Singapore minister says ‘fake news’ law not intended to target opposition parties

S. Iswaran, Singapore’s communications and information minister. Munshi Ahmed | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesSingapore’s communications and information minister, S. Iswaran, on Tuesday dismissed the view that his country’s “fake news” law is intended to stamp down on opposition parties. “I think that’s hardly the case,” he told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore and Steve Sedgwick at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Last month, the government invoked the law to order an opposition party to publish c


S. Iswaran, Singapore’s communications and information minister.
Munshi Ahmed | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesSingapore’s communications and information minister, S. Iswaran, on Tuesday dismissed the view that his country’s “fake news” law is intended to stamp down on opposition parties.
“I think that’s hardly the case,” he told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore and Steve Sedgwick at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
Last month, the government invoked the law to order an opposition party to publish c
Singapore minister says ‘fake news’ law not intended to target opposition parties Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opposition, intended, social, media, singapore, law, iswaran, thats, think, party, parties, fake, target, minister


Singapore minister says 'fake news' law not intended to target opposition parties

S. Iswaran, Singapore’s communications and information minister. Munshi Ahmed | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Singapore’s communications and information minister, S. Iswaran, on Tuesday dismissed the view that his country’s “fake news” law is intended to stamp down on opposition parties. “I think that’s hardly the case,” he told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore and Steve Sedgwick at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Iswaran said it’s widely recognized that digital technologies and communication platforms are great enablers for society, but there are potential risks such as the dissemination of misinformation. “I think there is a global dialogue. Different countries have been seeking out different methodologies to deal with it,” he said, referring to concerns around fake news.

“This is our approach to it. At the heart of it, it’s very simple: It’s a juxtaposition of the truth with the false statement or fact. That’s all that is required, and if the party concerned is aggrieved, they can have recourse,” Iswaran added. “We think it is a system that will work in our context and help address some of the concerns our citizens have.” Singapore passed the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Bill in October last year, which dictates websites to run government “correction notices” alongside content it deems false. Under the law, the government will also be able to issue so-called “take down” orders that require the removal of content posted by social media companies, news organizations or individuals.

Last month, the government invoked the law to order an opposition party to publish corrections on two social media posts and an article on its website about local employment, Reuters reported. It was the first time the law had been used against a political party, according to the news wire.

Hong Kong’s instability


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, opposition, intended, social, media, singapore, law, iswaran, thats, think, party, parties, fake, target, minister


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Spain needs to be a ‘motor for growth’ in Europe, vice president says

Spain is the latest European country to have a new coalition government after a period of political stalemate and uncertainty and the left-wing government will aim to focus on growth policies and addressing inequalities, the country’s vice president told CNBC. “I’m extremely happy that we finally have a government, it took quite some time, it was not an easy time but we finally have a coalition government in Spain,” Nadia Calviño, one of four vice presidents in Spain, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Eur


Spain is the latest European country to have a new coalition government after a period of political stalemate and uncertainty and the left-wing government will aim to focus on growth policies and addressing inequalities, the country’s vice president told CNBC.
“I’m extremely happy that we finally have a government, it took quite some time, it was not an easy time but we finally have a coalition government in Spain,” Nadia Calviño, one of four vice presidents in Spain, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Eur
Spain needs to be a ‘motor for growth’ in Europe, vice president says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, party, focus, political, needs, motor, growth, coalition, reforms, lines, calvio, spain, vice, president, europe


Spain needs to be a 'motor for growth' in Europe, vice president says

Spain is the latest European country to have a new coalition government after a period of political stalemate and uncertainty and the left-wing government will aim to focus on growth policies and addressing inequalities, the country’s vice president told CNBC.

“I’m extremely happy that we finally have a government, it took quite some time, it was not an easy time but we finally have a coalition government in Spain,” Nadia Calviño, one of four vice presidents in Spain, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” Wednesday.

“We are very clear about a continuity message. In the past 19 months, we have followed a policy based on three lines: fiscal responsibility, social sensitivity and structural reforms and these will be the three main guiding lines for us also in the coming years,” she said.

The coalition is made up of Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez’s party, the Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party (PSOE) and Unidas Podemos, a group of left-leaning parties led by Pablo Iglesias, who is known for his anti-austerity stance.

The joint government came about after Sanchez won snap elections in April and November 2019, but fell short of a majority and struggled to form a government. The inconclusive vote last fall led to the formation of this current minority coalition government, however, and it very narrowly won a parliamentary vote earlier this month.

As a minority coalition, the government will likely have to rely on smaller regional parties to pass laws. However, this could lead to political instability in Spain’s already fragmented political system.

Still, Sanchez and Iglesias (who is also a vice president) have some shared goals including plans to roll back some 2012 labor reforms under the previous Conservative government that supporters said make Spain more competitive, but whose critics say make many jobs more precarious. They have also signaled that they could increase taxes on higher earners and companies.

Speaking to CNBC at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Calviño recognized that a coalition government meant striking a balance between the different party approaches but said “the basic lines are common, are shared.”

“What we have signed with Podemos is a governing agreement which is very clear about striking the right balance of continuing growth, pursuing entrepreneurship, pursuing those reforms that we have been launching in the last few months and, at the same time, having a deep focus on addressing inequalities,” she said.

The European Commission forecast in November that Spain’s gross domestic product would expand 1.5% in 2020 and 1.4% in 2021, moderating a more robust trend seen in recent years. By comparison, the country’s GDP growth was 2.4% in 2018 and 1.9% in 2019.

There has been pressure on economies like Germany, seen as the euro zone’s growth driver and one which runs a large budget surplus, to spend more money in order to stimulate the wider sluggish European economy. But Calviño said every country has to look at its own policies to boost growth.

“Spain has been registering very strong growth for the past five years,” Calviño said. “We closed down last year in a slowdown environment, still at around 2% year-on-year growth, so Spain is one of the four larger economies (in the EU) and we need to play our part to be one of the motors for growth,” she said.

“I don’t think we should focus just on one country doing that job, we all have to undertake our reforms and ensure that we have solid sustainable growth in the mid-run.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, party, focus, political, needs, motor, growth, coalition, reforms, lines, calvio, spain, vice, president, europe


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I taught my bridesmaids how to travel hack my bachelorette party using credit cards

“I don’t understand why every bachelorette party has to be an out-of-town trip,” a woman recently confided in me at a destination bachelorette party. To start, I sent a Google doc to the women invited to my bachelorette party. “As your resident money nerd, I would like to make this bachelorette party as affordable as possible. Credit card optionsAfter a lot of explanations and disclaimers, I finally made some credit card recommendations and explained the difference between airline-branded credit


“I don’t understand why every bachelorette party has to be an out-of-town trip,” a woman recently confided in me at a destination bachelorette party.
To start, I sent a Google doc to the women invited to my bachelorette party.
“As your resident money nerd, I would like to make this bachelorette party as affordable as possible.
Credit card optionsAfter a lot of explanations and disclaimers, I finally made some credit card recommendations and explained the difference between airline-branded credit
I taught my bridesmaids how to travel hack my bachelorette party using credit cards Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: erin lowry, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, travel, wedding, cards, credit, taught, bachelorette, card, points, using, months, bonus, party, bridesmaids, hack


I taught my bridesmaids how to travel hack my bachelorette party using credit cards

“I don’t understand why every bachelorette party has to be an out-of-town trip,” a woman recently confided in me at a destination bachelorette party. I understood the confusion. I was the only attendee who didn’t live within an hour drive of the bride’s hometown, so it would have made sense to just have a fun weekend in their local city. Yet elaborate bachelorette weekends are increasingly common with guests spending upwards of $537, according to a survey from The Knot. I write about money for a living, helping “broke millennials” better manage their finances. I was also well aware of how expensive weddings can be for the bride and groom as well as their guests. Despite this, when I got engaged in the fall of 2017, I (perhaps selfishly) wanted a destination bachelorette party in part because I wanted to take a fun trip with my favorite people. Besides, I argued, my closest friends and family live all over the country, which meant even if I stayed local, hosting a party in New York City, 85% of the guest list would still have to travel to a not-very-cost-effective destination. Still, guilt immediately started to seep into my gut, because I’ve been a bridesmaid five times, and I’ve spent thousands of dollars over the last six years on such events. I knew going in it wasn’t a cheap ask of my friends. So, one of my goals as a bride was to attempt the near-impossible: make sure the entire wedding process didn’t become a financial burden on my guests. To start, I sent a Google doc to the women invited to my bachelorette party. “As your resident money nerd, I would like to make this bachelorette party as affordable as possible. One of the best ways I can help do that is by reducing your travel spend!” the introduction proclaimed. From there, I offered my guests advice on how to make this trip more affordable. Ahead, I share my tips with you.

Choose an affordable destination that works for everyone

Before I even sent that Google doc to my friends, my LA-based sister — who was in charge of planning my bachelorette party — and I started to scout out fun but affordable cities where we could go for the weekend. We took the time to evaluate the price of flights from the home cities of various attendees and as well as the cost of AirBnBs and local activities. We determined that Montreal was actually most affordable and convenient for the majority of invitees. We then presented this option and a handful of domestic ones (including Denver and Savannah), to the guests for input. Yes, my bachelorette party ended up being international, but it still worked out to be more affordable than many domestic ones I’ve attended. (It also didn’t hurt to leverage the conversion rate at the time.)

Nix other wedding traditions to focus on what you care about

As a bride and groom, it’s critical to evaluate what you actually value and focus your budget there. One value for me was to minimize the cost of my wedding for my bridesmaids. To that end, we decided against having an engagement party and I declined a bridal shower. Our families, both immediate and extended, don’t live close to each other and none of them live near us in New York City, so it felt asinine to keep asking people to travel for multiple events. In addition, I also paid for my bridesmaids’ dresses as well as the cost to have their hair done for the wedding. Another thing I value: travel. I’m lucky that most of my loved ones also love to travel. While other wedding traditions like a bridal shower just felt like an obligation at best, I truly wanted to a destination bachelorette party. Since I had eschewed other traditions in order to save money, I felt less guilty about asking my friends to join me for this trip.

Use credit cards smartly

Once we’d settled on a destination, I shared a doc with all the attendees on how they could use credit card bonuses to cover — or drastically subsidize — the cost of airfare. Travel hacking is something my husband and I do fairly often to reduce the cost of our trips, and it’s certainly possible to do without incurring any credit card debt. You just have to know how to play the game. In theory, travel hacking is pretty simple. You open a new rewards credit card that offers a welcome bonus, which can then be redeemed for travel. Usually, you need to spend a few thousand dollars in the first few months after you open the card to receive the bonus. For example, CNBC Select recommends the United℠ Explorer Card for people who frequently fly United Airlines. New cardmembers can get 40,000 bonus miles after they spend $2,000 in the first three months after they open the account and another 25,000 if they spend $10,000 in six months. Of course, the value of miles varies from airline to airline, so you’ll want to do your homework before you sign up for a card. You can also keep your eye out for when bonus offers spike. The Gold Delta SkyMiles® Card from American Express for example may only be offering 30,000 miles now (after spending $1,000 in the first three months), but sometimes it goes up to 60,000. Do your research to see if the card you want to get routinely offers a higher bonus before you apply. A lot of people get nervous about travel hacking because they worry it will hurt their credit score. Applying for a new credit card generally only dings you about five to 10 points and that is often recouped in a few months. Closing a card can also hurt you score a little bit, but as long as you’re not opening and closing a bunch of cards a year, or not closing your oldest card, you should be fine. However, if you’re planning to apply for a mortgage soon, it’s best to be on credit score lock-down and not do anything that could bring down your score even the smallest amount. Before I got into the recommendations, I made one final point.

When this isn’t a good option

I don’t know the full scope of my friends’ financial lives and therefore wanted to remove the risk of encouraging anyone to open credit cards when it wasn’t in their best financial interest. If you want to get into the travel hacking game, it’s important that you aren’t carrying any credit card debt and to have a baseline credit score of around 730. I was sure to make both of those details clear in the document. It’s also crucial not to carry a balance on the credit cards you’re hacking. If you’re paying interest on your credit card debt, it pretty much negates any savings you might earn from a welcome bonus. If the cost of the welcome bonus — say $3,000 in three months — is outside of what you usually spend, it’s not a good idea to apply. I urged people to only try hacking if they were able and committed to paying off the credit card on time and in full each month. No one should be going into debt or harming their credit score for a bachelorette party.

Credit card options

After a lot of explanations and disclaimers, I finally made some credit card recommendations and explained the difference between airline-branded credit cards (Southwest Rapid Rewards® Priority Credit Card or Platinum Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card) and generic travel cards (Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card or Chase Sapphire Preferred®) pointing out that generic travel cards may provide more flexibility for a bachelorette and/or wedding travel. I also added screenshots explaining how to redeem points and the difference between using the credit card company’s travel portal or just applying points to a purchase. Though rewards portals usually give you a better value, it could mean less flexibility on booking the airline or itinerary you’d prefer. For example, I currently have 89,873 points on one of my cards. If I purchased a flight and just applied those points as cash back to pay off the bill, it would convert to $898.73. But if I booked my flight through the credit card’s travel portal I get a better return on my points for a value of $1,123.41 but lose the convenience of having more flights to choose from. It’s also important to evaluate the annual fee, if you have to pay one up front. Sometimes a fee can be worth sticker shocking price. A few years ago, I signed up for the Chase Sapphire Reserve® in order to get the big welcome bonus (100,000 points at the time; currently it’s 50,000 points after you spend $4,000 in three months), but it had a $450 annual fee (the fee has since increased to $550). This is more than four times what I’d ever paid in an annual fee. However, the card came with a $300 travel rebate, which could be used on everything from ride-shares to hotel stays, a $100 credit if you applied for Global Entry (once every four years) and access to Priority Pass, which gets you into airline lounges around the world. Other cards I’ve hacked came with $95 annual fees, and the biggest perk was just a free checked bag. I ultimately decided to cancel some of those cards, since I wasn’t regularly flying the airline and I rarely check bags.

Giving people ample notice and an out

I sent this travel doc nine months before our trip, which was ample notice for them to take advantage of at least one credit card welcome bonus. The notice also gave guests plenty of time to incrementally save up if they wanted to attend. While I did truly strive to plan a fun and affordable destination bachelorette party, I felt it important to give people an out. So I closed the travel hacking document saying: No hard feelings if this feels out of your budget or just too stressful with other commitments in 2018. I do not want this to feel like a burden to anyone. In addition to the “out” clause, I followed up individually with invitees to express the sincerity that if this didn’t align with their budgets or if they simply felt overbooked with other wedding events or just had different personal financial goals or travel desires — to please not worry about declining, which some did. Ultimately, the Montreal bachelorette weekend ended up being a trip my friends still talk about, and I feel good that it wasn’t a weekend that broke the bank — or our friendships. Latest: Chase Sapphire Reserve increases annual fee to $550—is the card still worth the cost? Information about the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: erin lowry, alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, travel, wedding, cards, credit, taught, bachelorette, card, points, using, months, bonus, party, bridesmaids, hack


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China trade deal has new provisions to safeguard US tech secrets

The trade agreement President Donald Trump signed with China on Wednesday includes provisions on intellectual property enforcement and protections against forced technology transfers. Here’s what the agreement says about IP enforcement:Each Party shall determine the appropriate method of implementing the provisions of this Agreement within its own system and practice. If necessary, each Party shall provide suggestions for the amendment of laws to its legislative body according to its domestic le


The trade agreement President Donald Trump signed with China on Wednesday includes provisions on intellectual property enforcement and protections against forced technology transfers.
Here’s what the agreement says about IP enforcement:Each Party shall determine the appropriate method of implementing the provisions of this Agreement within its own system and practice.
If necessary, each Party shall provide suggestions for the amendment of laws to its legislative body according to its domestic le
China trade deal has new provisions to safeguard US tech secrets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, forced, persons, agreed, secrets, trade, transfer, deal, technology, tech, provisions, shall, safeguard, foreign, agreement, china, party


China trade deal has new provisions to safeguard US tech secrets

President Donald Trump meets with China’s President Xi Jinping at the start of their bilateral meeting at the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019.

The trade agreement President Donald Trump signed with China on Wednesday includes provisions on intellectual property enforcement and protections against forced technology transfers.

The two issues could have important consequences on the technology industry, which itself has a tenuous relationship with China due to suspicions over how officials can access data housed there.

The U.S. and China agreed that people from each country will “be able to operate openly and freely in the jurisdiction of the other Party without any force or pressure from the other Party to transfer their technology to persons of the other Party.” Any transfers of technology or licenses between people of each country must be voluntary, according to the agreement.

The countries also agreed to a provision to prevent either state from directing or supporting domestic companies from acquiring foreign technology in sectors and industries “that create distortion.” This provision gets to the heart of new rules unveiled by the Treasury Department on Monday that attempt to provide further scrutiny over foreign investments in U.S. companies for national security reasons. The rules would require more transactions between foreign investors and U.S. firms to seek clearance from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

CFIUS has already cracked down Chinese investments of this sort. Last year, health tech start-up PatientsLikeMe was forced to find a buyer after CFIUS forced its Chinese majority owner to divest its stake, CNBC reported in April.

Here’s what the trade agreement says about forced tech transfer:

Natural or legal persons (“persons”) of a Party shall have effective access to and be able to operate openly and freely in the jurisdiction of the other Party without any force or pressure from the other Party to transfer their technology to persons of the other Party. 2. Any transfer or licensing of technology between persons of a Party and those of the other Party must be based on market terms that are voluntary and reflect mutual agreement. 3. A Party shall not support or direct the outbound foreign direct investment activities of its persons aimed at acquiring foreign technology with respect to sectors and industries targeted by its industrial plans that create distortion. Neither Party shall require or pressure persons of the other Party to transfer technology to its persons in relation to acquisitions, joint ventures, or other investment transactions

China also agreed to create an action plan to “strengthen intellectual property protection aimed at promoting its high-quality growth” within 30 working days after the deal goes into effect. Both countries agreed to “determine the appropriate method of implementing the provisions of this Agreement within its own system and practice.”

Here’s what the agreement says about IP enforcement:

Each Party shall determine the appropriate method of implementing the provisions of this Agreement within its own system and practice. If necessary, each Party shall provide suggestions for the amendment of laws to its legislative body according to its domestic legislation procedure. Consistent with the Bilateral Evaluation and Dispute Resolution Chapter, each Party shall ensure that its obligations under this Agreement are fully implemented. Within 30 working days after the date of entry into force of this Agreement, China will promulgate an Action Plan to strengthen intellectual property protection aimed at promoting its high-quality growth. This Action Plan shall include, but not be limited to, measures that China will take to implement its obligations under this Chapter and the date by which each measure will go into effect.

WATCH: Why the US thinks Huawei has been a massive national security threat for years


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, forced, persons, agreed, secrets, trade, transfer, deal, technology, tech, provisions, shall, safeguard, foreign, agreement, china, party


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Salvini’s return? A regional vote in Italy risks further chaos in Rome

The face of anti-immigration politics in Italy could be about to make a comeback amid an election in the northeast region of Emilia-Romagna. However, with regional elections due later this month, analysts are wondering whether Salvini could return to government soon. “The regional election in Emilia-Romagna on 26 January is by far the most important political event that could determine the shelf life of the government,” Wolfango Piccoli, co-president of the research firm Teneo, said in a note Fr


The face of anti-immigration politics in Italy could be about to make a comeback amid an election in the northeast region of Emilia-Romagna.
However, with regional elections due later this month, analysts are wondering whether Salvini could return to government soon.
“The regional election in Emilia-Romagna on 26 January is by far the most important political event that could determine the shelf life of the government,” Wolfango Piccoli, co-president of the research firm Teneo, said in a note Fr
Salvini’s return? A regional vote in Italy risks further chaos in Rome Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, election, risks, vote, region, rome, salvinis, salvini, regional, chaos, win, lega, italy, party, return, m5s


Salvini's return? A regional vote in Italy risks further chaos in Rome

The face of anti-immigration politics in Italy could be about to make a comeback amid an election in the northeast region of Emilia-Romagna.

Matteo Salvini, head of the right-leaning Lega party, left the Italian government abruptly in the summer of 2019 after clashing with his coalition partner – the Five Star Movement (M5S), a party supportive of more social benefits. Salvini decided to put forward a motion of no confidence on the then prime minister Giuseppe Conte. His move, dubbed by critics as an attempt to govern Italy alone, led M5S to join forces with Partito Democratico (PD) – a pro-European social democratic party, averting the need for a snap election and thus stopping Salvini from potentially forming a government.

However, with regional elections due later this month, analysts are wondering whether Salvini could return to government soon.

“The regional election in Emilia-Romagna on 26 January is by far the most important political event that could determine the shelf life of the government,” Wolfango Piccoli, co-president of the research firm Teneo, said in a note Friday.

The region of Emilia Romagna, which includes the emblematic city of Bologna, has traditionally supported left-leaning parties. However, polls suggest that the candidate for the anti-immigration Lega party could win the vote and give the party its ninth consecutive win in regional ballots since the last national election in 2018, according to Reuters.

“Salvini has been campaigning in the region since November, pledging to ‘liberate’ it from the left. A PD (Partito Democratico) defeat at the hands of Salvini’s Lega would strip the center-left party of its symbolic heartland, and likely trigger an internal confrontation,” Piccoli added.

If the upcoming regional vote ends up seeing a victory for the Lega party, both the PD and the M5S would be under pressure – potentially leading their current government to an end.

“The (election) risks are significant because a loss could not only encourage the PD to leave its coalition with the M5S as it looks for a new identity, but it could also trigger an implosion of the M5S,” Erik Jones, professor of European Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Italy, told CNBC Monday.

“The M5S does not typically do well in regional elections and is currently polling only at about 8% in the region. But this region is also where M5S started, and where it first entered into local government. So, a devastating loss here will fuel ammunition for those who don’t like (Luigi) Di Maio (M5S’ leader) and who worry that the Movement has lost its way.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, election, risks, vote, region, rome, salvinis, salvini, regional, chaos, win, lega, italy, party, return, m5s


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Taiwan’s president re-elected as voters back tough China stance

Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan’s president, looks on during a news conference at the Presidential Palace in Taipei, Taiwan, on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019. Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen has won a second term, signaling strong voter support for her tough stance against China. Taiwan’s independence-leaning President Tsai Ing-wen appeared headed for a landslide victory and a second term on Saturday with more than 70% of precincts reporting election tallies. The self-governing island was expected to know later


Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan’s president, looks on during a news conference at the Presidential Palace in Taipei, Taiwan, on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019.
Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen has won a second term, signaling strong voter support for her tough stance against China.
Taiwan’s independence-leaning President Tsai Ing-wen appeared headed for a landslide victory and a second term on Saturday with more than 70% of precincts reporting election tallies.
The self-governing island was expected to know later
Taiwan’s president re-elected as voters back tough China stance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tough, island, kaohsiung, president, taiwan, beijing, party, stance, taiwans, tsai, vote, voters, china, reelected


Taiwan's president re-elected as voters back tough China stance

Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan’s president, looks on during a news conference at the Presidential Palace in Taipei, Taiwan, on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019.

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen has won a second term, signaling strong voter support for her tough stance against China.

Tsai defeated two challengers in Saturday’s election — Han Kuo-yu of the rival Nationalist Party and James Soong of the smaller People First Party.

Han told supporters in the southern port city of Kaohsiung that he had called to congratulate Tsai on her victory.

Voters chose Tsai’s tough stance against China over Han’s arguments for friendlier ties with Beijing, which considers self-governing Taiwan a renegade province to be brought under its control, by force if necessary.

China’s communist leaders have taken an especially hard line against Tsai since her 2016 inauguration, infuriated by her refusal to endorse its claim that Taiwan and the mainland belong to a single China. Her victory will likely deepen that deadlock and ratchet up pressure from Beijing.

Taiwan’s independence-leaning President Tsai Ing-wen appeared headed for a landslide victory and a second term on Saturday with more than 70% of precincts reporting election tallies.

Results from the Central Election Commission showed Tsai, with 58% of the vote, holding a healthy lead over her closest challenger, Han Kuo-yu of the Nationalist Party, who had 38%. A third candidate, James Soong, had 4%.

The mood was jubilant at the headquarters of Tsai’s Democratic Progressive Party in Taipei, the capital, with supporters cheering as her tally climbed. At a gathering in Kaohsiung, where Han is mayor, it was much grimmer, with some wiping away tears.

The self-governing island was expected to know later Saturday whether Tsai had triumphed with her tough stance toward China.

Taiwan has developed its own identity since separating from China during civil war in 1949 but has never declared formal independence. Beijing still claims sovereignty over the island of 23 million people and threatens to use force to seize control if necessary.

“I hope every citizen can come out and vote,” Tsai said after casting her vote in Taipei. “You should exercise your rights to make democracy stronger in Taiwan.”

Han voted in Kaohsiung, where he is mayor.

For many in Taiwan, months of anti-government protests in Hong Kong, a semi-autonomous Chinese territory, have driven home the contrast between their democratically governed island and authoritarian, communist-ruled mainland China.

Tsai portrayed the election as a chance to protect Taiwan’s democracy.

“Let us tell the world with our own votes that Taiwanese are determined to defend sovereignty, determined to guard democracy and determined to persist in reforms,” she said at a rally late Friday.

The Nationalist Party’s Han has said Taiwan should be more open to negotiations with China, in contrast to Tsai, who has dismissed Beijing’s overtures. At his last rally, attended by hundreds of thousands of people in the southern port city of Kaohsiung, he focused on practical issues such as improving education and the economy.

“I want to attract massive investments. I want products to be exported nonstop,” he said.

The Hong Kong protests have undermined support in Taiwan for the “one country, two systems” approach Beijing has championed for governing both that former British colony and Taiwan.

Fears of Chinese interference in Taiwan’s politics and an uptick in the economy helped Tsai regain an edge after a dire electoral setback for her Democratic Progressive Party, or DPP, 14 months ago.

“The reason why I vote for her is for upholding the value of Taiwan’s freedom and democracy and that should not be affected by the other side of the strait (China),” Lucy Ting, a college student, said at Tsai’s rally on Friday.

The Nationalists have struggled to find candidates who can fire up their pro-China supporters and win over young Taiwanese who increasingly favor the DPP.

A second term for Tsai is expected to draw more diplomatic, economic and military pressure from Beijing on the island, in a continuation of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s campaign to compel her administration to endorse its insistence that Taiwan is a part of China.

Tsai has refused to do so, maintaining that Beijing has no claim over Taiwan, although her government has repeatedly called for the reopening of talks between the sides without preconditions.

Since its transition to full democracy beginning in the 1980s, Taiwan has increasingly asserted its independent identity from China even though it is not recognized by the United Nations or any major nation.

The island of more than 23 million people exercises all the roles of a sovereign nation, issuing its own passports, maintaining its own military and legal system and serving as a crucial hub in the global high-tech supply chain.

If reelected, Tsai will face challenges in trying to reform the government and economy and push through unpopular cuts in generous civil service pensions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tough, island, kaohsiung, president, taiwan, beijing, party, stance, taiwans, tsai, vote, voters, china, reelected


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Referendum on the royal family? UK lawmaker calls for public vote after Harry and Meghan’s shock decision

LONDON — The U.K. should hold a referendum on the future of its royal family, a lawmaker vying for the leadership of the opposition Labour party said Friday. “Why not have a referendum in this country on the future of the Royal Family?” “Let’s talk about what a modern state looks like and what the role of the royal family would be in that, if it had one,” Lewis added. According to a 2018 YouGov poll, seven in 10 Britons consider themselves monarchists and support the continuation of the royal fa


LONDON — The U.K. should hold a referendum on the future of its royal family, a lawmaker vying for the leadership of the opposition Labour party said Friday.
“Why not have a referendum in this country on the future of the Royal Family?”
“Let’s talk about what a modern state looks like and what the role of the royal family would be in that, if it had one,” Lewis added.
According to a 2018 YouGov poll, seven in 10 Britons consider themselves monarchists and support the continuation of the royal fa
Referendum on the royal family? UK lawmaker calls for public vote after Harry and Meghan’s shock decision Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, referendum, family, monarchy, taken, harry, prince, meghans, lewis, party, shock, vote, royal, public, lawmaker


Referendum on the royal family? UK lawmaker calls for public vote after Harry and Meghan's shock decision

LONDON — The U.K. should hold a referendum on the future of its royal family, a lawmaker vying for the leadership of the opposition Labour party said Friday.

Clive Lewis, a candidate standing to replace Jeremy Corbyn at the helm of the country’s main opponents to Boris Johnson’s Conservatives, made the suggestion at his campaign launch in London.

Discussing Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s unprecedented decision to step back from their roles as senior royals, Lewis said the couple were perhaps “setting out a model for how the monarchy could be in the future.”

“A lot of people would like to see the monarchy scaled down,” he told reporters. “There’s been lots of discussion about the fact that the monarchy is quite large and there are a lot of people being paid by the public purse.”

Noting that he had been an advocate of a second referendum on the U.K.’s EU membership, Lewis suggested Brits should be consulted on whether to keep the royal institution in place.

“Why not have a referendum in this country on the future of the Royal Family?” he said. “We’re a democracy. I’d rather see us as citizens than subjects in the 21st century.”

“Let’s talk about what a modern state looks like and what the role of the royal family would be in that, if it had one,” Lewis added. The ruling Conservative Party is traditionally seen as favoring the monarchy while Labour has often taken a more apathetic stance. Indeed, Corbyn was attacked by his opponents on occasion for what they saw as disrespect toward Queen Elizabeth II.

According to a 2018 YouGov poll, seven in 10 Britons consider themselves monarchists and support the continuation of the royal family, while 21% oppose it. A separate survey at the end of 2019 found that 72% of people in the U.K. had a positive opinion of the queen.

The royal family’s reputation has taken a blow in recent months amid the exposure of Prince Andrew’s friendship with convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein. Following an interview with the BBC’s “Newsnight” in November — which was widely regarded as a PR disaster — the Duke of York withdrew from public duties.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, referendum, family, monarchy, taken, harry, prince, meghans, lewis, party, shock, vote, royal, public, lawmaker


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McDonald’s new CEO takes aim at the company’s ‘party’ culture

Easterbrook and McDonald’s Chief People Officer David Fairhurst often partied with staffers after work hours, according to the Journal. Previous and current McDonald’s employees also told the Journal that Easterbrook allegedly had a reputation for flirting with female employees. The Journal said Fairhurst couldn’t be reached for comment and a representative for Easterbrook told the newspaper he wasn’t available to comment. More than 1,000 McDonald’s employees have responded via a survey. Kempczi


Easterbrook and McDonald’s Chief People Officer David Fairhurst often partied with staffers after work hours, according to the Journal.
Previous and current McDonald’s employees also told the Journal that Easterbrook allegedly had a reputation for flirting with female employees.
The Journal said Fairhurst couldn’t be reached for comment and a representative for Easterbrook told the newspaper he wasn’t available to comment.
More than 1,000 McDonald’s employees have responded via a survey.
Kempczi
McDonald’s new CEO takes aim at the company’s ‘party’ culture Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: amelia lucas kate rogers, amelia lucas, kate rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kempczinski, message, companys, party, fairhurst, told, mcdonalds, ceo, aim, values, employees, takes, easterbrook, journal, culture


McDonald's new CEO takes aim at the company's 'party' culture

McDonald’s CEO Chris Kempczinski is trying to restore a more professional culture, starting with feedback from key stakeholders and applying the chain’s core values across the system of franchisees, suppliers and employees.

“When I started in this role, my commitment to you was to listen and learn across the System,” Kempczinski said in a message to employees obtained by CNBC. “In the past 9 weeks, I have been doing just that.”

Kempczinski said three things about McDonald’s make him proud: It creates opportunity, builds community and collaborates on solutions.

“All of this is underpinned by our core values, which are the bedrock of our company,” Kempczinski said. “We must now champion and apply them more evenly across the three-legged stool to be even stronger.”

The New Year’s message follows a Wall Street Journal report published Sunday that alleged that under Kempczsinki’s predecessor, Steve Easterbrook, the company’s culture tolerated late-night socializing between senior managers and rank-and-file employees. Easterbrook and McDonald’s Chief People Officer David Fairhurst often partied with staffers after work hours, according to the Journal. Previous and current McDonald’s employees also told the Journal that Easterbrook allegedly had a reputation for flirting with female employees.

The fast-food giant’s board fired Easterbrook in November because he had a consensual relationship with an employee, which violated the company’s fraternization policy. Fairhurst departed the company the day after Easterbrook’s firing became public knowledge. The Journal said Fairhurst couldn’t be reached for comment and a representative for Easterbrook told the newspaper he wasn’t available to comment.

After taking over as CEO in mid-November, Kempczinski asked employees for feedback. More than 1,000 McDonald’s employees have responded via a survey. In Kempczinski’s message Monday, he said he was “impressed by the candid feedback.”

Kempczinski has also heard from other stakeholders about McDonald’s culture and ethics through meetings with corporate officers, marketing managing directors and the franchise leadership of the chain’s International Development Licensed markets. He also held in-person town halls with employees in the United Kingdom and Germany in late December.

Read the full memo below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-06  Authors: amelia lucas kate rogers, amelia lucas, kate rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kempczinski, message, companys, party, fairhurst, told, mcdonalds, ceo, aim, values, employees, takes, easterbrook, journal, culture


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Spain’s Sanchez loses first bid to be confirmed as PM, aims for Tuesday vote

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez attends a debate on the government’s 2019 budget during a parliament session in Madrid on February 13, 2019. Spain’s Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez failed on Sunday in a first attempt to get parliament’s backing to form a government, leaving him two days to secure support to end an eight-month political gridlock. Sanchez has been acting prime minister since a first inconclusive election in April and November did not produce a conclusive result. Earlier this w


Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez attends a debate on the government’s 2019 budget during a parliament session in Madrid on February 13, 2019.
Spain’s Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez failed on Sunday in a first attempt to get parliament’s backing to form a government, leaving him two days to secure support to end an eight-month political gridlock.
Sanchez has been acting prime minister since a first inconclusive election in April and November did not produce a conclusive result.
Earlier this w
Spain’s Sanchez loses first bid to be confirmed as PM, aims for Tuesday vote Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bid, pedro, regional, small, majority, party, prime, aims, sanchez, vote, loses, votes, socialist, minister, confirmed, spains


Spain's Sanchez loses first bid to be confirmed as PM, aims for Tuesday vote

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez attends a debate on the government’s 2019 budget during a parliament session in Madrid on February 13, 2019.

Spain’s Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez failed on Sunday in a first attempt to get parliament’s backing to form a government, leaving him two days to secure support to end an eight-month political gridlock.

Sanchez has been acting prime minister since a first inconclusive election in April and November did not produce a conclusive result. He needed an absolute majority of at least 176 votes in his favour in the 350-seat house to be confirmed as prime minister but failed to get it.

He obtained 166 votes in favur and 165 against, with 18 abstentions, while one lawmaker did not attend.

On Tuesday, Sanchez will only need a simple majority – more “yes” than “no” votes. He is likely to get that after securing a commitment from the 13 lawmakers of Catalonia’s largest separatist party, Esquerra Republicana de Catalunya (ERC), to abstain.

Earlier this week, Socialist Party leader Sanchez and Pablo Iglesias, head of the far-left party Unidas Podemos, restated their intention to form the first coalition government in Spain’s recent history.

The two parties together have 155 seats, short of a majority, so Sanchez is reliant on the votes of small regional parties.

In a sign of how close the race could be on Tuesday, a member from the small regional party Coalicion Canaria, Ana Oramas, voted against Sanchez instead of abstaining as her party had agreed on Friday.

During Sunday morning’s debate, Sanchez stressed that a Socialist-Podemos coalition would take a progressive approach. Sanchez and Iglesias have said they will push for tax hikes on high-income earners and companies and also intend to roll back a labour reform passed by a previous conservative government.

The morning was marked by tension during the speech of Mertxe Aizpurua of pro-independence Basque party EH Bildu. Aizpurua called the conservative and right wing parties People’s Party, Vox and Ciudadanos “Francoists”, a reference to late dictator Francisco Franco, and criticised the Constitution and King Felipe.

She was met with boos and shouts of “murderers”.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bid, pedro, regional, small, majority, party, prime, aims, sanchez, vote, loses, votes, socialist, minister, confirmed, spains


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Here are the 5 biggest Republican mistakes of the decade

Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign stop at Lansing Community College May 8, 2012 in Lansing, Michigan. Bill Pugliano | Getty ImagesFor Republicans, the 2010s end with the party seemingly in a better situation than it was when the decade started. Thanks to five major blunders over the last decade, the Republican Party is actually weaker than it was on Jan.1, 2010. Much of this was fueled by the Tea Party movement, which added a rare Republican grassroots element to the GOP. When you think about


Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign stop at Lansing Community College May 8, 2012 in Lansing, Michigan.
Bill Pugliano | Getty ImagesFor Republicans, the 2010s end with the party seemingly in a better situation than it was when the decade started.
Thanks to five major blunders over the last decade, the Republican Party is actually weaker than it was on Jan.1, 2010.
Much of this was fueled by the Tea Party movement, which added a rare Republican grassroots element to the GOP.
When you think about
Here are the 5 biggest Republican mistakes of the decade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senate, republicans, trump, mitt, gop, party, republican, decade, mistakes, border, took, biggest, romney


Here are the 5 biggest Republican mistakes of the decade

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign stop at Lansing Community College May 8, 2012 in Lansing, Michigan. Last night former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum gave his endorsement to Gov. Romney in an e-mail sent to supporters. Bill Pugliano | Getty Images

For Republicans, the 2010s end with the party seemingly in a better situation than it was when the decade started. The GOP has control of the White House and the Senate. Ten years ago, the Democrats held the White House and both houses of Congress. But that scorecard doesn’t tell the whole story. Thanks to five major blunders over the last decade, the Republican Party is actually weaker than it was on Jan.1, 2010. To understand why, you have to document each key mistake in order:

2010: Blowing the midterm elections

The 2008 elections gave Barack Obama a clear win in the presidential election and the Democrats a filibuster-proof supermajority in Congress. They proceeded to spend that political capital almost entirely on passing Obamacare in a lengthy process that included a number of unusual compromises with their own party members, like the “Cornhusker Kickback” and controversial legislative tricks like the “deemed as passed” maneuver. All of this took place even as the Affordable Care Act failed to gain majority support in the polls. That set the stage for a strong Republican advantage going into the 2010 midterm elections. On paper, the GOP did score a resounding victory, picking up 63 seats in the House of Representatives and a net gain of six seats in the Senate. But Republicans blew a solid chance to retake the Senate. They put up weak candidates in several winnable races. They included Sharon Angle in Nevada, who was seen as too radical and managed to lose to then-incumbent Harry Reid despite his very weak approval ratings in his home state. Arch-abortion opponent Ken Buck won the GOP nomination in Colorado, marginalizing him in a moderate state. The biggest mistake of all was Christine O’Donnell in Delaware. O’Donnell lost after she became infamous for her revelation that she had once experimented with witchcraft. As a result, the Democrats kept control of the Senate and the Republicans lost a chance to force Obama into what could have been a series of advantageous compromises over the next six years.

2012: Nominating Mitt Romney for president

Despite the failure to grab the Senate, the GOP was still riding strong anti-Obamacare sentiment and voter frustration over the slow recovery from the Great Recession. Much of this was fueled by the Tea Party movement, which added a rare Republican grassroots element to the GOP. When you think about it now, all of that made former Mitt Romney an extremely odd choice for the Republican nomination for president in 2012. He embodied the establishment GOP in almost every way. Romney had years as a hedge fund manager at Bain Capital on his resume at a time when most Americans were still blaming Wall Street for the nation’s economic woes. Worst of all, his universal health coverage plan enacted while he was governor of Massachusetts looked eerily like Obamacare. In fact, “Romneycare” was seen as one of the models the crafters of the Affordable Care Act used when they wrote the law. If the GOP wanted to put up a candidate who invigorated its anti-Obamacare and increasingly anti-establishment base, they couldn’t have missed the mark much more than they did with Mitt Romney.

2013: Failing to recognize the crisis at the border

The first surge of unaccompanied children at the U.S. southern border began in 2013. It resumed a year later, and the Obama administration responded by detaining many of those children in fenced-in areas critics of the Trump administration today like to call “cages.” While the immigration issue and border battles have been front page news since President Trump was elected, the severe problems at the same border in 2013 and 2014 didn’t garner anywhere near as much attention in the mainstream media. But it was a regular topic on right wing talk radio at the time, and Republican congressional leaders should have spent more time listening. All of this set the stage for making the border issue the blunt weapon that helped Donald Trump trounce a crowded field of establishment GOP presidential candidates in the 2016 primaries. More importantly, it was evidence that Republican leaders seemed more interested in bowing to corporate pressure to keep the borders relatively open instead of dealing with the problems that massive migration present on a human scale.

2014: Surrendering before the battle

The midterm elections of 2014 gave the Republicans control of the Senate that they should have won in 2010. But even before the new members took their oaths of office, then-Senate Majority Leader-elect Mitch McConnell promised never to trigger a government shutdown. That effectively took the sharpest arrow out of the GOP’s congressional quiver, and again relieved the greatest pressure the Republicans could have exercised against Obama.

2017: The Obamacare “repeal & replace” failure


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senate, republicans, trump, mitt, gop, party, republican, decade, mistakes, border, took, biggest, romney


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