Here are some ways to pay off student loans, using other people’s money

As student debt grows, so do the plans to squelch it. The South Korean auto maker Hyundai announced recently that it will give $900 to people with student debt who buy or lease a car from them. Some of the other ideas are pretty creative: New Jersey, for example, considered establishing a lottery for borrowers burdened by student debt. “All money you receive for volunteering is considered income by the IRS,” said Mark Kantrowitz, a student loan expert. 1) At your jobWang Zhao | AFP/Getty Images”


As student debt grows, so do the plans to squelch it. The South Korean auto maker Hyundai announced recently that it will give $900 to people with student debt who buy or lease a car from them. Some of the other ideas are pretty creative: New Jersey, for example, considered establishing a lottery for borrowers burdened by student debt. “All money you receive for volunteering is considered income by the IRS,” said Mark Kantrowitz, a student loan expert. 1) At your jobWang Zhao | AFP/Getty Images”
Here are some ways to pay off student loans, using other people’s money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, money, offering, program, debt, work, companies, youll, loan, peoples, loans, ways, state, student, using, receive


Here are some ways to pay off student loans, using other people's money

As student debt grows, so do the plans to squelch it. A new federal program offers up to $75,000 in student loan relief for those who work for three years in the health-care field, battling the opioid epidemic. The South Korean auto maker Hyundai announced recently that it will give $900 to people with student debt who buy or lease a car from them. (The offer is available only at dealerships in California and Phoenix, Arizona, right now.) Meanwhile, student loan assistance, which started as a niche offering by a handful of companies, is finding its way into the mainstream menu of workplace benefits. Some of the other ideas are pretty creative: New Jersey, for example, considered establishing a lottery for borrowers burdened by student debt. Other ways of garnering money to eliminate your education debt don’t rely on luck, but rather require rolling up your sleeves or knowing historical facts.

Keep in mind, however, that these endeavors aren’t free. The funds are taxable, even money from an organization in return for volunteer work. “All money you receive for volunteering is considered income by the IRS,” said Mark Kantrowitz, a student loan expert. Here are some of the ways to get other people to pay off your debt.

1) At your job

Wang Zhao | AFP/Getty Images

“We’re certainly seeing more and more employers interested in offering student debt benefits to their employees,” said Asha Srikantiah, head of Fidelity’s student debt program. Companies that have offered their employees help with their student loans include Aetna, Penguin Random House, Nvidia and Sotheby’s. A spokesman for Fidelity said more than 75 companies — including U.S. defense contractor Raytheon and The Travelers Companies — are currently using its student debt employer contribution program. (Fidelity also offers a student debt benefit for its own employees.) Most likely the company you’re interviewing with won’t offer the benefit, yet that shouldn’t stop you from asking about it, said Katie Berliner, account executive at YouDecide, a benefits firm. “In the course of the interview, there comes a point where the interviewer says, ‘Do you have any questions?'” Berliner said. “It would not be out of line to say: ‘I want to get your perspective on whether you think this a valuable benefit.'”

2) Volunteering

Borrowers can enroll with Shared Harvest Fund, and get financial help in return for volunteering. Users create a profile and list the social causes they’re interested in, such as gender equality or homelessness. You’ll work on projects for nonprofits and businesses and receive a monthly stipend of $250 to $1,000.

3) Packing up and moving

Maine

To attract younger residents, Maine is offering student debt relief to graduates who live and work in the state. The details of the program vary based on when you graduated and whether you are from Maine or elsewhere. But generally, people are able to subtract their total student loan payments over the year from their state income tax liability. So if you owe the state $2,000 in state income taxes and you paid $1,800 in student loans, you’ll owe Maine just $200. Newburgh Heights, Ohio, has another offer for student loan borrowers. If you’re a graduate from a four-year accredited college or university and purchase a house in the town valued at $50,000 or more within five years of graduating, the town will pay off half of your student debt, up to $50,000. There are two payouts, 80% at the 10-year mark and the final 20% after the 15 years. Even if you’ve paid off your student loans by that time, you’ll receive the funds for the amount you owed when you first enrolled in the town’s program.

4) Apps


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, money, offering, program, debt, work, companies, youll, loan, peoples, loans, ways, state, student, using, receive


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Chinese state media urge action, voice support for Hong Kong police after overnight clashes

Protesters occupy the departure hall of the Hong Kong International Airport during a demonstration on August 12 in Hong Kong. However, Chinese state media has stopped short of calling for military action to deal with the protests. “Extreme political ideas have found frequent expression in Hong Kong, with some even raising ‘Hong Kong independence’ slogans recently. Chinese state media has also posted messages of support for the Hong Kong police, describing what was happening in the city as “a sha


Protesters occupy the departure hall of the Hong Kong International Airport during a demonstration on August 12 in Hong Kong. However, Chinese state media has stopped short of calling for military action to deal with the protests. “Extreme political ideas have found frequent expression in Hong Kong, with some even raising ‘Hong Kong independence’ slogans recently. Chinese state media has also posted messages of support for the Hong Kong police, describing what was happening in the city as “a sha
Chinese state media urge action, voice support for Hong Kong police after overnight clashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, overnight, state, peoples, media, urge, voice, clashes, chinas, protesters, chinese, kong, hong, reporter, times, support


Chinese state media urge action, voice support for Hong Kong police after overnight clashes

Protesters occupy the departure hall of the Hong Kong International Airport during a demonstration on August 12 in Hong Kong.

Chinese state media called on Beijing on Wednesday to deal with protests in Hong Kong more decisively after a reporter from one of China’s largest government-backed newspapers was caught up in overnight clashes.

Ten weeks of increasingly violent clashes between police and pro-democracy protesters, angered by a perceived erosion of freedoms, are posing one of the biggest challenges for Chinese President Xi Jinping since he came to power in 2012.

Demonstrators and riot police clashed at Hong Kong’s airport late on Tuesday after flights were cancelled for a second day. Protesters at one point held a man who Chinese media have said was a reporter from China’s Global Times newspaper.

A front-page commentary on the overseas edition of the Communist Party’s official People’s Daily newspaper said on Wednesday Hong Kong had reached a critical juncture.

“Using the sword of the law to stop violence and restore order is overwhelmingly the most important and urgent task for Hong Kong!” it said.

Another commentary by a Shenzhen University researcher, published by the China Daily, said the central government should deal with Hong Kong issues more decisively.

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Twitter overnight the Chinese government was moving troops to the border with Hong Kong and urged calm.

However, Chinese state media has stopped short of calling for military action to deal with the protests.

Demonstrators say they are fighting the erosion of the “one country, two systems” arrangement that enshrined some autonomy for Hong Kong after China took it back from Britain in 1997.

“Extreme political ideas have found frequent expression in Hong Kong, with some even raising ‘Hong Kong independence’ slogans recently. Which means the ‘one country, two systems’ principle faces a new challenge,” Chinese author Li Peiwen said.

Chinese state media has also posted messages of support for the Hong Kong police, describing what was happening in the city as “a shame”. Such posts were the most-discussed topics on China’s social media platforms on Wednesday.

“We support the Hong Kong police too!” said a post on the People’s Daily’s official Twitter-like Weibo account that was reposted more than 500,000 times.

Global Times editor Hu Xijin said one of the newspaper’s reporters was rescued by police after being tied up by demonstrators. The tabloid is published by the People’s Daily.

“GT reporter Fu Guohao has been rescued by police and sent to the hospital. We’re still learning about his injury conditions,” said in a tweet.

Chinese state broadcaster CCTV called Fu “a real man” in a another Weibo post that had more than 140,000 “likes.”

Netizens have been closely watching what Beijing might do next after China this week condemned some protesters for using dangerous tools to attack police and said the clashes showed “sprouts of terrorism.”

The Global Times reported on Monday that China’s People’s Armed Police assembled in the southeastern city of Shenzhen, fueling speculation of a possible intervention in Hong Kong.

Some reactions on China’s social media platforms called for Beijing to intervene while many others urged calm.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, overnight, state, peoples, media, urge, voice, clashes, chinas, protesters, chinese, kong, hong, reporter, times, support


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China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen


Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen
China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, media, assembles, protesters, peoples, asking, hong, china, airport, beijing, selfdestruction, military, kong, nearby, city


China media says Hong Kong protesters are 'asking for self-destruction' as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | Reuters

Chinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Meanwhile, the city’s embattled leader, Carrie Lam, told the news media on Tuesday that “lawbreaking activities in the name of freedom” were damaging the rule of law and that the Asian financial hub’s recovery from anti-government protests could take a long time. Her comments came after Beijing said widespread anti-government protests in the semi-autonomous city showed “sprouts of terrorism,” and such violence must be severely punished, “without leniency, without mercy.” Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Another sit-in is expected to take place at the airport, a major global hub, on Tuesday. Despite that reopening, Hong Kong flag carrier Cathay Pacific said it had cancelled over 200 flights to and out of the airport for the day, according to its website. The protest at the airport, while disruptive, was largely peaceful. That’s in contrast to Sunday night, where protesters appeared to have thrown Molotov cocktails at police stations around the city and dozens of protesters were arrested.

Beijing’s clear message

On Monday, Chinese officials focused on what they described as “deranged acts” by the protesters, including throwing gasoline bombs, saying they marked the emergence of terrorism in the Chinese city. “Radical Hong Kong protesters have repeatedly used extremely dangerous tools to attack police officers,” Yang Guang, a spokesman for the Chinese government’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, said in a news briefing on Monday, according to Chinese state broadcaster CCTV. China’s media is sending a clear signal to the protesters. On Monday afternoon, Chinese state-owned English tabloid the Global Times tweeted a video showing the People’s Armed Police assembling in Shenzhen, a city bordering Hong Kong, about a 1.5 hour- drive away. The People’s Daily, the official newspaper of China’s Communist Party, posted on Chinese social media a statement saying the People’s Armed Police are in Shenzhen prepared to handle “riots, disturbance, major violence and crime and terrorism-related social security issues.” In a Tuesday social media post from the Global Times‘ Chinese edition, the outlet said “if Hong Kong rioters cannot read the signal of having armed police gathering in Shenzhen, then they are asking for self-destruction,” according to a CNBC translation. China is “implying they might send in the People’s Liberation Army or issue direct intervention but they don’t want to,” according to Ben Bland, a director at Sydney-based policy think tank Lowy Institute. “(Beijing) hopes that the signals will scare protesters to back down,” but if and when Beijing decides to deploy troops they will not “advertise it,” he told CNBC. This is all part of a “delicate dance between China and Hong Kong” that’s reached a critical point because there is almost no common ground or overlapping interests between the protesters and Beijing, Bland added. Although China’s leaders do not want to deploy the PLA, they are “willing to do it if they have to,” the Asia politics expert said. Hong Kong’s former governor, Chris Patten, said on Tuesday that if China intervened in the city, it would be a “catastrophe” and that Chinese President Xi Jinping should see the wisdom of trying to bring people together. Patten called on British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to garner support from its allies to ensure Beijing does not intervene.

Protests continue


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, media, assembles, protesters, peoples, asking, hong, china, airport, beijing, selfdestruction, military, kong, nearby, city


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China’s central bank has one less worry after the Fed’s rate cut, analysts say

Zhang Peng | LightRocket | Getty ImagesThe U.S. Federal Reserve’s interest rate cut takes some pressure off China’s central bank, amid the multitude of challenges it already faces to keep the economy growing steadily. The People’s Bank of China is unlikely to respond with major changes to its monetary policy, analysts said. The Fed cut its benchmark interest rate on Wednesday New York time for the first time since 2008. The greater challenge is the (Chinese) central bank has many goals and needs


Zhang Peng | LightRocket | Getty ImagesThe U.S. Federal Reserve’s interest rate cut takes some pressure off China’s central bank, amid the multitude of challenges it already faces to keep the economy growing steadily. The People’s Bank of China is unlikely to respond with major changes to its monetary policy, analysts said. The Fed cut its benchmark interest rate on Wednesday New York time for the first time since 2008. The greater challenge is the (Chinese) central bank has many goals and needs
China’s central bank has one less worry after the Fed’s rate cut, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, analysts, say, china, peoples, zhu, chinas, fed, bank, policy, central, yield, measures, worry, cut, feds


China's central bank has one less worry after the Fed's rate cut, analysts say

Zhang Peng | LightRocket | Getty Images

The U.S. Federal Reserve’s interest rate cut takes some pressure off China’s central bank, amid the multitude of challenges it already faces to keep the economy growing steadily. The People’s Bank of China is unlikely to respond with major changes to its monetary policy, analysts said. Instead, the central bank can worry less about the key U.S. dollar-yuan exchange rate, amid drawn-out trade tensions between the two countries, a slowdown in economic growth and criticism China keeps its currency artificially weak to boost exports. Rates overall are in a downward trend, Zhu Chaoping, a global market strategist at J.P. Morgan Asset Management said in Mandarin, according to a CNBC translation. Among multiple policy measures, the People’s Bank of China can step back on foreign exchange policy and put more focus on other measures, such as increasing financing to small and medium-sized enterprises, Zhu said.

The Fed cut its benchmark interest rate on Wednesday New York time for the first time since 2008. However, contrary to market expectations that the move was a signal that there will be further rate cuts ahead, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell called the decision a “midcycle adjustment to policy.” Some investors interpreted the move as indicating tighter monetary policy than expected, and major U.S. stock indexes fell by more than 1% on Powell’s commentary. The rate-sensitive 2-year Treasury yield jumped to its highest since late May, while the 10-year Treasury yield fell, causing the so-called yield curve to flatten. The U.S. dollar index hit its highest in more than two years. Matt Toms, chief investment officer of fixed income at Voya Investment Management, said the market moves were likely an overreaction. “We would look to the Fed to come out and talk more about the lack of inflation,” he said. “That should help weaken the dollar, steepen the yield curve.”

The greater challenge is the (Chinese) central bank has many goals and needs many policies to achieve these goals. This is a lot more complex than the Fed. Zhu Chaoping JP Morgan Asset Management

On Thursday, the People’s Bank of China set the yuan’s midpoint slightly weaker against the greenback, at 6.8938. The currency has remained in a relatively narrow range this year, about half a percent weaker against the dollar for the year so far, according to Wind Information. Ma Yan, researcher at Chinese brokerage Nanhua Futures, said it expects greater pressure on the yuan, but noted the economy is not doing so poorly as to warrant a significant devaluation. In a Chinese statement translated by CNBC, Ma also said that if economic growth slows in the third or fourth quarter, a central bank cut to the reserve requirement ratio — or the amount that banks need to set aside as reserves — is a possibility. Some other loosening measures may also be possible.

More complex for China


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, analysts, say, china, peoples, zhu, chinas, fed, bank, policy, central, yield, measures, worry, cut, feds


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China wants to track and grade each citizen’s actions — it’s in the testing phase

Since the push to build a social credit system kicked off in earnest five years ago, a few dozen pilot programs have emerged with varying tracking metrics, and consequences for violations. Worries about misuseThe overarching concern, whether or not a social credit system reaches national scale, is the potential for abuse. Especially as technology develops, a social credit system has the potential to be far more invasive, with few checks on its power in authoritarian China. He is a co-author of t


Since the push to build a social credit system kicked off in earnest five years ago, a few dozen pilot programs have emerged with varying tracking metrics, and consequences for violations. Worries about misuseThe overarching concern, whether or not a social credit system reaches national scale, is the potential for abuse. Especially as technology develops, a social credit system has the potential to be far more invasive, with few checks on its power in authoritarian China. He is a co-author of t
China wants to track and grade each citizen’s actions — it’s in the testing phase Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: evelyn cheng shirley tay, evelyn cheng, shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, month, credit, system, chinese, individuals, country, grade, testing, citizens, social, china, track, scores, peoples, actions, phase


China wants to track and grade each citizen's actions — it's in the testing phase

People walk past the Public Credit Information Service Hall in Suzhou, China, on May 6, 2019. Suzhou was one of several places chosen in 2018 by the Chinese government to run a social credit trial, which can reward or punish citizens for their behavior. Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The Chinese government is forging ahead with official efforts to create a national social credit system, even as several academic analysts doubt whether authorities can ever reach that goal. Beijing affirmed its commitment last month to building out social credit, a plan which has sparked fears that the government will gain overt control over ordinary people’s lives. At its core, the proposed system tries to create a standard for trust by tracking individual actions across Chinese society, and rewarding or punishing accordingly. It’s unclear how fairly such a system could impose penalties on individuals, or how easy it would be to get off blacklists. Still, authorities already claim to have the records of 990 million individuals and 25.91 million enterprises, as the central government runs up against a self-imposed 2020 deadline to formulate a nationwide social credit plan that includes the capital city. Since the push to build a social credit system kicked off in earnest five years ago, a few dozen pilot programs have emerged with varying tracking metrics, and consequences for violations. In many respects, the measures are China’s attempt to manufacture a more law-abiding society in a country where respect for contracts has a far shorter history than that of the U.S. or England. Nevertheless, the trials have sparked concerns.

Worries about misuse

The overarching concern, whether or not a social credit system reaches national scale, is the potential for abuse. China has a far from stellar human rights record. Earlier this month, 22 countries issued a joint statement calling on the world’s most populous nation to “refrain from the arbitrary detention and restrictions on freedom of movement” of ethnic minorities in Xinjiang. The region in the westernmost part of the country is known for intense surveillance and is where the United Nations last year said more than a million people were being held in “counter-extremism centres” and another two million were forced into “re-education camps.” Especially as technology develops, a social credit system has the potential to be far more invasive, with few checks on its power in authoritarian China. Still, the country hasn’t crossed that threshold yet. “At the moment, the negative consequences (e.g., the sticks, not the carrots) are only carefully used, and if, only to those businesses and individuals, who clearly broke a law,” Genia Kostka, professor of Chinese politics at Freie Universitat Berlin (the Free University of Berlin), said in an email. “So the consequences are not huge at the moment,” she said, “but the system is developing fast and more sticks can quickly be added to the system once it is running.” That sentiment was echoed by the Economist Intelligence Unit, which said in a Monday report that “the social credit system is set to become a steadily more important aspect of daily life in China, including while doing business.”

It’s not yet a sure thing

For now, however, it remains to be seen how far-reaching the social credit system will be in practice, or when it will be implemented nationally. In fact, there are some who doubt it will ever realize its stated goals. “The social credit system is such a sprawling endeavor that it may never actually be ‘done’ in any meaningful sense,” said Martin Chorzempa, research fellow, at the Washington-based Peterson Institute For International Economics. He is a co-author of the June 2018 report “China’s Social Credit System: A Mark of Progress or a Threat to Privacy?” “They are years away from having some system that integrates all government data and data from the private sector into a unified nationwide system with a single score, and they may never actually achieve that because of bureaucratic infighting over data and growing privacy concerns, ” Chorzempa said in an email to CNBC last month. Launching social credit in the capital city would be significant for the country, but little has yet been divulged about Beijing’s plans to establish individual scores for permanent residents by the end of 2020, as was announced in November 2018. The major government entities involved in creating the China-wide system, the National Development and Reform Commission and the People’s Bank of China, did not respond to CNBC requests for comment. The Municipality of Beijing also did not respond. Currently, social credit is tied to a handful of disparate initiatives. One is the stringent garbage sorting regime that took effect in Shanghai this month, according to city regulations that were adopted in January. It’s not clear to what extent individual scores will be affected by adherence to the rules, although the Communist Party newspaper People’s Daily noted that in Xiamen, multiple violations of similar waste management statutes land individuals on a so-called blacklist. It was not clear from publicly available resources what that list does. Of various government efforts to track individuals in China, the Supreme People’s Court system of issuing travel restrictions for anyone who defies a court order is the most widely used, the EIU report said. These cases typically involve unpaid debt, and prevent offenders from taking flights or traveling by high-speed rail. Critics say such punishments are not enough to prevent fraudulent behavior, while the consequences would be rather extreme if tied to, say, a few improperly sorted pieces of garbage.

Low awareness in China

Despite the many pilot programs and government-run websites such as “Credit China,” the Chinese public so far generally does not know much about the country’s plans for social credit. Dev Lewis, research associate at Digital Asia Hub, said last month that most people he spoke with in Xiamen and Fuzhou did not know such scores existed, and that less than 4% of people in Xiamen had signed up. Lewis’ findings match other recent news reports about how few people in China actually know about a social credit test that is happening in their own city. However, while he noted that more rewards for high scores could improve awareness, other academic research and anecdotes indicate many in the country favor a system that steps up punishments on wrongdoers. “An algorithm with public criteria is more transparent than systems depending on human, possibly corrupt decision making, and it is supposed to supervise officials too,” Peterson Institute’s Chorzempa said. “There is a real problem with lack of rule of law in China that affects everyone, and lets people off (without punishment) when they’ve done terrible things.” The Chinese government’s push to move forward with social credit, and launch a system in Beijing, is part of the powerful State Council’s announcement in 2014 of a “Planning Outline for the Construction of a Social Credit System.” The document called for nationwide, uniform credit information collection, and for the regulations to be established by the year 2020. The council noted e-commerce, logistics and statistics as areas in which to use a credit system to build “social sincerity.” The idea for such a program has a longer history. The first well-known test for a local social credit system in China launched back in 2010 in the rural county of Suining in the province of Jiangsu. As much as modern China has moved toward an increasingly rigid system, the local environment was vastly different just half a century ago. During the decade-long Cultural Revolution that began in the late 1960s, “Mao’s word was the law, like that of the emperors who preceded him,” Weijian Shan, CEO of investment firm PAG, wrote in his 2019 book “Out of the Gobi: My Story of China and America.” “Even now (in the 1980s) that the chaos of the Mao era had ended, laws, policies, and rules were subject to change, sometimes arbitrarily or quite suddenly,” Shan said. “There was a common expression in China at that time: ‘ji hua (a plan) cannot catch up with bian hua (change).’ The resulting uncertainty and risk necessarily led to greater social costs. ”

Testing phase


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: evelyn cheng shirley tay, evelyn cheng, shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, month, credit, system, chinese, individuals, country, grade, testing, citizens, social, china, track, scores, peoples, actions, phase


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Trade war to drag on as Trump says long way to go and China strikes hard-line tone

The U.S. and China have restarted their trade talks, but signs are showing a comprehensive deal could be a long way off, if it happens at all. President Donald Trump said Tuesday that there’s still a long way to go to reach a deal with China, threatening to slap tariffs on another $325 billion of Chinese goods. His recent remarks in the Chinese press indicated his tough stance in the trade war. “No face-to-face meetings have even been scheduled,” Donald Straszheim, head of Evercore ISI’s China r


The U.S. and China have restarted their trade talks, but signs are showing a comprehensive deal could be a long way off, if it happens at all. President Donald Trump said Tuesday that there’s still a long way to go to reach a deal with China, threatening to slap tariffs on another $325 billion of Chinese goods. His recent remarks in the Chinese press indicated his tough stance in the trade war. “No face-to-face meetings have even been scheduled,” Donald Straszheim, head of Evercore ISI’s China r
Trade war to drag on as Trump says long way to go and China strikes hard-line tone Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tone, peoples, team, way, trade, china, trump, war, zhong, drag, washington, straszheim, long, strikes, chinese, hardline


Trade war to drag on as Trump says long way to go and China strikes hard-line tone

The U.S. and China have restarted their trade talks, but signs are showing a comprehensive deal could be a long way off, if it happens at all.

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that there’s still a long way to go to reach a deal with China, threatening to slap tariffs on another $325 billion of Chinese goods.

Meanwhile, China had suddenly added a new member to its negotiating team — the country’s commerce minister, Zhong Shan, who was present at last month’s G-20 summit and took part in a telephone conversation with U.S. representatives last week. Zhong is seen by many officials in Washington as a hard-liner, a sign Chinese leader Xi Jinping is standing firm, The Washington Post reported.

His recent remarks in the Chinese press indicated his tough stance in the trade war.

“The U.S. side has provoked economic and trade frictions against us and violated the principles of the WTO. It is typical of unilateralism and protectionism,” Zhong told the People’s Daily on Monday, according to a Google translation. “We have to uphold our warrior spirit in firmly defending national and people’s interests in defending the multilateral trading system.” The People’s Daily is the official newspaper of the Communist Party in China.

The new development dampened analysts and investors’ hope for a resolution as some see the progress “in reverse.”

“No face-to-face meetings have even been scheduled,” Donald Straszheim, head of Evercore ISI’s China research team, said in a note. “Trade progress has been in reverse. The two sides are further apart now than in Nov-Dec 2018.”

“A combination of substantial steps, partial actions and empty words which will be a relief but far from a final resolution of what has morphed from trade war to a ‘stop the China rise’ cold war,” Straszheim said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: yun li
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The bug in Zoom that could’ve let hackers spy on video meetings tapped into people’s deepest fears about tech

This week, consumers learned about a flaw in the Zoom meeting app that could theoretically allow an attacker to gain access to a video chat or meeting if one of the participants is using a Mac computer. Zoom quickly fixed the problem with a patch, and said the problem had not affected any users. It’s the kind of bug companies find themselves fixing everyday. Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg tapes over his laptop camera, according to an Instagram photo he posted in 2016. In other words, the Zoom


This week, consumers learned about a flaw in the Zoom meeting app that could theoretically allow an attacker to gain access to a video chat or meeting if one of the participants is using a Mac computer. Zoom quickly fixed the problem with a patch, and said the problem had not affected any users. It’s the kind of bug companies find themselves fixing everyday. Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg tapes over his laptop camera, according to an Instagram photo he posted in 2016. In other words, the Zoom
The bug in Zoom that could’ve let hackers spy on video meetings tapped into people’s deepest fears about tech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-14  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kind, fears, meeting, tech, zoom, peoples, bug, video, stock, hackers, flaw, meetings, problem, spy, mac, let, products, tapped


The bug in Zoom that could've let hackers spy on video meetings tapped into people's deepest fears about tech

Passersby walk under a surveillance camera as part of face ID technology test at Berlin Suedkreuz station on Aug. 3, 2017 in Berlin, Germany.

This week, consumers learned about a flaw in the Zoom meeting app that could theoretically allow an attacker to gain access to a video chat or meeting if one of the participants is using a Mac computer.

Researcher Jonathan Leitschuh reported the flaw on July 8 in a Medium post. Zoom quickly fixed the problem with a patch, and said the problem had not affected any users. Apple later pushed a “silent update ” to Mac operating systems to prevent the exploit from being used on machines that hadn’t yet applied the Zoom fix.

It was the kind of interesting discovery that bug bounty hunters report every day. It’s the kind of bug companies find themselves fixing everyday.

But from a user perspective, the issue created a great deal more buzz than those everyday problems normally do.

Part of reason was because Zoom is one of the hottest business tech stories of the year, with a stock price that’s risen more than 150% since its April IPO. Zoom’s stock saw virtually no impact after the flaw revelations.

But the flap also comes after months of revelations on how home assistant products from Amazon and Google use employees to monitor conversations in your home, and years of reports of hackers accessing video cameras on laptops and other computers. Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg tapes over his laptop camera, according to an Instagram photo he posted in 2016.

In other words, the Zoom bug shows how consumers are conflicted and nervous over the newest class of products which offer new kinds of convenience in new places — but new potential for exposure, too.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-14  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kind, fears, meeting, tech, zoom, peoples, bug, video, stock, hackers, flaw, meetings, problem, spy, mac, let, products, tapped


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‘Don’t say we didn’t warn you’: A phrase from China signals the trade war could get even worse

“We advise the U.S. side not to underestimate the Chinese side’s ability to safeguard its development rights and interests. Don’t say we didn’t warn you!” the People’s Daily said in a commentary titled “United States, don’t underestimate China’s ability to strike back.” The phrase “Don’t say we didn’t warn you” was only used two other times in history by the People’s Daily — in 1962 before China’s border war with India and ahead of the 1979 China-Vietnam War. “Will rare earths become a counter w


“We advise the U.S. side not to underestimate the Chinese side’s ability to safeguard its development rights and interests. Don’t say we didn’t warn you!” the People’s Daily said in a commentary titled “United States, don’t underestimate China’s ability to strike back.” The phrase “Don’t say we didn’t warn you” was only used two other times in history by the People’s Daily — in 1962 before China’s border war with India and ahead of the 1979 China-Vietnam War. “Will rare earths become a counter w
‘Don’t say we didn’t warn you’: A phrase from China signals the trade war could get even worse Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-29  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, underestimate, say, peoples, used, united, rare, signals, didnt, trade, war, phrase, publication, dont, china, states, worse, warn


'Don't say we didn't warn you': A phrase from China signals the trade war could get even worse

The biggest Chinese newspaper explicitly warned the U.S. on Wednesday that China would cut off rare earth minerals as a countermeasure in the escalated trade battle, using an expression the publication has only used twice in history, both of which involved full-on wars.

“We advise the U.S. side not to underestimate the Chinese side’s ability to safeguard its development rights and interests. Don’t say we didn’t warn you!” the People’s Daily said in a commentary titled “United States, don’t underestimate China’s ability to strike back.” The publication is the official newspaper of the Communist Party of China.

The phrase “Don’t say we didn’t warn you” was only used two other times in history by the People’s Daily — in 1962 before China’s border war with India and ahead of the 1979 China-Vietnam War.

“Will rare earths become a counter weapon for China to hit back against the pressure the United States has put on for no reason at all? The answer is no mystery,” the paper said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-29  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, underestimate, say, peoples, used, united, rare, signals, didnt, trade, war, phrase, publication, dont, china, states, worse, warn


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GOP megadonor Mercer family donated to nonprofit that celebrates ‘English-speaking peoples’

The Republican megadonor family led by billionaire Robert Mercer once donated money to a conservative group that bills itself as a promoter of “cultural events for English-speaking peoples.” The $25,000 donation was quietly made in 2017 through the Mercer Family Trust to the Anglosphere Society, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit group, which has ties to prominent members of the Washington, D.C., power establishment. She added that the Anglosphere Society did not hear from Mercer again after that donation. B


The Republican megadonor family led by billionaire Robert Mercer once donated money to a conservative group that bills itself as a promoter of “cultural events for English-speaking peoples.” The $25,000 donation was quietly made in 2017 through the Mercer Family Trust to the Anglosphere Society, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit group, which has ties to prominent members of the Washington, D.C., power establishment. She added that the Anglosphere Society did not hear from Mercer again after that donation. B
GOP megadonor Mercer family donated to nonprofit that celebrates ‘English-speaking peoples’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: brian schwartz, patrick mcmullan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peoples, family, events, donated, megadonor, donation, society, anglosphere, gop, englishspeaking, group, celebrates, mercer, website, nonprofit, rebekah


GOP megadonor Mercer family donated to nonprofit that celebrates 'English-speaking peoples'

The Republican megadonor family led by billionaire Robert Mercer once donated money to a conservative group that bills itself as a promoter of “cultural events for English-speaking peoples.”

The $25,000 donation was quietly made in 2017 through the Mercer Family Trust to the Anglosphere Society, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit group, which has ties to prominent members of the Washington, D.C., power establishment.

The founder of the Anglosphere Society, Amanda Bowman, confirmed in an email and a follow-up interview with CNBC that Mercer’s daughter, Rebekah, directed the contribution to her nonprofit in 2017 in support of an event titled “Leadership in Perilous Times.”

“What I was so grateful to Rebekah for was her donations enabled me to invite all these different veterans, and it was just a one-time thing,” Bowman said. She added that the Anglosphere Society did not hear from Mercer again after that donation.

A spokesman for Robert Mercer did not return repeated requests for comment. The attorney listed on the family foundation tax form that shows the donation also did not return an email for comment.

Bowman said the Mercer donation partially funded the gathering, which featured Fox News analyst Gen. Jack Keane and Gen. David Petraeus, a former CIA director. The two retired generals are pictured together on Anglosphere’s website at the event. Keane has said he turned down an offer from President Donald Trump to serve as Defense secretary.

Bowman said the donation came after she and Rebekah Mercer met at a separate meeting for veterans.

The Anglosphere Society identifies itself on its website as an “independent, educational, non-profit, tax-exempt membership organization focused on promoting the Special Relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom, free market economies, and cultural events for English-Speaking Peoples.” It also says that it promotes “cultural events for sharing ideas based on the historic values of English-Speaking Peoples.”

The group, which was founded in 2012, also promotes itself as having an influential network. Pictures on the group’s website show prominent event attendees such as former Sen. Joe Lieberman, who became an independent after losing a Democratic primary in his state, and Henry Kissinger, who served as secretary of State under President Richard Nixon.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: brian schwartz, patrick mcmullan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peoples, family, events, donated, megadonor, donation, society, anglosphere, gop, englishspeaking, group, celebrates, mercer, website, nonprofit, rebekah


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Dubai introduces cameras that use AI to measure people’s happiness

Smart cameras have been introduced to measure customer satisfaction at four “Customer Happiness Centers” in Dubai. The RTA’s Customer Happiness Centers provide services such as vehicle and drivers’ licensing. “The initiative aims to measure customers happiness index through smart cameras that analyze the extent of their happiness,” Maher Shirah, director of Smart Services at RTA’s Corporate Technology Support Services Sector, said in a statement. The RTA added that the system was able to produce


Smart cameras have been introduced to measure customer satisfaction at four “Customer Happiness Centers” in Dubai. The RTA’s Customer Happiness Centers provide services such as vehicle and drivers’ licensing. “The initiative aims to measure customers happiness index through smart cameras that analyze the extent of their happiness,” Maher Shirah, director of Smart Services at RTA’s Corporate Technology Support Services Sector, said in a statement. The RTA added that the system was able to produce
Dubai introduces cameras that use AI to measure people’s happiness Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: anmar frangoul, richard geoffrey, eyeem, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peoples, happiness, shirah, smart, customers, introduces, ai, centers, customer, technology, services, measure, cameras, system, dubai


Dubai introduces cameras that use AI to measure people's happiness

Smart cameras have been introduced to measure customer satisfaction at four “Customer Happiness Centers” in Dubai.

In an announcement Monday, Dubai’s Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) said that the system would use “highly accurate” cameras powered by artificial intelligence technology.

The devices have both wireless and Bluetooth connectivity, and can take 30 frames per second from a range of seven meters.

The RTA’s Customer Happiness Centers provide services such as vehicle and drivers’ licensing.

“The initiative aims to measure customers happiness index through smart cameras that analyze the extent of their happiness,” Maher Shirah, director of Smart Services at RTA’s Corporate Technology Support Services Sector, said in a statement.

“The technology analyses the facial expressions of customers, without saving images in respect of their privacy, before and after processing their transactions at the center,” Shirah added.

The RTA added that the system was able to produce detailed reports of a customer’s happiness levels, with instant alerts triggered when a center’s “happiness rating” drops below a predefined level. When this happens, actions can be taken to “restore customers’ happiness level.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: anmar frangoul, richard geoffrey, eyeem, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peoples, happiness, shirah, smart, customers, introduces, ai, centers, customer, technology, services, measure, cameras, system, dubai


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