House passes bill to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour

The House passed a bill Thursday to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour in a win for liberal activists who have long pushed to give low-wage workers a raise. Congress last raised the federal minimum wage to $7.25 per hour about a decade ago. Now, 29 states and Washington D.C. have higher pay floors than the U.S., while seven states have approved $15 per hour minimum wages. An amendment adopted Thursday, proposed by Rep. Tom O’Halleran, requires a Government Accountability Office report


The House passed a bill Thursday to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour in a win for liberal activists who have long pushed to give low-wage workers a raise. Congress last raised the federal minimum wage to $7.25 per hour about a decade ago. Now, 29 states and Washington D.C. have higher pay floors than the U.S., while seven states have approved $15 per hour minimum wages. An amendment adopted Thursday, proposed by Rep. Tom O’Halleran, requires a Government Accountability Office report
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, federal, minimum, hike, raise, passes, pay, legislation, house, hour, 15, workers, bill, wages


House passes bill to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour

Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) holds up seven-year-old Kassidy Durham of Durham, North Carolina, during a news conference prior to a vote on the Raise the Wage Act July 18, 2019 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.

The House passed a bill Thursday to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour in a win for liberal activists who have long pushed to give low-wage workers a raise.

The Democratic-held chamber passed the plan in a 231-199 vote. Six Democrats opposed it, while three Republicans supported it.

The measure would gradually hike the U.S. pay floor to $15 by 2025, then index further hikes to median wage growth. It would also phase out lower minimum wage paid to tipped workers.

House Democrats view the legislation as a core piece of their agenda to boost pay and economic growth. As President Donald Trump runs for reelection in 2020, the party argues strong economic growth and a roaring stock market have not done enough to lift the workers who most need relief.

“I commend my colleagues for taking this important step towards creating an economy that works for everyone,” said Rep. Bobby Scott, a Virginia Democrat who introduced the legislation, in a statement. “Now, Senate Republicans must decide to either stand with American workers or turn their backs on hardworking people across the country.”

Congress last raised the federal minimum wage to $7.25 per hour about a decade ago. Now, 29 states and Washington D.C. have higher pay floors than the U.S., while seven states have approved $15 per hour minimum wages. Those increases have boosted pay for the working class despite the federal inaction.

The bill has little chance of becoming law before next November’s election. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has no plans to bring the legislation up in his chamber. On Thursday, he told Fox Business Network that it would “depress the economy at a time of economic boom,” adding, “we’re not going to be doing that in the Senate.”

The White House also warned this week that Trump would veto the measure if it came to his desk. The Trump administration argued its policies are “driving economic growth and increasing workers’ take-home pay far more effectively and efficiently” than the Democratic plan. The White House contended it would “eliminate jobs and reduce total wages for American workers.”

In an analysis earlier this month, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated the bill would give 17 million U.S. workers a raise — and could lift wages for millions more. It would also boost the annual income of 1.3 million people above the poverty level.

At the same time, the measure would cause about 1.3 million Americans to lose jobs, according to the CBO. It would also “reduce business income and raise prices” as companies pass on higher labor costs, the CBO said.

Here are the main pieces of the Raise the Wage Act:

It would increase the federal pay floor to $15 per hour by 2025, then index future increase to median wage gains.

The minimum wage hikes would take effect on the following schedule: $8.40 in 2019, $9.50 in 2020, $10.60 in 2021, $11.70 in 2022, $12.80 in 2023, $13.90 in 2024 and $15 in 2025.

It would eventually drop the lower minimum wage for tipped workers.

The bill would eliminate a seldom used pay floor for teen workers that pays them less than the minimum wage.

It would also toss out subminimum wages for workers with disabilities.

An amendment adopted Thursday, proposed by Rep. Tom O’Halleran, requires a Government Accountability Office report on the effects of minimum wage increases. House and Senate committees could use the report to recommend changes to curb any negative effects of the bill.

Activists such as Fight for $15, a movement started by striking fast food workers, helped to spur $15 per hour minimum wage laws around the country. In a tweet, the group said: “Organizing workers. Strikes work. We’re not even close to done!”

RaiseTheWageNow

Some major business groups opposed the legislation. Sean Kennedy, executive vice president of public affairs at the National Restaurant Association, which represents more than 500,000 restaurant businesses, called it “the wrong wage at the wrong time, implemented in the wrong way.”

National Federation of Independent Business President and CEO Juanita Duggan also called the plan a “devastating blow to small business.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, federal, minimum, hike, raise, passes, pay, legislation, house, hour, 15, workers, bill, wages


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Ron Insana: Digitize the dollar faster and end the frenzy for fake money

To the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve: Please formally digitize the dollar and put an end to all this crypto-craziness. We have a token that already is a medium of exchange, storehouse of value and unit of account. They are not backed by anything, despite the complaints of crypto-enthusiasts who decry the use of fiat money. There are no currencies, save for those of failed states, that have less “backing” than bitcoin, Libra, ethereum, etc. (A record $13 trillion of global sovereign


To the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve: Please formally digitize the dollar and put an end to all this crypto-craziness. We have a token that already is a medium of exchange, storehouse of value and unit of account. They are not backed by anything, despite the complaints of crypto-enthusiasts who decry the use of fiat money. There are no currencies, save for those of failed states, that have less “backing” than bitcoin, Libra, ethereum, etc. (A record $13 trillion of global sovereign
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: ron insana
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Ron Insana: Digitize the dollar faster and end the frenzy for fake money

To the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve: Please formally digitize the dollar and put an end to all this crypto-craziness.

This bitcoin BS and Libra lunacy should stop.

We have a token that already is a medium of exchange, storehouse of value and unit of account. It’s called the dollar. And, quite frankly, it’s already largely been digitized.

How often does payroll department drop by your desk and leave a check?

Hardly ever anymore. Your pay is directly deposited into your bank account form which you may sometimes withdraw cash or coin.

More often than not, you use a debit/credit card to buy goods and services or pay your bills by automatic electronic transfer. That’s digital design.

The world doesn’t need a new currency, crypto or otherwise, to replace the U.S. dollar.

It’s true that the cost of all financial transactions needs to come down and that more efficiencies are needed to speed up transaction times.

Cryptocurrencies are not created more quickly than dollars. They are not backed by anything, despite the complaints of crypto-enthusiasts who decry the use of fiat money. There are no currencies, save for those of failed states, that have less “backing” than bitcoin, Libra, ethereum, etc.

The U.S. dollar is backed by not just a $20 trillion economy, but by the assets owned by the U.S. government and by Treasury securities that carry a positive yield, making U.S. debt a haven for investors seeking a return on cash.

(A record $13 trillion of global sovereign debt carries a negative yield, again, making the dollar, and dollar-denominated assets, an attractive place in which to invest.)


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: ron insana
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First-time homebuyers could snag lower costs for FHA loans under House-passed bill

A bipartisan bill that cleared the House last week would let first-time homebuyers pay a bit less at closing if they go through homeownership counseling. Borrowers who go through the counseling — aimed at helping them be financially responsible homeowners — would get a discount on the upfront mortgage insurance that all FHA loans require borrowers to pay. Photo by Rolf Bruderer via Getty ImagesThe delinquency rate on FHA loans is close to 9%, compared with about 3% for conventional loans, accord


A bipartisan bill that cleared the House last week would let first-time homebuyers pay a bit less at closing if they go through homeownership counseling. Borrowers who go through the counseling — aimed at helping them be financially responsible homeowners — would get a discount on the upfront mortgage insurance that all FHA loans require borrowers to pay. Photo by Rolf Bruderer via Getty ImagesThe delinquency rate on FHA loans is close to 9%, compared with about 3% for conventional loans, accord
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fha, mortgage, loan, homebuyers, lower, housing, firsttime, housepassed, loans, upfront, snag, pay, costs, bill, insurance, borrowers


First-time homebuyers could snag lower costs for FHA loans under House-passed bill

A bipartisan bill that cleared the House last week would let first-time homebuyers pay a bit less at closing if they go through homeownership counseling. Called the Housing Financial Literacy Act, the measure would apply to first-time homebuyers who take out a mortgage backed by the Federal Housing Administration. Borrowers who go through the counseling — aimed at helping them be financially responsible homeowners — would get a discount on the upfront mortgage insurance that all FHA loans require borrowers to pay. “The idea behind the legislation is that counseling should improve loan performance and make people better borrowers,” said Pete Mills, senior vice president of residential policy for the Mortgage Bankers Association, which generally supports the bill.

Photo by Rolf Bruderer via Getty Images

The delinquency rate on FHA loans is close to 9%, compared with about 3% for conventional loans, according to data from the Mortgage Bankers Association. In 2009, in the midst of the housing crisis that caused the Great Recession, that FHA delinquency rate reached above 14%. Roughly 83% of all FHA loans (excluding refinanced mortgages) in 2018 went to first-time homebuyers. FHA loans, which come with less-stringent requirements than conventional loans, tend to be used by first-time borrowers with low or moderate incomes who often have lower credit scores than other borrowers. Due to that increased risk for lenders, borrowers are required to pay mortgage insurance to the FHA for many years or over the life of the loan (depending on the particulars of the terms), as well as an upfront mortgage insurance premium. That upfront amount currently is equal to 1.75% of the base loan amount, and it can be paid at closing or rolled into the loan. The proposed discount of 25 basis points would reduce that amount to 1.5%.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fha, mortgage, loan, homebuyers, lower, housing, firsttime, housepassed, loans, upfront, snag, pay, costs, bill, insurance, borrowers


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The top 10 public US colleges that pay off the most

Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. public colleges that pay off the most:1. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” Michigan Technological UniversityMichigan Technical University Jcvert


Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. public colleges that pay off the most:1. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” Michigan Technological UniversityMichigan Technical University Jcvert
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: abigail hess
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The top 10 public US colleges that pay off the most

Then, using data from PayScale’s College Salary Report, we divided net cost by graduates’ expected annual earnings, which was calculated based on the median salary of graduates with less than five years of experience as well as those with 10 or more years of experience. The ranking gives greater weight to workers’ earnings in the years immediately after college, when individuals are the most impacted by college costs and student debt. (You can read our full methodology here.) The top public university on our list is the University of Washington in Seattle, a school where the average net cost for in-state students from families that make between $48,001 and $75,000 per year is $8,984 and the median salary for alumni with 10 or more years of experience is $111,800. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. public colleges that pay off the most:

1. University of Washington, Seattle

University of Washington Nikko Hellstern | Getty Images

The University of Washington, Seattle, is the flagship school of the University of Washington school system. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,984

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $111,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,850

2. University of Washington, Bothell

University of Washington Bothell Photo: Joe Mabel | Wikipedia CC

Also a member of the University of Washington school system, the University of Washington, Bothell, is a public university that offers roughly 55 degree programs and enrolls just 5,411 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,767

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $58,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $104,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,150

3. Massachusetts Maritime Academy

A Google Earth view of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Source: Google Earth

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is a public college located in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, that offers bachelor’s and master’s of science degrees in marine engineering fields. Many MMA students choose to volunteer for military service, though it is not a requirement. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,235

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $67,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $114,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,900

4. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

University of Michigan tiny-al | Getty Images

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, is the flagship campus of the University of Michigan school system. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,106

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $84,950

5. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology, often referred to as “Georgia Tech,” is a public university located in Atlanta. The school offers technology-focused education to more than 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students across six colleges and 28 schools focusing on business, computing, design, engineering, the liberal arts and sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,284

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $70,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,350

6. Purdue University, West Lafayette

Purdue University Michael Hickey/Getty Images

Purdue University’s campus in West Lafayette, Indiana, is the flagship campus of the Purdue University system. The public university enrolls 32,672 undergraduate students. Known for its strong engineering program, 28% of undergraduate students at Purdue study in the College of Engineering. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,828

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $105,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $83,000

7. College of William and Mary

College of William and Mary Will Pryce/Construction Photography/Avalon/Getty Images

Founded in 1693, the College of William and Mary is the second-oldest college in the country. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” The school offers a joint degree program with University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,320

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $113,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,350

8. Michigan Technological University

Michigan Technical University Jcvertin | Wikipedia CC

Michigan Technological University is a public university located in Houghton, Michigan. The technology-focused school is made up of seven colleges and schools including a College of Computing, a College of Engineering and a School of Business and Economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,080

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $64,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $110,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,400

9. University of California, Los Angeles

UCLA Al Seib | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

One of the most selective schools in the University of California school system, the University of California, Los Angeles, is known for its strong athletics department. The most popular majors at UCLA are biology, business economics, political science, psychology and psychobiology. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,416

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $118,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,250

10. Baruch College

CUNY Bernard M Baruch College Ben Hider/Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: abigail hess
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Morgan Stanley’s rich clients withdrew a surprising amount from accounts to pay their taxes

Signage is displayed outside Morgan Stanley & Co. headquarters in the Times Square neighborhood of New York. Morgan Stanley’s rich clients may have gotten surprised by their tax bills this year. Morgan Stanley had “greater-than-expected deposit outflows due in part to tax payments,” Pruzan told analysts during a Thursday call. Rich clients liquidate some investments every year to cover their tax bill, so presumably this was higher than what Morgan Stanley has seen in previous years. That has wid


Signage is displayed outside Morgan Stanley & Co. headquarters in the Times Square neighborhood of New York. Morgan Stanley’s rich clients may have gotten surprised by their tax bills this year. Morgan Stanley had “greater-than-expected deposit outflows due in part to tax payments,” Pruzan told analysts during a Thursday call. Rich clients liquidate some investments every year to cover their tax bill, so presumably this was higher than what Morgan Stanley has seen in previous years. That has wid
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: hugh son
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Morgan Stanley's rich clients withdrew a surprising amount from accounts to pay their taxes

Signage is displayed outside Morgan Stanley & Co. headquarters in the Times Square neighborhood of New York.

Morgan Stanley’s rich clients may have gotten surprised by their tax bills this year.

The bank’s wealth management business was hit by an unexpectedly high outflow of deposits in the second quarter, which covers the April tax filing season, according to Chief Financial Officer Jonathan Pruzan.

Morgan Stanley had “greater-than-expected deposit outflows due in part to tax payments,” Pruzan told analysts during a Thursday call. “We saw about $10 billion of outflows in the bank deposit program, some from larger tax payments.”

Rich clients liquidate some investments every year to cover their tax bill, so presumably this was higher than what Morgan Stanley has seen in previous years. The likely culprit: Under the Trump administration’s 2017 tax reform, the deduction for state income, sales and property taxes was capped at $10,000. That has widely been perceived as causing higher taxes for people living in New York, New Jersey and California, states that happen to have high property taxes and a disproportionate share of wealthy Americans.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: hugh son
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How going cash-only helped this 23-year-old pay off $20,000 in debt in one year

Paying with paper instead of plastic helped Kristy Epperson eliminate $20,000 in student loan and car loan debt in just one year. Every month, Epperson started withdrawing money from her checking account to cover spending categories like dining out, groceries, and gas. The debt-free celebration: Spruce up her homeWhile in debt-elimination mode, Epperson promised herself she’d spruce up her lawn once she finally zeroed out her student loan debt. Kristy Epperson’s lawn, before and after she hired


Paying with paper instead of plastic helped Kristy Epperson eliminate $20,000 in student loan and car loan debt in just one year. Every month, Epperson started withdrawing money from her checking account to cover spending categories like dining out, groceries, and gas. The debt-free celebration: Spruce up her homeWhile in debt-elimination mode, Epperson promised herself she’d spruce up her lawn once she finally zeroed out her student loan debt. Kristy Epperson’s lawn, before and after she hired
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: sofia pitt
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How going cash-only helped this 23-year-old pay off $20,000 in debt in one year

Paying with paper instead of plastic helped Kristy Epperson eliminate $20,000 in student loan and car loan debt in just one year. After earning her bachelor’s degree in nursing from Wright State University in 2017, Epperson owed about $16,000 in student loans from multiple borrowers with interest rates of between 3.6% and 6.8%. She also had roughly $4,000 left on her car loan, at an interest rate of 4.2%. Even as Epperson began slowly chipping away at that debt, she managed to achieve another financial goal: homeownership. She was able to buy a place in Dayton, Ohio, with only 5% as a down payment. Becoming a homeowner forced her to take a hard look at her expenses and reevaluate her spending habits — which made her more determined to wipe out her student loan and auto debts. “If something happened, if I lost my job, I’d have no way to pay my bills,” Epperson tells Grow. “I needed a better long-term plan.” In addition to getting a second job as a substitute teacher, which brought in an extra $100 to $300 a month, Epperson created an expense spreadsheet and began tracking her purchases to help her pay down debt faster. She used her Instagram page, @DebtFreeAtTwentyThree, to share her setbacks, strategies, and accomplishments.

The anti-debt strategy: Cold, hard cash

Epperson’s expense tracking showed her one key problem area: credit card use. “I would look at my credit card bill and not even remember some of the charges,” she says. “I was eating out a lot, buying new clothes at Target, shopping on Amazon.” So she ditched the credit cards. “I felt using cash would hold me accountable,” she explains.

Every month, Epperson started withdrawing money from her checking account to cover spending categories like dining out, groceries, and gas. Once she ran out of the money she had allocated to a specific expense, she stopped spending on that category. If Epperson overspent in a category, she would borrow from another. That meant making spending sacrifices: “One month my friends were all going to a Kenny Chesney concert and I didn’t have the money left that month, so I couldn’t go,” she says. When paying in cash wasn’t an option—like when she had to make purchases online—Epperson says she used a credit card and paid off the balance immediately with the money in her checking account to avoid racking up more debt. Once Epperson’s friends realized she was turning down plans, they tried to be accommodating to help her save: Epperson and her friends started taking advantage of Dayton’s great hiking trails, hosting game nights, and all chipping in to buy groceries and cook dinner together.

The debt-free celebration: Spruce up her home

While in debt-elimination mode, Epperson promised herself she’d spruce up her lawn once she finally zeroed out her student loan debt. “Looking out the window and imagining the yard I wanted motivated me to stick to the budget,” she says. Hiring a landscaper was one of the first moves she made after paying off her student loans earlier this summer.

Kristy Epperson’s lawn, before and after she hired a landscaper as part of her celebration of paying off student loan debt.

The opportunity: An emergency fund

Now that Epperson is free of her student and auto loan debt, her midterm goal is to save up enough to buy a new car using cash, and to replace her hand-me-down TV. But first, she says, her priority is to build up a six-month emergency fund. So far, she has nearly a third of what she needs saved up. Epperson says she plans to keep up with her cash budgeting strategy. In fact, she hasn’t used her credit cards in months. Do you have an inspiring story about how you paid down debt? Email us at getgrowing@cnbc.com. The article How Going Cash-Only Helped This 23-Year-Old Pay Off $20,000 in Debt in One Year originally appeared on Grow by Acorns + CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: sofia pitt
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The 10 private US colleges that pay off the most

This means for some students, attending a private college can be surprisingly affordable. We found that many private colleges and universities can provide students significant value at manageable costs. The net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. private colleges that pay off the most:1. Pomona CollegePomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty ImagesPomona College is one of five private, no


This means for some students, attending a private college can be surprisingly affordable. We found that many private colleges and universities can provide students significant value at manageable costs. The net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. private colleges that pay off the most:1. Pomona CollegePomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty ImagesPomona College is one of five private, no
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: abigail hess
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The 10 private US colleges that pay off the most

Research consistently demonstrates that college graduates earn more than their peers without degrees, but rising college costs can also scare students into thinking that school may be out of reach for them. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report, during the 2018 – 2019 school year, the tuition at private nonprofit four-year schools was $35,830 on average. But in reality, many students end up paying far less. These college “sticker prices” include tuition, fees, room and board, but they do not account for scholarships, grants and tax benefits. This means for some students, attending a private college can be surprisingly affordable. In fact, the average net price of tuition and fees in 2019 is $14,610 at private nonprofit four-year schools, and students at these schools typically receive an average $21,220 in grant aid and tax benefits. CNBC Make It set out to capture the information students would need to balance these considerations. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their education dollars. We found that many private colleges and universities can provide students significant value at manageable costs.

Click to expand To develop this list, we identified the true net cost of each college for the typical American student — including tuition, fees, books, supplies and other expenses — after subtracting scholarships and grants. Using data from Tuition Tracker, a tool created by education-focused nonprofit news organization The Hechinger Report, we looked at the net cost for students from families making between $48,001 and $75,000. We chose to focus on this bracket because it includes the median U.S. household income, $61,372. Then, using data from PayScale’s College Salary Report, we divided net cost by graduates’ expected annual earnings, which was calculated based on the median salary of graduates with less than five years of experience as well as those with 10 or more years of experience. The ranking gives greater weight to workers’ earnings in the years immediately after college, when individuals are the most impacted by college costs and student debt. (You can read our full methodology here.) Stanford University takes first place on the list. The net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. According to Stanford, the average scholarship and grant total for students from families making less than $65,000 a year is $74,095 per year. Students from families making between $65,000 and $95,000 receive $65,050 on average in scholarships and grant aid. Plus, Stanford graduates with more than 10 years of experience report average salaries of $143,100. But getting into a school like Stanford isn’t easy. The acceptance rate for the Stanford class of 2022 was just 4.4%, and other high-ranking private universities reported similarly low acceptance rates. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 10 U.S. private colleges that pay off the most:

1. Stanford University

Stanford University David Butow | Getty Images

Stanford University, often referred to as a “West Coast Ivy,” is located near Silicon Valley in Stanford, California. The highly selective school is known for its strong science, technology and engineering programs as well as its successful athletics programs. Stanford enrolls approximately 7,083 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,061

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $76,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $109,800

2. Princeton University

Princeton University Photo: Princeton University, Office of Communications.

Princeton University was founded in 1746, making it the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Undergraduate Princeton students study one of 37 concentrations and must be proficient in at least one language other than English. Known for its strong engineering program, approximately 25% of undergraduates at the Ivy League school study in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,557

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $141,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,000

3. University of Chicago

The University of Chicago Bob Krist | Getty Images

The University of Chicago is a private, nonprofit university in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. The school is known for its strong STEM programs, but the curriculum also requires students to complete courses in three areas: humanities, civilization studies and the arts; natural sciences; and social sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,536

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $117,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,550

4. California Institute of Technology

California Institute of Technology Danita Delimont | Getty Images

California Institute of Technology, known as CalTech, is a private, nonprofit engineering university located in Pasadena, California. The CalTech curriculum emphasizes STEM education and all students are required to take math, physics, chemistry, biology and scientific communication courses. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,781

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $113,250

5. Harvard University

Harvard University DenisTangneyJr | iStock | Getty Images

Founded in 1636, Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is the oldest college in the United States. Harvard is known for its historic legacy, famous alumni and generous financial aid, which the university is able to provide in part because of an endowment worth approximately $39.2 billion. Harvard students select “concentrations” instead of majors and one of the most popular is economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,577

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $142,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,600

6. Yale University

Yale University Yana Paskova / Stringer (Getty Images)

Located in New Haven, Connecticut, Yale is a private, Ivy League university. Founded in 1701, Yale is the third-oldest college in the United States. Yale teaches a liberal arts curriculum and requires students take classes in humanities and arts; sciences and social sciences; foreign languages; quantitative reasoning; and writing. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,551

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,850

7. Columbia University

Columbia University Getty Images

Columbia University is a private Ivy League university in New York City. Founded in 1754, Columbia is the fifth-oldest college in the United States. Columbia students can choose from 80 areas of study but must take six required classes, such as Contemporary Civilization and Frontiers of Science, and must fulfill several requirements including taking a foreign language. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,592

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $69,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $127,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,350

8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT Kevin Fleming | Corbis Documentary | Getty Images

Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a STEM-focused private, nonprofit university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Instead of majors, MIT students choose a “course” to specialize in. Electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science are among the most popular courses at MIT. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,633

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $150,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $117,000

9. Pomona College

Pomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty Images

Pomona College is one of five private, nonprofit, liberal arts colleges in Claremont, California. The curriculum at the highly selective school is broad and requires students take at least one course in each of six areas: criticism, analysis and contextual study of works of the human imagination; social institutions and human behavior; history, values, ethics and cultural studies; physical and biological sciences; mathematical reasoning; and creation and performance of works of art and literature. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,975

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $119,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,200

10. Duke University


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, colleges, net, cost, salary, experience, alumni, pay, average, private, college, students


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The top 50 US colleges that pay off the most

And less than half, 41%, of first-time, full-time college students earn their bachelor’s degree in four years. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their tuition dollars. According to The Hechinger Report, the net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 50 U.S. colleges that


And less than half, 41%, of first-time, full-time college students earn their bachelor’s degree in four years. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their tuition dollars. According to The Hechinger Report, the net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 50 U.S. colleges that
The top 50 US colleges that pay off the most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cost, university, salary, experience, income, pay, students, average, college, 50, alumni, colleges, net


The top 50 US colleges that pay off the most

Each year, high school students across the U.S. march through campuses on guided tours, pore over course catalogs, and frantically check mailboxes and inboxes for letters granting them admission to the next phase of life: college. Most are facing significant financial questions. Research consistently demonstrates that college graduates earn more than their peers without degrees. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Americans with a bachelor’s degree have median weekly earnings of $1,173, compared with just $712 a week for those who have a high school diploma. Still, experts urge high school students to think carefully before taking on significant amounts of debt to finance a college degree. College costs can be difficult to estimate, and even for college applicants with the foresight to research things like debt balances at graduation and average alumni salaries, outcomes can be challenging to quantify. Sticker prices published by universities do not include grants, scholarships or loans. Financial aid awards can change from year to year. Housing, travel, books and other personal expenses can add up quickly. And less than half, 41%, of first-time, full-time college students earn their bachelor’s degree in four years. Many of them end up paying for more than four years of college, driving up the cost of attendance significantly. CNBC Make It set out to capture the information students would need to balance these considerations. The result is our first list of the U.S. colleges that pay off the most, a ranking that spotlights 50 schools that provide students the highest average salaries for their tuition dollars.

Click to expand We started by identifying the true net cost of each college for the typical American student — including tuition, fees, books, supplies and other expenses — after subtracting scholarships and grants. Using data from Tuition Tracker, a tool created by education-focused nonprofit news organization The Hechinger Report, we looked at the net cost for students from families making between $48,001 and $75,000, an income range established by the Department of Education. We chose to focus on this bracket because it includes the median U.S. household income, $61,372. The Hechinger Report calculates net cost by subtracting federal, state, local and institutional grants and scholarships from the sticker price for first-time, full-time (and, at public universities, in-state) undergraduates based on data provided by the U.S. Department of Education. Then, using data from PayScale’s College Salary Report, we divided net cost by graduates’ expected annual earnings, which was calculated based on the median salary of graduates with less than five years of experience as well as those with 10 or more years of experience. The ranking gives greater weight to workers’ earnings in the years immediately after college, when individuals are the most impacted by college costs and student debt. (You can read our full methodology here.) We excluded tuition-free institutions from the list, including military schools like West Point and U.S. Naval Academy, because the cost of post-college military service introduces an additional factor that’s challenging to measure against other schools. Stanford University takes first place on the list. According to The Hechinger Report, the net cost for a student from a family that earns between $48,001 and $75,000 is $4,061 per year. Stanford graduates with more than 10 years of experience report average salaries of $143,100. According to PayScale, 51% of Stanford students major in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) field, a factor that contributes to high average salaries among graduates. And Stanford is known for providing robust financial aid. The average scholarship and grant total for students from families making less than $65,000 a year is $74,095 per year. Students from families making between $65,000 and $95,000 receive $65,050 on average in scholarships and grant aid. While Princeton, Harvard and Yale get top marks, a wide range of schools from across the U.S. are represented here. State schools like the University of Washington-Seattle, small liberal arts colleges like Pomona College and STEM-focused schools like MIT also appear on this list, indicating that you don’t have to attend the Ivy League to get a great return on your college investment. Here is CNBC Make It’s 2019 list of the top 50 U.S. colleges that pay off the most:

The top 25 private universities

1. Stanford University

Stanford University David Butow | Getty Images

Stanford University, often referred to as a “West Coast Ivy,” is located near Silicon Valley in Stanford, California. The highly selective school is known for its strong science, technology and engineering programs as well as its successful athletics programs. Stanford enrolls approximately 7,083 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,061

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $76,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $109,800

2. Princeton University

Princeton University Photo: Princeton University, Office of Communications.

Princeton University was founded in 1746, making it the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Undergraduate Princeton students study one of 37 concentrations and must be proficient in at least one language other than English. Known for its strong engineering program, approximately 25% of undergraduates at the Ivy League school study in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,557

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $141,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,000

3. University of Chicago

The University of Chicago Bob Krist | Getty Images

The University of Chicago is a private, nonprofit university in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood. The school is known for its strong STEM programs, but the curriculum also requires students to complete courses in three areas: humanities, civilization studies and the arts; natural sciences; and social sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $4,536

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $117,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,550

4. California Institute of Technology

California Institute of Technology Danita Delimont | Getty Images

California Institute of Technology, known as CalTech, is a private, nonprofit engineering university located in Pasadena, California. The CalTech curriculum emphasizes STEM education and all students are required to take math, physics, chemistry, biology and scientific communication courses. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,781

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $143,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $113,250

5. Harvard University

Harvard University DenisTangneyJr | iStock | Getty Images

Founded in 1636, Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is the oldest college in the United States. Harvard is known for its historic legacy, famous alumni and generous financial aid, which the university is able to provide in part because of an endowment worth approximately $39.2 billion. Harvard students select “concentrations” instead of majors and one of the most popular is economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,577

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $142,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $107,600

6. Yale University

Yale University Yana Paskova / Stringer (Getty Images)

Located in New Haven, Connecticut, Yale is a private, Ivy League university. Founded in 1701, Yale is the third-oldest college in the United States. Yale teaches a liberal arts curriculum and requires students take classes in humanities and arts; sciences and social sciences; foreign languages; quantitative reasoning; and writing. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,551

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,850

7. Columbia University

Columbia University Getty Images

Columbia University is a private Ivy League university in New York City. Founded in 1754, Columbia is the fifth-oldest college in the United States. Columbia students can choose from 80 areas of study but must take six required classes, such as Contemporary Civilization and Frontiers of Science, and must fulfill several requirements including taking a foreign language. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,592

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $69,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $127,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,350

8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT Kevin Fleming | Corbis Documentary | Getty Images

Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a STEM-focused private, nonprofit university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Instead of majors, MIT students choose a “course” to specialize in. Electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science are among the most popular courses at MIT. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,633

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $83,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $150,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $117,000

9. Pomona College

Pomona College Ted Soqui | Corbis | Getty Images

Pomona College is one of five private, nonprofit, liberal arts colleges in Claremont, California. The curriculum at the highly selective school is broad and requires students take at least one course in each of six areas: criticism, analysis and contextual study of works of the human imagination; social institutions and human behavior; history, values, ethics and cultural studies; physical and biological sciences; mathematical reasoning; and creation and performance of works of art and literature. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $6,975

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $119,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,200

10. Duke University

Duke University Lance King | Getty Images

Located in Durham, North Carolina, Duke University is a private university. The southern school, known for its strong athletic program, offers 4,000 courses each semester. The most popular major among Duke undergrads is computer science and 83% of students study more than just one major. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $7,880

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $133,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $100,900

11. Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee Doug Plummer | Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee is a private liberal arts university located in Lexington, Virginia. The small southern university is composed of two undergraduate schools: the Williams School of Commerce, Economics and Politics — which offers degrees in business administration, business administration and accounting, public accounting, economics and politics — as well as a liberal arts school referred to as “the College” that offers 40 different majors. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,962

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $130,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $96,800

12. Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt | Collegiate Images | Getty Images

Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, is a private, nonprofit university. Undergraduate Vanderbilt students can earn bachelor’s degrees from the College of Arts and Science, the Blair School of Music, the School of Engineering and the Peabody College of Education and Human Development. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,451

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $118,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $91,100

13. Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College Cheryl Senter/Bloomberg | Getty Images

Dartmouth College is a private, nonprofit, Ivy League university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, that enrolls approximately 4,400 undergraduate students and is known for its graduate programs, such as the Tuck School of Business. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,048

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $137,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $103,200

14. Olin College of Engineering

Olin College Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Founded in 1997, the Olin College of Engineering is a private, nonprofit, engineering college in Needham, Massachusetts. Located near Babson College and Wellesley College, Olin is known for its project-based engineering curriculum. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,706

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $81,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $134,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $108,050

15. Rice University

Rice University Craig Hartley | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Rice University is a private, nonprofit university located in Houston. Undergraduate students at Rice can study more than 50 different majors in the George R. Brown School of Engineering, the Shepherd School of Music, the School of Architecture, the School of Humanities, the School of Social Sciences and the Wiess School of Natural Sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,080

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $69,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $133,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,400

16. Williams College

Williams College John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

This highly respected private, nonprofit, liberal arts college is based in Williamstown, Massachusetts. All Williams students take at least two writing-intensive courses as well several courses in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and science and mathematics. Williams enrolls approximately 2,020 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,448

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $64,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $99,750

17. University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania Margie Politzer | Lonely Planet Images | Getty Images

The University of Pennsylvania is a private university known for its business program. Undergraduate students at this Ivy League school can choose from more than 90 majors across four schools: the College for Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Nursing and the Wharton Business School. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,322

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $70,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $102,950

18. Bowdoin College

Bowdoin College Derek Davis | Portland Press Herald | Getty Images

Bowdoin College is a private, nonprofit, liberal arts college located in Brunswick, Maine. Students at the small school must take at least one course in five areas: mathematical, computational or statistical reasoning; inquiry in the natural sciences; exploring social differences; international perspectives; and visual and performing arts. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,057

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $116,000

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,850

19. Webb Institute

Webb Institute Source: Webb Institute

Webb Institute in Glen Cove, New York, is a small, private, nonprofit college that educates students in naval architecture and marine engineering. During the 2018-2019 school year, the Webb Institute enrolled just 104 students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,682

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $79,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $134,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $106,900

20. Brown University

Brown University Yiming Chen | Getty Images

Brown University is an Ivy League university located in Providence, Rhode Island. Brown is known for its flexible “open curriculum ” that only requires that students complete at least 30 courses in eight semesters, complete at least one major and “demonstrate excellent skill in written English.” Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,697

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $65,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,500

21. Haverford College

Haverford College Source: Michael Branscom

Haverford College is a private liberal arts college in Haverford, Pennsylvania. Haverford’s liberal arts curriculum requires that students study in areas such as meaning, interpretation and creative expression or analysis and the social world: individuals, institutions and cultures. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,110

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $56,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $93,750

22. Swarthmore College

Swarthmore College aimintang | Getty Images

Swarthmore College is a private liberal arts college located in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1864 by Quakers, Swarthmore is part of a tri-college consortium with Bryn Mawr and Haverford College and also offers cross-registration with the University of Pennsylvania. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,638

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $129,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $96,500

23. The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art

Cooper Union Campus Source: Mario Morgado | Courtesy of The Cooper Union

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art Engineering, also referred to as “The Cooper Union,” is a private college located in New York City comprised of three schools specializing in architecture, art and engineering. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,743

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $65,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $128,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $97,100

24. Bates College

Bates College Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Located in Lewiston, Maine, Bates College is a private liberal arts college. Bates has a unique academic calendar that features two semesters and one “short term,” a five-week period that allows students to focus on one single class. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,108

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $120,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $88,900

25. Wesleyan University

Wesleyan University Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Located in Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University is a private, liberal arts school that enrolls roughly 3,000 undergraduate students. Wesleyan’s flexible curriculum requires that students study each of four “competencies” — mapping (navigating complex environments), expressing (writing and communication), mining (empirical analysis and interpretation) and engaging (negotiating cultural contexts). Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,996

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $114,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,000

The top 25 public universities

1. University of Washington, Seattle

University of Washington Nikko Hellstern | Getty Images

The University of Washington, Seattle, is the flagship school of the University of Washington school system. The large public university offers more than 180 majors and is known for its computer science program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,984

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $111,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,850

2. University of Washington, Bothell

University of Washington Bothell Photo: Joe Mabel | Wikipedia CC

Also a member of the University of Washington school system, the University of Washington, Bothell, is a public university that offers roughly 55 degree programs and enrolls just 5,411 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $8,767

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $58,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $104,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,150

3. Massachusetts Maritime Academy

A Google Earth view of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Source: Google Earth

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is a public college located in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, that offers bachelor’s and master’s of science degrees in marine engineering fields. Many MMA students choose to volunteer for military service, though it is not a requirement. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,235

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $67,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $114,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $90,900

4. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

University of Michigan tiny-al | Getty Images

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, is the flagship campus of the University of Michigan school system. The public university offers 263 degree programs, enrolls 29,026 undergraduate students and is known for its athletics program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,106

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $84,950

5. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

Georgia Tech

Georgia Institute of Technology, often referred to as “Georgia Tech,” is a public university located in Atlanta. The school offers technology-focused education to more than 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students across six colleges and 28 schools focusing on business, computing, design, engineering, the liberal arts and sciences. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,284

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $70,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $101,350

6. Purdue University, West Lafayette

Purdue University Michael Hickey/Getty Images

Purdue University’s campus in West Lafayette, Indiana, is the flagship campus of the Purdue University system. The public university enrolls 32,672 undergraduate students. Known for its strong engineering program, 28% of undergraduate students at Purdue study in the College of Engineering. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $10,828

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $105,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $83,000

7. College of William and Mary

College of William and Mary Will Pryce/Construction Photography/Avalon/Getty Images

Founded in 1693, the College of William and Mary is the second-oldest college in the country. The public university, which is located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is often referred to as a “Public Ivy.” The school offers a joint degree program with University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,320

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $113,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $85,350

8. Michigan Technological University

Michigan Technical University Jcvertin | Wikipedia CC

Michigan Technological University is a public university located in Houghton, Michigan. The technology-focused school is made up of seven colleges and schools including a College of Computing, a College of Engineering and a School of Business and Economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,080

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $64,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $110,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $87,400

9. University of California, Los Angeles

UCLA Al Seib | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

One of the most selective schools in the University of California school system, the University of California, Los Angeles, is known for its strong athletics department. The most popular majors at UCLA are biology, business economics, political science, psychology and psychobiology. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $12,416

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $60,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $118,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,250

10. Baruch College

CUNY Bernard M Baruch College Ben Hider/Getty Images

Baruch College is one of 13 four-year colleges in The City University of New York school system. The public university is known for its business program and enrolls approximately 15,024 undergraduate students. The most popular majors at Baruch include accounting, finance and marketing. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,473

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $82,350

11. University of California, San Diego

University Of California, San Diego Education Images | Getty Images

University of California, San Diego, is part of the University of California school system and is located in La Jolla, California. The public university enrolls approximately 30,285 undergraduate students and is known both for its fine arts program and its engineering program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,367

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $126,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $94,050

12. University of California, Riverside

UC Riverside Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Part of the University of California system, University of California, Riverside, is a public university that offers more than 80 undergraduate majors across five schools. Located east of Los Angeles, UCR enrolls roughly 20,581 undergraduate students. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $11,685

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $54,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $109,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,650

13. New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

The campus of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, or more commonly known as New Mexico Tech in Socorro, New Mexico. Source: Atomic Energy505 | Wikimedia Commons

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology is a public university that offers associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees primarily in science and engineering. NMT is located in Socorro, New Mexico, approximately 75 miles south of Albuquerque and is known for its chemical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,756

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $121,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $92,00

14. Missouri University of Science and Technology

Curtis Laws Wilson Library, Missouri S&T, Rolla, Missouri. Source: Steveewatkins | WikiMedia Commons

STEM-focused Missouri University of Science and Technology, often called Missouri S&T, is a public land grant university based in Rolla, Missouri. The school’s mission is to integrate “education, research and application to create and convey knowledge that serves our state and helps solve the world’s great challenges.” Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,066

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $66,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $116,400

Salary average, early and mid career: $91,550

15. University of California, Irvine

School of Biological Sciences, University of California at Irvine Source: WikiMedia Commons

University of California, Irvine, is one of 10 campuses in the University of California school system. In 2018, the public university enrolled approximately 29,736 undergraduate students. UCI is known for its engineering and criminal justice programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,820

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $121,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,750

16. Montana Tech

Source: Montan Tech

Originally named the Montana State School of Mines, today Montana Tech is part of the University of Montana system with an emphasis on STEM. The public university is located in Butte, Montana, and is known for its engineering and nursing programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,133

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $61,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $107,200

Salary average, early and mid career: $84,550

17. California State University Maritime Academy (tie)

The TS Golden Bear training ship at the California State University Maritime Academy. Photo: Coldasshonky | Wikipedia CC

California State University Maritime Academy, known as “Cal Maritime,” is one of 23 schools in the California State University system. Located in Vallejo, California, the university is the only degree-granting maritime academy on the West Coast and aims to prepare students for careers fields like engineering, transportation, international relations, business and global logistics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $15,515

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $67,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $129,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $98,300

17. University of Virginia, Charlottesville (tie)

University of Virginia Source: Dan Addison | UVA University Communications

The University of Virginia, is a public university located in Charlottesville, Virginia. Founded by Thomas Jefferson, the public university enrolls approximately 16,777 undergraduate students and is known for its law and business schools as well as for its strong athletics program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,374

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $62,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $119,900

Salary average, early and mid career: $91,100

19. University of California, Santa Barbara

UC Santa Barbara Patricia Marroquin | Getty Images

The University of California, Santa Barbara, is a public university within the University of California school system. During the 2018-2019 school year, UCSB enrolled 25,976 undergraduate students. UCSB is known for its engineering, education and environmental studies programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,176

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $121,500

Salary average, early and mid career: $89,400

20. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

California State Polytechnic University – Pomona Source: California State Polytechnic University-Pomona

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, known as Cal Poly Pomona, is a public polytechnic university located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Cal Poly Pomona enrolls approximately 24,314 undergraduate students and is known for its business and engineering programs. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,335

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $56,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $111,600

Salary average, early and mid career: $83,800

21. University of California, Davis

University of California, Davis Billy Hustace | Getty Images

University of California, Davis, known for its food and agriculture program, is a part of the University of California school system. The public university enrolls approximately 30,718 undergraduate students. The three most popular majors at UC Davis are psychology, managerial economics and economics. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $14,186

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $59,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $113,800

Salary average, early and mid career: $86,600

22. North Carolina State University, Raleigh

North Carolina State University DenisTangneyJr | Getty Images

NC State University in Raleigh, North Carolina, is a public university that enrolls roughly 35,479 students. The public university is known for its veterinary medicine program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,244

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $55,800

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $104,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $80,250

23. SUNY Maritime College

SUNY Maritime College Jim Henderson | Wikimedia Commons

Part of the State University of New York system, SUNY Maritime College is located in the Bronx, New York. The public university enrolls roughly 1,635 undergraduate students and offers bachelor’s of engineering, bachelor’s of science, master’s of science and associate’s of applied science degrees. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $18,019

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $73,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $140,100

Salary average, early and mid career: $106,700

24. University of Delaware, Newark

University of Delaware gregobagel | Getty Images

Located in Newark, Delaware, the University of Delaware is a public university. The school enrolls approximately 18,221 undergraduate students and is known for its chemical engineering program. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $13,909

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $56,700

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $105,700

Salary average, early and mid career: $81,200

25. University of California, Berkeley

University of California, Berkeley Rick Gerharter | Getty Images

University of California, Berkeley, is the flagship school of the University of California system. Located in Berkeley, California, near San Francisco, the university enrolls some 30,853 undergraduate students. The school is home to the Haas School of Business. Average net cost (income $48,001-$75,000): $17,413

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $68,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $132,300

Salary average, early and mid career: $100,300 Beyond school selection, there are several steps students can take to maximize the value of their time in college while minimizing the costs. Consider pursuing a degree in a high-paying field. Earning a degree in a STEM field can help students at any college prepare themselves for in-demand high-paying jobs. Students can keep costs low by keeping on pace with their requirements and graduating on time. Additional semesters of college can be expensive and in some cases, scholarship and grant aid does not apply for semesters beyond the standard four years. But the most significant step students can take to ensure their college degree pays off is, simply, to complete their college degree. Just 60% of college students complete their bachelor’s in six years and many drop out altogether, and one of the worst outcomes for students is taking on loans for a degree they do not complete. The economic benefits of earning a bachelor’s degree are still significant, and if students study hard and play their cards right, college can pay off big time. Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cost, university, salary, experience, income, pay, students, average, college, 50, alumni, colleges, net


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This is the credit score you typically need to take out a mortgage

How to improve your credit scoreIf you’re interested in buying a home in the future, there are easy ways to increase your credit score and improve your chances of getting a mortgage at a good interest rate. Payment history makes up 35% of your FICO score, which is the most commonly used measure of creditworthiness. Next, pay attention to your credit utilization rate, which comprises 30% of your score. Credit utilization refers to the percentage of your total available credit that you are using a


How to improve your credit scoreIf you’re interested in buying a home in the future, there are easy ways to increase your credit score and improve your chances of getting a mortgage at a good interest rate. Payment history makes up 35% of your FICO score, which is the most commonly used measure of creditworthiness. Next, pay attention to your credit utilization rate, which comprises 30% of your score. Credit utilization refers to the percentage of your total available credit that you are using a
This is the credit score you typically need to take out a mortgage Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payment, need, month, mortgage, score, utilization, improve, typically, credit, pay, keeping, bills, rate


This is the credit score you typically need to take out a mortgage

How to improve your credit score

If you’re interested in buying a home in the future, there are easy ways to increase your credit score and improve your chances of getting a mortgage at a good interest rate. First of all, pay all of your bills on time and in full. Payment history makes up 35% of your FICO score, which is the most commonly used measure of creditworthiness. Setting your bills on auto-pay and keeping tabs on your payment due date for each account will help ensure that you routinely make on-time payments. Next, pay attention to your credit utilization rate, which comprises 30% of your score. Experts recommend keeping it at 30% or less month to month. Credit utilization refers to the percentage of your total available credit that you are using at one time. If your credit card has a limit of $10,000 and you have a balance of $2,000, your credit utilization rate is 20%, for example.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payment, need, month, mortgage, score, utilization, improve, typically, credit, pay, keeping, bills, rate


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15 of the most common flexible side jobs and how much they pay

Today, roughly 30% of Americans with a side hustle say they need the extra income to help cover their living expenses. Using data from its platform, FlexJobs created a list of the 15 most common side jobs that you can apply to today. Each of these positions are either part-time employee roles or freelance jobs, with many of them providing the flexibility to work from home. All of these jobs also pay an average salary of at least $14 per hour, with management consulting roles paying $60 per hour,


Today, roughly 30% of Americans with a side hustle say they need the extra income to help cover their living expenses. Using data from its platform, FlexJobs created a list of the 15 most common side jobs that you can apply to today. Each of these positions are either part-time employee roles or freelance jobs, with many of them providing the flexibility to work from home. All of these jobs also pay an average salary of at least $14 per hour, with management consulting roles paying $60 per hour,
15 of the most common flexible side jobs and how much they pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flexible, apply, extra, jobs, youre, income, work, 15, pay, roles, common, today, hour


15 of the most common flexible side jobs and how much they pay

Today, roughly 30% of Americans with a side hustle say they need the extra income to help cover their living expenses.

Using data from its platform, FlexJobs created a list of the 15 most common side jobs that you can apply to today. Each of these positions are either part-time employee roles or freelance jobs, with many of them providing the flexibility to work from home. All of these jobs also pay an average salary of at least $14 per hour, with management consulting roles paying $60 per hour, according to PayScale data.

Check below to see which common side jobs you should apply to if you’re looking to bring in some extra income:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flexible, apply, extra, jobs, youre, income, work, 15, pay, roles, common, today, hour


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