The student debt squeeze: A look at 3 people’s budgets

Today, more than two-thirds of college graduates have student debt, compared with less than 50% in the early 1990s. Americans are more burdened by student debt than they are by credit card or auto debt. Examine their budgets to see the sacrifices and anxiety that student debt leaves people facing for years, often decades, after they’ve left school. His monthly student loan bill made living in a city like Portland or Seattle, where he had hoped to spend his 20s, unaffordable. Still, his student l


Today, more than two-thirds of college graduates have student debt, compared with less than 50% in the early 1990s.
Americans are more burdened by student debt than they are by credit card or auto debt.
Examine their budgets to see the sacrifices and anxiety that student debt leaves people facing for years, often decades, after they’ve left school.
His monthly student loan bill made living in a city like Portland or Seattle, where he had hoped to spend his 20s, unaffordable.
Still, his student l
The student debt squeeze: A look at 3 people’s budgets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-20  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debt, whitstone, margoni, squeeze, english, budgets, paying, peoples, look, loan, bill, college, student, left


The student debt squeeze: A look at 3 people's budgets

Anastasia Usenko

Student debt is consuming an ever larger share of household budgets. Today, more than two-thirds of college graduates have student debt, compared with less than 50% in the early 1990s. And, back then, the average balance was $9,000 – now it’s $30,000. The typical monthly bill is nearly $400. Americans are more burdened by student debt than they are by credit card or auto debt. For many borrowers, it’s a challenge to keep up with payment after payment. That’s because as student loan bills have climbed over time, incomes haven’t. The average hourly wage in 2018 had no more purchasing power than it did in 1978, according to the Pew Research Center. As a result, people are paying off their student loans at a slower rate. The typical borrower takes 16 years to emerge-debt-free now, compared to less than 14 years in 2013. More from Personal Finance:

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What to do about Medicare if you’re almost 65 and still working People are also finding it harder to purchase houses, amass savings and start families. “There’s just a lot of uncertainty in my future,” said Travis Margoni, 39, who owes around $80,000. A quarter of people with education debt say they couldn’t come up with $2,000 in the next month, according to government survey research analyzed by Mark Kantrowitz, the publisher of SavingforCollege.com. A handful of people with student debt, from a copy writer in Morehead, Kentucky, to an English professor in Yakima, Washington, provided CNBC with a breakdown of their monthly expenses. Examine their budgets to see the sacrifices and anxiety that student debt leaves people facing for years, often decades, after they’ve left school.

“It feels like a giant mountain on top of me.”

Brittany Whitstone is a 33-year-old tutor and writer who lives in McKinney, Texas. She has around $115,000 in student debt.

Brittany Whitstone (C) with her parents. Source: Brittany Whitstone

Monthly take-home pay: around $2,500 Student loan: $190 Rent: $925 Storage: $125 Phone: $93 Car insurance: $122 Life, health and dental insurance: $130 Eating out: $100 Groceries and gas: $200 Credit card debt: $300 Old tuition bill: $200 Left over each month: around $100 Whitstone has a bachelor’s and master’s degree in English from Abilene Christian University in Texas. Those two diplomas left her with more than $100,000 in student debt. She started but never finished a PhD program, in part because her existing student loans weighed on her. “One semester, I wasn’t able to finish paying for the costs, so I couldn’t register for future classes,” she said. Today, she holds multiple part-time jobs, and often works on weekends. She’s a writing tutor, SAT instructor and author. In all, she made around $35,000 last year. Because she’s on a repayment plan that caps her bill at a share of her income, she pays less than $200 a month toward her student debt. That also means she has two decades of payments ahead of her. And, like many other student loan borrowers, Whitstone has other debt, too. She racked up a credit card balance in 2018 when she needed an emergency root canal. She isn’t currently saving, she said, because “the credit card is priority.” She also is still paying off a tuition bill from the PhD program she left. “Living without savings is so precarious because any one unexpected expense can put me in the hole,” she said. There are longer-term anxieties, too. A few years ago, she stumbled on a book about apartment gardening; she soon began to grow stone fruit in her one-bedroom rental. She said it was an “otherworldly experience, … nothing like the cardboard you get in the grocery store.” Since, she’s dreamed of buying a house with a yard. She’d grow peaches, melons and plums, she said. “Gardening is very grounding and satisfying.” But her six-figure student debt makes homeownership feel impossible. “Thinking about how that’ll never happen is stressful,” Whitstone said.

“No matter what path I take, the debt plays a role.”

Travis Margoni is a 39-year-old English professor who lives in Yakima, Washington. He has around $75,000 in student debt.

Travis Margoni Source: Travis Margoni

Monthly take-home pay: around $4,500 Student loan: $635 Rent: $800 Car payment and insurance: $415 Spotify, Netflix and Microsoft: $30 Utilities: $250 Phone: $130 Utilities: $250 Gym: $45 Food and gas: $500 Left over each month: around $1,000 Margoni grew up in a working-class family in Crystal Falls, Michigan. “My father’s union job was the only thing that kept us above the poverty line,” he said. “My parents did not have savings for me for college.” He worked two jobs while he pursued his bachelor’s degree, but he still graduated in 2005 from Northern Michigan University with $50,000 in student debt. After college, he wanted to move out west, saying that the “mountains and ocean just drew me in.” His monthly student loan bill made living in a city like Portland or Seattle, where he had hoped to spend his 20s, unaffordable. Instead, he settled into “tiny Winston, Oregon,” where he taught high school English and made $28,000 a year. He soon learned that “as a high school teacher with no master’s, you hardly make enough to survive on rural Oregon salaries.” And so, in 2007, he enrolled at Oregon State University to get his master’s degree in English. Awards covered his graduate school tuition but he still had to take out another $25,000 in student loans to cover his living expenses, including rent and groceries. Today he’s an English professor at Yakima Valley College in Washington state. On top of the courses he’s required to teach, he said, “I work an overload of classes or administrative duties every quarter, and I teach every summer to supplement my income” and to cover his more than $600 monthly student loan bill. He makes around $75,000 a year. Still, his student loan balance hasn’t budged much: He still owes approximately $75,000 because his payments just go to interest. He hopes his job at a community college will eventually qualify him for the government’s public service loan forgiveness program. If it does, he could be student debt-free by 2022. Even so, he said, the loans have left a permanent mark on his life. He wasn’t able to start saving until 38 and he still needs to work more than 50 hours a week to keep up. “I don’t have a relationship; I don’t have kids,” Margoni said. “I’ve never been able to buy a house.”

“I’m paying the living expenses of me 10 years ago.”

Josh Rahn is a 40-year-old copy editor who lives in Morehead, Kentucky. He has around $50,000 in student debt.

Josh Rahn Source: Josh Rahn


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-20  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debt, whitstone, margoni, squeeze, english, budgets, paying, peoples, look, loan, bill, college, student, left


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How student debt came to define people’s lives

Monthly student loan payments can dictate when people have children and how much they’ll retire with. It was 10 years ago that education debt eclipsed credit card debt. As we enter a new decade, outstanding student debt trails only mortgages and is expected to top $2 trillion in the next couple of years. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass – are proposing to forgive most or all student debt. Former Trump Administration official A. Wayne Johnson, who used to oversee the country’s


Monthly student loan payments can dictate when people have children and how much they’ll retire with.
It was 10 years ago that education debt eclipsed credit card debt.
As we enter a new decade, outstanding student debt trails only mortgages and is expected to top $2 trillion in the next couple of years.
Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass – are proposing to forgive most or all student debt.
Former Trump Administration official A. Wayne Johnson, who used to oversee the country’s
How student debt came to define people’s lives Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-28  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nearly, outstanding, came, loan, student, loans, define, education, start, debt, past, peoples, decade, lives


How student debt came to define people's lives

Monthly student loan payments can dictate when people have children and how much they’ll retire with.

Student loans have become a defining feature of American life.

It was 10 years ago that education debt eclipsed credit card debt. The next year, in 2011, it exceeded auto debt.

As we enter a new decade, outstanding student debt trails only mortgages and is expected to top $2 trillion in the next couple of years.

Around 43 million people in the U.S. are in debt for their education. Each year, 70% of college graduates start off their lives in the red. And their average balance is around $30,000, up from $10,000 in the early 1990s.

Wages haven’t kept up. Starting salaries for new college graduates have grown less than 1% over the past two years, remaining at around $50,000.

As a result, repayment has proved difficult for many people. Nearly 30% of borrowers are in delinquency or default.

Six-figure balances are becoming more common. Seattle-area resident Elisha Bokman has been out of school for eight years and still owes nearly $500,000 for her doctorate degree in naturopathic medicine and master’s in acupuncture from Bastyr University.

“It really effects the remainder of your life,” Bokman said.

Indeed, over the past decade, these loans have made it harder for people to purchase houses, start businesses and families, save or invest.

Changes might be coming. Two front runners for the Democratic presidential nomination – Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass – are proposing to forgive most or all student debt.

Former Trump Administration official A. Wayne Johnson, who used to oversee the country’s outstanding student debt, made headlines earlier this year when he proposed forgiving $50,000 for all borrowers, about $925 billion.

“It’s the first Republican support for widespread student loan forgiveness,” said Mark Kantrowitz, a higher education expert. “That makes it a bipartisan issue.”

It’s little surprise politicians have turned their attention to the topic: More than half of Americans say student debt is “a major problem” for the country, according to a Politico/Morning Consult poll.

Here are some of the ways the loans have come to shape our lives over the last decade.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-28  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nearly, outstanding, came, loan, student, loans, define, education, start, debt, past, peoples, decade, lives


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China keeps lending benchmark lending rate steady, as expected

A pedestrian walks past the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) headquarters on August 6, 2019 in Beijing, China. China stood pat on its lending benchmark rate on Friday, as widely expected, after the central bank kept borrowing costs of medium-term loans steady earlier this month. The one-year loan prime rate (LPR) was unchanged at 4.15% from the previous monthly fixing. “The average bank lending rate published quarterly by the PBOC remained elevated, up five basis points during the first three quart


A pedestrian walks past the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) headquarters on August 6, 2019 in Beijing, China.
China stood pat on its lending benchmark rate on Friday, as widely expected, after the central bank kept borrowing costs of medium-term loans steady earlier this month.
The one-year loan prime rate (LPR) was unchanged at 4.15% from the previous monthly fixing.
“The average bank lending rate published quarterly by the PBOC remained elevated, up five basis points during the first three quart
China keeps lending benchmark lending rate steady, as expected Cached Page below :
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China keeps lending benchmark lending rate steady, as expected

A pedestrian walks past the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) headquarters on August 6, 2019 in Beijing, China.

China stood pat on its lending benchmark rate on Friday, as widely expected, after the central bank kept borrowing costs of medium-term loans steady earlier this month.

Economic growth slowed to near 30-year lows in the third quarter and speculation is mounting that Beijing needs to roll out stimulus more quickly and more aggressively.

The one-year loan prime rate (LPR) was unchanged at 4.15% from the previous monthly fixing. The five-year LPR also remained the same at 4.80%.

A Reuters snap survey published on Thursday showed that near 74% of all 53 participants predicted no change to the LPR this month.

Governor of the People’s Bank of China Yi Gang said earlier this month the authorities should maintain “normal” monetary policy as long as possible since economic growth is still within a reasonable range and inflation is mild overall.

China will not resort to quantitative easing even as the monetary policies of the world’s major economies are approaching zero interest rates, Yi wrote in an article published by the leading Communist Party’s theoretical journal Qiushi.

The central bank conducted medium-term lending facility operations twice this month, injecting a total of 600 billion yuan ($85.61 billion) into the banking system, exceeding 473.5 billion yuan. The PBOC kept the one-year MLF rate in both operations unchanged at 3.25%.

MLF, one of the PBOC’s main tools in flexibly managing longer-term liquidity in the banking system, now serves as a guide for the new LPR.

Although the government has pledged to lower borrowing costs for smaller businesses to support the real economy, Serena Zhou, economist at Mizuho Securities in Hong Kong argued that cutting LPR may not be a “panacea” for China.

“The average bank lending rate published quarterly by the PBOC remained elevated, up five basis points during the first three quarters this year. This is in sharp contrast to the decline in money market rates during the same period,” she said.

“In our view, the widening gap reflects decoupling of bank financing costs and the real economy, highlighting China’s urgent need to improve its monetary policy transmission.”

The LPR is a lending reference rate set monthly by 18 banks.

The People’s Bank of China revamped the mechanism to price LPR in August, loosely pegging it to the medium-term lending facility rate.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-20
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Andrew Yang says Democrats should focus on ‘putting cash into people’s hands’

Even though he’s running as a Democratic candidate for president, Andrew Yang certainly has his differences with the party. Yang last week became the final person to qualify for Thursday’s Democratic debate, the last one of the year. During the November debate, Yang ranked last in terms of speaking time among the candidates. So if you have a sugar rush because of an irresponsible tax cut, you shouldn’t be celebrating. Trump championed his $1.5 trillion tax cut that was signed into law in 2017, b


Even though he’s running as a Democratic candidate for president, Andrew Yang certainly has his differences with the party.
Yang last week became the final person to qualify for Thursday’s Democratic debate, the last one of the year.
During the November debate, Yang ranked last in terms of speaking time among the candidates.
So if you have a sugar rush because of an irresponsible tax cut, you shouldn’t be celebrating.
Trump championed his $1.5 trillion tax cut that was signed into law in 2017, b
Andrew Yang says Democrats should focus on ‘putting cash into people’s hands’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: yelena dzhanova
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Andrew Yang says Democrats should focus on 'putting cash into people's hands'

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks to media outside the Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Even though he’s running as a Democratic candidate for president, Andrew Yang certainly has his differences with the party.

The entrepreneur and 2020 contender said in a Freakonomics interview published Wednesday that “putting money into people’s hands is at odds with the Democratic Party.”

Yang’s signature proposal to give every American adult $1,000 a month is primarily how he differs from other Democrats on the ticket, he said.

“The Democratic Party has a lot of faith in programs and institutions where it’s more likely to champion something like free college, even though only 33% of us will go to college, than just putting cash into people’s hands,” Yang said.

Yang last week became the final person to qualify for Thursday’s Democratic debate, the last one of the year. Six others have qualified, but he will be the only person of color amid what was once a crowded field with the greatest diversity of candidates ever running for president.

Several outlets after multiple debates noted that Yang got considerably less speaking time than some Democratic leaders such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden. During the November debate, Yang ranked last in terms of speaking time among the candidates.

But even with limited speaking time and single-digit support in national polls, he said, “we’ve always had a really strong surge of support afterwards, regardless of how much I got to talk.”

For Thursday’s debate, Yang is sticking to his tried-and-true strategies, opting to discuss policy on the stage, he said, rather than sparring with a candidate by “using rehearsed attack lines that invoke the name of other candidates and then you have a tit-for-tat spat.”

In the interview, Yang also discussed President Donald Trump’s meetings with dictators. Such meetings drew criticism during the November debate, when South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg ripped into Rep. Tulsi Gabbard for meeting with “murderous dictator” Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian president.

“I do not mind the fact that [Trump] sat down with dictators like Kim [Jong Un],” Yang said. “I think that he should have gotten much more out of sitting down with them than just a photo op. But the fact that he is questioning established practices to me is not intrinsically a bad thing.”

Yang said Democrats generally believe that Trump should be the focal point but that Trump won the 2016 election because he recognized that “D.C. has stopped serving the American people.”

“People in D.C. will succeed whether the rest of us succeed or fail. And that message really hit home for many, many Americans,” Yang said. “And unfortunately, the Democratic response seems to be, ‘D.C. is not the problem, Trump is the problem.'”

That doesn’t mean Trump’s actions should be celebrated, however, Yang said.

“When I go around campaigning around the country, I cannot tell you how many heads nod when I talk about how their lived experience has nothing to do with corporate profits, the headline unemployment rate, or GDP,” he said.

“We know that a lot of the headline economic numbers are due to the $1.5 trillion tax cut, the vast majority of which went to big companies. So if you have a sugar rush because of an irresponsible tax cut, you shouldn’t be celebrating. I mean, anyone could have predicted that,” he said.

Trump championed his $1.5 trillion tax cut that was signed into law in 2017, but Democrats criticized it heavily for going to top earners.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, putting, cash, focus, yang, cut, democrats, debate, speaking, democratic, tax, president, trump, andrew, hands, peoples


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Autonomous driving could be viable in ‘all scenarios’ in 10 years: Co-CEO

Autonomous driving could be viable in ‘all scenarios’ in 10 years: Co-CEO1 Hour AgoGrace Liu of Fosun RZ Capital says autonomous driving has “big potential” because of it has a large market and will affect many people’s lives. She also discusses the recent cooldown in Chinese venture capital fundraising.


Autonomous driving could be viable in ‘all scenarios’ in 10 years: Co-CEO1 Hour AgoGrace Liu of Fosun RZ Capital says autonomous driving has “big potential” because of it has a large market and will affect many people’s lives.
She also discusses the recent cooldown in Chinese venture capital fundraising.
Autonomous driving could be viable in ‘all scenarios’ in 10 years: Co-CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, autonomous, venture, driving, potential, coceo, scenarios, recent, viable, capital, peoples


Autonomous driving could be viable in 'all scenarios' in 10 years: Co-CEO

Autonomous driving could be viable in ‘all scenarios’ in 10 years: Co-CEO

1 Hour Ago

Grace Liu of Fosun RZ Capital says autonomous driving has “big potential” because of it has a large market and will affect many people’s lives. She also discusses the recent cooldown in Chinese venture capital fundraising.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20
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UK’s Labour vows to nationalize some of BT in free broadband plan

Britain’s opposition Labour Party said it would nationalize parts of telecoms provider BT’s network if it won power in the December 12 election to provide free full-fiber broadband for all. Labour said it would nationalize Openreach – the digital network arm of the country’s biggest broadband and mobile phone provider — as well as parts of BT Technology, BT Enterprise and BT Consumer. “It’s time to make the very fastest full-fiber broadband free to everybody, in every home in every corner of the


Britain’s opposition Labour Party said it would nationalize parts of telecoms provider BT’s network if it won power in the December 12 election to provide free full-fiber broadband for all.
Labour said it would nationalize Openreach – the digital network arm of the country’s biggest broadband and mobile phone provider — as well as parts of BT Technology, BT Enterprise and BT Consumer.
“It’s time to make the very fastest full-fiber broadband free to everybody, in every home in every corner of the
UK’s Labour vows to nationalize some of BT in free broadband plan Cached Page below :
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UK's Labour vows to nationalize some of BT in free broadband plan

Britain’s opposition Labour Party said it would nationalize parts of telecoms provider BT’s network if it won power in the December 12 election to provide free full-fiber broadband for all.

The sweeping upgrade of Britain’s internet infrastructure would be paid for by raising taxes on tech firms such as Alphabet’s Google, Amazon and Facebook and using its Green Transformation fund, Labour said.

Labour said it would nationalize Openreach – the digital network arm of the country’s biggest broadband and mobile phone provider — as well as parts of BT Technology, BT Enterprise and BT Consumer.

“It’s time to make the very fastest full-fiber broadband free to everybody, in every home in every corner of the country,” Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn will say in a speech, according to an extract released by the party.

“By creating British Broadband as a public service, we will lead the world in using public investment to transform our country, reduce people’s monthly bills, boost our economy and improve people’s quality of life.”

Labour said the cost of nationalizing parts of BT would be set by parliament and paid for by swapping bonds for shares.

A BT spokesman said in an emailed statement that rolling out full-fiber broadband and 5G across Britain should be a top political priority. He did not specifically address Labour’s nationalization plan.

“Whatever the result of the election, we’d encourage the next government to work with all parts of the industry to achieve that,” the spokesman said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15
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19-year-old Mark Zuckerberg: ‘Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t seem to be surmountable’

Privacy concerns are a constant for Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg. Even as Zuckerberg testified before Congress about Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra on Wednesday, the CEO was asked about Facebook’s privacy violations. After Harvard’s computer services department complained about the site, Zuckerberg was brought before Harvard’s Administrative Board, accused of violating individual privacy, breaching security and violating copyrights with Facemash. “Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t s


Privacy concerns are a constant for Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg.
Even as Zuckerberg testified before Congress about Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra on Wednesday, the CEO was asked about Facebook’s privacy violations.
After Harvard’s computer services department complained about the site, Zuckerberg was brought before Harvard’s Administrative Board, accused of violating individual privacy, breaching security and violating copyrights with Facemash.
“Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t s
19-year-old Mark Zuckerberg: ‘Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t seem to be surmountable’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: catherine clifford
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19-year-old Mark Zuckerberg: 'Issues about violating people's privacy don't seem to be surmountable'

Privacy concerns are a constant for Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg. Even as Zuckerberg testified before Congress about Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra on Wednesday, the CEO was asked about Facebook’s privacy violations.

In light of what has unfolded over the last several years, including Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data scandal, comments Zuckerberg made about user privacy as a 19-year-old Harvard student seem ironic today.

In 2003, before Zuckerberg dropped out of Harvard to start Facebook, he created a site called Facemash; at the time, The Harvard Crimson described it as a “popular Harvard version of the Am I Hot or Not? website.”

After Harvard’s computer services department complained about the site, Zuckerberg was brought before Harvard’s Administrative Board, accused of violating individual privacy, breaching security and violating copyrights with Facemash.

Zuckerberg chose to shut down the site because he didn’t see a good way around the issues.

“Issues about violating people’s privacy don’t seem to be surmountable,” Zuckerberg told the Crimson about Facemash in an issue published in November 2003.

“I’m not willing to risk insulting anyone,” said a teenage Zuckerberg.

The Crimson article was recently resurfaced by Bloomberg’s Sarah Frier after Zuckerberg gave a speech at Georgetown University on Oct. 17. The speech defended Facebook’s stance on “freedom of expression,” including its decision not to ban or fact check political advertising on the site. (Frier referenced The Harvard Crimson story to make a point about Facebook’s origin.)

Despite a young Zuckerberg’s privacy concerns with Facemash (an admittedly small and short-lived operation), he of course went on to launch Facebook on Feb. 4, 2004, with co-founders Chris Hughes, Dustin Moskovitz and Eduardo Saverin.

Today, at 35, Zuckerberg and is worth $68 billion. Facebook has almost 40,000 full-time employees and more than 2.7 monthly active users across Facebook and its properties Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger.

In July, Facebook paid a $5 billion fine to consumer protection agency, the Federal Trade Commission, to settle a privacy violation claim.

The FTC began investigating Facebook in March 2018 after allegations that the data of 87 million Facebook users were accessed by the political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica, violating a user agreement requiring Facebook to give users clear notifications when their data was shared with third parties.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mark, peoples, issues, facebook, facebooks, users, facemash, privacy, dont, crimson, violating, site, surmountable, harvard, 19yearold, zuckerberg


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China unexpectedly keeps benchmark lending rate unchanged in October

A pedestrian walks past the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) headquarters on August 6, 2019 in Beijing, China. China on Monday unexpectedly kept unchanged its new benchmark lending rate, for the first time since its debut in August, suggesting Beijing is keen to avoid overly loosening monetary policy for fear it may push up already-high debt levels across the economy. The one-year Loan Prime Rate (LPR) remained at 4.20%, steady from the previous monthly fixing. It is the third fixing since the Peop


A pedestrian walks past the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) headquarters on August 6, 2019 in Beijing, China.
China on Monday unexpectedly kept unchanged its new benchmark lending rate, for the first time since its debut in August, suggesting Beijing is keen to avoid overly loosening monetary policy for fear it may push up already-high debt levels across the economy.
The one-year Loan Prime Rate (LPR) remained at 4.20%, steady from the previous monthly fixing.
It is the third fixing since the Peop
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21
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China unexpectedly keeps benchmark lending rate unchanged in October

A pedestrian walks past the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) headquarters on August 6, 2019 in Beijing, China.

China on Monday unexpectedly kept unchanged its new benchmark lending rate, for the first time since its debut in August, suggesting Beijing is keen to avoid overly loosening monetary policy for fear it may push up already-high debt levels across the economy.

The one-year Loan Prime Rate (LPR) remained at 4.20%, steady from the previous monthly fixing. The five-year LPR was fixed at 4.85%, unchanged from September.

A Reuters poll last week had forecast the rate would be cut again following reductions in August and last month.

It is the third fixing since the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) unveiled the new lending benchmark, which is set by 18 banks.

The new LPR is linked to the rate on PBOC’s medium-term lending facility (MLF), which is determined by broader financial system demand for central bank liquidity. The one-year MLF rate, last cut in February 2016, now stands at 3.3%.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21
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These stocks could be the biggest winners if the US completes this phased trade deal with China

The U.S. and China agreed to the first phase of a “substantial” trade deal that delays tariff hikes scheduled to kick in next week. These stocks are set to win the most from the resolution, if it can be completed. CNBC’s proprietary “China Trade Index” jumped nearly 2.5% on Friday on the partial deal announcement. The 25 companies in the index are among those with the biggest China revenue exposure and the most imports from China. They could have more room to gain as the two countries finalize t


The U.S. and China agreed to the first phase of a “substantial” trade deal that delays tariff hikes scheduled to kick in next week. These stocks are set to win the most from the resolution, if it can be completed. CNBC’s proprietary “China Trade Index” jumped nearly 2.5% on Friday on the partial deal announcement. The 25 companies in the index are among those with the biggest China revenue exposure and the most imports from China. They could have more room to gain as the two countries finalize t
These stocks could be the biggest winners if the US completes this phased trade deal with China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peoples, vice, china, special, republic, stocks, premier, trade, winners, biggest, completes, deal, phased, liu, president


These stocks could be the biggest winners if the US completes this phased trade deal with China

US President Donald Trump shows a letter from Chinese President Xi Jinping as he announces and initial deal with China while meeting the special Envoy and Vice Premier of the People’s Republic of China Liu He Special Envoy and Vice Premier of the People’s Republic of China Liu He at the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC on October 11, 2019.

The U.S. and China agreed to the first phase of a “substantial” trade deal that delays tariff hikes scheduled to kick in next week. These stocks are set to win the most from the resolution, if it can be completed.

CNBC’s proprietary “China Trade Index” jumped nearly 2.5% on Friday on the partial deal announcement. The 25 companies in the index are among those with the biggest China revenue exposure and the most imports from China. They could have more room to gain as the two countries finalize the agreement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peoples, vice, china, special, republic, stocks, premier, trade, winners, biggest, completes, deal, phased, liu, president


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China state newspaper criticizes Apple for app used by Hong Kong protesters

The Chinese Communist Party’s official newspaper, the People’s Daily, lashed out on Tuesday at Apple for allowing an app on its app store that tracks the movement of police around Hong Kong and is used by protesters in ongoing and sometimes violent demonstrations. In a commentary the newspaper did not mention the name of the location app, but it decried what it said was Apple’s complicity in helping the protesters and questioned whether Apple was “thinking clearly”. One such map that is availabl


The Chinese Communist Party’s official newspaper, the People’s Daily, lashed out on Tuesday at Apple for allowing an app on its app store that tracks the movement of police around Hong Kong and is used by protesters in ongoing and sometimes violent demonstrations. In a commentary the newspaper did not mention the name of the location app, but it decried what it said was Apple’s complicity in helping the protesters and questioned whether Apple was “thinking clearly”. One such map that is availabl
China state newspaper criticizes Apple for app used by Hong Kong protesters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, criticizes, kong, used, peoples, daily, newspaper, apple, state, protests, protesters, store, hong, app


China state newspaper criticizes Apple for app used by Hong Kong protesters

The Chinese Communist Party’s official newspaper, the People’s Daily, lashed out on Tuesday at Apple for allowing an app on its app store that tracks the movement of police around Hong Kong and is used by protesters in ongoing and sometimes violent demonstrations.

In a commentary the newspaper did not mention the name of the location app, but it decried what it said was Apple’s complicity in helping the protesters and questioned whether Apple was “thinking clearly”.

One such map that is available on the Apple app store, the HKmap.live app, has become a lightning rod on Twitter for criticism and support of the protests. The developer did not immediately respond to a request for comment. On Saturday in a tweet they said that Apple had “many business considerations” but had “make thing(s) right.”

Apple is the latest foreign company to catch heat in relation to the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, which have lasted four months.

The National Basketball Association (NBA) and U.S. sports brand Vans also have become embroiled in controversies over the protests.

The piece on the website of the People’s Daily said Apple did not have a sense of right and wrong, and ignored the truth.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, criticizes, kong, used, peoples, daily, newspaper, apple, state, protests, protesters, store, hong, app


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