Fed’s Powell says US homebuilders hit by ‘a perfect storm’ of Trump’s immigration policy, tariffs

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell echoed what most in the homebuilding industry have been complaining about all year. While the nation sinks into a severe housing shortage, homebuilders are struggling against high costs for labor and materials. Powell replied, “That’s what we hear from homebuilders. The homebuilders feel almost like they’ve been hit by a perfect storm here.” The lack of sufficient home construction, especially at affordable price points, has led to a severe housing shortage


Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell echoed what most in the homebuilding industry have been complaining about all year. While the nation sinks into a severe housing shortage, homebuilders are struggling against high costs for labor and materials. Powell replied, “That’s what we hear from homebuilders. The homebuilders feel almost like they’ve been hit by a perfect storm here.” The lack of sufficient home construction, especially at affordable price points, has led to a severe housing shortage
Fed’s Powell says US homebuilders hit by ‘a perfect storm’ of Trump’s immigration policy, tariffs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: diana olick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, construction, hit, immigration, perfect, shortage, labor, policy, smith, powell, storm, housing, hear, thats, feds, trumps, especially, homebuilders


Fed's Powell says US homebuilders hit by 'a perfect storm' of Trump's immigration policy, tariffs

Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, speaks during a Senate Banking Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, July 11, 2019.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell echoed what most in the homebuilding industry have been complaining about all year. While the nation sinks into a severe housing shortage, homebuilders are struggling against high costs for labor and materials.

In response to questioning from Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn., Powell said, “What we hear from the homebuilders is that it’s a series of factors that are holding them back and challenging affordability.”

He pointed to the fact that thousands of skilled workers left the construction industry following the housing crash that began in 2008 and never returned.

“Now you have a shortage of skilled labor, so it’s hard to get people on the job, electricians, plumbers, carpenters and other people. No matter what you pay them, just finding people to do that work,” said Powell.

Smith responded, “Would you say our immigration policy might have something to do with that?”

Powell replied, “That’s what we hear from homebuilders. That’s part of it for sure.”

Then he added, “Material costs too have gone up, and some of that is tariffs for sure. The homebuilders feel almost like they’ve been hit by a perfect storm here.”

Builders, especially in the south and west, rely on immigrant labor, much of it from Mexico. The Trump administration’s tough stance on immigration has hit construction employers hard.

“It’s really across the entire labor force, I mean some of the stats are staggering,” said Sheryl Palmer, CEO of Arizona-based homebuilder Taylor Morrison, at a recent CNBC Capital Exchange conference. “We’ve lost productivity, and we haven’t brought new kids into the system because it’s not this career that folks are aspiring to have, and for all those reasons, we just can’t physically solve the problem because we just can’t get them [houses] built.”

Single-family housing starts have been unimpressive so far this year. In May, they fell 6.4% compared with April and were 12.5% lower compared with May 2018, according to the U.S. Census.

The lack of sufficient home construction, especially at affordable price points, has led to a severe housing shortage. That shortage continues to inflate home prices, keeping would-be first-time buyers on the sidelines. Rents are now rising at a fast clip, as occupancy is unexpectedly high in both apartment buildings and single-family rental properties.

“What I hear from businesses and communities, especially in rural Minnesota but really all over the state, is that the lack of workforce housing, affordable housing for people who have good jobs is actually a real limit on economic growth,” said Smith.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: diana olick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, construction, hit, immigration, perfect, shortage, labor, policy, smith, powell, storm, housing, hear, thats, feds, trumps, especially, homebuilders


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Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es


Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es
Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


Here's an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache.

But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience.

Certainly, they aren’t exactly the same (resumes shouldn’t be written in a narrative style), but both share a few similarities: They tell the truth, differentiate you from others, highlight your most unique qualities and capture readers’ attention.

Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):

IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center

Don’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the essential tips below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


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Oreo-owner Mondelez to take majority stake in Perfect Bar-parent, Perfect Snacks

Oreo-owner Mondelez is taking a majority stake in Perfect Snacks, the owner of refrigerated protein bar Perfect Bar, the companies announced on Wednesday. Perfect Snacks has roughly $70 million in sales and is posting double-digit growth year-over-year. Since then, Perfect Snacks has expanded beyond their “Original Refrigerated Protein Bar,” an organic, non-GMO nut-butter-based protein bar into a kids’ line and bite-sized Perfect Bites. As a whole, refrigerated snacks like soup, hummus and yogur


Oreo-owner Mondelez is taking a majority stake in Perfect Snacks, the owner of refrigerated protein bar Perfect Bar, the companies announced on Wednesday. Perfect Snacks has roughly $70 million in sales and is posting double-digit growth year-over-year. Since then, Perfect Snacks has expanded beyond their “Original Refrigerated Protein Bar,” an organic, non-GMO nut-butter-based protein bar into a kids’ line and bite-sized Perfect Bites. As a whole, refrigerated snacks like soup, hummus and yogur
Oreo-owner Mondelez to take majority stake in Perfect Bar-parent, Perfect Snacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, majority, keith, refrigerated, bar, roughly, snacking, family, oreoowner, snacks, stake, deal, barparent, perfect, mondelez


Oreo-owner Mondelez to take majority stake in Perfect Bar-parent, Perfect Snacks

Oreo-owner Mondelez is taking a majority stake in Perfect Snacks, the owner of refrigerated protein bar Perfect Bar, the companies announced on Wednesday.

The deal gives Mondelez a further foothold into snacking as more people eat on-the-go. It comes on the heels of its roughly $500 million acquisition of premium cookie brand, Tate’s Bake Shop, in 2018 and the innovation hub it launched for new snacking brands, SnackFutures, the same year.

Perfect Snacks has roughly $70 million in sales and is posting double-digit growth year-over-year. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

For the Keith family, the deal is an achievement. Bill Keith, along with six of his 13 siblings, founded the company in 2005, when their father was diagnosed with cancer and they needed a way to support themselves. The Perfect Bar recipe is based on a treat their dad, who has since passed, made the family to try to get the kids to swallow their vitamin supplements.

“We started the company to save our family,” Keith explained.

Since then, Perfect Snacks has expanded beyond their “Original Refrigerated Protein Bar,” an organic, non-GMO nut-butter-based protein bar into a kids’ line and bite-sized Perfect Bites.

As bars and snacking have exploded in popularity, Perfect Snacks continues to distinguish itself by the refrigeration its products require, which the Keith family says helps offer a fresher product.

As a whole, refrigerated snacks like soup, hummus and yogurt, generate roughly $20 billion in annual sales, according to Mintel. Mondelez sees an opportunity to further expand in the segment, said Glen Walter, executive vice president of Mondelez and president of North America.

“There is still a lot of runway in building overall category leadership in refrigerated snacking,” he said.

Mondelez, which also owns BelVita and Toblerone, has spoken openly about its intent to push further into snacking through its own products, as well as through dealmaking, should the opportunity arise.

“We want to take a very disciplined approach. We’ve studied the market and we’re looking at different targets. We think we have a great deal of opportunity in our business … and we will continue to take a disciplined approach to explore opportunities that make sense to exploit the advantages we have,” said Walter.

After the sale, Bill, Leigh and Charisse Keith, as well as the rest of the company’s leadership team, will continue to run the business out of its San Diego, California headquarters. The company’s manufacturing operations will also stay in place.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: lauren hirsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, majority, keith, refrigerated, bar, roughly, snacking, family, oreoowner, snacks, stake, deal, barparent, perfect, mondelez


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Bank of America has found the perfect recession play — death

Investors worried about a potential recession can seek shelter in a morbid sector of the market: death companies. Bank of America analyst Joanna Gajuk noted that pre-need service companies, which make funeral arrangements before the person dies, only saw a “slight pullback” in business during the last recession as “75% of the pre-need funeral customers pay in one lump sum.” She added that 40% to 50% of cemetery plot and memorial space purchases are also paid in a lump sum. Recession fears have r


Investors worried about a potential recession can seek shelter in a morbid sector of the market: death companies. Bank of America analyst Joanna Gajuk noted that pre-need service companies, which make funeral arrangements before the person dies, only saw a “slight pullback” in business during the last recession as “75% of the pre-need funeral customers pay in one lump sum.” She added that 40% to 50% of cemetery plot and memorial space purchases are also paid in a lump sum. Recession fears have r
Bank of America has found the perfect recession play — death Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sum, trade, tensions, sumrecession, perfect, worried, recession, play, america, funeral, weaker, death, preneed, bank, lump


Bank of America has found the perfect recession play — death

Investors worried about a potential recession can seek shelter in a morbid sector of the market: death companies.

Bank of America analyst Joanna Gajuk noted that pre-need service companies, which make funeral arrangements before the person dies, only saw a “slight pullback” in business during the last recession as “75% of the pre-need funeral customers pay in one lump sum.” She added that 40% to 50% of cemetery plot and memorial space purchases are also paid in a lump sum.

Recession fears have risen lately amid weaker economic data and increasing trade tensions. Monthly jobs growth fell to just 75,000 in May — missing an estimate of 180,000 — while manufacturing activity grew last month at its slowest pace since October 2016. Meanwhile, China and the U.S. continue to strengthen their rhetoric against each other on the trade front.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sum, trade, tensions, sumrecession, perfect, worried, recession, play, america, funeral, weaker, death, preneed, bank, lump


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‘Perfect storm’ for dollar as bets on US rate cuts grow

The dollar fell on Wednesday as rising trade tensions between Washington and Beijing and growing bets on a U.S. interest rate cut sapped investor demand for the currency. A Fed watch tool by CME assigns a 18% probability of a U.S. rate cut next week and a 68% probability of a cut in July. “This is a perfect storm for the dollar, and that is also undermining risk appetite broadly in the market,” said Ricardo Evangelista, a senior analyst at ActivTrades in London. It also weakened against the Hong


The dollar fell on Wednesday as rising trade tensions between Washington and Beijing and growing bets on a U.S. interest rate cut sapped investor demand for the currency. A Fed watch tool by CME assigns a 18% probability of a U.S. rate cut next week and a 68% probability of a cut in July. “This is a perfect storm for the dollar, and that is also undermining risk appetite broadly in the market,” said Ricardo Evangelista, a senior analyst at ActivTrades in London. It also weakened against the Hong
‘Perfect storm’ for dollar as bets on US rate cuts grow Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grow, rate, fed, bets, cut, market, trade, storm, dollar, probability, weekthe, perfect, global, local, cuts


'Perfect storm' for dollar as bets on US rate cuts grow

The dollar fell on Wednesday as rising trade tensions between Washington and Beijing and growing bets on a U.S. interest rate cut sapped investor demand for the currency.

Against a basket of other currencies, the dollar edged 0.1 percent lower to 96.64 and just above a two-and-a-half-month low of 96.46 reached last week.

The dollar has suffered a setback after the latest escalation of the U.S.-China trade, which analysts fear could tip the global economy into recession.

Those fears have grown as recent data have pointed to a global economic slowdown. Chinese factory inflation slowed in May and Fed officials have become increasingly cautious. That has fuelled expectations of U.S. rate cuts, a shift from a few months.

A Fed watch tool by CME assigns a 18% probability of a U.S. rate cut next week and a 68% probability of a cut in July.

“This is a perfect storm for the dollar, and that is also undermining risk appetite broadly in the market,” said Ricardo Evangelista, a senior analyst at ActivTrades in London.

The dollar slipped as much as 0.2% against the pound, taking its losses to nearly 1% so far this month.

It also weakened against the Hong Kong dollar, which rose towards the midpoint of a daily trading range as bond auctions and large listings in the local stock market sucked cash from the local market.

The local dollar also strengthened as the city was roiled by violent protests against an extradition bill that would allow people to be sent to mainland China.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grow, rate, fed, bets, cut, market, trade, storm, dollar, probability, weekthe, perfect, global, local, cuts


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Cramer: Wednesday’s ‘crazy session’ is a perfect example of the market’s new normal

A cross current of bad retail data and market-moving news out of the White House carried Wall Street higher on Wednesday, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said. “I want to walk you through what happened in this crazy session because it is a perfect encapsulation of the new normal.” Macy’s saw action during the session similar to Ralph Lauren’s the day prior, Cramer said. The Trump administration has imposed tariffs on 40% of imports from China and is considering slapping duties on the remaining 60%, Cramer sai


A cross current of bad retail data and market-moving news out of the White House carried Wall Street higher on Wednesday, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said. “I want to walk you through what happened in this crazy session because it is a perfect encapsulation of the new normal.” Macy’s saw action during the session similar to Ralph Lauren’s the day prior, Cramer said. The Trump administration has imposed tariffs on 40% of imports from China and is considering slapping duties on the remaining 60%, Cramer sai
Cramer: Wednesday’s ‘crazy session’ is a perfect example of the market’s new normal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, session, wall, white, crazy, wednesdays, chinese, today, cramer, normal, trump, trade, stocks, tariffs, street, example, markets, perfect


Cramer: Wednesday's 'crazy session' is a perfect example of the market's new normal

A cross current of bad retail data and market-moving news out of the White House carried Wall Street higher on Wednesday, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained nearly 116 points Wednesday. The S&P 500 advanced 0.58%, while the Nasdaq Composite advanced 1.13%.

“We got a weird combination of tailwinds today … Turns out we can get good news, too, and some days like today the stock market actually makes sense,” the “Mad Money” host said. “I want to walk you through what happened in this crazy session because it is a perfect encapsulation of the new normal.”

The market had a rough opening after news that retail sales declined for the second time in three months, tallying a 0.2% fall in April. The weakness included autos, home centers and the internet stores, Cramer said.

That brought the benchmark 10-year Treasury to its lowest yield of the year at 2.37% and pushed buyers into stocks with safe, consistent dividends, he noted, including Kimberly-Clark and PepsiCo. Money also moved into Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google’s Alphabet, along with the financial technology plays of PayPal, Square Inc., Visa and MasterCard, he added.

Even health care stocks, which have been hurting amid calls from some Democratic presidential candidates for a single-payer system, rallied because the industry does well in a slowing economy, Cramer said.

Macy’s saw action during the session similar to Ralph Lauren’s the day prior, Cramer said. The department chain’s share price rallied after the company reported an earnings beat and recorded higher-than-expected sales in the morning, but the company ultimately revealed how vulnerable it is to tariffs and finished down 0.46%.

The Trump administration has imposed tariffs on 40% of imports from China and is considering slapping duties on the remaining 60%, Cramer said.

“If that happens, the analysts will have to slash their estimates on this one,” Cramer said. “Macy’s won’t be alone. Almost every retailer has some exposure because they’ve spent decades sourcing their merchandise from Chinese vendors in order to keep costs down. Now that’s blowing up in their faces.”

Later in the day, news broke that the White House plans to delay automotive tariffs by up to six months.

“I can’t overemphasize the importance of this leaked news,” Cramer said. “In one fell swoop, [President Donald] Trump went from being a hated protectionist, know-nothing to someone who might be cleverly assembling a coalition of the willing in the trade war against the Chinese, at least in the eyes of Wall Street.”

Furthermore, more CEOs of companies that deal with China are warming up to the action that Trump has taken on the country, Cramer said.

That includes Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon, who on Tuesday tweeted: “Tariffs might be an effective negotiating tool.” Cramer also highlighted that New York Times foreign affairs columnist Tom Friedman, who is a proponent of globalization, came out in support of the trade war.

“To me, these represent tectonic shifts in the Wall Street consensus,” Cramer said. “I think it gives Trump a much better bargaining position versus the Chinese, and it certainly gave us higher stock prices.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, session, wall, white, crazy, wednesdays, chinese, today, cramer, normal, trump, trade, stocks, tariffs, street, example, markets, perfect


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Review: The Volvo XC40 is the perfect entry-level luxury car

The 2019 Volvo XC40 Mack Hogan/CNBCThe Volvo XC40 compact crossover is the culmination of Volvo’s revamped lineup under Geely, creating what is unquestionably the best entry-level luxury crossover on sale today. The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack HoganThe goodThere are a few things Volvo is historically known for. The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack HoganThey’re also known for comfort, another highlight of the XC40. The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack HoganCare by Volvo starts at $700 per month with $0 down and


The 2019 Volvo XC40 Mack Hogan/CNBCThe Volvo XC40 compact crossover is the culmination of Volvo’s revamped lineup under Geely, creating what is unquestionably the best entry-level luxury crossover on sale today. The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack HoganThe goodThere are a few things Volvo is historically known for. The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack HoganThey’re also known for comfort, another highlight of the XC40. The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack HoganCare by Volvo starts at $700 per month with $0 down and
Review: The Volvo XC40 is the perfect entry-level luxury car Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26  Authors: mack hogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, perfect, car, inscription, luxury, volvo, review, system, 2019, entrylevel, volvos, cnbcmack, drive, xc40, best, safety


Review: The Volvo XC40 is the perfect entry-level luxury car

The 2019 Volvo XC40 Mack Hogan/CNBC

The Volvo XC40 compact crossover is the culmination of Volvo’s revamped lineup under Geely, creating what is unquestionably the best entry-level luxury crossover on sale today. The class-leading interiors, refined driving dynamics, fantastic designs and competitive feature sets were all impressive on the S90, V90 and XC60 we’ve tested.

The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack Hogan

The good

There are a few things Volvo is historically known for. Safety is the biggest one, as evidenced by the standard automatic emergency braking, lane keeping aid, oncoming lane collision mitigation and driver fatigue monitoring. On top of that, our tester had Volvo’s tremendously helpful pilot assist semi-autonomous driving system, a blind-spot monitoring system and a 360-degree parking camera. The combination of technology and traditional crash safety earned the Volvo a Top Safety Pick + award from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the highest honor the agency grants. Suffice to say, the safety box is checked.

The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack Hogan

They’re also known for comfort, another highlight of the XC40. Between a 10-day stint in Ireland and a winding trip through Pennsylvania and Ohio, we’ve put far more than a thousand miles on Volvo XC40s. While the suspension is comfortable and compliant, the real hero is the seat. Volvo has long been known to do the best thrones in the business, and the XC40’s are no exception. They’re soft without being overly squishy, with firm back support to really pack on the miles. And you won’t be complaining about extended trips in the XC40’s cabin. Fully optioned, flagship products from Mercedes and Audi can best Volvo’s interiors, but at this price range and in this segment nothing comes close. The XC40 Inscription we tested was a fantastic mix of real wood, gorgeous metal work, a crystal shifter and the aforementioned sublime leather seats.

The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack Hogan

It’s also enjoyable to drive. Our Inscription model was a T5, which means it comes with a 248-horsepower, turbocharged four-cylinder engine connected to an all-wheel drive system. In between, there’s a quick-shifting, eight-speed transmission. This team makes short work of highway passes and is more than powerful enough. In fact, we sampled the 187-horsepower T4 model in Ireland and found it plenty quick, so if you’re working with a limited budget, that may be the one to get.

The bad

The one thing you do notice on extended trips in the XC40 is some road noise, with a dull roar pretty much always present at highway speeds. The engine, too, is prone to unpleasant groaning if you need to merge onto a highway with some verve. There’s also the debatable point regarding the infotainment system. The interior is dominated by an upright touch screen that controls most of your key functions, including climate control, media and navigation. By all accounts it looks great, but many people complain about the difficulty of navigating the system.

The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack Hogan

In our testing, it was responsive and relatively easy to sort out, but certain things are a bit too buried. For instance, it’s far more arduous to adjust the fan speed and direction with Volvo’s Sensus infotainment than it would be if you had a simple knob. That, though, is far from the Volvo’s most serious usability sin. That honor goes to the shifter, a beautiful piece of Orrefors Crystal that you come to hate as soon as you have to use it. Unlike every non-Volvo we’ve tested, the XC40 cannot be shifted into drive with one quick move. Instead, you have to pull twice back for drive or push twice for reverse.

The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack Hogan

If you do it too quickly or the second one doesn’t register, you end up revving the engine in neutral. That happened more often than we’d like to admit. Volvo decided to reinvent something that absolutely nobody had a problem with, an out-of-character move for such a pragmatic company.

How we’d option it

Unless you need all-wheel drive, we think the best value in the XC40 range is the T4 Inscription. It’s still plenty powerful, but it’s cheaper and gets better gas mileage. It starts at $39,890 with destination.

The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack Hogan

We’d also add the $900 premium package to get pilot assist along with the $1,100 vision package to add blind-spot monitoring, front and rear parking sensors and auto-dimming mirrors. Finally, we’d spend $750 on heated seats and a heated steering wheel. Volvo’s heated steering wheels are some of the only ones that get hot enough to be worth paying for. All in, our XC40 would cost $42,640. However, that’s not the only option. Volvo also offers a subscription service targeted toward young and first-time buyers, called Care by Volvo.

The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack Hogan

Care by Volvo starts at $700 per month with $0 down and includes the car, taxes, maintenance, insurance and even wear items like tires. The only mileage option is for 15,000 miles per year and the term of the subscription is 24 months, though you can upgrade to a new Volvo after 12 months if you renew the contract. The Inscription model is not currently available via Care by Volvo. Given the restrictions of Care by Volvo, we imagine most buyers will be best off doing a traditional lease or purchasing the XC40. However, depending on your insurance and mileage requirements, it is worth considering.

Final thoughts

The XC40 is phenomenal. While so many small SUVs feel cheap or lazily designed, the XC40 is full of nice details and amenities that make it feel like a truly premium product. From the fantastic seats to the little console-mounted, removable trash can, it’s clear that the XC40 is designed to be as usable as possible.

The 2019 Volvo XC40 CNBC/Mack Hogan

If you’re looking to buy your first luxury car, it’s a great place to start. It’s small and affordable enough to serve as a great entry point without the sacrificed, dumbed-down approach of some entry-level products.

Rating:

Exterior: 5 Interior: 4.5 Driving Experience: 4 Value: 5 Overall: 4.6 Price as tested: $46,290 *Ratings out of 5


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26  Authors: mack hogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, perfect, car, inscription, luxury, volvo, review, system, 2019, entrylevel, volvos, cnbcmack, drive, xc40, best, safety


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The winner of Warren Buffett’s March Madness office pool could get $1 million a year for life

Your office’s March Madness pool most likely pales in comparison to what billionaire Warren Buffett is offering his employees if they can predict which teams make this year’s Sweet 16 of the men’s NCAA tournament. Buffett confirmed that the multimillion-dollar challenge is back on this year in an interview with CNBC in February. “All you have to do is get through the first bracket to win $1 million, assuming nobody else wins at the same time—then you split the million,” Buffett told Becky Quick


Your office’s March Madness pool most likely pales in comparison to what billionaire Warren Buffett is offering his employees if they can predict which teams make this year’s Sweet 16 of the men’s NCAA tournament. Buffett confirmed that the multimillion-dollar challenge is back on this year in an interview with CNBC in February. “All you have to do is get through the first bracket to win $1 million, assuming nobody else wins at the same time—then you split the million,” Buffett told Becky Quick
The winner of Warren Buffett’s March Madness office pool could get $1 million a year for life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: tom huddleston jr, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, employees, perfect, prize, life, buffetts, pool, buffett, office, sweet, bracket, madness, split, winner, tournament, million


The winner of Warren Buffett's March Madness office pool could get $1 million a year for life

Your office’s March Madness pool most likely pales in comparison to what billionaire Warren Buffett is offering his employees if they can predict which teams make this year’s Sweet 16 of the men’s NCAA tournament.

The investor known as the “Oracle of Omaha” has a penchant for making multimillion-dollar bets that test his employees’ predictive abilities, and this year’s no different. Buffett is once again offering to pay $1 million a year for life to any of the employee of Berkshire Hathaway or its subsidiaries who accurately predicts the results of the first week of March Madness games.

Buffett confirmed that the multimillion-dollar challenge is back on this year in an interview with CNBC in February. Unfortunately for most basketball fans, the billionaire’s offer is only available to the roughly 375,000 people who either work for Buffett’s investment firm, Berkshire Hathaway, or one of that company’s various subsidiaries (including insurance company Geico and fast-food chain Dairy Queen).

“All you have to do is get through the first bracket to win $1 million, assuming nobody else wins at the same time—then you split the million,” Buffett told Becky Quick on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

If more than one employee manages to fill out a March Madness bracket that correctly picks the college teams that reach this year’s Sweet 16, then those winners will split the $1 million prize each year for the rest of their lives, Buffett explained. And, if no one submits a perfect bracket for the first weekend of March Madness, then whoever lasts the longest into the tournament without missing a pick will win $100,000 (or split that amount in the case of multiple winners).

Buffett first offered a big March Madness prize in 2014, with a whopping $1 billion offer to the public (not just his employees) for anyone with a perfect bracket all the way through the NCAA tournament. Unsurprisingly, no one claimed that prize, since the odds of picking a perfect bracket are roughly one in 2.4 trillion, according to one estimate. (In fact, according to the NCAA, no one has ever officially picked a perfect bracket and the best anyone has ever done is to predict the first 39 games of the 67-game tournament, in 2017.)

However, in recent years, Buffett has tried to make his March Madness challenge a little bit easier (you only have to be perfect up to the Sweet 16, instead of the entire tournament) while limiting the contest to his many employees. Still, no one has yet claimed the big prize from Buffett.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: tom huddleston jr, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, employees, perfect, prize, life, buffetts, pool, buffett, office, sweet, bracket, madness, split, winner, tournament, million


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After comeback, the stock market is aligned with a historical pattern with perfect track record

Stocks hit a new high for the year this week, back on track to match a post-election pattern that has stood the test of time. The stock market has risen in the year after all 18 midterm elections since World War II, with the S&P 500 delivering an average return of 14.5 percent, according to LPL Financial Research. After this week’s rally, the stock market has bounced back from December’s steep sell-off with the S&P 500 up more than 12 percent year to date. President Donald Trump, ‘glued’ to the


Stocks hit a new high for the year this week, back on track to match a post-election pattern that has stood the test of time. The stock market has risen in the year after all 18 midterm elections since World War II, with the S&P 500 delivering an average return of 14.5 percent, according to LPL Financial Research. After this week’s rally, the stock market has bounced back from December’s steep sell-off with the S&P 500 up more than 12 percent year to date. President Donald Trump, ‘glued’ to the
After comeback, the stock market is aligned with a historical pattern with perfect track record Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-16  Authors: yun li, johannes eisele, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, record, sp, pattern, stocks, 500, stock, comeback, election, track, aligned, week, good, historical, market, perfect


After comeback, the stock market is aligned with a historical pattern with perfect track record

Stocks hit a new high for the year this week, back on track to match a post-election pattern that has stood the test of time.

The stock market has risen in the year after all 18 midterm elections since World War II, with the S&P 500 delivering an average return of 14.5 percent, according to LPL Financial Research. The pattern is pointing to a longer bull run even after this year’s epic rebound.

“With the S&P 500 up only 1.3 percent since the midterm election last November, there indeed could still be room for stocks to run in 2019,” LPL’s Ryan Detrick said in a note on Wednesday.

After this week’s rally, the stock market has bounced back from December’s steep sell-off with the S&P 500 up more than 12 percent year to date. And there are a couple catalysts that could send stocks even higher, including a China trade deal that could take the uncertainty out of the market and a helping hand from the Federal Reserve that already signaled a more “patient” approach to rate hikes and it is prepared to “adjust” balance sheet unwind if needed.

President Donald Trump, ‘glued’ to the stock market’s fluctuations, is a big champion of this market pattern as he views a booming market as his way to re-election. CNBC reported last week Trump is pushing hard to strike a trade deal with China in the hope of lifting the stock market ahead of his re-election bid.

“The third year leading up to an election tends to be a very good one for the market because the president is trying to have the economy and the party in power looking good for getting re-elected,” Andrew Slimmon, senior portfolio manager at Morgan Stanley Investment Management, said on CNBC’s Power Lunch.

The year prior to a presidential election has almost always been a good one — in the last 19 such years, the market is up on average 15 percent and 18 out of 19 times it’s been positive, according to Slimmon.

The pattern can also be explained by the gridlock situation often seen after an election, where lawmakers and the President are unlikely to do harm or remove any bullish policy that is already in place.

— With reporting from CNBC’s Michael Bloom


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-16  Authors: yun li, johannes eisele, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, record, sp, pattern, stocks, 500, stock, comeback, election, track, aligned, week, good, historical, market, perfect


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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Deciding to be brave opens up ‘way more possibilities’ than being perfect

“When you decide that you want to be just brave, it opens up way more possibilities than trying to be perfect ever does.” So says Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to NowThis at a recent talk with a group of young women of color who are coders. “I felt like I had to be this epic person to justify all the sacrifices that my parents made,” Ocasio-Cortez told Saujani. “I felt like a total failure,” Ocasio-Cortez said. But being brave “means actually risking something,” Ocasio-Cortez told Saujani.


“When you decide that you want to be just brave, it opens up way more possibilities than trying to be perfect ever does.” So says Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to NowThis at a recent talk with a group of young women of color who are coders. “I felt like I had to be this epic person to justify all the sacrifices that my parents made,” Ocasio-Cortez told Saujani. “I felt like a total failure,” Ocasio-Cortez said. But being brave “means actually risking something,” Ocasio-Cortez told Saujani.
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Deciding to be brave opens up ‘way more possibilities’ than being perfect Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: sarah berger, reuters jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, possibilities, opens, email, going, trying, failure, ocasiocortez, way, deciding, told, perfect, primary, brave, person, alexandria


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Deciding to be brave opens up 'way more possibilities' than being perfect

“When you decide that you want to be just brave, it opens up way more possibilities than trying to be perfect ever does.”

So says Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to NowThis at a recent talk with a group of young women of color who are coders.

Ocasio-Cortez has experienced it first hand.

As a child, she put a lot of pressure on herself to be perfect, she told Reshma Saujani, author of the book “Brave, Not Perfect” and founder of Girls Who Code, at the New York City event in February. Both her parents grew up in poverty, and she saw the sacrifices they made to give her a better life — like her mother cleaning people’s houses to pay for her daughter’s for piano lessons.

“I felt like I had to be this epic person to justify all the sacrifices that my parents made,” Ocasio-Cortez told Saujani.

“That perfectionism in me created a lot of anxiety, and every time I got 80 percent, all I could think of is that it was a 20 percent failure. And if I didn’t get into the No. 1 school, then that was it, like I had let people down.”

Ocasio-Cortez studied international relations and economics at Boston University and graduated cum laude in 2011. But by the time she was 28, Ocasio-Cortez was working as a waitress, cleaning up after customers and pulling double shifts.

“I felt like a total failure,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

However, it also made her brave.

“[I]n a way, it took that rock-bottom, a feeling like a total failure, that I was like, ‘well, at this point anything that I do is up. And, like, why not?'”

So Ocasio-Cortez ran for Congress. It was a daunting prospect given that her primary opponent was Rep. Joe Crowley, the fourth-ranking House Democrat, who had represented the district for 10 terms.

But being brave “means actually risking something,” Ocasio-Cortez told Saujani.

“Brave does mean you may fail…it’s not just like, ‘oh, I’m going to do this thing that’s probably going to succeed. I’m going to do something with a 70 percent chance of success,'” she said. “No, brave means you’re going to go in with a 2 percent chance of success. Bravery is the moonshot.”

For Ocasio-Cortez, her moonshot paid off. She shocked the establishment, beating Crowley in the primary and winning the house seat at age 29, making her the youngest woman in history to be elected to Congress. And as a person of color, Ocasio-Cortez became the firstrepresentative to fully reflect the demographics of the 14th district, which encompasses parts of Bronx and Queens counties.

Ocasio-Cortez still grapples with anxiety when it comes to failure, she told Saujani, but it’s something she’s starting to grow out of; she’s learning to roll with the punches.

Ocasio-Cortez recalled a particularly freeing moment during the New York primary: Someone forwarded her a leaked email from a local community group that she’d asked for an endorsement. The email talked about Ocasio-Cortez and highlighted her past failures.

“Literally, what I saw when that email was forwarded to me was my inner voice,” Ocasio-Cortez said. “It was every critical, horrible thing that I was already saying to myself, that I was already battling when I was getting up out of bed. It was the voice — it was me — looking at myself in the mirror, externalized in an email. And that moment was actually really freeing.”

“It’s your worst fear, especially when you feel impostor syndrome….feeling like someone was going to find you out as like a fraud,” she says. “And I read it, and I was like, ‘you know what? I don’t care anymore. I don’t care anymore, because again, I’m at least trying. And they’re not.’ So, the power is in the person who’s trying, regardless of the success.”

Don’t miss: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: When you only see ‘white dudes’ running the world, you think you need to act like one

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: sarah berger, reuters jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, possibilities, opens, email, going, trying, failure, ocasiocortez, way, deciding, told, perfect, primary, brave, person, alexandria


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