Spain’s about to hold a general election: Here’s what you need to know

The party has been overseeing a minority government with just 84 seats in the 350-member Congress of Deputies, Spain’s lower house of parliament. In this election, it could gain as many as 54 seats — but that would still fall short of the 176 seats a party needs to gain a majority. Opinion polls have consistently showed that the PSOE leads by a wide margin and is seen with between 28 to 31% of the votes. The Vox party is seen getting around 9-11% of the vote. “People are really scared of the ris


The party has been overseeing a minority government with just 84 seats in the 350-member Congress of Deputies, Spain’s lower house of parliament. In this election, it could gain as many as 54 seats — but that would still fall short of the 176 seats a party needs to gain a majority. Opinion polls have consistently showed that the PSOE leads by a wide margin and is seen with between 28 to 31% of the votes. The Vox party is seen getting around 9-11% of the vote. “People are really scared of the ris
Spain’s about to hold a general election: Here’s what you need to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: holly ellyatt, jose jordan, afp, getty images, david ramos, getty images news
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hold, election, party, gain, vote, consistently, polls, socialists, psoe, seen, heres, seats, need, general, know, spains, voters


Spain's about to hold a general election: Here's what you need to know

Opinion polls in recent weeks have consistently signaled that Sanchez’s socialists could win the largest share of the vote — but not enough for the party to govern alone.

The party has been overseeing a minority government with just 84 seats in the 350-member Congress of Deputies, Spain’s lower house of parliament. In this election, it could gain as many as 54 seats — but that would still fall short of the 176 seats a party needs to gain a majority.

Opinion polls have consistently showed that the PSOE leads by a wide margin and is seen with between 28 to 31% of the votes. The PP is trailing with around 20-24% of the vote. Ciudadanos is seen with around 15% and Podemos with around 12-13%. The Vox party is seen getting around 9-11% of the vote.

A large number of voters (25-30%) remain undecided as to who to vote for, and this could have a significant impact on the final result.

Speculation is already mounting over what alliances PSOE could seek to enable it to form a government. Anna Rosenberg, partner and head of Europe and U.K. at Signum Global Advisors, told CNBC that the socialists were benefiting from the fragmentation on the right.

“People are really scared of the rise of the right-wing parties and that will mobilize voters that might not have been expected to vote before. Sanchez has also actually done quite well and doesn’t represent the status quo,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: holly ellyatt, jose jordan, afp, getty images, david ramos, getty images news
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hold, election, party, gain, vote, consistently, polls, socialists, psoe, seen, heres, seats, need, general, know, spains, voters


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Cenk Uygur on why Democrats are afraid of Bernie Sanders

Sen. Bernie Sanders is making mainstream Democrats nervous. But some of the presidential candidate’s supporters say it’s not because they’re worried Sanders can’t defeat President Donald Trump in 2020. Uygur said the establishment’s concerns about Sanders raised in a New York Times article on Tuesday, will only make Sanders stronger. They are going to fight Bernie Sanders harder than any Republican will.” The company published “Rules for Revolutionaries” by former Sanders’ campaign staffers Beck


Sen. Bernie Sanders is making mainstream Democrats nervous. But some of the presidential candidate’s supporters say it’s not because they’re worried Sanders can’t defeat President Donald Trump in 2020. Uygur said the establishment’s concerns about Sanders raised in a New York Times article on Tuesday, will only make Sanders stronger. They are going to fight Bernie Sanders harder than any Republican will.” The company published “Rules for Revolutionaries” by former Sanders’ campaign staffers Beck
Cenk Uygur on why Democrats are afraid of Bernie Sanders Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: valerie block, lucas jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, power, democrats, bernie, donors, uygur, cenk, campaign, money, democratic, party, sanders, afraid, worried


Cenk Uygur on why Democrats are afraid of Bernie Sanders

Sen. Bernie Sanders is making mainstream Democrats nervous.

But some of the presidential candidate’s supporters say it’s not because they’re worried Sanders can’t defeat President Donald Trump in 2020. It’s because he can, they say.

The Vermont democratic socialist may have surprised the party’s establishment with his strong performance so far. He’s been polling second, behind only former Vice President Joe Biden, who has yet to enter the race. Sanders also took the lead in an Emerson poll released Tuesday. He raised more than $18 million in the first quarter of 2019, the most money of any Democratic contender. And his base of loyal followers, who made him a force in the 2016 primary, has not gone anywhere.

“Bernie right now has a better chance of winning than the rest of field combined,” said Cenk Uygur, founder of progressive news network TYT and host of “The Young Turks,” who supported Sanders in 2016. Uygur has not decided whom he will back in 2020, but says he likes Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

Uygur said the establishment’s concerns about Sanders raised in a New York Times article on Tuesday, will only make Sanders stronger.

The article quotes party insiders who fear that Sanders’ campaign will complicate efforts to defeat Trump. Their goal is to stop him from gaining more ground and certainly to thwart his chances of becoming the Democratic 2020 nominee.

David Brock, a political consultant, told the Times: “There’s a growing realization that Sanders could end up winning this thing, or certainly that he stays in so long that he damages the actual winner.”

Brock told the paper that he has had discussions with other operatives about an anti-Sanders campaign and believes it should commence “sooner rather than later.”

The Sanders campaign was not available for comment. The Democratic National Committee did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Already, a fight has erupted between Sanders and the Center for American Progress, a think tank that has ties to Hillary Clinton.

But Uygur sees another reason for the establishment’s concerns about Sanders: “The big Dem donors are not worried he’s going to lose the general election, they’re worried he’s going to win,” he tweeted on Tuesday.

Uygur’s point is that big money donors who back mainstream candidates will lose their positions of power in the face of a Sanders win. A political system corrupted by corporate cash and influence, he said, will finally fall if the democratic socialist who has proposed “Medicare for All,” free college education and a $15 minimum wage is elected.

“The people with the most money will lose all power, they will not be rewarded,” he said. “All their power is in giving money to politicians and controlling them. Bernie Sanders doesn’t want their money. They are going to fight Bernie Sanders harder than any Republican will.”

That could be a dangerous game: Attacking Sanders will “force everyone to rally around him,” Uygur said. “That’s why Bernie has always stood an excellent chance of winning. They can’t take away a small donor base. The more they attack him, the more he will raise.”

Indeed, the Sanders’ campaign is already fundraising on the party conflict, dashing off a pitch this week that read in part: “The Democratic establishment and high-dollar donors are already planning how to stop our campaign. They are terrified of our movement – as they should be.”

Ryan Grim, Washington bureau chief for progressive news site The Intercept, a former contributor to MSNBC and a contributor to the Young Turks Network also believes that establishment Democrats are afraid a Sanders win could upend the entire system they operate within.

“They couch that fear in claims that they’re worried he’ll lose,” he told CNBC. “Change is scary.”

Margo Baldwin, president of Vermont-based Chelsea Green Publishing, called the Democratic establishment “part of the power elite in bed with the banks and the moneyed interests.” The company published “Rules for Revolutionaries” by former Sanders’ campaign staffers Becky Bond and Zack Exley, as well as “Essential Bernie Sanders and his Vision for America” by Jonathan Tasini. “They don’t like Trump, but they don’t want to see real change,” Baldwin added.

She joked that the party doesn’t seem to like winning either, adding that they “can trot out Biden and they will lose.”

But Markos Moulitsas, founder and publisher of liberal blog Daily Kos said it’s not fear, “it’s frustration” that party insiders are feeling. He said in an email that Sanders is “a divisive person” who “roils the party.”

“As for the big donors, the best way to fight them is to build a small dollar machine that will power candidates at all levels of office,” Moulitsas said. He added, “But even if we succeed in building an entire party of small dollar donors, weep not for big corporate money. They’ll always have Republicans to buy.”

It’s certainly too early to tell where the race will end up, but for Sanders’ supporters, a replay of the infighting that happened in 2016 will not go over well.

“There will be no end to the fury,” Uygur said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: valerie block, lucas jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, power, democrats, bernie, donors, uygur, cenk, campaign, money, democratic, party, sanders, afraid, worried


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Finnish Social Democrats and nationalist Finns Party nearly tied in election

Finland’s leftist Social Democrats and the nationalist Finns Party emerged nearly tied to win Sunday’s general election, reflecting a mounting sense of insecurity in the Nordic nation over immigration, welfare and climate change. Tipped to win, the opposition Social Democrats scored 17.7 percent, while their eurosceptic Finns Party rivals were at 17.5 percent, according to final results from the justice ministry. “For the first time since 1999 we are the largest party in Finland … SDP is the p


Finland’s leftist Social Democrats and the nationalist Finns Party emerged nearly tied to win Sunday’s general election, reflecting a mounting sense of insecurity in the Nordic nation over immigration, welfare and climate change. Tipped to win, the opposition Social Democrats scored 17.7 percent, while their eurosceptic Finns Party rivals were at 17.5 percent, according to final results from the justice ministry. “For the first time since 1999 we are the largest party in Finland … SDP is the p
Finnish Social Democrats and nationalist Finns Party nearly tied in election Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: antti aimo-koivisto, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, welfare, sense, finnish, nearly, win, finns, nationalist, rising, party, rinne, social, tied, democrats, election


Finnish Social Democrats and nationalist Finns Party nearly tied in election

Finland’s leftist Social Democrats and the nationalist Finns Party emerged nearly tied to win Sunday’s general election, reflecting a mounting sense of insecurity in the Nordic nation over immigration, welfare and climate change.

Tipped to win, the opposition Social Democrats scored 17.7 percent, while their eurosceptic Finns Party rivals were at 17.5 percent, according to final results from the justice ministry.

The co-ruling Centre Party of Prime Minister Juha Sipila and centre-right National Coalition stood at 13.8 percent and 17.0 percent, respectively, marking the first time in a century that no party won more than 20 percent in a general election.

With a fragmented parliament and deep divisions within the mainstream parties over how to tackle rising costs of expensive public services, coalition talks following the election could be protracted.

But Social Democrat leader Antti Rinne, 56, a former union boss, was expected to have the first shot at forming a government, with most party leaders having ruled out cooperation with the populist Finns.

“For the first time since 1999 we are the largest party in Finland … SDP is the prime minister’s party,” Rinne told supporters and party members celebrating in central Helsinki.

With the European Parliament election less than two months away, the Finnish ballot is being watched in Brussels.

Underscoring a growing confidence among the far-right in Europe, anti-immigration parties, including the Finns, have announced plans to join forces after the May 26 EU election in a move that could give them a major say in how the continent is run.

At stake in Finland is the future shape of the country’s welfare system, a pillar of the social model across the Nordics, which the leftists want to preserve through tax hikes and the centre-right wants to see streamlined because of rising costs.

Just as the Social Democrats are benefiting from a growing sense of insecurity among Finland’s older and poorer voters, the Finns argue that the nation has gone too far in addressing issues such as climate change and migration at its own expense.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: antti aimo-koivisto, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, welfare, sense, finnish, nearly, win, finns, nationalist, rising, party, rinne, social, tied, democrats, election


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Spain’s Socialists are riding high in election polls — but there are plenty of wildcards

Spanish opinion polls are signalling that the Socialist party could win a large share of the vote in a snap election on April 28 – but not enough for it to govern alone. The move could have worked in Sanchez’ favor, however, with opinion polls suggesting that his Spanish Socialist and Workers’ Party (the PSOE) will gain far more parliamentary seats. There are four major parties spanning the political landscape in Spain – the left-wing, ruling Socialists, the center-right People’s Party (PP), far


Spanish opinion polls are signalling that the Socialist party could win a large share of the vote in a snap election on April 28 – but not enough for it to govern alone. The move could have worked in Sanchez’ favor, however, with opinion polls suggesting that his Spanish Socialist and Workers’ Party (the PSOE) will gain far more parliamentary seats. There are four major parties spanning the political landscape in Spain – the left-wing, ruling Socialists, the center-right People’s Party (PP), far
Spain’s Socialists are riding high in election polls — but there are plenty of wildcards Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: holly ellyatt, miguel riopa, afp, getty images, javier soriano, cesar manso
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, psoe, pp, vote, polls, plenty, socialist, party, podemos, riding, parties, seen, election, wildcards, seats, socialists, high, vox, spains


Spain's Socialists are riding high in election polls — but there are plenty of wildcards

Spanish opinion polls are signalling that the Socialist party could win a large share of the vote in a snap election on April 28 – but not enough for it to govern alone.

Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez called the snap vote in February after Catalan independence parties withdrew their support for the government’s budget bill. The move could have worked in Sanchez’ favor, however, with opinion polls suggesting that his Spanish Socialist and Workers’ Party (the PSOE) will gain far more parliamentary seats.

There are four major parties spanning the political landscape in Spain – the left-wing, ruling Socialists, the center-right People’s Party (PP), far-left Unidos Podemos party and the liberal, centrist Ciudadanos (Citizens’ Party). There is also now an upstart, populist newcomer in the mix – the far-right VOX party.

According to the latest opinion poll, the PSOE leads by a wide margin and is seen with 31.1% of the votes. Conducted between April 9-11 by social research firm GAD3 for La Vanguardia newspaper, the poll showed the PP trailed with 20.1% of the vote, Ciudadanos was seen with 14.4% and Unidos Podemos with 11.4%. Far-right Vox is seen closely behind with 11.2% of the vote.

A host of smaller parties, including Catalan independence parties, are seen with a smaller percentage of the vote while a large number of voters (26%) remain undecided as to who to vote for, and this could have a large impact on the final result.

As it stands, however, the Socialist Party is expect to win the highest number of seats (around 137-139 seats). But with 350 seats up for grabs in Congress, no one party will gain an absolute majority (of 176 seats) to govern alone so a coalition government is highly likely. That will involve horse-trading between the main parties and smaller partners.

The PSOE could have to rely on Podemos and secessionists in Spain, again, while a right-leaning coalition could be formed by PP, Ciudadanos and Vox. Whatever the outcome, the political scene is seen as highly fragmented.

A key date for voters could be April 23 when a debate between the main party leaders – Pedro Sánchez (PSOE), Pablo Casado (PP), Pablo Iglesias (Podemos), Albert Rivera (Citizens) and Santiago Abascal (Vox) – is televised.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: holly ellyatt, miguel riopa, afp, getty images, javier soriano, cesar manso
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, psoe, pp, vote, polls, plenty, socialist, party, podemos, riding, parties, seen, election, wildcards, seats, socialists, high, vox, spains


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says socialism is ‘not the view’ of the Democratic Party

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said socialism is “not the view” of the Democratic Party. “I do reject socialism,” Pelosi added. Presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt, who has long called himself a democratic socialist, last week introduced “Medicare for All” legislation. Though some Democrats, including freshman Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., have embraced aspects of socialism, Pelosi insisted that it’s only “like five people.” Though Pelosi said she i


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said socialism is “not the view” of the Democratic Party. “I do reject socialism,” Pelosi added. Presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt, who has long called himself a democratic socialist, last week introduced “Medicare for All” legislation. Though some Democrats, including freshman Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., have embraced aspects of socialism, Pelosi insisted that it’s only “like five people.” Though Pelosi said she i
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says socialism is ‘not the view’ of the Democratic Party Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: ashley turner, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, speaker, socialist, view, democratic, pelosi, house, sanders, nancy, democrats, presidential, socialism, medicare, party


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says socialism is 'not the view' of the Democratic Party

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said socialism is “not the view” of the Democratic Party.

In an interview with the CBS program “60 Minutes” that aired Sunday, the California Democrat said that lawmakers on her side of the aisle “know that we have to hold the center.”

“I do reject socialism,” Pelosi added. “If people have that view, that’s their view. That is not the view of the Democratic Party.”

Pelosi’s comments come as members of the party who embrace some of the ideas behind socialism become more outspoken. Presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt, who has long called himself a democratic socialist, last week introduced “Medicare for All” legislation.

The idea of a government-run health-care plan for all Americans has been denounced by Republicans who are trying to paint all Democrats with the socialism brush and use it as a 2020 campaign weapon.

Centrist Democrats are also distancing themselves. Pelosi herself urged caution on Sanders’ health-care proposal, instead touting President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, despite a number of Democratic presidential candidates co-sponsoring Sanders’ Medicare for All bill. Presidential hopefuls Sens. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Cory Booker, D-N.J., Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., support Medicare for All and signed on to Sanders’ legislation.

In her “60 Minutes” interview, Pelosi said: “The Affordable Care Act is better than Medicare, there’s no question about that. The Affordable Care Act benefits are better, Medicare doesn’t have a catastrophic plan. So if you want Medicare for All, you have to change Medicare and let’s take a look at that.”

Though some Democrats, including freshman Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., have embraced aspects of socialism, Pelosi insisted that it’s only “like five people.”

Pelosi added that it’s been an “ongoing theme” for Republicans to accuse Democrats of adopting socialism, citing an example of when a newly conservative Ronald Reagan, before becoming a politician, warned that starting the Medicare system would create a “socialist dictatorship.”

The Republican National Committee did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment on Pelosi’s remarks.

Though Pelosi said she is not a socialist, the House speaker said she believes she’s still a progressive lawmaker.

Pelosi’s office did not respond to a request for additional comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: ashley turner, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, speaker, socialist, view, democratic, pelosi, house, sanders, nancy, democrats, presidential, socialism, medicare, party


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

UK parliament ‘very likely’ to consider new Brexit referendum, says British finance minister

The idea of a second Brexit referendum is very likely to be put before Britain’s parliament again although the government remains opposed to any new plebiscite, the British finance minister said on Friday. But a second referendum could not be ruled out. Many Labour lawmakers are pressing their leader Jeremy Corbyn to demand a new referendum in talks with the government. He angered them again recently by describing another Brexit referendum as a “perfectly credible proposition”. Parliament has pr


The idea of a second Brexit referendum is very likely to be put before Britain’s parliament again although the government remains opposed to any new plebiscite, the British finance minister said on Friday. But a second referendum could not be ruled out. Many Labour lawmakers are pressing their leader Jeremy Corbyn to demand a new referendum in talks with the government. He angered them again recently by describing another Brexit referendum as a “perfectly credible proposition”. Parliament has pr
UK parliament ‘very likely’ to consider new Brexit referendum, says British finance minister Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, second, referendum, minister, parliament, consider, uk, british, brexit, deal, months, talks, hammond, finance, party, labour


UK parliament 'very likely' to consider new Brexit referendum, says British finance minister

The idea of a second Brexit referendum is very likely to be put before Britain’s parliament again although the government remains opposed to any new plebiscite, the British finance minister said on Friday.

Philip Hammond said he hoped parliament would break the Brexit impasse by passing a deal by the end of June, potentially ending the calls for a new referendum, and there was a “good chance” of a breakthrough in talks with the opposition Labour Party.

“I remain optimistic that over the next couple of months we will get a deal done,” he told reporters in Washington where he is attending meetings at the International Monetary Fund.

But a second referendum could not be ruled out.

“It’s a proposition that could and, on all the evidence, is very likely to be put to parliament at some stage,” Hammond said.

Prime Minister Theresa May has so far failed to get her own Conservative Party behind the Brexit divorce deal she agreed with other European Union leaders last year, forcing her to ask the bloc for a delay and to start talks with Labour about how to break the impasse in parliament.

Many Labour lawmakers are pressing their leader Jeremy Corbyn to demand a new referendum in talks with the government.

Hammond said that while the government was opposed to a new public vote, other Labour demands – such as a customs union with the EU – were up for debate.

Hammond said about six months would be needed to hold a referendum, so if parliament voted in a couple of months’ time to make one a condition of approving a Brexit deal, there would be no time before Britain is due to leave the EU on Oct. 31.

One of May’s most pro-EU ministers, Hammond has faced criticism from Brexit supporters for saying Britain should stay close to the bloc. He angered them again recently by describing another Brexit referendum as a “perfectly credible proposition”.

“(A second referendum) in the end is an issue about parliament and parliamentary numbers, and where the Labour Party ends up on this, as the Labour Party itself is deeply divided on this issue and at some point will have to decide on where it stands,” Hammond said.

Parliament has previously rejected the idea of a new referendum and other possible solutions the Brexit impasse.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, second, referendum, minister, parliament, consider, uk, british, brexit, deal, months, talks, hammond, finance, party, labour


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India heads to the polls today. Here’s what you need to know

India will start voting on Thursday to elect members to the lower house of Parliament. Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party hope to win power for a second five-year term — but opinion polls suggest it could be a close fight to the finish. There’ll be around 900 million eligible voters in India, almost three times the size of the U.S. population. That makes the elections — spread over seven phases that end on May 19 — the largest democratic exercise in the world. Vot


India will start voting on Thursday to elect members to the lower house of Parliament. Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party hope to win power for a second five-year term — but opinion polls suggest it could be a close fight to the finish. There’ll be around 900 million eligible voters in India, almost three times the size of the U.S. population. That makes the elections — spread over seven phases that end on May 19 — the largest democratic exercise in the world. Vot
India heads to the polls today. Here’s what you need to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, noah seelam, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, india, know, heads, suggest, polls, win, term, voters, times, today, party, voting, heres, eligible, world, need


India heads to the polls today. Here's what you need to know

India will start voting on Thursday to elect members to the lower house of Parliament.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party hope to win power for a second five-year term — but opinion polls suggest it could be a close fight to the finish.

The coalition led by Modi’s party is predicted to win 273 of the 543 parliament seats being contested, one seat more than the number needed to govern, Reuters reported.

There’ll be around 900 million eligible voters in India, almost three times the size of the U.S. population. That makes the elections — spread over seven phases that end on May 19 — the largest democratic exercise in the world. Indian citizens who are 18 or older are eligible to participate.

Votes will be counted on May 23 and results are likely to be announced the same day.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, noah seelam, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, india, know, heads, suggest, polls, win, term, voters, times, today, party, voting, heres, eligible, world, need


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘Time is finally up’ for Theresa May after Brexit delayed to Halloween, analysts say

Prime Minister Theresa May managed to convince EU leaders to grant the U.K. more time before it leaves the bloc, but experts say her days in office are now numbered. “One could even cram a general election into that time frame too if PM May were to resign by roughly the end of May.” More tumult in British politics is expected despite a reprieve from Brussels on Wednesday night, with EU leaders agreeing to a “flexible extension” of the Brexit deadline until October 31, following a request from Ma


Prime Minister Theresa May managed to convince EU leaders to grant the U.K. more time before it leaves the bloc, but experts say her days in office are now numbered. “One could even cram a general election into that time frame too if PM May were to resign by roughly the end of May.” More tumult in British politics is expected despite a reprieve from Brussels on Wednesday night, with EU leaders agreeing to a “flexible extension” of the Brexit deadline until October 31, following a request from Ma
‘Time is finally up’ for Theresa May after Brexit delayed to Halloween, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: holly ellyatt, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, leaders, extension, party, say, bloc, finally, uk, mays, eu, theresa, delayed, british, halloween, analysts, deal, conservative


'Time is finally up' for Theresa May after Brexit delayed to Halloween, analysts say

Prime Minister Theresa May managed to convince EU leaders to grant the U.K. more time before it leaves the bloc, but experts say her days in office are now numbered.

“A six-month period is clearly enough for the Conservative Party to contemplate a change in leadership while still allowing some time for the incoming PM to seek to negotiate with the EU,” J.P. Morgan economist Malcolm Barr said in a research note Thursday.

“One could even cram a general election into that time frame too if PM May were to resign by roughly the end of May.”

More tumult in British politics is expected despite a reprieve from Brussels on Wednesday night, with EU leaders agreeing to a “flexible extension” of the Brexit deadline until October 31, following a request from May.

The U.K. was initially meant to leave the bloc on March 29 but was granted an extension to April 12 with the British Parliament failing to agree on any exit deal. Then, when it was apparent that there was still no majority consensus for the deal on offer, May was forced to ask for more time.

Influential pro-Brexit members of her Conservative Party are unhappy at May’s decision and would have preferred a no-deal departure. Others balked at May’s withdrawal agreement with the EU which was seen as a “softer” Brexit that maintained a closer relationship with the bloc.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: holly ellyatt, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, leaders, extension, party, say, bloc, finally, uk, mays, eu, theresa, delayed, british, halloween, analysts, deal, conservative


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

We should vote swiftly to seize the EU’s generous offer: UK lawmaker

We should vote swiftly to seize the EU’s generous offer: UK lawmaker9 Hours AgoThe EU and U.K. agreed to a flexible extension of the Brexit deadline to the end of October. Mary Creagh, a British member of parliament, says the U.K. should “grasp this opportunity with both hands.” She also says the Labour Party is “very clear” that there has to be a public vote on any Brexit deal that comes forward.


We should vote swiftly to seize the EU’s generous offer: UK lawmaker9 Hours AgoThe EU and U.K. agreed to a flexible extension of the Brexit deadline to the end of October. Mary Creagh, a British member of parliament, says the U.K. should “grasp this opportunity with both hands.” She also says the Labour Party is “very clear” that there has to be a public vote on any Brexit deal that comes forward.
We should vote swiftly to seize the EU’s generous offer: UK lawmaker Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eus, brexit, party, swiftly, generous, uk, seize, public, vote, opportunity, lawmaker, parliament, offer


We should vote swiftly to seize the EU's generous offer: UK lawmaker

We should vote swiftly to seize the EU’s generous offer: UK lawmaker

9 Hours Ago

The EU and U.K. agreed to a flexible extension of the Brexit deadline to the end of October. Mary Creagh, a British member of parliament, says the U.K. should “grasp this opportunity with both hands.” She also says the Labour Party is “very clear” that there has to be a public vote on any Brexit deal that comes forward.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eus, brexit, party, swiftly, generous, uk, seize, public, vote, opportunity, lawmaker, parliament, offer


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Chinese billionaire met with Australia’s Peter Dutton: Report

The report from Australia’s ABC Four Corners said Peter Dutton, now the home affairs minister, met one-on-one with Huang Xiangmo in a private area of a Chinese restaurant in Sydney. Former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, for one, told reporters on Tuesday that the allegation is “very troubling,” adding that “Peter Dutton has got a lot to explain about this.” Turnbull also said Australia’s current prime minister will need to get involved in the situation: “The buck stops with him. I know what it


The report from Australia’s ABC Four Corners said Peter Dutton, now the home affairs minister, met one-on-one with Huang Xiangmo in a private area of a Chinese restaurant in Sydney. Former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, for one, told reporters on Tuesday that the allegation is “very troubling,” adding that “Peter Dutton has got a lot to explain about this.” Turnbull also said Australia’s current prime minister will need to get involved in the situation: “The buck stops with him. I know what it
Chinese billionaire met with Australia’s Peter Dutton: Report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: will koulouris, cameron spencer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dutton, australian, huang, prime, chinese, donations, australias, peter, report, met, meeting, billionaire, minister, party


Chinese billionaire met with Australia's Peter Dutton: Report

China’s influence on Australian politics is again in focus after a media investigation revealed a secret meeting in 2016 between the then-immigration minister and a controversial Chinese billionaire seeking an Australian passport.

The report from Australia’s ABC Four Corners said Peter Dutton, now the home affairs minister, met one-on-one with Huang Xiangmo in a private area of a Chinese restaurant in Sydney. The meeting was set up after the Chinese businessman paid tens of thousands of dollars to a lobbyist, according to the investigation. That’s led to calls for Australia’s current government to look into the matter further.

Former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, for one, told reporters on Tuesday that the allegation is “very troubling,” adding that “Peter Dutton has got a lot to explain about this.”

Turnbull also said Australia’s current prime minister will need to get involved in the situation: “The buck stops with him. I know what it is like to be prime minister and, ultimately, you are responsible and so Scott Morrison has to deal with this.”

Dutton has confirmed the meeting, but denied helping Huang with any immigration issues, according to SBS News.

Still, the Four Corners report is just the latest allegation of large political donors with apparent ties to China’s Communist Party wielding influence within Australian politics.

Back in February, Huang — who is currently in China following a decision to ban him from re-entering Australia — called on both the ruling Coalition and the opposition Labor Party to return over 2.7 million Australian dollars (about $1.9 million) in donations that he had made over the past five years.

In an interview with the Australian Financial Review, Huang called out his treatment as being hypocritical — and questioned the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation’s inference that his membership of groups that were promoting the “peaceful reunification” of China was tantamount to him being an operative of the Chinese state.

“If I am being penalized for promoting the peaceful reunification of China, this is against Australia’s own position as well as its fundamental principles of cultural diversity and freedom of speech,” Huang told the Australian Financial Review.

While Huang’s donations were a contributing factor in the Australian government’s decision to ban foreign political donations in November last year, Chinese-associated donations continue to raise concerns. In December, the New South Wales Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) raided the offices of the state’s Labor Party over A$100,000 in donations by Chinese-Australian nationals.

According to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, ICAC is currently investigating a trio of individuals — including Huang — in relation to documents seized in the raid.

For more on the meeting, see the report from Australia’s ABC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: will koulouris, cameron spencer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dutton, australian, huang, prime, chinese, donations, australias, peter, report, met, meeting, billionaire, minister, party


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post