Facebook Pay brings ‘impulse shopping’ to billions of people and will boost the stock, analyst says

RBC Capital sees Facebook’s stock climbing more than 40% in the year ahead, especially now that the technology giant unveiled a cross-platform payments service that can unlock “impulse shopping” on social media. Facebook announced its new Facebook Pay service on Tuesday, saying it will allow uses to securely send payments to each other. While Facebook users had been able to send money through the Messenger app, this links a single system for all four of the company’s social media and messaging a


RBC Capital sees Facebook’s stock climbing more than 40% in the year ahead, especially now that the technology giant unveiled a cross-platform payments service that can unlock “impulse shopping” on social media.
Facebook announced its new Facebook Pay service on Tuesday, saying it will allow uses to securely send payments to each other.
While Facebook users had been able to send money through the Messenger app, this links a single system for all four of the company’s social media and messaging a
Facebook Pay brings ‘impulse shopping’ to billions of people and will boost the stock, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, daily, stock, send, users, pay, facebook, boost, social, payments, brings, active, uses, billions, service, shopping, analyst, impulse


Facebook Pay brings 'impulse shopping' to billions of people and will boost the stock, analyst says

RBC Capital sees Facebook’s stock climbing more than 40% in the year ahead, especially now that the technology giant unveiled a cross-platform payments service that can unlock “impulse shopping” on social media.

Facebook announced its new Facebook Pay service on Tuesday, saying it will allow uses to securely send payments to each other. While Facebook users had been able to send money through the Messenger app, this links a single system for all four of the company’s social media and messaging apps. Facebook Pay will accept most major credit and debit cards, as well as PayPal.

The company has more than 1.6 billion daily active users on Facebook and over 500 million daily active users on Instagram.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, daily, stock, send, users, pay, facebook, boost, social, payments, brings, active, uses, billions, service, shopping, analyst, impulse


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Facebook Pay brings ‘impulse shopping’ to billions of people and will boost the stock, analyst says

RBC Capital sees Facebook’s stock climbing more than 40% in the year ahead, especially now that the technology giant unveiled a cross-platform payments service that can unlock “impulse shopping” on social media. Facebook announced its new Facebook Pay service on Tuesday, saying it will allow uses to securely send payments to each other. While Facebook users had been able to send money through the Messenger app, this links a single system for all four of the company’s social media and messaging a


RBC Capital sees Facebook’s stock climbing more than 40% in the year ahead, especially now that the technology giant unveiled a cross-platform payments service that can unlock “impulse shopping” on social media.
Facebook announced its new Facebook Pay service on Tuesday, saying it will allow uses to securely send payments to each other.
While Facebook users had been able to send money through the Messenger app, this links a single system for all four of the company’s social media and messaging a
Facebook Pay brings ‘impulse shopping’ to billions of people and will boost the stock, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, daily, stock, send, users, pay, facebook, boost, social, payments, brings, active, uses, billions, service, shopping, analyst, impulse


Facebook Pay brings 'impulse shopping' to billions of people and will boost the stock, analyst says

RBC Capital sees Facebook’s stock climbing more than 40% in the year ahead, especially now that the technology giant unveiled a cross-platform payments service that can unlock “impulse shopping” on social media.

Facebook announced its new Facebook Pay service on Tuesday, saying it will allow uses to securely send payments to each other. While Facebook users had been able to send money through the Messenger app, this links a single system for all four of the company’s social media and messaging apps. Facebook Pay will accept most major credit and debit cards, as well as PayPal.

The company has more than 1.6 billion daily active users on Facebook and over 500 million daily active users on Instagram.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, daily, stock, send, users, pay, facebook, boost, social, payments, brings, active, uses, billions, service, shopping, analyst, impulse


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Facebook consolidating payment services under ‘Facebook Pay’

Facebook consolidating payment services under ‘Facebook Pay’CNBC’s Kate Rooney reports that Facebook is putting all of its payment tools under a new roof called ‘Facebook Pay.’


Facebook consolidating payment services under ‘Facebook Pay’CNBC’s Kate Rooney reports that Facebook is putting all of its payment tools under a new roof called ‘Facebook Pay.’
Facebook consolidating payment services under ‘Facebook Pay’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roof, pay, services, reports, consolidating, tools, putting, paycnbcs, facebook, rooney, payment


Facebook consolidating payment services under 'Facebook Pay'

Facebook consolidating payment services under ‘Facebook Pay’

CNBC’s Kate Rooney reports that Facebook is putting all of its payment tools under a new roof called ‘Facebook Pay.’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roof, pay, services, reports, consolidating, tools, putting, paycnbcs, facebook, rooney, payment


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Facebook takes on Venmo with new payments tool that can be used across its family of apps

Facebook is taking on PayPal’s Venmo with a new payments service that will soon be able to be used across its family of apps. In a blog post on Tuesday, the company said the new service, called Facebook Pay, will allow users to securely send payments to others. Facebook Pay accepts most major credit and debit cards, as well as PayPal. But with Facebook Pay, users will be able to send money via other Facebook apps. “Facebook Pay will make these transactions easier while continuing to ensure your


Facebook is taking on PayPal’s Venmo with a new payments service that will soon be able to be used across its family of apps.
In a blog post on Tuesday, the company said the new service, called Facebook Pay, will allow users to securely send payments to others.
Facebook Pay accepts most major credit and debit cards, as well as PayPal.
But with Facebook Pay, users will be able to send money via other Facebook apps.
“Facebook Pay will make these transactions easier while continuing to ensure your
Facebook takes on Venmo with new payments tool that can be used across its family of apps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, whatsapp, family, company, money, messenger, venmo, payments, takes, send, apps, users, tool, facebook, used


Facebook takes on Venmo with new payments tool that can be used across its family of apps

Facebook is taking on PayPal’s Venmo with a new payments service that will soon be able to be used across its family of apps.

In a blog post on Tuesday, the company said the new service, called Facebook Pay, will allow users to securely send payments to others. Facebook Pay accepts most major credit and debit cards, as well as PayPal.

Facebook already allows users to send money through the Messenger app. But with Facebook Pay, users will be able to send money via other Facebook apps. To start, it’s rolling out on the core Facebook and Messenger apps, but will be added to Instagram and WhatsApp in the future.

“People already use payments across our apps to shop, donate to causes and send money to each other,” the company said. “Facebook Pay will make these transactions easier while continuing to ensure your payment information is secure and protected.”

The company noted that Facebook Pay is separate from Calibra, its yet-to-be-launched digital wallet. Calibra is part of libra, Facebook’s controversial cryptocurrency project.

It’s also a step towards Facebook’s goal of linking its family of apps together. Earlier this year, Facebook said it’s working on a way to allow WhatsApp, Instagram and Messenger users send messages to each other. Critics see the move as protection against antitrust scrutiny the company has received from government agencies and proposals to break the company up.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, whatsapp, family, company, money, messenger, venmo, payments, takes, send, apps, users, tool, facebook, used


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Science says listening to this meditation can help you make fewer mistakes

Lots of successful people, from billionaire Ray Dalio to Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey, swear by daily meditation. But in this new study, researchers found that listening to a guided meditation for just 20 minutes is enough to make an impact — even if you’ve never meditated before. The meditation instructed participants to notice the feelings, thoughts and physical sensations that arose in the moment and take note of them without judgement. Researchers were looking for a specific neural sig


Lots of successful people, from billionaire Ray Dalio to Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey, swear by daily meditation.
But in this new study, researchers found that listening to a guided meditation for just 20 minutes is enough to make an impact — even if you’ve never meditated before.
The meditation instructed participants to notice the feelings, thoughts and physical sensations that arose in the moment and take note of them without judgement.
Researchers were looking for a specific neural sig
Science says listening to this meditation can help you make fewer mistakes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, thoughts, specific, study, signal, mistakes, feel, fewer, meditation, mindfulness, science, help, participants, attention, listening


Science says listening to this meditation can help you make fewer mistakes

On days when you feel spacey, forgetful or tired at work, taking a 20-minute break to meditate could help you pay closer attention to tasks and ultimately make fewer mistakes, according to a new study out of Michigan State University.

Lots of successful people, from billionaire Ray Dalio to Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey, swear by daily meditation. But in this new study, researchers found that listening to a guided meditation for just 20 minutes is enough to make an impact — even if you’ve never meditated before.

For the experiment, 212 undergraduate college students with no meditation experience followed along with a guided meditation recorded by Steven Hickman, a licensed clinical psychologist and the founding director of the University of California San Diego Center for Mindfulness. The meditation instructed participants to notice the feelings, thoughts and physical sensations that arose in the moment and take note of them without judgement.

After meditating, participants completed a quiz on a computer that was intended to distract them and test their concentration. Throughout the experiment, participants were wearing electroencephalography (EEG) sensors, so researchers could measure their brain waves.

Researchers were looking for a specific neural signal that fires a half-second after you make a mistake, called “error positivity.” They found that the strength of the “mistake” signal was stronger in people who had meditated, meaning they were able to recognize and correct their slip-ups.

“It makes us feel more confident in what mindfulness meditation might really be capable of for performance and daily functioning right there in the moment,” Jason Moser, co-study author said in a press release.

The specific meditation that the participants listened to is also unique. Unlike other meditation styles, such as mindfulness meditation, which have you pay attention to your breath, this type coaches you to pay close attention to everything going on in your body and mind, including your thoughts, Jeff Lin, co-author explained in a press release. “The goal is to sit quietly and pay close attention to where the mind travels without getting too caught up in the scenery,” he said.

Listen to the meditation below and see if you feel sharper:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, thoughts, specific, study, signal, mistakes, feel, fewer, meditation, mindfulness, science, help, participants, attention, listening


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How to start paying back your student loans

Federal student loans, which make up the bulk of student debt, generally have a six-month grace period after graduation to give borrowers time to get on their feet before they have to start repayment. The majority, or 64%, of students are solely responsible for repaying their student loans, according to this year’s How America Pays for College report by Sallie Mae. The first step in building a student loan repayment plan is understanding who you owe, whether it’s the Department of Education or a


Federal student loans, which make up the bulk of student debt, generally have a six-month grace period after graduation to give borrowers time to get on their feet before they have to start repayment.
The majority, or 64%, of students are solely responsible for repaying their student loans, according to this year’s How America Pays for College report by Sallie Mae.
The first step in building a student loan repayment plan is understanding who you owe, whether it’s the Department of Education or a
How to start paying back your student loans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, paying, loan, loans, repayment, pay, including, student, interest, start, payments, plan, borrowers


How to start paying back your student loans

Shaun Wilkinson | iStock | Getty Images Plus

For recent college graduates, the approach of December brings a dose of harsh reality. Federal student loans, which make up the bulk of student debt, generally have a six-month grace period after graduation to give borrowers time to get on their feet before they have to start repayment. That means grads are just now facing their first bill. Seven in 10 college seniors graduate in the red, owing about $30,000 per borrower, according to the most recent data from the Institute for College Access & Success — a hefty tab for those just starting out. “It’s a rude awakening for a lot of borrowers,” said Kaitlin Walsh-Epstein, a vice president of marketing at Laurel Road, a student-loan refinancer. The majority, or 64%, of students are solely responsible for repaying their student loans, according to this year’s How America Pays for College report by Sallie Mae. Yet half haven’t even researched repayment methods, the education lender found. For those just getting caught up, here’s a cheat sheet for what you need to do:

Step 1: Know your loans

Many borrowers have several loans, each potentially with a different interest rate, monthly due date and repayment period. That can be confusing. “Cozy up to your debt,” Walsh-Epstein said. “First and foremost, it’s about understanding the loans you’ve taken out in the first place.” The first step in building a student loan repayment plan is understanding who you owe, whether it’s the Department of Education or a bank, added Ashley Boucher, a spokesperson for Sallie Mae. Then, determine how much you owe, including your interest rates and any accrued interest as well as your monthly due date. By default, you are likely in a 10-year standard repayment plan but there are other options, including pay as you earn or income-based repayment. Ask your lender about what plan best suits you.

Step 2: Update your contact info

Chances are you’ve moved, changed your email address and have a new cellphone. Make sure each lender can reach you. “As borrowers, we are responsible for making sure our contact information is accurate, including the correct address and email,” said Abril Hunt, the outreach manager at Educational Credit Management Corporation, or ECMC, a nonprofit dedicated to helping student borrowers. Hunt recommends reaching out to each loan servicer at the outset to establish a direct line of communication. “By being proactive, we are showing lenders that we want to work with them,” she said.

Step 3: Establish a budget

Take your income minus expenses, including your rent, utilities and monthly loan tab, to determine if you can afford your loan payments. “Once you have your budget set up, you can understand what you can afford — maybe you need to get a roommate or move home for a few months to make that minimum student loan payment,” said Walsh-Epstein. Use an app to track your spending or Sallie Mae’s budget worksheet to create a plan to stay on top of your finances. More from Your Money Your Future:

Here are the hidden benefits of a Roth IRA conversion

Here’s how much you can save toward retirement in 2020

Don’t miss the tax advantages of this savings account If your budget feels stretched too thin, look into income-based repayment programs, which allow you to pay a percentage of your income rather than a flat rate, as long as you are under a certain income threshold. Generally, you’ll qualify if your federal student loan debt is higher than your annual discretionary income, according to the Education Department. If you don’t have a job yet and your cash flow is negative, consider a deferment or forbearance. A deferment lets you put your loan on hold for up to three years. If you don’t qualify for a deferment, a forbearance lets you temporarily suspend payments for up to one year. However, in this case, interest will still accrue. In each case, borrowers must apply for permission to postpone payments.

Step 4: Set up autopay

If you can afford your payments, sign up for autopay. An automatic program will decrease your chances of missing a payment and may come with the added perk of a modest interest-rate deduction on your loan. A stretch of on-time payments will also put you on the right track to building a favorable credit history. “That can make a big difference when you apply for a car loan, credit card, lease, mortgage or even a job,” said Boucher.

Step 5: Give your tab a cash boost

If you are feeling flush from monetary gifts at graduation or a starting bonus, consider beefing up your first few payments. “If and when you can, make more than the minimum payment each month. You’ll pay off your loan faster, and you’ll pay less interest,” Boucher said. Just make sure extra payments go toward unsubsidized loans first, then toward loans with the highest interest rate. You should also specify that those extra funds get applied to the principal of the loan and not to future interest payments. However, if you are just getting on your feet, don’t forgo the chance to build an emergency fund or max out contributions to a 401(k) plan, either.

Step 6: See if your employer will chip in

More employers are offering student-loan repayment benefits to their workers, which can help recent grads pay down their debt. About 8% of companies, including Aetna, Fidelity and PwC, now offer taxable contributions to help employees repay student loans, up from 4% three years ago, according to the Society for Human Resource Management’s 2019 Employee Benefits survey. If you are job hunting, give extra consideration to potential employers that do offer a student loan assistance program.

Step 7: Consider consolidating or refinancing


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, paying, loan, loans, repayment, pay, including, student, interest, start, payments, plan, borrowers


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Investors are shrugging off fear of Medicare for All – for now

Ending private health insurance has been one of the rallying cries of Elizabeth Warren’s presidential bid and her rise in the polls has made health care investors nervous. Yet the week after the leading Democratic contender detailed how she’d pay for her Medicare for All plan, prompting widespread debate, investors are seemingly to shrugging off the news altogether. Six straight weeks of gains have the large-cap health insurance sector up more 19% for the fourth quarter. Analysts say the sector


Ending private health insurance has been one of the rallying cries of Elizabeth Warren’s presidential bid and her rise in the polls has made health care investors nervous.
Yet the week after the leading Democratic contender detailed how she’d pay for her Medicare for All plan, prompting widespread debate, investors are seemingly to shrugging off the news altogether.
Six straight weeks of gains have the large-cap health insurance sector up more 19% for the fourth quarter.
Analysts say the sector
Investors are shrugging off fear of Medicare for All – for now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: bertha coombs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, market, care, shrugging, insurance, medicare, private, pay, insurers, warren, fear, plan, health


Investors are shrugging off fear of Medicare for All – for now

US Senator Elizabeth Warren (C), Democrat from Massachusetts, speaks with US Senator Bernie Sanders (2nd R), Independent from Vermont, as they discusses Medicare for All legislation on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on September 13, 2017.

Ending private health insurance has been one of the rallying cries of Elizabeth Warren’s presidential bid and her rise in the polls has made health care investors nervous.

Yet the week after the leading Democratic contender detailed how she’d pay for her Medicare for All plan, prompting widespread debate, investors are seemingly to shrugging off the news altogether.

The S&P 500 Managed Care index rose more than 3% last week. Six straight weeks of gains have the large-cap health insurance sector up more 19% for the fourth quarter.

Part of the move higher follows strong third-quarter earnings reports over the last few weeks from the major health insurance giants UnitedHealth Group, Humana, Centene, Cigna and Aetna parent CVS Health.

It marks a big change in sentiment, after the sector sank 12% over the second and third quarters, when Warren’s poll numbers began to rise and the White House and Congress seemed poised to introduce regulatory curbs on insurers’ pharmacy benefit units.

Analysts say the sector was due for a rebound, but the reprieve in the Medicare for All fear factor is likely temporary.

“As regards potential stock volatility on the political risks and the elections, we still see a binary setup for November 2020,” BMO Capital Markets analyst Matt Borsch wrote in a note to clients, adding that a Warren win would pose the biggest risk for insurers UnitedHealth and Humana which are the leading issuers of private Medicare Advantage plans. Warren calls for eliminating private plans.

“While we don’t see a lot of downside risk for Medicare Advantage, the change in regulatory approach could still be meaningful,” Borsch said.

“We’re looking at Medicare for All as an existential threat to the insurance industry,” said Deep Banerjee, lead insurance credit analyst at S&P Global Ratings, but he adds that a move to single payer would also have a big impact on physicians, hospitals and other health care providers.

“It is not just insurance reform, it’s also payment reform because you know, if you look at how (Warren) will achieve a system like that you would have to cut payments to providers,” explained Banerjee.

Warren maintains her plan would not negatively impact the actual delivery of medical care. She says she would expand the “value-based reforms enabled by the Affordable Care Act,” such as bundled payments for in-patient and post-operative care, and encourage better coordination of treatment to try to bring down costs.

“On the one hand, Medicare for All would offer opportunities to use payment incentives to better coordinate care,” said Larry Levitt, KFF executive vice president for health policy, but he adds, “on the other hand, a single public insurance plan would close off opportunities for individual private insurers to experiment with different approaches.”

“We’ve seen some good things in Medicare with the ACA work that’s been done, certainly,” said Tracy Watts, senior partner and health policy leader at benefits consulting firm Mercer, “but I feel like the employers are kind of that independent voice that drives the market… they drive all of this great change.”

Under Warren’s plan, large employers would pay a health-care tax rather than fund workers’ health coverage directly, giving up control over the design of benefits.

“That would be an impractical solution that would stifle innovation,” argued Annie Lamont, co-founder of venture capital firm Oak HC/FT at the company’s HLTH conference in Las Vegas last month, noting that the self-insured employer market has been more open to new digital health models.

Telemedicine has been a prime example. Large employers and private insurers have embraced the technology for years, and for 2020 many are looking at integrating video visits with primary care and mental health benefits for patients with chronic conditions. Traditional fee-for-service Medicare has been slower to reimburse those services.

“I’ve always viewed what we do as the most bipartisan part of health care—lower costs, higher quality and greater access,” said Hill Ferguson, CEO of telemedicine provider Dr. on Demand.

While he’s not advocating for a single-payer system, Ferguson believes at this point digital health firms could make the shift to Medicare for All and help ease the looming shortage of doctors under any new system at a competitive cost.

“I think if Medicare for All were to materialize, it would inflict a lot of pain on insurers, obviously, but it could actually help companies like ours that would be required to provide access to more people,” he said.

“What’s not going away is chronic conditions… whether you’re a Republican or Democrat you’re equally affected,” said Glen Tullman, chairman of Livongo Health which provides digital management for chronic disease.

“You’re going to need consumer-first digital health solutions,” even under single payer, Tullman said.

The move away from employer-based health insurance to Medicare for All could actually strengthen the market for direct-to-consumer services, according to Zach Reitano co-founder and CEO of Ro, the parent company of online men’s health service Roman.

“The cash market is where innovation increases and prices come down,” Reitano said, noting that costs for services like Lasik eye surgery and cosmetic procedures continue to come down because they’re not covered by health insurance and patients pay out of their own pockets.

“We see people vote with their feet first,” when they pay cash, he said.

The first votes in the Democratic presidential race are just over two months away, beginning with the Iowa Caucuses on February 3 and the New Hampshire primary on February 11.

But over the next few weeks as impeachment proceedings take center stage in Washington, the Medicare for All debate will likely move to the back burner, and along with it sweeping drug price bills being debated in Congress. That could help keep investors positive on health care stocks near-term.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: bertha coombs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, market, care, shrugging, insurance, medicare, private, pay, insurers, warren, fear, plan, health


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Elizabeth Warren shares a ‘calculator for billionaires’ for her wealth tax plan

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren revealed a “calculator for the billionaires” on Thursday that shows how much the wealthiest Americans would pay under her wealth tax plan. “Some billionaires seem confused about how much they would pay under my #TwoCentWealthTax,” Warren tweeted after billionaires Bill Gates and Leon Cooperman expressed concern about how much they’d pay under her plan. “Don’t worry, we’ve got a calculator for that, too.” The users of Warren’s calculator can inpu


Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren revealed a “calculator for the billionaires” on Thursday that shows how much the wealthiest Americans would pay under her wealth tax plan.
“Some billionaires seem confused about how much they would pay under my #TwoCentWealthTax,” Warren tweeted after billionaires Bill Gates and Leon Cooperman expressed concern about how much they’d pay under her plan.
“Don’t worry, we’ve got a calculator for that, too.”
The users of Warren’s calculator can inpu
Elizabeth Warren shares a ‘calculator for billionaires’ for her wealth tax plan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, tax, warrens, calculator, worth, billion, warren, plan, elizabeth, shares, wealth, theyd, billionaires


Elizabeth Warren shares a 'calculator for billionaires' for her wealth tax plan

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren revealed a “calculator for the billionaires” on Thursday that shows how much the wealthiest Americans would pay under her wealth tax plan.

“Some billionaires seem confused about how much they would pay under my #TwoCentWealthTax,” Warren tweeted after billionaires Bill Gates and Leon Cooperman expressed concern about how much they’d pay under her plan. “Don’t worry, we’ve got a calculator for that, too.”

The users of Warren’s calculator can input any billionaire’s net worth to see what they’d pay, or they can choose from names including Gates, Jeff Bezos, Michael Bloomberg and Betsy Devos’s family.

Gates, for example, currently worth about $107 billion, would pay about $6.38 billion under Warren’s tax plan, and Jeff Bezos, currently worth $111 billion, would pay about $6.7 billion, according to the calculator.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, tax, warrens, calculator, worth, billion, warren, plan, elizabeth, shares, wealth, theyd, billionaires


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Tech workers are in the position to negotiate for high pay, but it’s not always the perk they want most

A 2019 report from iCIMS, a recruitment software provider, says app software developers are the most sought-after tech workers, making up nearly one-third of all tech openings. In some of the most competitive markets for tech, software engineers of varying specialties easily earn upwards of $150,000, according to data from Hired, a tech recruitment platform. Rishon Blumberg is co-founder of 10x Ascend, a company that negotiates compensation packages on behalf of senior tech leaders. Beyond pay,


A 2019 report from iCIMS, a recruitment software provider, says app software developers are the most sought-after tech workers, making up nearly one-third of all tech openings.
In some of the most competitive markets for tech, software engineers of varying specialties easily earn upwards of $150,000, according to data from Hired, a tech recruitment platform.
Rishon Blumberg is co-founder of 10x Ascend, a company that negotiates compensation packages on behalf of senior tech leaders.
Beyond pay,
Tech workers are in the position to negotiate for high pay, but it’s not always the perk they want most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, recruitment, pay, workers, software, high, tech, position, blumberg, work, nearly, offer, negotiate, perk


Tech workers are in the position to negotiate for high pay, but it's not always the perk they want most

There are nearly 1 million open tech jobs in the U.S., and they’re lucrative.

A 2019 report from iCIMS, a recruitment software provider, says app software developers are the most sought-after tech workers, making up nearly one-third of all tech openings. Workers in this role earn a mean annual salary of $108,080, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

In some of the most competitive markets for tech, software engineers of varying specialties easily earn upwards of $150,000, according to data from Hired, a tech recruitment platform.

But earning power goes far beyond paycheck in the current job market. Rishon Blumberg is co-founder of 10x Ascend, a company that negotiates compensation packages on behalf of senior tech leaders. The biggest trend he’s seen in today’s tech talent shortage is companies realizing the need to meet workers where they are in offering not just competitive pay, but an overall employment package.

In other words, work-life balance is big.

“We’re beginning to see a lot more of an understanding of work-life balance being more important than salary,” Blumberg tells CNBC Make It. He says he’s helped clients successfully negotiate for a flexible work space or schedule arrangement, sometimes with the trade-off of a slightly lower salary.

But it turns out a company’s mission may be the most alluring perk of all.

“Most frequently, we’re seeing people taking a lower offer if the project they get to work on aligns more with their own goals,” Blumberg adds. He cites a recent client who was considering taking a job with Facebook that paid more, but ended up going with a different major company that would allow the client to work on initiatives they felt were more in line with their interests. Blumberg describes the pay cut as “not insignificant.”

Companies would do well to invest in developing their employer brand, both in personalizing recruitment efforts and offering competitive, negotiable compensation packages up front. And considering workers want to join a company whose values they believe in, employers may want to maintain a high standard of conducting business, representing themselves and adding value with their products, Blumberg says.

After all, Hired’s 2019 Global Brand Health Report found nearly half of tech workers said they wouldn’t accept an offer if they weren’t interested in the product, and 43% would turn down an offer if the company had a poor reputation. Beyond pay, tech workers prioritized a company’s culture and opportunities to learn.

Of course, adjustments to these values would benefit workers far beyond the tech sector, and job-seekers in all kinds of markets stand to benefit.

Ana Recio, Salesforce’s executive vice president of global recruiting, tells CNBC Make It that especially given the current labor market, it’s in a company’s best interest to adopt the high standards of their current — and potential — employees.

“It’s a candidate’s market, so employees now have greater individual bargaining power,” she says, “and the corporations that will succeed in the coming years will think about stakeholders, not shareholders.”

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Don’t miss: This algorithm can predict when workers are about to quit—here’s how


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, recruitment, pay, workers, software, high, tech, position, blumberg, work, nearly, offer, negotiate, perk


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EU urged to investigate Apple Pay on competition concerns, Vestager says

LISBON, Portugal — Apple’s digital wallet is stifling competition in the payments market, according to a high number of complaints sent to the EU’s Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager. “We get many, many concerns when it comes to Apple Pay for pure competition reasons,” Vestager said in a press conference at the Web Summit tech conference in Lisbon, Portugal on Thursday. Apple Pay is now available in all EU member states and venture capital firm Loup Ventures estimates that 88% of its us


LISBON, Portugal — Apple’s digital wallet is stifling competition in the payments market, according to a high number of complaints sent to the EU’s Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager.
“We get many, many concerns when it comes to Apple Pay for pure competition reasons,” Vestager said in a press conference at the Web Summit tech conference in Lisbon, Portugal on Thursday.
Apple Pay is now available in all EU member states and venture capital firm Loup Ventures estimates that 88% of its us
EU urged to investigate Apple Pay on competition concerns, Vestager says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, competition, pay, spotify, vestager, investigate, urged, tech, portugal, apple, users, payments, concerns


EU urged to investigate Apple Pay on competition concerns, Vestager says

LISBON, Portugal — Apple’s digital wallet is stifling competition in the payments market, according to a high number of complaints sent to the EU’s Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager.

“We get many, many concerns when it comes to Apple Pay for pure competition reasons,” Vestager said in a press conference at the Web Summit tech conference in Lisbon, Portugal on Thursday.

“People see that it becomes increasingly difficult to compete in the market for easy payments.” Apple Pay is now available in all EU member states and venture capital firm Loup Ventures estimates that 88% of its users are outside of the U.S. While it is struggling to compete with the likes of WeChat and Samsung Pay it currently has 383 million global users — more than mobile payment platforms like Google Pay and Amazon Pay.

The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, is also investigating an antitrust complaint into Apple from music streaming rival Spotify related to terms in the App Store. Vestager said the EU is in the process of analyzing Apple’s response to the Spotify complaint.

Vestager has taken a tough stance regulating big U.S. tech companies, imposing more than $9.5 billion in antitrust fines against Google over the past two years. She did not comment on specifics of Google’s acquisition of smartwatch maker FitBit but said “in general we have a concern if companies merge because of data.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, competition, pay, spotify, vestager, investigate, urged, tech, portugal, apple, users, payments, concerns


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