Jimmy Carter: This is the key to living to 95

Jimmy Carter became the oldest living former president in American history when he turned 95 on Oct. 1. “It’s hard to live until you’re 95 years old,” Carter told People magazine recently, while building homes in Nashville for Habitat for Humanity. And he attributes his longevity to his relationship with his wife of 73 years, Rosalynn Carter. As for Carter, he has said that he knew he wanted to marry Rosalynn after their first date, which was a trip to the movies. “It just never had been my ambi


Jimmy Carter became the oldest living former president in American history when he turned 95 on Oct. 1. “It’s hard to live until you’re 95 years old,” Carter told People magazine recently, while building homes in Nashville for Habitat for Humanity. And he attributes his longevity to his relationship with his wife of 73 years, Rosalynn Carter. As for Carter, he has said that he knew he wanted to marry Rosalynn after their first date, which was a trip to the movies. “It just never had been my ambi
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, key, rosalynn, carter, jimmy, marry, wife, living, told, think, person, relationship, married, spouse


Jimmy Carter: This is the key to living to 95

Jimmy Carter became the oldest living former president in American history when he turned 95 on Oct. 1.

“It’s hard to live until you’re 95 years old,” Carter told People magazine recently, while building homes in Nashville for Habitat for Humanity.

And he attributes his longevity to his relationship with his wife of 73 years, Rosalynn Carter.

“I think the best explanation for that is to marry the best spouse: someone who will take care of you and engage and do things to challenge you and keep you alive and interested in life,” Carter told People.

The advice echoes that of 89-year-old billionaire Warren Buffett. “You want to associate with people who are the kind of person you’d like to be. You’ll move in that direction,” Buffett said during a 2017 conversation with Bill Gates at Columbia University. “And the most important person by far in that respect is your spouse. I can’t overemphasize how important that is.”

He gave similar advice at the 2009 Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting: “Marry the right person. I’m serious about that. It will make more difference in your life. It will change your aspirations, all kinds of things.”

Buffett was married to his first wife, Susan, from 1952 until she died in 2004. He has been married to second wife Astrid Menks since 2006.

As for Carter, he has said that he knew he wanted to marry Rosalynn after their first date, which was a trip to the movies. They started dating while Rosalynn was a freshman in college and Carter was home for a visit while attending the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis.

The pair married in 1946, and Carter went on to become the 39th president, serving from 1977 to 1981.

These days, philanthropy is a big part of the Carter’s relationship, and they’ve been working with Habitat for Humanity since 1984, building and repairing thousands of homes with the organization. They’re also avid bird-watchers, and told People that they enjoy tennis and downhill skiing.

“I think both mine and Rose’s minds are almost as good as they used to be, we just have limited capability on stamina and strength,” Carter told People. “But we still try to stay busy and do a good job at what we do.”

They often spend birthdays or special occasions alone at home, and keep phone calls and emails to a minimum, he said.

The Carters are also known for living frugally. They live in the Plains, Georgia, ranch house Carter built in 1961, which was assessed at just $167,000, the Washington Post reported in August 2018. Carter also shops for clothing at the Dollar General and flies commercial.

“It just never had been my ambition to be rich,” Carter told the Post.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, key, rosalynn, carter, jimmy, marry, wife, living, told, think, person, relationship, married, spouse


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TikTok has moved into Facebook’s backyard and is starting to poach its employees

TikTok, the upstart social media app, has opened an office in Silicon Valley and begun to poach Facebook employees, multiple people familiar with the matter told CNBC. Along with the new office, TikTok and ByteDance have posted numerous job listings for positions in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to LinkedIn. One person said TikTok has been known to offer salaries that are as much as 20% higher than Facebook’s. Besides its new Bay Area office, TikTok is also planning to upgrade its headqu


TikTok, the upstart social media app, has opened an office in Silicon Valley and begun to poach Facebook employees, multiple people familiar with the matter told CNBC. Along with the new office, TikTok and ByteDance have posted numerous job listings for positions in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to LinkedIn. One person said TikTok has been known to offer salaries that are as much as 20% higher than Facebook’s. Besides its new Bay Area office, TikTok is also planning to upgrade its headqu
TikTok has moved into Facebook’s backyard and is starting to poach its employees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, employees, according, tiktok, moved, office, facebooks, told, app, poach, company, facebook, person, backyard, starting


TikTok has moved into Facebook's backyard and is starting to poach its employees

TikTok, the upstart social media app, has opened an office in Silicon Valley and begun to poach Facebook employees, multiple people familiar with the matter told CNBC.

The Chinese-owned company recently moved into an office space in Mountain View, California, that was previously occupied by Facebook’s WhatsApp messaging app, multiple people told CNBC. The new location gives TikTok a presence just miles from the Menlo Park headquarters of Facebook, elevating the rivalry between the two companies from a battle for young users to a competition for talent.

TikTok was released in 2017 by China-based company ByteDance, which makes a Chinese version of the app called Douyin. TikTok lets users watch and create short videos that are usually set to songs. Across its suite of apps and around the globe, ByteDance now claims 700 million daily active users. By way of comparison, Facebook claims more than 2.1 billion people use one of its apps, including Instagram, Messenger or WhatsApp, every day.

Along with the new office, TikTok and ByteDance have posted numerous job listings for positions in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to LinkedIn. Since 2018, the company has hired more than two dozen employees from Facebook.

The appeal to leave Facebook for TikTok stems from a desire to work at a popular social media company as it goes through an extreme growth phase, two former Facebook employees who are now at TikTok told CNBC. Although Facebook offers unrivaled perks, such as free food throughout the day, TikTok is offering salaries that are comparable and competitive to that of its rival. One person said TikTok has been known to offer salaries that are as much as 20% higher than Facebook’s.

TikTok is interested in hiring employees with experience from competitors who have the ability to fix issues that arise with high-growth technology, one person said.

As it’s been poaching from Facebook, TikTok has hired even more people from other tech companies, including Snap, Hulu, Apple, Google’s YouTube and Amazon, according to another person familiar. These people asked for anonymity when discussing confidential business matters.

Besides its new Bay Area office, TikTok is also planning to upgrade its headquarters in Culver City, California, near Los Angeles. The company will move into a new office there in early 2020 with the capacity for 1,000 employees, a person familiar with the company’s plans told CNBC.

Facebook has yet to list TikTok as a competitor on its financial documents as Twitter and Snap have both done, but the company has landed on its radar nonetheless.

Last year, Facebook released Lasso, an app that is nearly identical to TikTok, except when it comes to download stats. TikTok has been downloaded from the Apple App Store and Google Play by 546 million global users since the start of 2019, according to third-party estimates provided to CNBC by Sensor Tower, an app market intelligence firm. By comparison, Lasso has been downloaded by only 420,000 worldwide users, according to Sensor Tower. These figures do not include Android downloads in China.

Facebook’s Instagram is also reportedly working on a new feature called Clips that copies TikTok’s video-creation capabilities. And in a recent meeting with employees, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company plans to compete with TikTok by beating it in markets where it has yet to gain traction, such as Mexico, with Lasso, according to The Verge.

“TikTok … is really the first consumer internet product built by one of the Chinese tech giants that is doing quite well around the world. It’s starting to do well in the U.S., especially with young folks,” Zuckerberg said.

Facebook did not respond to requests for comment.

WATCH: The most valuable startup in the world?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, employees, according, tiktok, moved, office, facebooks, told, app, poach, company, facebook, person, backyard, starting


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This founder says some of her best hires are people who’ve never had a job before—here’s how they got her attention

Katerina Schneider learned early on not to hire people based on their resumes. These days, she doesn’t care for resumes much at all, and she doesn’t hire based on someone’s experience. In fact, she’s said some of her best hires have been people with no work history at all. Interested job-seekers have also stopped by the wellness company’s Los Angeles office to apply for a role in person. “We’ve had people come to the office and drop off their resumes; we’ve had someone make us cookies,” Schneide


Katerina Schneider learned early on not to hire people based on their resumes. These days, she doesn’t care for resumes much at all, and she doesn’t hire based on someone’s experience. In fact, she’s said some of her best hires have been people with no work history at all. Interested job-seekers have also stopped by the wellness company’s Los Angeles office to apply for a role in person. “We’ve had people come to the office and drop off their resumes; we’ve had someone make us cookies,” Schneide
This founder says some of her best hires are people who’ve never had a job before—here’s how they got her attention Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hires, attention, weve, job, schneider, best, whove, founder, office, beforeheres, person, hired, hire, based, jobseekers, resumes


This founder says some of her best hires are people who've never had a job before—here's how they got her attention

Katerina Schneider learned early on not to hire people based on their resumes. The founder and CEO of Ritual, named one of LinkedIn’s top start-ups of 2019, says focusing too much on a candidate’s previous experience hasn’t worked in her favor.

“I’d say, ‘Oh, this person has an MBA and Ph.D. and works for this big company — that’s awesome! They’re probably great,'” she tells CNBC Make It. “And I got burned a couple of times doing that.”

These days, she doesn’t care for resumes much at all, and she doesn’t hire based on someone’s experience. In fact, she’s said some of her best hires have been people with no work history at all.

“Some of the best people we’ve hired have never had a job before: a designer, some marketers, the woman that runs our supply chain now, were all hired right out of college based on their innate abilities,” Schneider says. Instead, she looks for qualities that can’t be taught, like adaptability and perseverance.

The company, which now has upwards of 70 employees, is still small enough that the best way to kick off the interview process is through employee referral. Interested job-seekers have also stopped by the wellness company’s Los Angeles office to apply for a role in person. Schneider credits her marketing team for creating a recognizable, personable brand that spurs interest among consumers and job-seekers alike.

“We’ve had people come to the office and drop off their resumes; we’ve had someone make us cookies,” Schneider adds. “There’s no end in sight.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hires, attention, weve, job, schneider, best, whove, founder, office, beforeheres, person, hired, hire, based, jobseekers, resumes


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HSBC reportedly plans to cut up to 10,000 jobs in drive to slash costs

HSBC Holdings is planning to cut up to 10,000 jobs as interim Chief Executive Officer Noel Quinn seeks to reduce costs across the banking group, the Financial Times reported on Sunday. The plan represents the lender’s most ambitious attempt in years to cut costs, the newspaper said, citing two people briefed on the matter. It said the cuts will focus mainly on high-paid roles. HSBC could announce the beginning of the latest cost-cutting drive and job cuts when it reports third-quarter results la


HSBC Holdings is planning to cut up to 10,000 jobs as interim Chief Executive Officer Noel Quinn seeks to reduce costs across the banking group, the Financial Times reported on Sunday. The plan represents the lender’s most ambitious attempt in years to cut costs, the newspaper said, citing two people briefed on the matter. It said the cuts will focus mainly on high-paid roles. HSBC could announce the beginning of the latest cost-cutting drive and job cuts when it reports third-quarter results la
HSBC reportedly plans to cut up to 10,000 jobs in drive to slash costs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, briefed, reported, job, plans, jobs, cuts, interim, citing, drive, person, reportedly, slash, costs, 10000, matter, cut, hsbc


HSBC reportedly plans to cut up to 10,000 jobs in drive to slash costs

HSBC Holdings is planning to cut up to 10,000 jobs as interim Chief Executive Officer Noel Quinn seeks to reduce costs across the banking group, the Financial Times reported on Sunday.

The plan represents the lender’s most ambitious attempt in years to cut costs, the newspaper said, citing two people briefed on the matter. It said the cuts will focus mainly on high-paid roles.

HSBC could announce the beginning of the latest cost-cutting drive and job cuts when it reports third-quarter results later this month, the FT said, citing one person briefed on the matter.

Quinn became interim CEO in August after the bank announced the surprise departure of John Flint, saying it needed a change at the top to address “a challenging global environment.”

Flint’s exit was a result of differences of opinion with chairman Mark Tucker over topics including approaches to cutting expenses, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters in August.

The reported job cuts come after the lender said it would be laying off about 4,000 people this year, and issued a gloomier business outlook with an escalation of a trade war between China and the United States, an easing monetary policy cycle, unrest in its key Hong Kong market and Brexit.

HSBC declined to comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, briefed, reported, job, plans, jobs, cuts, interim, citing, drive, person, reportedly, slash, costs, 10000, matter, cut, hsbc


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This is the best answer I ever received to ‘Tell me about yourself’—after 20 years of interviewing

“Tell me about yourself” is a question you’re certain to be asked at any job interview. As the CEO of the world’s largest executive search firm, I have conducted thousands of interviews over the past 20 years. The best — and most memorable — answer I have ever received to that question was: “I’ve climbed the highest mountains on every continent, including Everest.” Predictors of successToo many people respond to “Tell me about yourself” by essentially giving a recital of their resume. More impor


“Tell me about yourself” is a question you’re certain to be asked at any job interview. As the CEO of the world’s largest executive search firm, I have conducted thousands of interviews over the past 20 years. The best — and most memorable — answer I have ever received to that question was: “I’ve climbed the highest mountains on every continent, including Everest.” Predictors of successToo many people respond to “Tell me about yourself” by essentially giving a recital of their resume. More impor
This is the best answer I ever received to ‘Tell me about yourself’—after 20 years of interviewing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, everest, yourselfafter, person, past, answer, ability, candidate, showed, interviewing, question, memorable, tell, asked, received


This is the best answer I ever received to 'Tell me about yourself'—after 20 years of interviewing

“Tell me about yourself” is a question you’re certain to be asked at any job interview. As the CEO of the world’s largest executive search firm, I have conducted thousands of interviews over the past 20 years. The best — and most memorable — answer I have ever received to that question was: “I’ve climbed the highest mountains on every continent, including Everest.” Of course, anyone who is unimpressed by the person who conquered the “Seven Summits” must have foolishly high standards. But the fact that this candidate achieved such an impressive accomplishment wasn’t the reason she stood out from all the rest.

Predictors of success

Too many people respond to “Tell me about yourself” by essentially giving a recital of their resume. This candidate, however, shared something that showed who she really was beyond a piece of paper: a person who was adventurous, curious, goal-oriented and disciplined. More importantly, it was clear that she had the ability to apply lessons learned from past experiences to new challenges. But that’s not all. When I then asked about the first thought that ran through her head upon reaching the summit of Mount Everest, she didn’t wax philosophical or go off about how she’d done something most of us can’t even contemplate. Instead, she laughed and said, “How the heck am I going to get down?” This showed her ability to engage others with humor and humility. I knew right then and there that she was a highly-qualified person anyone would want on their team — and the realization came through an exchange that lasted less than a minute.

Be memorable


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, everest, yourselfafter, person, past, answer, ability, candidate, showed, interviewing, question, memorable, tell, asked, received


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A fired CEO remains the most influential person in the rise of ghost kitchens

Jeffrey MacMillan | Getty ImagesTravis Kalanick may end being known more for supporting ghost kitchens than being CEO of Uber. Venture capitalists interested in food technology are now looking to ghost kitchens to cash in on the restaurant delivery trend. Also known as virtual, cloud or dark kitchens, ghost kitchens are meant to address the demand for off-premise restaurant dining. Kalanick’s interest in ghost kitchens — and disinterest in venture funding — is making it easier for others to find


Jeffrey MacMillan | Getty ImagesTravis Kalanick may end being known more for supporting ghost kitchens than being CEO of Uber. Venture capitalists interested in food technology are now looking to ghost kitchens to cash in on the restaurant delivery trend. Also known as virtual, cloud or dark kitchens, ghost kitchens are meant to address the demand for off-premise restaurant dining. Kalanick’s interest in ghost kitchens — and disinterest in venture funding — is making it easier for others to find
A fired CEO remains the most influential person in the rise of ghost kitchens Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delivery, united, company, startup, kitchens, funding, influential, ghost, restaurant, remains, kitchen, fired, ceo, zuul, rise, person


A fired CEO remains the most influential person in the rise of ghost kitchens

A Sweetgreen location in Bethesda, Maryland. Jeffrey MacMillan | Getty Images

Travis Kalanick may end being known more for supporting ghost kitchens than being CEO of Uber. Kalanick joined the likes of DoorDash and GrubHub in shaking up the restaurant industry with third-party food delivery. After his ouster, he’s kept changing it through a controlling stake in City Storage Systems — the Los Angeles-based parent company to a ghost kitchen start-up called CloudKitchens. The impact of Kalanick’s investment rippled across the United States to New York City, where another start-up was trying to get its feet off the ground. “I think, at that time, Travis planting his stake in the space was a whole new proof of concept, of market validation,” Corey Manicone, the co-founder and CEO of Zuul Kitchens, said in an interview. “Every single VC that we had spoken to since then effectively circled back.” Venture capitalists interested in food technology are now looking to ghost kitchens to cash in on the restaurant delivery trend. Also known as virtual, cloud or dark kitchens, ghost kitchens are meant to address the demand for off-premise restaurant dining. In 2018, consumers spent $10.2 billion on orders through third-party delivery platforms like UberEats and GrubHub, according to Technomic. That growth has left restaurants struggling to keep up with orders. The solution: ghost kitchens. These sites also help restaurants that want to expand to new neighborhoods. While some restaurants and third-party delivery platforms are running their own virtual kitchens, start-ups that house multiple restaurants under one roof are gaining steam with investors. Kalanick has reportedly been ramping up the virtual kitchen business through a series of deals with start-ups in China, India and the United Kingdom. Dark kitchens are relatively new in the United States but have gained more traction overseas in densely packed cities because it makes delivery much more efficient and often these sites can be opened with less red tape than in the U.S. The billionaire is reportedly funding the company through his own wealth instead of seeking outside investors. CloudKitchens did not respond to a request for comment from CNBC. Kalanick’s interest in ghost kitchens — and disinterest in venture funding — is making it easier for others to find funding. Zuul is in the process of closing its second funding round.

The value of restaurant experience

In September, Zuul opened its first location. Sweetgreen, the salad restaurant chain known for lines out the door during lunchtime, is its anchor tenant. Gaurav Jain, the co-founder and managing partner of Afore Capital, invested in Zuul in late 2018, before the company had even signed a lease. After talking to several other ghost kitchen start-ups, Jain invested in Zuul because of Manicone’s background.

Kitchen United’s Pasadena facility Source: Kitchen United

Manicone’s father was an IHOP franchisee and later owned an independent bar and grill restaurant, introducing his son to the challenges of the industry. Manicone became the first employee of Relay Delivery, a New York-based restaurant tech start-up that connects bike couriers to restaurants with delivery orders. Jain said that Kalanick’s investments in ghost kitchens seem to have prompted more interest from the broader venture capital community, particularly with those who did not have experience in food delivery. Jain was on the board of Canada’s SkipTheDishes before its sale to Just Eat, a British online food order and delivery service. For the last five years, Jain has been thinking about the potential opportunity of virtual kitchens. He uses the analogy of Amazon Web Services, the arm of the e-commerce giant that gives companies — both large and small — access to cloud computing. In his mind, Zuul will do the same for restaurants’ ability to meet delivery demand.

They’re not thinking small. They’re thinking big. And they have the restaurant background, they’re not a couple of tech people. Adam Ghobarah GV general partner

Zuul will soon face competition in its home market from Kitchen United, a Pasadena, California-based company that recently closed a $40 million Series B funding round. GV, Alphabet’s independent venture arm, doubled down on Kitchen United by leading its Series A round and co-leading its Series B funding. The start-up has ghost kitchens open in Pasadena and Chicago and plans to open a third in Scottsdale, Arizona this week. For GV general partner Adam Ghobarah, one area of increasing focus for him as an investor is the ecosystem that has developed on top of third-party delivery services. He said he believes that food delivery will displace people cooking in their homes. That belief led him to approach Kitchen United — several times.

Kitchen United CEO Jim Collins Source: Kitchen United

Kitchen United CEO Jim Collins said that the start-up was initially conservative when it came to fundraising. “Early on, we talked to a lot of investors who pushed hard for us to think about making KU look more like this company or that company, who were the darlings of the investment community at the time,” he said. Collins had served as a chief executive for a number of venture-backed companies before switching gears and opening his own restaurant, Town Kitchen and Grill in Montrose, California. Kitchen United’s Chief Operating Officer Meredith Sandland, also has restaurant experience. She served as the chief development officer for Yum Brands’ Taco Bell prior to joining the start-up. “They’re not thinking small. They’re thinking big. And they have the restaurant background, they’re not a couple of tech people,” Ghobarah said. Ghobarah said that Kitchen United also understands the necessity of attracting regional and national chains, in addition to new restaurant concepts that lack consumer awareness.

REEF Kitchens Source: REEF Technology

Another company looking to attract national chains is REEF Technology. The primary business of REEF, formerly known as ParkJockey, is operating more than 4,500 parking facilities. That business helped the Miami-based company net funding from SoftBank, which has also backed delivery providers Uber and DoorDash. The deal, struck in December, reportedly valued the start-up at more than $1 billion. In June, REEF announced its name change and plans to branch out into ghost kitchens, housed in its parking garages, that can host five or six restaurant concepts at a time. “Ghost kitchens are an emerging area, so obviously capital from SoftBank means that we’re looking at very fast growth across the sector,” REEF co-founder and CEO Ari Ojalvo said in an interview. The company has already opened more than 50 of those kitchens across 20 cities in the U.S. and plans to launch hundreds more by the end of the year.

‘Where trends are going right now’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delivery, united, company, startup, kitchens, funding, influential, ghost, restaurant, remains, kitchen, fired, ceo, zuul, rise, person


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LGBT workers head to Supreme Court for blockbuster discrimination cases: ‘I’ll be that person to stand up’

Now Bostock’s firing is at the center of a blockbuster set of Supreme Court cases that will determine whether LGBT workers may be fired on the basis of their identities. The justices will hear the cases of three LGBT workers who were fired, including Bostock. sex’ is that it extends to sexual orientation discrimination because sex is necessarily a factor in sexual orientation,” Chief Judge Robert Katzmann wrote. “What I’m really interested in is how you could practically exclude LGBT workers fro


Now Bostock’s firing is at the center of a blockbuster set of Supreme Court cases that will determine whether LGBT workers may be fired on the basis of their identities. The justices will hear the cases of three LGBT workers who were fired, including Bostock. sex’ is that it extends to sexual orientation discrimination because sex is necessarily a factor in sexual orientation,” Chief Judge Robert Katzmann wrote. “What I’m really interested in is how you could practically exclude LGBT workers fro
LGBT workers head to Supreme Court for blockbuster discrimination cases: ‘I’ll be that person to stand up’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: tucker higgins
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LGBT workers head to Supreme Court for blockbuster discrimination cases: 'I'll be that person to stand up'

Gerald Bostock pictured in front of the Supreme Court on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. Tucker Higgins | CNBC

Gerald Bostock was devastated when he learned he had been fired from his job overseeing child welfare services for the Clayton County, Georgia juvenile court system. The role, he says now, was his dream job. He believed working with children was his calling, and that he was good at it. In 2010, his county became the first in Atlanta to supply a volunteer to every neglected or abused child in the system. Bostock believes he was fired for being gay. His termination came in 2013, months after he joined a gay softball league, after a history positive performance reviews. When he lost his job, he also lost friends, his home and his health insurance, he said. Now Bostock’s firing is at the center of a blockbuster set of Supreme Court cases that will determine whether LGBT workers may be fired on the basis of their identities. Arguments are set for Tuesday morning. “Somebody needed to stand up,” Bostock said in a recent interview. “I’ll be that person to stand up so that nobody has to go to work fearful of losing their job.” The Supreme Court cases are the first to squarely address the question of whether federal anti-discrimination law protects lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender workers. While the court has expanded the rights of LGBT individuals in recent years, holding that same-sex marriage is protected by the Constitution, for instance, it has yet to apply protections to the workplace. In about half the country, states and localities have passed laws forbidding such discrimination. In the other half, including Clayton County, workers are without protection. “In an era where people want to believe that gay marriage solved everything, this shows that it clearly didn’t. There are many battles left,” said Brian Riedel, a professor at Rice University who studies LGBT social movements. The justices will hear the cases of three LGBT workers who were fired, including Bostock. The other two individuals are Donald Zarda, a gay man who was fired from his job as a skydiving instructor after remarking on his sexual orientation to a female client, and Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman fired from her job as a funeral director after she announced her intention to present as a woman. Ahead of arguments, it is not clear how the justices may come down on the issue. The case is the first major LGBT case to come before the justices since the departure of Justice Anthony Kennedy, who had long been a champion for gay rights from the court. In focus will be Justice Brett Kavanaugh, Kennedy’s replacement, who is believed to be more conservative. “I think that it is actually a case that is pretty hard to predict,” said David Cole, the national legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, which is representing Zarda and Stephens. Asked which justices he is hoping to corral into a majority, Cole said: “I’ll take any five.” The decisions in the cases are expected by the end of June, in the middle of the 2020 presidential election.

Because of ‘sex’

Aimee Stephens talks during in an interview in Ferndale, Mich., Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019. Paul Sancya | AP

The legal question comes down to the language of Title 7 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bars discrimination because of “sex” but does not specifically mention sexual orientation or gender identity. Both the workers and the employers agree that the lawmakers who passed the law did not envision that it would protect gay or transgender workers. But in legal briefs, the workers have noted that the Supreme Court has applied the Civil Rights Act to unforeseen territory before. In the 1989 case Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins, the court ruled that the law also barred discrimination against workers on the basis that they do not conform to gender stereotypes. Years later, the court ruled in the 1998 case Oncale v. Sundowner Offshore Services that the law protected workers against discrimination by members of the same sex. Federal appeals courts have split on the issue. The Eleventh Circuit, which reviewed Bostock’s case, dismissed his complaint. Under the court’s precedent, “discharge for homosexuality is not prohibited by Title VII,” a three-judge panel said in an unsigned opinion. The appeals courts which reviewed Zarda and Stephens’s cases came down differently. The Second Circuit, which heard Zarda’s case, also had precedents on the books which held that Title 7 did not apply to LGBT workers. But after the full court heard the case, it reversed those precedents. “Looking first to the text of Title VII, the most natural reading of the statute’s prohibition on discrimination ‘because of . . . sex’ is that it extends to sexual orientation discrimination because sex is necessarily a factor in sexual orientation,” Chief Judge Robert Katzmann wrote. He added that “sexual orientation discrimination is predicated on assumptions about how persons of a certain sex can or should be, which is an impermissible basis for adverse employment actions.” Likewise, in Stephens’s case, the Sixth Circuit held that firing someone based on their transitioning status is by definition discrimination based on sex stereotypes. “There is no way to disaggregate discrimination on the basis of transgender status from discrimination on the basis of gender non-conformity, and we see no reason to try,” Circuit Judge Karen Moore wrote. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a federal agency, has also said that Title 7 forbids gender identity and sexual orientation discrimination, though the Trump administration, via the Department of Justice, has taken the opposite view. “Even if sexual orientation were a ‘function’ of sex, that would be insufficient, standing alone, to violate Title VII; otherwise, all sex-specific practices, including bathrooms, dress codes, and physical fitness standards, would be unlawful,” Solicitor General Noel Francisco wrote in a brief with the top court. Francisco argued that the top court’s prohibition on discriminating based on sex stereotypes likewise does not forbid discriminating based on gender identity or sexual orientation. While Title 7 protects men from being fired for being effeminate, that protection applies equally to straight and gay employees, he wrote. Sunu Chandy, the legal director for the National Women’s Law Center, which filed a brief in support of the employees, said she will be looking at whether the justices ask questions about the practicality of such distinctions during arguments. Adopting such a standard, she said, would “throw into havoc civil rights protections that have been precedent for decades.” “What I’m really interested in is how you could practically exclude LGBT workers from these civil rights protections that we all enjoy?” she said. “If there is someone who does not comply with sex stereotypes, the employer could then say, ‘[you were fired] because I thought you were gay,’ and get a free pass.”

Businesses support LGBT workers


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, head, orientation, workers, discrimination, sexual, lgbt, sex, ill, court, cases, case, stand, gay, fired, person, supreme


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Trump claims whistleblower source committed ‘treason,’ suggests harsh punishment, reports say

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters after arriving aboard Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, September 26, 2019. Jonathan Ernst | ReutersPresident Donald Trump on Thursday raged about a whistleblower’s bombshell complaint at a fundraising event, comparing its sources to spies and suggesting that they committed “treason,” several reports said. The New York Times, which published a similar account of Trump’s remarks, reported that Trump’s comment “stunned people in the audience.


President Donald Trump speaks to reporters after arriving aboard Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, September 26, 2019. Jonathan Ernst | ReutersPresident Donald Trump on Thursday raged about a whistleblower’s bombshell complaint at a fundraising event, comparing its sources to spies and suggesting that they committed “treason,” several reports said. The New York Times, which published a similar account of Trump’s remarks, reported that Trump’s comment “stunned people in the audience.
Trump claims whistleblower source committed ‘treason,’ suggests harsh punishment, reports say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, united, donald, treason, times, complaint, committed, punishment, suggests, trumps, say, person, whistleblower, harsh, york, source, trump, reports


Trump claims whistleblower source committed 'treason,' suggests harsh punishment, reports say

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters after arriving aboard Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, September 26, 2019. Jonathan Ernst | Reuters

President Donald Trump on Thursday raged about a whistleblower’s bombshell complaint at a fundraising event, comparing its sources to spies and suggesting that they committed “treason,” several reports said. Trump fumed about the whistleblower, who is a member of the intelligence community, as the explosive complaint about Trump’s actions became public Thursday morning. The complaint alleges that Trump has been engaged in an effort to get Ukraine to investigate a leading political opponent, former Vice President Joe Biden, and that White House officials took steps to cover up evidence of that effort.

“I want to know who’s the person, who’s the person who gave the whistle-blower the information? Because that’s close to a spy,” Trump said at a private breakfast for staff from the United States Mission in New York, according to the Los Angeles Times.

“You know what we used to do in the old days when we were smart? Right? The spies and treason, we used to handle it a little differently than we do now,” Trump said, according to the LA Times. The New York Times, which published a similar account of Trump’s remarks, reported that Trump’s comment “stunned people in the audience.” The New York Times article cited a person briefed on what took place, who had notes of what Trump said. Diplomats attending were taken aback to hear such explicitly political comments and attacks on the president’s perceived enemies during an event for government workers, an official told NBC News The crowd at the breakfast included the United States ambassador to the United Nations, Kelly Craft.

Photo illustration on September 26, 2019 shows redacted pages of the whistleblower complaint referring to President Donald Trump’s call with his Ukrainian counterpart Volodymyr Zelensky. Eva Hambach | AFP | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, united, donald, treason, times, complaint, committed, punishment, suggests, trumps, say, person, whistleblower, harsh, york, source, trump, reports


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Jamie Dimon says US trade deal with China ‘unlikely’ before 2020 election

Jamie Dimon said its unlikely that the U.S. and China will agree on a trade deal before the 2020 election. “But I hope after that we have a fair trade deal.” Dimon didn’t elaborate on why he thought an agreement between the world’s two biggest economies was unlikely to happen soon. “They should take trade more seriously than they have,” Dimon said of China. Trade has never been reciprocal, but closer to reciprocal in a way that’s good for everybody” is the goal, he said.


Jamie Dimon said its unlikely that the U.S. and China will agree on a trade deal before the 2020 election. “But I hope after that we have a fair trade deal.” Dimon didn’t elaborate on why he thought an agreement between the world’s two biggest economies was unlikely to happen soon. “They should take trade more seriously than they have,” Dimon said of China. Trade has never been reciprocal, but closer to reciprocal in a way that’s good for everybody” is the goal, he said.
Jamie Dimon says US trade deal with China ‘unlikely’ before 2020 election Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: hugh son
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, china, dimon, 2020, unlikely, reciprocal, jamie, election, happen, trade, dont, person, fair, gdp


Jamie Dimon says US trade deal with China 'unlikely' before 2020 election

Jamie Dimon said its unlikely that the U.S. and China will agree on a trade deal before the 2020 election.

“I don’t expect it to happen before the elections, tell you the truth,” Dimon, CEO and chairman of J.P. Morgan Chase, said Wednesday at the Bloomberg Global Business Forum in New York. “But I hope after that we have a fair trade deal.”

Dimon didn’t elaborate on why he thought an agreement between the world’s two biggest economies was unlikely to happen soon. But analysts have speculated that the Chinese government may want to wait for the outcome of what will be a contentious election before coming to terms with the U.S. on trade.

“They should take trade more seriously than they have,” Dimon said of China. “Fair means kind of reciprocal. Trade has never been reciprocal, but closer to reciprocal in a way that’s good for everybody” is the goal, he said.

Dimon added that the U.S. is in a superior position to China in many respects.

“People should look at China a little bit differently,” he said. “I say this out of respect. They don’t have enough food, water and energy. Their neighbors are really complicated, including the Koreas, Japan, Indonesia, Vietnam, Pakistan, India and Russia. They have 500 million people living in poverty and a GDP per person of $10,000.”

He concluded: “Even if we do a crappy job running this country for the next 30 years, our GDP per person will be three times theirs 30 years from now.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: hugh son
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, china, dimon, 2020, unlikely, reciprocal, jamie, election, happen, trade, dont, person, fair, gdp


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No Leftovers founder: You can reinvent last night’s dinner for less than $1 a person

Jackie Gebel, the founder of No Leftovers, never felt shame in leaving a restaurant with a doggie bag. Jackie Gebel and Robby Miller, the couple behind No Leftovers, creating content for their Instagram. Courtesy Jackie Gebel and Robby MillerThe No Leftover’s founder spoke to Grow about her best tips for saving time and money on food preparation and fresh ingredients. Jackie Gebel, No Leftovers founder. How to reinvent last-night’s leftovers for less than $1Graphic preview Leftovers Fried Rice J


Jackie Gebel, the founder of No Leftovers, never felt shame in leaving a restaurant with a doggie bag. Jackie Gebel and Robby Miller, the couple behind No Leftovers, creating content for their Instagram. Courtesy Jackie Gebel and Robby MillerThe No Leftover’s founder spoke to Grow about her best tips for saving time and money on food preparation and fresh ingredients. Jackie Gebel, No Leftovers founder. How to reinvent last-night’s leftovers for less than $1Graphic preview Leftovers Fried Rice J
No Leftovers founder: You can reinvent last night’s dinner for less than $1 a person Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-31  Authors: sofia pitt, jackie gebel, aditi shrikant, lance lambert, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gebel, nights, leftovers, rice, jackie, reinvent, miller, person, tablespoon, founder, leftover, sesame, oil, food, dinner


No Leftovers founder: You can reinvent last night's dinner for less than $1 a person

Jackie Gebel, the founder of No Leftovers, never felt shame in leaving a restaurant with a doggie bag. “People are so embarrassed to take leftovers home,” she told Grow. In 2012, Gebel — who says repurposing food makes her feel at her most creative — turned her passion into a project when she launched a monthly email blast to friends and family with restaurant recommendations. Her emails quickly developed a following, and two years later, Gebel created the No Leftovers Instagram account and blog. Today, she shares her dining experiences and recipes with her 425,000 followers. Gebel’s former side hustle is now a full-fledged business, which she runs with her fiancé, Robby Miller. Their success has led to appearances on Food Network and “The Dr. Oz Show, ” and to mentions in various publications including Bon Appetit. Gebel was also recognized as a 2017 “Foodie of the Year” by Zagat.

Jackie Gebel and Robby Miller, the couple behind No Leftovers, creating content for their Instagram. Courtesy Jackie Gebel and Robby Miller

The No Leftover’s founder spoke to Grow about her best tips for saving time and money on food preparation and fresh ingredients. And if you want to make the most of your own doggie bag, Gebel also shared one of her leftover transformation recipes, below.

Taking a leap of faith for leftovers

While earning her reputation as a foodie via her email blasts, Gebel worked in social media management in Manhattan. Her job helped her see an opportunity to turn her love of food into a side hustle, and, inspired, she launched No Leftovers in 2014. In 2015, No Leftovers caught the attention of Becca PR, a creative marketing agency. Gebel accepted a job there working in social media management, with a focus on food. That on-the-job learning helped accelerate No Leftovers’ growth, Gebel says. “Find paid work in something related to your side hustle. You can learn so much,” she recommends. When Gebel began working for herself in 2017, the transition wasn’t easy, she says. Before taking No Leftovers full time, she saved up two months income and came up with creative tactics to pinch pennies.

Jackie Gebel, No Leftovers founder. Courtesy Jackie Gebel

‘Throw an egg on it’

One way Gebel and Miller save on food is by transforming leftovers into fried rice: “Whatever you’ve got at home, it can take it,” she says. “Shrimp scampi? Turkey burger? Peking duck? Yup! Last night’s Brussels sprouts? Works for us! Top it with an egg and whatever veggies and herbs you’ve got, and that’s a meal!” When the couple cooks at home, they cut costs by buying long-shelf-life pantry ingredients like nuts, dried fruits, and grains in bulk on Amazon. At the grocery shop, they use their store discount cards to buy low-cost staples, like eggs, rice, and sweet potatoes: “They’re superhealthy and versatile, and literally the base of the majority of our last-minute meals, ” Gebel says. Instead of cooking with expensive proteins like meat, she says throwing in an egg “makes anything into a more filling meal.”

Throw an egg on it. It makes anything into a more filling meal. Jackie Gebel No Leftovers founder

Frugal food travel tips

Gebel and Miller are also avid travelers, and to save money on the road, Gebel says they bring their own food to the airport and stick to the complimentary breakfasts at their hotels. While traveling, Gebel suggests eating at local food spots, not tourist traps. For example, while the couple was in Tokyo last year, one of their Instagram followers suggested a restaurant called Sukeroku. There, they paid a total of $120 for a high-end Omakase meal for two with sake, an experience that tends to run upwards of $180. Gebel called it “the best dining experience of all time.”

How to reinvent last-night’s leftovers for less than $1

Graphic preview Leftovers Fried Rice Jackie Gebel @noleftovers 20 min. 2 servings $0.93 per serving Ingredients Prices based on national averages. Leftover chicken schnitzel, chopped

Leftover roasted potatoes, chopped

1 large bunch scallions, chopped $0.25

½ medium red onion, chopped $0.20

3 large eggs, beaten $0.22

½ tablespoon sugar

3 teaspoons soy sauce

1 1-inch piece ginger, grated $0.39

2 garlic cloves, chopped $0.09

3 tablespoons coconut oil, divided $0.15

2 cups cooked leftover rice

1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil $0.23

1 tablespoon rice vinegar $0.16

1 teaspoon sesame seeds $0.15

1 teaspoon cilantro $0.03 Directions In a small bowl, combine sugar, 2 teaspoons of soy sauce, ginger, and garlic.

Heat your wok or nonstick pan on high. Once the pan is hot, add 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Add red onions and cook until they begin to get translucent.

Add remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil into the skillet and turn the heat to medium/low.

Add eggs and stir constantly with a spatula for about 30 seconds, or until it begins to resemble scrambled eggs.

Add 2 cups of rice and the remaining 1 teaspoon of soy sauce to the pan.

Add leftover chicken schnitzel, roasted potatoes, scallions, sesame oil, and rice vinegar.

Mix and cook for about 5 minutes until the rice is slightly crispy.

Garnish with chopped cilantro and a sprinkle of sesame seeds. noun_Download_205165 Download recipe

Watch how it’s made


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-31  Authors: sofia pitt, jackie gebel, aditi shrikant, lance lambert, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gebel, nights, leftovers, rice, jackie, reinvent, miller, person, tablespoon, founder, leftover, sesame, oil, food, dinner


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