Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t


If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders.
Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray.
Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.
It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like t
Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there’s something they don’t want you to see Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


Instagrammers love this iconic spot, but there's something they don't want you to see

If there is one thing that Instagram has shown us is that the world is filled with fascinating natural wonders. The downside? There are few geological secrets anymore. What was once a tribe’s, then a town’s, and eventually a country’s pride and joy is now subject to the whims of the international traveling world — all 1.4 billion of us. Take Norway’s now-famous Trolltunga. Jutting 2,300 feet above the north side of Ringedalsvatnet lake, the natural rock formation resulted from receding glaciers that broke off large, angular blocks from area mountains. It’s easy to see why photos at the site are an instant hit.

Two visitors gaze off Norway’s Trolltunga. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

The serenity. The solitude.

Trolltunga in Hardangerfjord, Norway. Morten Rustad | 500px Prime | Getty Images

The stillness of the remote surroundings. But widen the frame a bit, and that’s not the story.

Tourism explosion at Trolltunga

A decade ago, fewer than 800 people a year traveled to Trolltunga. Next year, that figure’s expected to hit 100,000. Trolltunga was formed roughly 10,000 years before the advent of the internet, but social media has played a major role in its massive influx. A photo there seems to combine everything we’ve come to expect from online travel photos: distant lands, a touch of daredevilism, breath-taking scenery and a soul-searchingly authentic experience.

Trolltunga, from a different angle. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

“Instagram has elevated the interest in the site that really no conventional marketing campaign can do,” said Bo Vibe, head of digital marketing at Fjord Tours. “Getting the ‘selfie’ on the top becomes the end-all for many visitors.” “Facebook has probably had just as much influence as Instagram,” said Jostein Soldal, CEO of Trolltunga Active, citing effective local and national marketing campaigns, word of mouth and the sheer beauty of the area as other factors. Unlike other hotspots of the photo-sharing world, Trolltunga — which translates to “Troll’s tongue” — is every bit as beautiful as photographs portray. But that solemn mood conveyed on social media doesn’t match what’s happening just beyond the selfie-frame.

Tourists wait in line to be photographed on Trolltunga. Kotenko_A | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

As tourist numbers have increased, so have the lines. Visitors who arrive in the summer months have been known to wait longer than three hours to get a photograph on the tongue’s tip. The longest waits often result when good weather follows a long period of rain — and when the average number of visitors increases from 800 to 2,000 per day. Travelers who arrive from June to September should mentally prepare for an average wait of 60 to 90 minutes for a photo opp. “If you are prepared that there will be a line and spend the time just enjoying all the impressive poses many of the tourists are doing, the waiting is not a big issue,” said Soldal. Interestingly, the website for the regional tourism office keeps it real with an expectation-managing photograph of its most famous spot.

Trolltunga’s saving grace – it’s hard to get there

Consistently ranked one of the best hikes in Norway, the journey to reach Trolltunga isn’t an easy one. From Skjeggedal, it’s a 10- to 12-hour hike that covers 28 kilometers and an 800-meter ascent. Hikers need to be fit and equipped with food, water, headlights, hiking boots and other gear. Efforts to inform tourists of this have helped reduce rescue operations from an all-time high of 40 in 2016 to just 12 in 2018. Built in the early 1900s, a funicular called Mågelibanen once made the journey to Trolltunga considerably easier, but it closed in 2012. To date, the only way to reach it is by foot, a fact that suits the local population just fine, says Soldal. “We don’t want more visitors,” he said with a laugh. “Plus, if it’s a five-minute walk, the Trolltunga will lose some of its ‘I did it’ factor.” There is a steep, private road that takes travelers 400 meters up the mountain, but it’s still eight hours of hiking from there. Only 30 cars are allowed to park at a time, and the hairpin turns on the drive aren’t for the faint of heart.

Trolltunga isn’t alone

Trolltunga isn’t Norway’s only site to achieve Insta-fame. It’s common to see photos of breathtaking Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock, that typically look like this:

Norway’s Preikestolen, or Pulpit Rock. Oleh_Slobodeniuk | E+ | Getty Images

But with 300,000 visitors a year — roughly three times as many visitors as Trolltunga — it’s better to assume it will look more like this in person.

Hiikers at Preikestolen. Xichao Yu | 500px | Getty Images

The journey to Pulpit Rock is a less-arduous, eight-kilometer hike that can be completed in three to four hours, making it a popular stop on the tourist bus and cruise ship circuit. Instagram is also rife with photos of Kjeragbolten, another picture-perfect geological wonder in Norway.

Woman atop Kjeragbolten. kotangens | iStock | Getty Images

But behind-the-scenes photos show that the line at Kjeragbolten is decidedly less zen.

Hikers wait in line to take a photo at Kjeragbolten. Courtesy of Ali Ronca at amsterdamandbeyond.com

How to avoid the crowds

For a less-congested experience, one option is to book an off-season tour. Winter tours reward visitors with open trails, little to no waits and beautiful snow-covered views, though the hike is more difficult and conditions can be too slick to step out onto the troll’s tongue. Off-season hikes — from October to May — can be dangerous for novices and should not be attempted without a guide. Early morning starts in high season are also possible, though it adds the extra challenge of hiking in darkness.

It’s an area where all logic says is not a place to settle down. And we have managed it for 8,000 years. Jostein Soldal CEO, Trolltunga Active


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: monica buchanan pitrelli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spot, kjeragbolten, world, photos, instagrammers, line, love, iconic, dont, getty, wait, soldal, visitors, theres, trolltunga, rock


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Facebook addresses antitrust concerns with new tool that lets you transfer photos to Google

Facebook on Monday announced a new feature that lets users take their photos and videos to other services, including Google Photos. Facebook has previously written about the importance of letting users transfer their data to other platforms, a feature known as data portability. Facebook already lets users download a file containing all their data, but it’s not easy to transfer that data to a rival social network. The new tool does all the work for you, at least for photos and videos you want to


Facebook on Monday announced a new feature that lets users take their photos and videos to other services, including Google Photos.
Facebook has previously written about the importance of letting users transfer their data to other platforms, a feature known as data portability.
Facebook already lets users download a file containing all their data, but it’s not easy to transfer that data to a rival social network.
The new tool does all the work for you, at least for photos and videos you want to
Facebook addresses antitrust concerns with new tool that lets you transfer photos to Google Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feature, facebook, google, transfer, lets, portability, addresses, require, photos, tool, antitrust, services, concerns, data, videos, users


Facebook addresses antitrust concerns with new tool that lets you transfer photos to Google

Facebook on Monday announced a new feature that lets users take their photos and videos to other services, including Google Photos.

The launch follows proposed legislation that would require large platforms like Facebook to let their users easily move their data to other services. Democratic Sens. Mark Warner of Virginia and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut and Republican Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri introduced the bill, known as the ACCESS Act, in October.

Facebook has previously written about the importance of letting users transfer their data to other platforms, a feature known as data portability. The company released a white paper on the topic in September after CEO Mark Zuckerberg asked for regulation guaranteeing data portability in a March op-ed in The Washington Post.

Facebook already lets users download a file containing all their data, but it’s not easy to transfer that data to a rival social network. The new tool does all the work for you, at least for photos and videos you want to transfer to Google.

The new feature also comes as Facebook faces multiple investigations into its competitive practices from federal regulators and a large group of state attorneys general. Since anti-monopoly action has traditionally been determined based on harm to consumers, Facebook’s introduction of data portability tools could assuage some antitrust concerns by giving users the option to freely and easily leave if they are unhappy with Facebook’s services. The company might argue that the feature will make it easier for new competitors to spring up if users can take their Facebook data elsewhere.

The new tool will launch in Ireland and be available worldwide in the first half of 2020, Facebook said in a blog post. Users will be able to transfer their information from settings under “Your Facebook Information,” where data downloads are already available. Data transferred through the tool will be encrypted and will require users to reenter their passwords, according to the announcement.

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WATCH: How US antitrust law works, and what it means for Big Tech


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feature, facebook, google, transfer, lets, portability, addresses, require, photos, tool, antitrust, services, concerns, data, videos, users


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Inside Facebook’s efforts to stop revenge porn before it spreads

In interviews with NBC News, members of Facebook’s team tasked with clamping down on revenge porn spoke publicly about their work for the first time. They also interviewed five men and five women in the U.S. who had reported revenge porn to the company. Bowden said she met with some of Facebook’s specialist content reviewers, responsible for checking images flagged as revenge porn. Now, anything flagged as revenge porn is treated with a similar level of urgency as content related to self harm. H


In interviews with NBC News, members of Facebook’s team tasked with clamping down on revenge porn spoke publicly about their work for the first time.
They also interviewed five men and five women in the U.S. who had reported revenge porn to the company.
Bowden said she met with some of Facebook’s specialist content reviewers, responsible for checking images flagged as revenge porn.
Now, anything flagged as revenge porn is treated with a similar level of urgency as content related to self harm.
H
Inside Facebook’s efforts to stop revenge porn before it spreads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: olivia solon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, content, facebooks, spreads, bowden, photos, efforts, porn, facebook, stop, inside, shared, intimate, victims, images, revenge


Inside Facebook's efforts to stop revenge porn before it spreads

People are silhouetted against the Instagram logo at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Michaela Zehara, 22, was going through her Instagram three years ago when an account bearing her name, photo and phone number started following her. “I just had a gut feeling something bad was about to happen,” Zehara, a Los Angeles-based fitness trainer and aspiring actor, told NBC News. Her gut was right. Minutes later, friends and family members started messaging her saying that the account was uploading photos of her naked body that she had shared with her boyfriend at the time. “My vagina, breasts, butt. Everything,” she said. “I threw up, I started crying. For a moment I was suicidal; death sounded a little bit more fun than this.” Instagram took the images down in about 20 minutes, after Zehara and dozens of her friends had reported them. But the damage was already done. “I don’t know who screen-shotted them,” she said. “And he still has the pictures. It could happen again. He has that hanging round my neck.” Zehara was the victim of revenge porn, a form of invasion of sexual privacy and online harassment where the perpetrator — usually a disgruntled ex-partner — posts or threatens to post intimate photos without consent, often with the aim of shaming the subject. To combat this problem, Facebook has built a team of about 25 people, not including content moderators, working full-time to fight the nonconsensual sharing of intimate photos and videos. Each month, Facebook, which owns Instagram, has to assess about half a million reports of revenge porn and “sextortion,” a source familiar with the matter said. The team’s goal is not only to quickly remove pictures or videos once they have been reported, as happened in Zehara’s case, but also to detect the images using artificial intelligence at the moment they are uploaded, to prevent them from being shared at all. The team’s work is complex and culturally nuanced, involving a wide variety of images, vulnerable people and time sensitivity. It’s a problem that requires a human touch on the individual level, but that only an automated system can tackle at the necessary scale. In interviews with NBC News, members of Facebook’s team tasked with clamping down on revenge porn spoke publicly about their work for the first time. They recounted a number of missteps, including a poorly communicated pilot program inviting people to pre-emptively submit their nude photos to Facebook. They described how recent research across eight countries highlighted the cultural variation in what counts as an “intimate” image, which makes it more difficult for artificial intelligence to identify them. And they wrestled with what all that means for developing tools to quickly and effectively take these images down. “In hearing how terrible the experiences of having your image shared was, the product team was really motivated in trying to figure out what we could do that was better than just responding to reports,” said Radha Plumb, head of product policy research at Facebook. But she noted that the problem extends beyond the company. There will always be “malicious actors” in the world who will “figure out how to hurt people in ways that are very hard to predict or prevent,” she said. Facebook’s fight against revenge porn is just one piece of the broader challenge technology platforms face as they grapple with scalable content moderation solutions for ugly human behavior. From hate speech and violence to terrorist propaganda and conspiracy theories, companies including Facebook, Google and Twitter are all trying to teach artificial intelligence how to identify objectionable material. If Facebook can do that with revenge porn, it could revolutionize this battle. But its efforts so far show just how difficult this will be.

Facebook’s ‘greater responsibility’

The problem of revenge porn is not confined to Facebook, as images can be posted elsewhere on the web, on pornography sites, for example, and may appear in search engine results. Some websites have specialized in what tech companies and victims’ advocates call “nonconsensual intimate images,” although the legal risk of doing so has grown. In 2015, a man who operated one such site was sentenced to 18 years in prison in California. (There is no federal law criminalizing the nonconsensual sharing of intimate images, although 46 states have such laws.) Facebook, though, can have a huge impact on victims because it’s where their real-life connections might see an image. “Specialty websites show up in Google searches, but unless you are looking for them no one is going to see you nude,” said Katelyn Bowden, founder of the victim advocacy group BADASS (Battling Against Demeaning and Abusive Selfie Sharing). “On Facebook and Instagram you have your family, friends, co-workers, bosses and your real name. Everybody is going to see.” Alex Stamos, a former head of security at Facebook, added that social platforms have a “civic responsibility” to focus on revenge porn. “Because this type of abuse involves sending images to strangers in the social network of your victim, any app that lets you look up who is in someone’s social network has a greater responsibility,” he said. While other platforms, such as Twitter, TikTok and Snap, prohibit users from posting intimate images, Facebook is alone in developing tools to prevent them from being shared in the first place. In November 2017, Facebook launched a pilot in Australia inviting users to pre-emptively send the company their nude or intimate images. The idea was that Facebook could then block any attempts to distribute those images on the platform without the subject’s consent. The media reaction to the announcement, which CBS headlined “Facebook: send us your naked photos to stop revenge porn,” was, at best, mockery, with prominent publications describing it as “idiotic” and highlighting the risks of sharing one’s naked selfies with the social network. Some expressed concerns that a human content reviewer would look at the images before they were converted into indecipherable digital fingerprints, a process known as “hashing.” But some victims and support groups responded more positively. They saw the pilot as a way to claw back some control from people who threaten to share images. “It’s one way to ensure your photos won’t be reposted,” said Danielle Citron, vice president of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, a nonprofit dedicated to fighting nonconsensual porn. “It doesn’t mean they won’t appear on Pornhub, but it’s better to have something you feel like you can do. You feel helpless and your sexual identity is ripped from your control. It’s psychologically devastating.” Citron said she found the media coverage of the pilot “really frustrating.” “Facebook was unfairly attacked for something that was coming from a victim-centered place,” she said.

What is considered ‘intimate’?

The negative response to the pilot made Facebook officials realize that they needed to know more about the problem. The following year, 2018, Facebook launched a research program, detailed here for the first time, to explore how it could better support revenge porn victims and prevent images from being shared. Company researchers interviewed victim support groups in the U.S., Brazil, the U.K., Bulgaria, the West Bank, Denmark, Kenya and Australia. They also interviewed five men and five women in the U.S. who had reported revenge porn to the company. Among them was a young man whose ex-girlfriend had posted a naked image of him to Facebook that was seen by many of his connections and a young woman who had exchanged naked photos with someone she didn’t know offline, who then started threatening to release the photos to family members if she didn’t give him money. The victims and advocacy groups told researchers that the existing reporting process was confusing and insensitive, particularly at a time of high stress. “People who aren’t familiar with various types of gender-based violence or online abuse can sometimes assume it’s only online, so how bad can it be? But it’s a really traumatic experience,” said Plumb, head of product policy research at Facebook. “Some victims talked about having suicidal thoughts or living in constant fear about their personal and professional reputation. It changes how they view the world around them, causing them to live in fear and paranoia about what other information could be shared without their consent.” Facebook’s research highlighted significant geographical, cultural and religious differences in the types of images that are considered “intimate.” “Originally our policy focused on nudity that was shared without consent, but we found that there are images that may be shared without consent that wouldn’t violate our nudity policy but are used to harass somebody,” said Antigone Davis, Facebook’s head of global safety. Davis gave the example of a woman in India who reported a photo in which she was fully clothed in a pool with a fully clothed man. “Within her culture and family that would not be acceptable behavior,” Davis said. “The photo was shared intentionally with her family and employer to harass her.” The consequences for victims can be extreme. Some advocacy groups noted that their clients face honor killings, disownment by their family or physical abuse.

How AI can help

Based on the research, Facebook has tried to train its artificial intelligence applications to recognize a wide variety of images as potential revenge porn. Facebook’s systems scan each post for clues, some of them subtle. For example, the inclusion of a laughing-face emoji along with a phrase like “look at this” are two potential indications that an image could be revenge porn, according to the company. Once the algorithms flag an image, it’s sent for review by humans. “Our goal is to find the vengeful context, and the nude or near-nude, and however many signals we need to look at, we’ll use that,” said Mike Masland, Facebook’s product manager for fighting revenge porn. Artificial intelligence systems require large amounts of data to learn to distinguish images. To get enough examples, Facebook says it turned to a readily available source: nude and near-nude images uploaded to Facebook that were already flagged by the company’s own human reviewers. As more images are reported, the AI may have a challenge in keeping up, but with more examples it may also get better. “It will evolve,” Masland said. But some are skeptical that AI can effectively identify these images. “Humans already struggle with determining intent,” Sarah T. Roberts, an assistant professor at UCLA who studies commercial content moderation, said. “So how can AI, which is largely based on abstracted patterns of human behavior, be better positioned to know?”

‘A big game of whack-a-mole’

One of the people Facebook consulted when developing tools to combat revenge porn was Katelyn Bowden from BADASS. It was in April 2017 that Bowden discovered that nude images of her had been posted to a website known for sharing revenge porn. “My immediate reaction was panic, embarrassment and shock,” said Bowden, who was a bartender in Youngstown, Ohio, at the time. “The shock evolved into depression.” Bowden discovered that the only way to get her photos removed was to copyright them and then issue takedown notices to websites. But they started popping up on other sites like 4Chan and Discord, a chat platform for gamers. “It was a big game of whack-a-mole,” she said. Soon Bowden started to connect with other victims she found online to help them get their photos taken down, and she created a Facebook group for what she called the “BADASS Army,” which accumulated 3,000 members in 18 months. In mid-2017, Bowden received a message from Antigone Davis, inviting her to Facebook’s offices in Menlo Park, California, and Seattle to talk to the teams about the experiences of her “army.” Bowden said she met with some of Facebook’s specialist content reviewers, responsible for checking images flagged as revenge porn. They had backgrounds in sex trafficking and child exploitation investigations, she said. “I believe they are taking it seriously, but they are looking for a technical solution to a human problem,” she said, suggesting that the company invest in more human moderators.

Robotic responses

Bowden and other leaders of victim support groups consulted by Facebook want the social network to take a far more personal approach with victims. “Facebook doesn’t seem to have a whole lot of empathy,” Bowden said of the language the company uses in its policies and reporting systems. Plumb said this was one of the most common pieces of feedback offered during Facebook’s months of research. Victim support groups said that the language Facebook used did not convey the severity of the situation and at times could be perceived as victim blaming. In response, Facebook has altered the language it uses on its site, in policy guidelines and in reporting tools, with the goal of making victims feel supported, not judged. For example, it deleted a line on the customer support page dedicated to nonconsensual intimate images that stated: “The safest thing you can do is never share something you wouldn’t want other people seeing.” “This is definitely true but not that helpful for victims after the fact,” Plumb said. Facebook has updated the reporting process to let victims file a revenge porn complaint in one simple page, with clear instructions for how to gather the evidence Facebook needs to take action on a complaint. On the back end, the company has made this type of material a priority in queues for content moderation. Now, anything flagged as revenge porn is treated with a similar level of urgency as content related to self harm. If Facebook determines that a user shared intimate images with malicious intent, both the content and the sharer’s account are removed. Victims and advocates say Facebook needs to do more. Two victims who spoke to NBC News said their photos had been shared by their harassers in group chats on Messenger to which they had no access. This meant they couldn’t view or report the content. Amanda, 32, a stay-at-home mom from Lexington, Kentucky, said that even when her harasser did include her in a group chat, Facebook was not responsive. In September, she reported that he had shared photos of her breasts in group chats along with messages describing her as a “whore” and a “slut,” but weeks later the images are still there. Bowden said that members of her BADASS community regularly complain about Instagram’s unresponsiveness. “Instagram is awful,” Bowden said. “They take forever to respond and they are not shutting down accounts that are bad.” A Facebook spokeswoman said that because Instagram shares the same policies and content reviewers as Facebook, it should be enforcing the rules evenly. However, neither Instagram nor Messenger have specific language in their reporting flows to allow users to flag content as revenge porn. Instead they must flag it as nudity or harassment, which means it won’t be given top priority.

The ‘next frontier’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-18  Authors: olivia solon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, content, facebooks, spreads, bowden, photos, efforts, porn, facebook, stop, inside, shared, intimate, victims, images, revenge


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Rep. Katie Hill’s husband claimed his computer was ‘hacked’ before her private photos appeared online, report says

Kenny Heslep’s father, Fred Heslep, told BuzzFeed, “He was hacked is what he says.” “I think he started having computer issues, so that’s what made him think it was a hacking,” Fred Heslep told the site. When BuzzFeed asked Fred Heslep if his son played a role in disseminating the images of Hill that were published, Fred Heslep said, “He says no.” Fred Heslep also said that his son had not contacted authorities about the possible alleged hacking. Hill’s own father, Michael Hill, blasted Kenny He


Kenny Heslep’s father, Fred Heslep, told BuzzFeed, “He was hacked is what he says.”
“I think he started having computer issues, so that’s what made him think it was a hacking,” Fred Heslep told the site.
When BuzzFeed asked Fred Heslep if his son played a role in disseminating the images of Hill that were published, Fred Heslep said, “He says no.”
Fred Heslep also said that his son had not contacted authorities about the possible alleged hacking.
Hill’s own father, Michael Hill, blasted Kenny He
Rep. Katie Hill’s husband claimed his computer was ‘hacked’ before her private photos appeared online, report says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: yelena dzhanova dan mangan, yelena dzhanova, dan mangan, stephen desaulniers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rep, husband, told, fred, hills, report, online, private, hill, house, relationship, heslep, photos, computer, katie, hacked, kenny


Rep. Katie Hill's husband claimed his computer was 'hacked' before her private photos appeared online, report says

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., left, poses during a ceremonial swearing-in with Rep. Katie Hill, D-Calif., right, and Hill’s husband, Kenny Heslep, center, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019, during the opening session of the 116th Congress.

Rep. Katie Hill, who is resigning her seat in Congress following disclosure of actual and alleged romantic relationships with subordinates, is set to give a final House floor speech Thursday — as two reports raise new questions about the possible role the California Democrat’s estranged husband played in her downfall.

The father of Hill’s husband, Kenny Heslep, told BuzzFeed News that Heslep claimed to him that his computer was “hacked” shortly before nude photos of Hill were published online by Redstate, a conservative news website, as well as by The Daily Mail.

Kenny Heslep’s father, Fred Heslep, told BuzzFeed, “He was hacked is what he says.”

“I think he started having computer issues, so that’s what made him think it was a hacking,” Fred Heslep told the site.

When BuzzFeed asked Fred Heslep if his son played a role in disseminating the images of Hill that were published, Fred Heslep said, “He says no.”

Fred Heslep also said that his son had not contacted authorities about the possible alleged hacking.

BuzzFeed noted that weeks before RedState ran the first report about Hill detailing text messages and photos suggesting she had a relationship with a female campaign staffer and a male congressional office staffer, Kenny Heslep had offered some information about his marriage to the host of a local podcast in California.

But the 32-year-old Hill has said she is the victim of a coordinated political attack “carried out by right-wing media and Republican operatives,” along with Kenny Heslep.

She has repeatedly called her estranged husband “abusive” since the photos began appearing.

Hill’s own father, Michael Hill, blasted Kenny Heslep in a statement to ABC News on Tuesday that explicitly accused the husband of sending “revenge porn” of Katie Hill.

“I have remained silent and watched as Katie and our entire family has had to endure the spectacle created when her estranged husband, sent ‘revenge porn’ to RedState and/or some other British tabloid,” Michael Hill said in his statement.

“The fact that Kenny Heslep would do such a thing is unfathomable and appalling, especially considering that they were together since Katie was in high school and this is a woman that he purportedly loved and cared about.”

“Let’s not pretend that her resigning is anything other than the direct result of the actions of a wicked man whose sole purpose in life, after he was dumped, was to hurt my little girl,” Michael Hill told ABC News.

“Evil has many faces and this is one of them.”

Hill, as well as Kenny and Fred Heslep, did not return multiple requests for comment from CNBC.

Neither Hill’s lawyers nor Heslep’s lawyers returned multiple requests for comment.

Kenny Heslep, 36, sued Hill for divorce in July, less than a year after she was elected to Congress, representing California’s 25th District.

On Thursday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said of Hill and the photos of her that were leaked, “It’s shameful that she’s been subject to … cyber exploitation.”

Hill is set to give her final House speech between 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. ET Thursday, according to a press release from her office.

She announced her resignation earlier this week after the House Ethics Committee announced it would investigate her for possibly having a sexual relationship with her male office staffer.

Hill denies having such a relationship with that man.

But she does admit she had such a relationship with a female campaign staffer during her race for Congress.

“Resigning from Congress was one of the most difficult decisions of my life,” Hill said in a statement announcing her final floor speech.

“But I could not allow myself to be a distraction from the constitutional crisis we are faced with and the critical work to fulfill our promises of quality healthcare, housing we can afford and a government that works for the people.”

Read More: Ex-Trump aide George Papadopoulos, who went to jail in Mueller probe, to run for Katie Hill’s House seat


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: yelena dzhanova dan mangan, yelena dzhanova, dan mangan, stephen desaulniers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rep, husband, told, fred, hills, report, online, private, hill, house, relationship, heslep, photos, computer, katie, hacked, kenny


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Rep. Katie Hill admits to having a relationship with a staffer after the announcement of an ethics probe

California Rep. Katie Hill confirmed that she had an inappropriate relationship with a campaign staffer following an announcement Wednesday of a probe by the House Committee on Ethics. “I know that even a consensual relationship with a subordinate is inappropriate, but I still allowed it to happen despite my better judgment,” the letter read. Among the content published by RedState was a nude photo of Hill. “Intimate photos of me and another individual were published by Republican operatives on


California Rep. Katie Hill confirmed that she had an inappropriate relationship with a campaign staffer following an announcement Wednesday of a probe by the House Committee on Ethics.
“I know that even a consensual relationship with a subordinate is inappropriate, but I still allowed it to happen despite my better judgment,” the letter read.
Among the content published by RedState was a nude photo of Hill.
“Intimate photos of me and another individual were published by Republican operatives on
Rep. Katie Hill admits to having a relationship with a staffer after the announcement of an ethics probe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hill, announcement, having, letter, photos, lawmaker, probe, katie, kelly, involved, rep, published, ethics, admits, relationship, staffer


Rep. Katie Hill admits to having a relationship with a staffer after the announcement of an ethics probe

California Rep. Katie Hill confirmed that she had an inappropriate relationship with a campaign staffer following an announcement Wednesday of a probe by the House Committee on Ethics.

On Tuesday, Hill said she did not have a relationship with legislative director Graham Kelly, but she walked back that account the next day, saying in a letter to constituents that she got involved with Kelly “during the final tumultuous years of my abusive marriage,” the Los Angeles Times reported.

“I know that even a consensual relationship with a subordinate is inappropriate, but I still allowed it to happen despite my better judgment,” the letter read.

Her husband, Kenneth Heslep, filed for divorce in July.

RedState, a conservative website, published over the weekend a series of articles and photos reporting that the lawmaker and her husband had been involved in a relationship with a female campaign staffer whose name was not released. Among the content published by RedState was a nude photo of Hill.

“Intimate photos of me and another individual were published by Republican operatives on the internet without my consent,” the lawmaker told The Hill, referring to the materials as a “smear campaign.”

Hill, a freshman Democrat, won the race for Southern California’s 25th Congressional District against two-term Rep. Steve Knight during the 2018 midterm elections. Her victory was among those that propelled Democrats to a House majority.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hill, announcement, having, letter, photos, lawmaker, probe, katie, kelly, involved, rep, published, ethics, admits, relationship, staffer


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Snap shares plunge after Facebook’s latest clone attempt

Snap shares fell as much as 7% on Thursday after Facebook announced the launch of Threads, a new messaging app for Instagram users. The camera-focused Threads allows Instagram users to share their status or quickly send photos and videos to people they’ve added to their list of close friends. The app borrows several elements from Snap, whose Snapchat app focuses usage on sending photos and videos through private messages. The launch of Threads could pose a problem for Snap due to the sheer size


Snap shares fell as much as 7% on Thursday after Facebook announced the launch of Threads, a new messaging app for Instagram users. The camera-focused Threads allows Instagram users to share their status or quickly send photos and videos to people they’ve added to their list of close friends. The app borrows several elements from Snap, whose Snapchat app focuses usage on sending photos and videos through private messages. The launch of Threads could pose a problem for Snap due to the sheer size
Snap shares plunge after Facebook’s latest clone attempt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threads, app, videos, shares, million, snap, latest, clone, attempt, instagram, launch, users, facebooks, photos, daily, plunge


Snap shares plunge after Facebook's latest clone attempt

Snap shares fell as much as 7% on Thursday after Facebook announced the launch of Threads, a new messaging app for Instagram users.

The camera-focused Threads allows Instagram users to share their status or quickly send photos and videos to people they’ve added to their list of close friends. The app borrows several elements from Snap, whose Snapchat app focuses usage on sending photos and videos through private messages.

The launch of Threads could pose a problem for Snap due to the sheer size of Instagram, which claims more than 500 million daily active users. By comparison, Snap has 203 million daily users.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threads, app, videos, shares, million, snap, latest, clone, attempt, instagram, launch, users, facebooks, photos, daily, plunge


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Facebook launches Instagram Threads, its latest attempt to clone Snapchat

TOPSHOT – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the opening keynote introducing new Facebook, Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram privacy features at the Facebook F8 Conference at McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California on April 30, 2019. Facebook on Thursday announced the launch of Threads, a new messaging app for Instagram users. The app will be available for iPhone and Android and should be hitting app stores later in the day. Threads is a camera-focused app that allows Instagram use


TOPSHOT – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the opening keynote introducing new Facebook, Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram privacy features at the Facebook F8 Conference at McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California on April 30, 2019. Facebook on Thursday announced the launch of Threads, a new messaging app for Instagram users. The app will be available for iPhone and Android and should be hitting app stores later in the day. Threads is a camera-focused app that allows Instagram use
Facebook launches Instagram Threads, its latest attempt to clone Snapchat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, snapchat, threads, app, facebook, videos, youre, instagram, latest, clone, attempt, close, launches, users, photos, friends


Facebook launches Instagram Threads, its latest attempt to clone Snapchat

TOPSHOT – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the opening keynote introducing new Facebook, Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram privacy features at the Facebook F8 Conference at McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California on April 30, 2019. – Got a crush on another Facebook user? The social network will help you connect, as part of a revamp unveiled Tuesday that aims to foster real-world relationships and make the platform a more intimate place for small groups of friends.

Facebook on Thursday announced the launch of Threads, a new messaging app for Instagram users. The app will be available for iPhone and Android and should be hitting app stores later in the day.

Threads is a camera-focused app that allows Instagram users to share their status or quickly send photos and videos to people they’ve added to their list of close friends.

“For your smaller circle of friends, we saw the need to stay more connected throughout the day, so you can communicate what you’re doing and how you’re feeling through photos and videos,” the company said in a blog post. “That’s why we built Threads, a new way to message with close friends in a dedicated, private space.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, snapchat, threads, app, facebook, videos, youre, instagram, latest, clone, attempt, close, launches, users, photos, friends


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I made $70,000 through this side hustle at 27—while working a full-time job. Here’s how I did it

I’ve done just about every side hustle you can imagine, from selling Avon products to my mom’s friends to starting an online retail store for bridal accessories. But Onada Photography, the wedding photography business that I started in my early-20s, was my longest-running one. A natural interestGrowing up, my dad was always taking photos of our family. But the idea to turn my hobby into a business came about during a trip to Jamaica for my friend’s wedding. I was more than happy to do it, and ph


I’ve done just about every side hustle you can imagine, from selling Avon products to my mom’s friends to starting an online retail store for bridal accessories. But Onada Photography, the wedding photography business that I started in my early-20s, was my longest-running one. A natural interestGrowing up, my dad was always taking photos of our family. But the idea to turn my hobby into a business came about during a trip to Jamaica for my friend’s wedding. I was more than happy to do it, and ph
I made $70,000 through this side hustle at 27—while working a full-time job. Here’s how I did it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: bola sokunbi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, better, photos, friends, taking, photography, business, heres, money, 27while, job, starting, took, wedding, hustle, fulltime, 70000


I made $70,000 through this side hustle at 27—while working a full-time job. Here's how I did it

Eleven years ago, when I was 27, I reached one of my proudest financial milestones: I had amassed more than $100,000 in savings — and I did it in just three years. One of the biggest things that helped me accelerate my savings was taking on side hustles. I highly recommend everyone consider starting one at some point, even if it’s just for a short period of time. I’ve done just about every side hustle you can imagine, from selling Avon products to my mom’s friends to starting an online retail store for bridal accessories. But Onada Photography, the wedding photography business that I started in my early-20s, was my longest-running one. I did it for seven years, and it earned me the most amount of money of all my side hustles. In one particular year, I made more than $70,000 total. A chunk of that money went toward my savings.

A natural interest

Growing up, my dad was always taking photos of our family. As a result, I developed an interest in photography. But the idea to turn my hobby into a business came about during a trip to Jamaica for my friend’s wedding. I had just purchased an inexpensive entry-level DSLR camera, which I took with me. (From the author’s wedding portfolio | Credit: Bola Sokunbi) As luck would have it, the photographer was running late on the wedding day. My friend then turned to me and asked, “Would it be all right if you took a few photos while we wait for him to arrive?” I was more than happy to do it, and photos I took turned out better than I expected. More importantly, my friend loved them. It was then and there that I decided to make some money out of my photography skills.

A self-taught photographer

Getting started was the biggest hurdle. I was nervous to put myself out there, but I knew that if I didn’t try, I’d never know if it was something I could be successful doing. I created a simple website using the photos I took at my friend’s wedding, set up my first ad on Craigslist and asked everyone I knew to spread the word. I had so much to learn, and I really needed to expand my portfolio, so I decided to shoot the first wedding for free. (Pictured above: The author, Bola Sokunbi) To further build on my skills and knowledge, I read books, watched videos, took workshops and practiced taking photos of my friends and family. Once I had a solid portfolio, I felt confident in charging clients for my services. I charged $300 per wedding. But as I did more events, my client base grew and my services became increasingly in demand. So I finally upped my rates to between $2,000 and $5,000, which was — and still is — pretty standard. Some photographers charge up to $10,000, but it really depends on factors like shoot duration and location.

Slow and steady

If you’re starting a side hustle, it’s important to take things slowly so you don’t operate on a negative balance. It took me about two years to turn a decent profit. My goal was to build a business with zero debt, so I opened a business savings account. Once I paid my business taxes, I invested the rest of the money back into Onada Photography (e.g. purchasing high-quality equipment, better editing software, travel expenses). With better quality equipment and better skills, I had mastered the art of photography. My dedication earned me solid reviews and several awards. (Recognition and awards for Onada Photography) As my business grew more successful, I expanded my services and offered lifestyle photo sessions. (These are less time-consuming and capture day-to-day activities and normal life scenarios, such as family and engagement portraits). I charged between $300 and $450 for those.

Hustling is hard work


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: bola sokunbi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, better, photos, friends, taking, photography, business, heres, money, 27while, job, starting, took, wedding, hustle, fulltime, 70000


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Satellite photos show early devastation of Hurricane Dorian, with much of the Bahamas underwater

A photo from a next-generation satellite gave a first look at heavy flooding across the Bahamas from Hurricane Dorian, as the immense storm brought devastating winds and rain to the islands on Monday and Tuesday. Satellite start-up Iceye shared imagery of the Grand Bahama island during Hurricane Dorian with CNBC. The photo, taken midday Monday from the ICEYE-X2 satellite, reveals Dorian’s storm surge. Iceye outlined the previously uncovered coastline in yellow and roads in white. The company est


A photo from a next-generation satellite gave a first look at heavy flooding across the Bahamas from Hurricane Dorian, as the immense storm brought devastating winds and rain to the islands on Monday and Tuesday. Satellite start-up Iceye shared imagery of the Grand Bahama island during Hurricane Dorian with CNBC. The photo, taken midday Monday from the ICEYE-X2 satellite, reveals Dorian’s storm surge. Iceye outlined the previously uncovered coastline in yellow and roads in white. The company est
Satellite photos show early devastation of Hurricane Dorian, with much of the Bahamas underwater Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grand, dorian, underwater, bahama, yellow, winds, storm, photos, satellite, iceye, bahamas, devastation, hurricane, early, island


Satellite photos show early devastation of Hurricane Dorian, with much of the Bahamas underwater

A photo from a next-generation satellite gave a first look at heavy flooding across the Bahamas from Hurricane Dorian, as the immense storm brought devastating winds and rain to the islands on Monday and Tuesday.

Satellite start-up Iceye shared imagery of the Grand Bahama island during Hurricane Dorian with CNBC. The photo, taken midday Monday from the ICEYE-X2 satellite, reveals Dorian’s storm surge. Iceye outlined the previously uncovered coastline in yellow and roads in white.

The company estimates that, in the wider view below, more than 60% of the Grand Bahama island shown is submerged.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grand, dorian, underwater, bahama, yellow, winds, storm, photos, satellite, iceye, bahamas, devastation, hurricane, early, island


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Dozens of celebrities fall for Instagram hoax

The widely circulated fake post warns Instagram is changing its privacy policy and will make public all of users’ photos, including deleted messages. The hoax post went viral earlier this week, with Energy Secretary Rick Perry sharing the post on his Instagram and Twitter accounts. He later deleted the Instagram post after acknowledging in a comment that the image was fake. Instagram flatly denied the hoax, which has been circulated in similar forms on Facebook over the past several years. Adam


The widely circulated fake post warns Instagram is changing its privacy policy and will make public all of users’ photos, including deleted messages. The hoax post went viral earlier this week, with Energy Secretary Rick Perry sharing the post on his Instagram and Twitter accounts. He later deleted the Instagram post after acknowledging in a comment that the image was fake. Instagram flatly denied the hoax, which has been circulated in similar forms on Facebook over the past several years. Adam
Dozens of celebrities fall for Instagram hoax Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: annie palmer, brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fall, hoax, fake, site, image, photos, instagram, including, celebrities, dozens, post, users, facebook


Dozens of celebrities fall for Instagram hoax

Instagram has been hit by a hoax that falsely claims the Facebook-owned social media site is making major changes to its terms of service.

The widely circulated fake post warns Instagram is changing its privacy policy and will make public all of users’ photos, including deleted messages. It also claims the site can “use” users’ photos against them in court, and says users have to repost the image in order to prevent Instagram from taking action.

The hoax post went viral earlier this week, with Energy Secretary Rick Perry sharing the post on his Instagram and Twitter accounts. He later deleted the Instagram post after acknowledging in a comment that the image was fake.

The fake post continues to be shared by numerous celebrities and high-profile influencers, however, including actresses Julia Roberts, Debra Messing, and Taraji P. Henson, movie producer Judd Apatow, as well as musicians Pink, T.I., and Usher.

Instagram flatly denied the hoax, which has been circulated in similar forms on Facebook over the past several years.

“There’s no truth in this post,” said Facebook spokesperson Stephanie Otway.

Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, also called foul on the hoax in a post on his Instagram Stories.

“If you’re seeing a meme claiming Instagram is changing its rules tomorrow, it’s not true,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: annie palmer, brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fall, hoax, fake, site, image, photos, instagram, including, celebrities, dozens, post, users, facebook


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