that their parents did not as young adults. On top of carrying most of the $1.5 trillion in student loan debt, their wages are lower than their parents’ earnings when they were in their 20s.

A 2017 study of Federal Reserve data by advocacy group Young Invincibles showed that millennials earned an average of $40,581 in 2013. That’s 20% less than the inflation-adjusted $50,910 earned by baby boomers in 1989.

In addition, rents continue to rise even as housing prices outpace wages, making it even harder for those just starting out to go it alone.

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As a result, nearly a quarter, or 24%, of empty nesters are covering cell phone expenses, while 19% of parents help with rent and another 18% foot the bill for groceries, 55places found. About 15% help cover their child’s student loan repayments after graduation.

More millennials are also living with their parents longer. The average age parents expected their children to move out was 21, but nearly half said their child was 21 or older by the time they actually left the nest, 55places found. The site surveyed more than 1,800 empty nesters between June and July.

A separate report by Merrill Lynch and Age Wave found that 58% of early adults, which Merrill defines as those between the ages 18 and 34, said they would not be able to afford their current lifestyles without parental support.

And yet financial experts warn that supporting grown children can be a significant financial burden when retirement looms.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, children, adult, bill, nesters, half, financially, loan, support, nearly, report, student, financial, millennials, parents


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