Florida deputy faces criminal charges after failing to confront the gunman during Parkland school shooting

People are brought out of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after a shooting at the school that reportedly killed and injured multiple people. The former Florida deputy who stood outside instead of confronting the gunman during last year’s Parkland school massacre was arrested Tuesday on 11 criminal charges related to his inaction. Peterson, then a Broward County deputy, was on duty as the school resource officer during the February 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School bu


People are brought out of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after a shooting at the school that reportedly killed and injured multiple people. The former Florida deputy who stood outside instead of confronting the gunman during last year’s Parkland school massacre was arrested Tuesday on 11 criminal charges related to his inaction. Peterson, then a Broward County deputy, was on duty as the school resource officer during the February 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School bu
Florida deputy faces criminal charges after failing to confront the gunman during Parkland school shooting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, failing, tony, shooting, criminal, peterson, charges, stoneman, parkland, statement, deputy, gunman, florida, faces, 17, school, confront, state


Florida deputy faces criminal charges after failing to confront the gunman during Parkland school shooting

People are brought out of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after a shooting at the school that reportedly killed and injured multiple people.

The former Florida deputy who stood outside instead of confronting the gunman during last year’s Parkland school massacre was arrested Tuesday on 11 criminal charges related to his inaction.

Broward State Attorney Mike Satz said in a statement that 56-year-old Scot Peterson faces child neglect, culpable negligence and perjury charges that carry a combined potential maximum prison sentence of nearly 100 years.

Peterson, then a Broward County deputy, was on duty as the school resource officer during the February 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School but never went inside while bullets were flying. Seventeen people died and 17 others were wounded in the attack.

One of the victims was 14-year-old Gina Montalto, whose father Tony Montalto said families wanted justice to be done.

“We are happy to see some accountability for this tragedy that took the life of my daughter Gina and 16 other wonderful individuals as well as terribly injured 17 others,” said Montalto, president of the Stand With Parkland victim families’ group.

Peterson’s bail was set at $102,000, Satz said. Once released, Peterson will be required to wear a GPS monitor and surrender his passport, and will be prohibited from possessing a firearm, the prosecutor said.

Peterson lawyer Joseph DiRuzzo III didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. In the past, he has defended Peterson’s conduct as justified under the circumstances.

The charges follow a 14-month investigation by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, according to that agency.

“The FDLE investigation shows former deputy Peterson did absolutely nothing to mitigate the MSD shooting that killed 17 children, teachers and staff and injured 17 others,” FDLE Commissioner Rick Swearingen in an email statement said. “There can be no excuse for his complete inaction and no question that his inaction cost lives.”

U.S. Sen. Rick Scott, a Republican who was Florida governor when the shooting happened, initiated the FDLE probe and said Tuesday in a statement that he was glad the investigation was finished.

“Now it’s time for justice to be served,” Scott said.

Broward Sheriff Gregory Tony said Peterson has been formally terminated, although he announced his retirement shortly after the shooting. Another deputy, former Sgt. Brian Miller, was also fired, although he faces no criminal charges for his actions that day.

“It’s never too late for accountability and justice,” Tony said.

David S. Weinstein, a former federal prosecutor now in private practice, said key to the case will be the culpable negligence charge, which essentially means an “utter disregard for the safety of others.”

“They are focusing on the care he was required to give to the students as a caregiver who was responsible for their welfare,” Weinstein added.

The Peterson arrest is the latest fallout from the Valentine’s Day 2018 shooting. Gov. Ron DeSantis suspended then-Sheriff Scott Israel for “neglect of duty and incompetence” over the department’s actions that day. Israel is appealing that decision to the state Senate and said he intends to run again next year.

The case also spawned a state commission that issued a 458-page report detailing a litany of errors before and during the shooting, including unaggressive Broward deputies who stayed outside the school building and the policies that led to that. The commission also recommended voluntary arming of teachers, which state lawmakers approved this year.

The chairman of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission, Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri, said in an interview that the charges against Peterson are “absolutely warranted.”

“Scott Peterson is a coward, a failure and a criminal,” Gualtieri said. “There is no doubt in my mind that because he didn’t act, people were killed.”

Nikolas Cruz , 20, faces the death penalty if convicted of the first-degree murder charges filed in the attack. His lawyers have said Cruz would plead guilty in return for a life sentence, but prosecutors have refused that offer.

Cruz is expected to go on trial in early 2020.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, failing, tony, shooting, criminal, peterson, charges, stoneman, parkland, statement, deputy, gunman, florida, faces, 17, school, confront, state


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If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users


While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users
If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


If you are a 'Game of Thrones' fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

“Skorverdon zaldrīzoti Daenerys ēza?”

Translation: How many dragons does Daenerys have? It’s not a ridiculous question if you’re a fan of the HBO hit series “Game of Thrones,” which returns for its eighth and final season on Sunday. The language? It’s called High Valyrian, the tongue of the ruined Valyrian Freehold empire, and it’s one of four languages created by linguist David J. Peterson spoken on the show.

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app.

Duolingo first offered lessons in High Valyrian in 2017 and, since then, 1.2 million people have started the course. In the last two weeks leading up to the premier of the final season, Duolingo has seen a near 65% increase in people taking the course, said Sam Dalsimer, a spokesman for Duolingo.

High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. Star Trek fans can find Klingon, a language constructed by Marc Okrand and centered around spacecraft, warfare and weaponry.

To offer languages on Duolingo, the company usually relies on hundreds of volunteers and employees to develop course material and monitor users’ experiences. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free.

“We teach over 30 languages and most have thousands of people who speak them and are capable of helping us teach them.” Dalsimer said. “There’s only one person on planet Earth who knows the language, and that’s David Peterson.”

The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. Martin. Peterson won a contest to develop the more common language used on “Game of Thrones” called Dothraki but was asked to build High Valyrian later in the series. His goal was to create a classic language that could give birth to many others, similar to Romance languages, and Peterson noted it had to fit with the names Martin created for the book, such as Daenerys, Viserys and Rhaella.

There are now 824 words of High Valyrian that users can learn on Duolingo, and that number continues to grow. Peterson said there are now 2,000 words in the full version of the language he maintains.

“With every single language I create I keep working on it for the rest of my life or until I’m not happy with it,” said Peterson, who has created more than 50 languages. “It will basically just be another one of my languages, it’s not like it’s going to get any special treatment.”

When Peterson first encountered Duolingo, he felt it could revolutionize the way people learned languages. It had a great interface, it was free and, as a linguist, it’s the dream for people like him to create languages people would have access to, although he didn’t foresee how popular High Valyrian would become.

Today, High Valyrian has 822,000 active learners, or those who have used the course in the last 12 months. That’s more than Czech, Norwegian, Vietnamese and Hungarian.

“I imagined it would attract casual interest, but I never imagined there would be that many people who would actually be interested in taking the course,” Peterson said.

There is one statistic Peterson is particularly proud of: 44% of users who came to Duolingo to learn High Valyrian went on to practice other languages. While users may not perfect High Valyrian, Peterson sees the language as a “gateway drug” to learners discovering other cultures.

“As we become more economically focused, people view language as a tool as opposed to an art piece in and of itself or cultural history,” Peterson said.

More than 40% of the world speaks one of eight languages, although there are more than 7,000 worldwide. UNESCO, The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, has labeled 2,680 languages in danger as it celebrates the International Year of Indigenous Languages, designed to raise awareness to disappearing languages.

“It’s nice that the UN is putting this emphasis on indigenous languages because people need to start addressing this issue,” Peterson said. “We’re losing them and we’re losing them quickly, and once they’re lost, they’re lost.”

Duolingo has worked with communities and volunteers like Peterson to develop courses in endangered languages, such as offering lessons in Hawaiian, Irish and Navajo, Dalsimer said.

“Those courses are driven entirely by volunteer contributors and for them it’s more about a desire to preserve their language and their culture because they see it as being endangered, and it is,” Dalsimer said. “Languages die every year and Duolingo can help them preserve it.”

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“I remember thinking that if David Peterson ever taught the ‘Game of Thrones’ language I would definitely check it out,” said Andrew Feinberg, a volunteer for Duolingo who has used the app since its beta version nearly seven years ago.

Except when Duolingo announced it would offer High Valyrian courses, Feinberg thought it was a joke. He helped Duolingo develop its Norwegian and Japanese platforms, and he’s witnessed the company’s pranks in the past, like when it offered pirate and zombie languages.

But Feinberg noticed the only contributor to the course was Peterson. That’s when he realized it wasn’t a joke.

Peterson, dubbed by the Los Angeles Times as “Hollywood’s go-to language guy” has created languages for many film and television projects, including the movies “Thor: The Dark World” and “Doctor Strange.”

“I had sort of stalked him on YouTube and watched all those videos on how he created those languages,” Feinberg said. “I was really excited for it. I knew that he was a serious linguist who had complimented Duolingo before.”

Now Feinberg manages learning groups on Facebook for Japanese, Chinese, Norwegian and, a day after its introduction, High Valyrian, which has amassed over 200 members learning alongside Peterson himself, who encourages people to use and develop the language in conversation with each other even if that means moving beyond what he imagined.

“It’s always a little different since I did create High Valyrian and, in a sense, there is an arbiter to determine what is right and what is wrong,” Peterson said. “But as long as I’m here I feel like not only do I want to, but I should be there to try to help people out.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


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‘Shark Tank’: Why Mark Cuban made an $80,000 deal for something called the Shower Toga

The idea for the Shower Toga stemmed from Peterson and her family’s participation in obstacle races and mud runs. Peterson told the Sharks Shower Toga can also be used by people like surfers, hikers and music festival attendees. Peterson also mentions she wants to use Shower Toga for disaster relief, helping those affected get clean and safe. Don’t miss: ‘Shark Tank’: This personal assistant quit her job to solve under-breast sweat and her company did over $1M in sales in a yearLike this story?


The idea for the Shower Toga stemmed from Peterson and her family’s participation in obstacle races and mud runs. Peterson told the Sharks Shower Toga can also be used by people like surfers, hikers and music festival attendees. Peterson also mentions she wants to use Shower Toga for disaster relief, helping those affected get clean and safe. Don’t miss: ‘Shark Tank’: This personal assistant quit her job to solve under-breast sweat and her company did over $1M in sales in a yearLike this story?
‘Shark Tank’: Why Mark Cuban made an $80,000 deal for something called the Shower Toga Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: sarah berger, eric mccandless, abc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, called, peterson, shark, garbage, bag, toga, webb, tank, 80000, cuban, oleary, shower, mark, deal


'Shark Tank': Why Mark Cuban made an $80,000 deal for something called the Shower Toga

The idea for the Shower Toga stemmed from Peterson and her family’s participation in obstacle races and mud runs. After the competitions, they were always left dirty and muddy, with no privacy to shower off and change into clean clothes. Peterson told the Sharks Shower Toga can also be used by people like surfers, hikers and music festival attendees.

O’Leary wasn’t convinced: “Isn’t your competition a garbage bag?” O’Leary asked.

No, Peterson said. “That’s like saying a balloon is the same thing as a condom.” She argued that a garbage bag, has slits on the side and gaps, making it much less private. Judge Lori Greiner added that a garbage bag leaks.

“I love your energy,” O’Leary said to Peterson. “You are really aggressive. It’s fantastic. But I don’t like to invest in products where the competition is a garbage bag that costs 99 cents.”

The other judges were intrigued, however. Shower Toga had good margins, had done $80,000 in sales and had attracted interest from a range of people, including caretakers for the elderly and race car drivers. When asked by guest judge Webb what the business means to her personally, Peterson got emotional.

“Five years ago, I got breast cancer, and I just needed something to bury myself into, ” Peterson said. Peterson also mentions she wants to use Shower Toga for disaster relief, helping those affected get clean and safe.

Cuban and Webb are sold — although they note the name of the product needs to change to convey more clearly what it actually is, they said. Peterson was seeking $80,000 for a 33 percent stake in her company, but Cuban and Webb offered a joint deal of $80,000 for 40 percent. Peterson accepted.

Despite the deal, O’Leary remained doubtful. “Now that she’s gone,” he said, “you’ve bought a garbage bag with a string on it.”

Don’t miss: ‘Shark Tank’: This personal assistant quit her job to solve under-breast sweat and her company did over $1M in sales in a year

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: sarah berger, eric mccandless, abc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, called, peterson, shark, garbage, bag, toga, webb, tank, 80000, cuban, oleary, shower, mark, deal


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‘Shark Tank’: Why Mark Cuban made an $80,000 deal for something called the Shower Toga

The idea for the Shower Toga stemmed from Peterson and her family’s participation in obstacle races and mud runs. Peterson told the Sharks Shower Toga can also be used by people like surfers, hikers and music festival attendees. Peterson also mentions she wants to use Shower Toga for disaster relief, helping those affected get clean and safe. Don’t miss: ‘Shark Tank’: This personal assistant quit her job to solve under-breast sweat and her company did over $1M in sales in a yearLike this story?


The idea for the Shower Toga stemmed from Peterson and her family’s participation in obstacle races and mud runs. Peterson told the Sharks Shower Toga can also be used by people like surfers, hikers and music festival attendees. Peterson also mentions she wants to use Shower Toga for disaster relief, helping those affected get clean and safe. Don’t miss: ‘Shark Tank’: This personal assistant quit her job to solve under-breast sweat and her company did over $1M in sales in a yearLike this story?
‘Shark Tank’: Why Mark Cuban made an $80,000 deal for something called the Shower Toga Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: sarah berger, eric mccandless, abc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, called, peterson, shark, garbage, bag, toga, webb, tank, 80000, cuban, oleary, shower, mark, deal


'Shark Tank': Why Mark Cuban made an $80,000 deal for something called the Shower Toga

The idea for the Shower Toga stemmed from Peterson and her family’s participation in obstacle races and mud runs. After the competitions, they were always left dirty and muddy, with no privacy to shower off and change into clean clothes. Peterson told the Sharks Shower Toga can also be used by people like surfers, hikers and music festival attendees.

O’Leary wasn’t convinced: “Isn’t your competition a garbage bag?” O’Leary asked.

No, Peterson said. “That’s like saying a balloon is the same thing as a condom.” She argued that a garbage bag, has slits on the side and gaps, making it much less private. Judge Lori Greiner added that a garbage bag leaks.

“I love your energy,” O’Leary said to Peterson. “You are really aggressive. It’s fantastic. But I don’t like to invest in products where the competition is a garbage bag that costs 99 cents.”

The other judges were intrigued, however. Shower Toga had good margins, had done $80,000 in sales and had attracted interest from a range of people, including caretakers for the elderly and race car drivers. When asked by guest judge Webb what the business means to her personally, Peterson got emotional.

“Five years ago, I got breast cancer, and I just needed something to bury myself into, ” Peterson said. Peterson also mentions she wants to use Shower Toga for disaster relief, helping those affected get clean and safe.

Cuban and Webb are sold — although they note the name of the product needs to change to convey more clearly what it actually is, they said. Peterson was seeking $80,000 for a 33 percent stake in her company, but Cuban and Webb offered a joint deal of $80,000 for 40 percent. Peterson accepted.

Despite the deal, O’Leary remained doubtful. “Now that she’s gone,” he said, “you’ve bought a garbage bag with a string on it.”

Don’t miss: ‘Shark Tank’: This personal assistant quit her job to solve under-breast sweat and her company did over $1M in sales in a year

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: sarah berger, eric mccandless, abc, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, called, peterson, shark, garbage, bag, toga, webb, tank, 80000, cuban, oleary, shower, mark, deal


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Women could give the US economy a $1.6 trillion boost, says S&P Global CEO

Getting more women involved in the U.S. economy could generate a $1.6 trillion boost, S&P Global President and CEO Doug Peterson told CNBC on Monday. “In our research the last couple years, we’ve been looking at what would be the impact on markets if women had a higher participation rate? And we used Norway as kind of the benchmark,” Peterson told CNBC’s Jim Cramer on “Mad Money.” Better yet, having women enter and stay in the U.S. workforce could add some $5.8 trillion to the total global marke


Getting more women involved in the U.S. economy could generate a $1.6 trillion boost, S&P Global President and CEO Doug Peterson told CNBC on Monday. “In our research the last couple years, we’ve been looking at what would be the impact on markets if women had a higher participation rate? And we used Norway as kind of the benchmark,” Peterson told CNBC’s Jim Cramer on “Mad Money.” Better yet, having women enter and stay in the U.S. workforce could add some $5.8 trillion to the total global marke
Women could give the US economy a $1.6 trillion boost, says S&P Global CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, global, women, boost, told, starts, peterson, really, economy, sp, ceo, 16, workforce


Women could give the US economy a $1.6 trillion boost, says S&P Global CEO

Getting more women involved in the U.S. economy could generate a $1.6 trillion boost, S&P Global President and CEO Doug Peterson told CNBC on Monday.

“In our research the last couple years, we’ve been looking at what would be the impact on markets if women had a higher participation rate? And we used Norway as kind of the benchmark,” Peterson told CNBC’s Jim Cramer on “Mad Money.”

“In the United States, if we were operating [at] the same level of women’s participation as Norway, our economy would be 8 percent bigger, $1.6 trillion larger, than it is right now,” the CEO said.

Better yet, having women enter and stay in the U.S. workforce could add some $5.8 trillion to the total global market cap, he said.

Besides presiding over the S&P 500 index, S&P Global offers a host of financial analytics services to market-watchers, industry bodies and other organizations.

Since becoming CEO in 2013, Peterson has introduced several initiatives focused on gender equality, including this study and a hashtag highlighting the benefits of closing the gender gap: #ChangePays.

“What inspired us is that, as we saw the women in our organization flourishing and we see the kinds of opportunities there are for people coming to the workforce, [it] really, really required us to take a stand,” Peterson told Cramer, acknowledging that he and his company can also do more to hire and promote women.

“It starts with the tone at the top, and we believe that starts with our board, it starts with me, and we also have a lot more to do ourselves,” he said.

S&P Global’s stock inched up Monday, ending the day 0.28 percent higher at $194.13.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, global, women, boost, told, starts, peterson, really, economy, sp, ceo, 16, workforce


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Stagflation is the ‘real potential outcome’ in the UK: PIIE

Stagflation is the ‘real potential outcome’ in the UK: PIIE5:59 PM ET Mon, 11 Feb 2019The U.K. could be approaching a recession “imminently” if it doesn’t go through an “ultra-soft” Brexit, says Adam Posen of the Peterson Institute for International Economics.


Stagflation is the ‘real potential outcome’ in the UK: PIIE5:59 PM ET Mon, 11 Feb 2019The U.K. could be approaching a recession “imminently” if it doesn’t go through an “ultra-soft” Brexit, says Adam Posen of the Peterson Institute for International Economics.
Stagflation is the ‘real potential outcome’ in the UK: PIIE Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, piie, potential, ultrasoft, uk, outcome, recession, real, peterson, piie559, posen, stagflation


Stagflation is the 'real potential outcome' in the UK: PIIE

Stagflation is the ‘real potential outcome’ in the UK: PIIE

5:59 PM ET Mon, 11 Feb 2019

The U.K. could be approaching a recession “imminently” if it doesn’t go through an “ultra-soft” Brexit, says Adam Posen of the Peterson Institute for International Economics.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, piie, potential, ultrasoft, uk, outcome, recession, real, peterson, piie559, posen, stagflation


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Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick defeats Republican Marquez Peterson in Arizona House race: NBC

Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick is projected to return to Congress, this time as a representative of Arizona’s 2nd District, according to NBC News. The seat was held by Republican Arizona Senate candidate Martha McSally, but the race tilted in Kirkpatrick’s favor over Republican Lea Marquez Peterson. Marquez Peterson, on the other hand, is the CEO of Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, an Arizona lobbying group that pushes for Hispanic business and economic development. The National Republican Congres


Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick is projected to return to Congress, this time as a representative of Arizona’s 2nd District, according to NBC News. The seat was held by Republican Arizona Senate candidate Martha McSally, but the race tilted in Kirkpatrick’s favor over Republican Lea Marquez Peterson. Marquez Peterson, on the other hand, is the CEO of Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, an Arizona lobbying group that pushes for Hispanic business and economic development. The National Republican Congres
Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick defeats Republican Marquez Peterson in Arizona House race: NBC Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: brian schwartz, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kirkpatrick, nonpartisan, district, congress, nbc, race, house, marquez, hispanic, arizona, congressional, republican, defeats, democrat, peterson


Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick defeats Republican Marquez Peterson in Arizona House race: NBC

Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick is projected to return to Congress, this time as a representative of Arizona’s 2nd District, according to NBC News.

The seat was held by Republican Arizona Senate candidate Martha McSally, but the race tilted in Kirkpatrick’s favor over Republican Lea Marquez Peterson. Nonpartisan political analysis site Larry Sabato’s Crystal Ball marked the district as “likely Democrat.” The polls had shown Kirkpatrick surging in popularity.

Data analyst Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight gave Kirkpatrick a 96 percent chance at victory. Hillary Clinton won the district during the 2016 presidential election.

The two candidates have stark differences.

Kirkpatrick was once a member of Congress representing Arizona’s 1st District and has wide name recognition. She has run on making inroads in campaign finance reform and the passing of universal health care.

Marquez Peterson, on the other hand, is the CEO of Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, an Arizona lobbying group that pushes for Hispanic business and economic development. She has at times tried to find the perfect balance of backing President Donald Trump’s policies and being critical of his rhetoric direct at immigrants.

“I kind of separate the man from the policy,” she said during a recent Politico interview.

The National Republican Congressional Committee, the House GOP fundraising arm, went on defense and spent just over $1 million against Kirkpatrick, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, meanwhile, has put up almost the equivalent amount versus Marquez Peterson.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: brian schwartz, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kirkpatrick, nonpartisan, district, congress, nbc, race, house, marquez, hispanic, arizona, congressional, republican, defeats, democrat, peterson


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Rising national debt to affect voters’ midterm election decisions, poll says

A wide majority of voters say the nation’s rising debt will factor into their decision during next week’s midterm elections, according to a survey released Tuesday. The poll by the nonpartisan Peter G. Peterson Foundation found that about three-quarters of voters rank the national debt as “important” in determining which candidate to support. The survey also found that voters were more likely to back a candidate who is willing to work across party lines to reduce the debt. More than half of vote


A wide majority of voters say the nation’s rising debt will factor into their decision during next week’s midterm elections, according to a survey released Tuesday. The poll by the nonpartisan Peter G. Peterson Foundation found that about three-quarters of voters rank the national debt as “important” in determining which candidate to support. The survey also found that voters were more likely to back a candidate who is willing to work across party lines to reduce the debt. More than half of vote
Rising national debt to affect voters’ midterm election decisions, poll says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: ylan mui, nick oxford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, election, survey, decisions, debt, affect, national, poll, voters, rising, tax, fiscal, trillion, peterson, deficit, midterm, federal


Rising national debt to affect voters' midterm election decisions, poll says

A wide majority of voters say the nation’s rising debt will factor into their decision during next week’s midterm elections, according to a survey released Tuesday.

The poll by the nonpartisan Peter G. Peterson Foundation found that about three-quarters of voters rank the national debt as “important” in determining which candidate to support.

The number held steady across political lines — Republican, Democrat and independent. The survey also found that voters were more likely to back a candidate who is willing to work across party lines to reduce the debt.

“This election season, voters are looking for leaders who will restore fiscal order and secure our future,” said Michael A. Peterson, the foundation’s chief executive.

The poll was conducted during the past week and surveyed 1,000 registered voters. The margin of error is 3.1 percentage points.

The think tank has long called on Washington to rein in federal spending. But its findings were mirrored in other national surveys this month.

The Pew Research Center found that growing deficits are one of the few issues that a majority of both Republicans and Democrats regard as a major national problem. More than half of voters in a Morning Consult/Politico survey ranked reducing the federal deficit as a “top priority.”

The deficit ballooned by 17 percent last fiscal year to $779 billion, driven by the sweeping Republican tax cuts and more government spending, particularly on defense. The deficit is forecast to hit $1 trillion in fiscal year 2019.

But with the 2020 presidential election looming, both parties appear more eager to talk about costly new proposals than about budget cuts.

The Penn Wharton Budget Model estimates a plan from Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., to give working families a tax credit worth up to $6,000 would cost $3 trillion over a decade. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey, another possible Democratic presidential contender, announced a similar idea to provide $1,000 savings account for every child.

President Donald Trump has floated another 10 percent tax cut for middle-income households. The administration has not released details of the proposal or an estimated price tag.

The cut would come on top of a bill passed by the House that would make permanent the current cuts to individual tax rates. That is expected to cost $627 billion, according to government estimates.

“Lawmakers have made irresponsible fiscal choices that have grown the national debt to dangerous levels, putting critical federal programs and future generations at risk,” Peterson said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-29  Authors: ylan mui, nick oxford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, election, survey, decisions, debt, affect, national, poll, voters, rising, tax, fiscal, trillion, peterson, deficit, midterm, federal


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10 years after recession, here’s how fintech giant S&P Global is hedging against another one

Ten years after a U.S. financial crisis debilitated world markets, financial services and ratings conglomerate S&P Global is putting processes in place to prevent it from happening again, President and CEO Douglas Peterson told CNBC on Friday. “We have ways that our sovereign analysts, our financial analysts, our corporate analysts, energy, commodities, etcetera — they get together and they talk, not just in the region, but also globally,” the CEO said. S&P Global — the sprawling corporation beh


Ten years after a U.S. financial crisis debilitated world markets, financial services and ratings conglomerate S&P Global is putting processes in place to prevent it from happening again, President and CEO Douglas Peterson told CNBC on Friday. “We have ways that our sovereign analysts, our financial analysts, our corporate analysts, energy, commodities, etcetera — they get together and they talk, not just in the region, but also globally,” the CEO said. S&P Global — the sprawling corporation beh
10 years after recession, here’s how fintech giant S&P Global is hedging against another one Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-07  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peterson, china, look, fintech, services, heres, financial, hedging, sp, ratings, recession, global, credit, analysts, giant


10 years after recession, here's how fintech giant S&P Global is hedging against another one

Ten years after a U.S. financial crisis debilitated world markets, financial services and ratings conglomerate S&P Global is putting processes in place to prevent it from happening again, President and CEO Douglas Peterson told CNBC on Friday.

“One thing that’s interesting that we’ve added in from those days is ways to connect the dots,” Peterson said in an exclusive interview with “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer.

“We have ways that our sovereign analysts, our financial analysts, our corporate analysts, energy, commodities, etcetera — they get together and they talk, not just in the region, but also globally,” the CEO said.

S&P Global — the sprawling corporation behind Standard & Poor’s, S&P Global Market Intelligence, S&P Dow Jones Indices and countless other benchmarks and financial technology services — became embroiled in the aftermath of the 2007 and 2008 recession.

The company’s Standard & Poor’s Financial Services division paid more than $1.3 billion in 2015 to settle a lawsuit led by the Department of Justice that accused the segment of defrauding investors using inflated ratings that miscast the credit risks associated with mortgage-backed securities.

Now, Peterson said his company’s over 1,500 analysts around the world are being more diligent about looking for worrisome trends.

“We look for credit indicators, we look for credit bubbles, we look for credit risk,” he said. “And this is something so that it gets then built across the entire practice.”

Still a highly accredited security and bond rating service, S&P Global has also been involved in talks with China despite the hotbed of trade disputes between the People’s Republic and the United States.

The relationship between the company and the Chinese government — for which S&P has begun building a customized ratings system that has worried some investors — speaks to the narrative of China chasing legitimacy and establishment amid global economic disconnect.

“It’s still essentially a bank market when you look at their financial markets. Most of the corporate debt is on bank balance sheets and even the loans, even the bonds are on bank balance sheets,” Peterson said of China. “They need to start incorporating themselves into the global economy and that means they need to have a bond yield, they need a yield curve, they’ve got to have a credit risk curve, they have to open up their capital account.”

Adding that China being “thoughtful” about its financial development, Peterson told Cramer that the relationship would likely amount to more than just an official rating from S&P.

“We think that they’re going to be looking at not just the ratings, but also the data products and other market analytics as well,” the CEO said.

S&P Global’s shares sank slightly into Friday’s close, settling at $206.88. The company’s latest analysis showed U.S. corporate debt at a record $6.3 trillion, a sign that worried some on Wall Street given the high levels of leverage.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-07  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peterson, china, look, fintech, services, heres, financial, hedging, sp, ratings, recession, global, credit, analysts, giant


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Trump administration’s new tariffs hit US consumers less

The latest round of tit-for-tat tariffs hits U.S. consumers less but American companies more, an analysis shows. The Trump administration is trying to reduce the U.S. trade deficit with China and improve intellectual property protection, although many analysts say tariffs are not an effective way to solving those issues. Lovely pointed out that latest list of U.S. tariffs adds more components that U.S. vehicle companies need. Key US products subject to additional China 25% tariff (effective July


The latest round of tit-for-tat tariffs hits U.S. consumers less but American companies more, an analysis shows. The Trump administration is trying to reduce the U.S. trade deficit with China and improve intellectual property protection, although many analysts say tariffs are not an effective way to solving those issues. Lovely pointed out that latest list of U.S. tariffs adds more components that U.S. vehicle companies need. Key US products subject to additional China 25% tariff (effective July
Trump administration’s new tariffs hit US consumers less Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: evelyn cheng, muyu xu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, administrations, peterson, china, latest, hit, trade, products, list, lists, trump, tariffs, consumers, additional, ubs


Trump administration's new tariffs hit US consumers less

The latest round of tit-for-tat tariffs hits U.S. consumers less but American companies more, an analysis shows.

Consumer goods account for just 1 percent of items on the June 15 lists from the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, down from 12 percent on the April 3 list, according to a report from the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

The portion of the latest lists set for July 6 implementation also did not include cellphones, personal computers and laptops, while televisions, air conditioning and aluminum were deleted, UBS economist Tao Wang pointed out in a June 18 report.

Source: Peterson Institute for International Economics.

The revisions follow public pushback and come as Republicans try to hold their majority in Congress during November’s midterm elections.

“They really decided not to go directly [due to] worry about the impact on voters,” said Mary Lovely, economics professor at Syracuse University and nonresident senior fellow at the Peterson Institute.

Last Friday, the U.S. and subsequently China said a first round of additional 25 percent tariffs, each targeting about $34 billion worth of imports from the other, is set to take effect July 6. A second round valued at roughly $16 billion for each country will be implemented at an unspecified date.

The Trump administration is trying to reduce the U.S. trade deficit with China and improve intellectual property protection, although many analysts say tariffs are not an effective way to solving those issues. The trade dispute escalated this week after President Donald Trump on Monday said he has asked the U.S. trade representative to identify an additional $200 billion worth of Chinese goods for an additional 10 percent in tariffs.

Key Chinese products subject to additional US 25% tariff

Source: US Census, USTR, UBS estimates

Despite some reprieve in the revised tariff lists, U.S. consumers will likely still feel the effects of higher prices down the road.

The list raises costs for many U.S. companies sourcing components from overseas. The proportion of intermediate goods rose to 52 percent from 41 percent, the Peterson analysis showed.

Lovely pointed out that latest list of U.S. tariffs adds more components that U.S. vehicle companies need.

Key US products subject to additional China 25% tariff (effective July 6)

Source: US Census; China Customs, MOC and MOF; UBS estimates. Note: For trade data not available from China’s Customs and MOC statistics, we use US Census data as references.

The second set of products also covers electronic integrated circuits, machines and parts for manufacturing semiconductor devices or electronic ICs, UBS’ Wang noted. “They are products the USTR identified as benefiting from China’s industrial policies (e.g. ‘Made in China 2025’),” Wang said.

American farmers still bear the brunt of Beijing’s planned tariffs. Soybeans have remained on both the April and June lists, along with wheat and corn. The latest announcement also added a slew of seafood, and fruit and nuts.

The agricultural duties will affect the Chinese people. So will tariffs on motor cars and auto parts that remained on the June list.

But Beijing “stayed far away from supply chains. They wanted to signal to the rest of the world that they are still a good place to provide value,” Lovely said.

Notably, China deleted aircraft from its latest list. That’s potentially a boon to Boeing, although it still must vie with Airbus for Chinese contracts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: evelyn cheng, muyu xu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, administrations, peterson, china, latest, hit, trade, products, list, lists, trump, tariffs, consumers, additional, ubs


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