Suddenly, every major tech company is building an Apple AirPods competitor

Microsoft is building its own set of in-ear headphones to compete with AirPods, according to Thurrott, a website that follows Microsoft closely. The move adds to the growing list of major tech companies seeking to capitalize on the massive popularity of AirPods. Microsoft announced its Surface Headphones last year, and they let consumers speak to its digital voice assistant, Cortana, much the same way AirPods owners can speak to Siri. In recent years, Microsoft has bolstered its portfolio of pro


Microsoft is building its own set of in-ear headphones to compete with AirPods, according to Thurrott, a website that follows Microsoft closely. The move adds to the growing list of major tech companies seeking to capitalize on the massive popularity of AirPods. Microsoft announced its Surface Headphones last year, and they let consumers speak to its digital voice assistant, Cortana, much the same way AirPods owners can speak to Siri. In recent years, Microsoft has bolstered its portfolio of pro
Suddenly, every major tech company is building an Apple AirPods competitor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: todd haselton, bernd von jutrczenka, picture alliance, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, headphones, company, speak, thurrott, surface, tech, major, building, product, airpods, morrison, suddenly, competitor, popularity, voice, microsoft, apple


Suddenly, every major tech company is building an Apple AirPods competitor

Microsoft is building its own set of in-ear headphones to compete with AirPods, according to Thurrott, a website that follows Microsoft closely. The move adds to the growing list of major tech companies seeking to capitalize on the massive popularity of AirPods.

The product is currently code named Morrison, according to the site. Microsoft announced its Surface Headphones last year, and they let consumers speak to its digital voice assistant, Cortana, much the same way AirPods owners can speak to Siri. Thurrott speculated that they are named for the late rocker Jim Morrison of the Doors

This would mark Microsoft’s second attempt at headphones and would further position the company as a hardware player. In recent years, Microsoft has bolstered its portfolio of products to align more against Apple’s, with its Surface Laptop, Surface Pro and Surface Studio desktop.

Apple’s AirPods have exploded in popularity, and it appears that other manufacturers want a piece of the market, especially among people who might not own Apple products.

The Thurrott report follows another from Bloomberg earlier this month, which said Amazon is planning to launch a pair of buds that are similar to AirPods, and that they would let people speak to its Alexa voice assistant. Samsung recently released its take on the product with the Galaxy Buds.

Thurrott didn’t provide details on Morrison and whether or not they’ll come with a charging case like AirPods.

Microsoft was not immediately available to comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: todd haselton, bernd von jutrczenka, picture alliance, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, headphones, company, speak, thurrott, surface, tech, major, building, product, airpods, morrison, suddenly, competitor, popularity, voice, microsoft, apple


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Suddenly, every major tech company is building an Apple AirPods competitor

Microsoft is building its own set of in-ear headphones to compete with AirPods, according to Thurrott, a website that follows Microsoft closely. The move adds to the growing list of major tech companies seeking to capitalize on the massive popularity of AirPods. Microsoft announced its Surface Headphones last year, and they let consumers speak to its digital voice assistant, Cortana, much the same way AirPods owners can speak to Siri. In recent years, Microsoft has bolstered its portfolio of pro


Microsoft is building its own set of in-ear headphones to compete with AirPods, according to Thurrott, a website that follows Microsoft closely. The move adds to the growing list of major tech companies seeking to capitalize on the massive popularity of AirPods. Microsoft announced its Surface Headphones last year, and they let consumers speak to its digital voice assistant, Cortana, much the same way AirPods owners can speak to Siri. In recent years, Microsoft has bolstered its portfolio of pro
Suddenly, every major tech company is building an Apple AirPods competitor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: todd haselton, bernd von jutrczenka, picture alliance, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, headphones, company, speak, thurrott, surface, tech, major, building, product, airpods, morrison, suddenly, competitor, popularity, voice, microsoft, apple


Suddenly, every major tech company is building an Apple AirPods competitor

Microsoft is building its own set of in-ear headphones to compete with AirPods, according to Thurrott, a website that follows Microsoft closely. The move adds to the growing list of major tech companies seeking to capitalize on the massive popularity of AirPods.

The product is currently code named Morrison, according to the site. Microsoft announced its Surface Headphones last year, and they let consumers speak to its digital voice assistant, Cortana, much the same way AirPods owners can speak to Siri. Thurrott speculated that they are named for the late rocker Jim Morrison of the Doors

This would mark Microsoft’s second attempt at headphones and would further position the company as a hardware player. In recent years, Microsoft has bolstered its portfolio of products to align more against Apple’s, with its Surface Laptop, Surface Pro and Surface Studio desktop.

Apple’s AirPods have exploded in popularity, and it appears that other manufacturers want a piece of the market, especially among people who might not own Apple products.

The Thurrott report follows another from Bloomberg earlier this month, which said Amazon is planning to launch a pair of buds that are similar to AirPods, and that they would let people speak to its Alexa voice assistant. Samsung recently released its take on the product with the Galaxy Buds.

Thurrott didn’t provide details on Morrison and whether or not they’ll come with a charging case like AirPods.

Microsoft was not immediately available to comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: todd haselton, bernd von jutrczenka, picture alliance, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, headphones, company, speak, thurrott, surface, tech, major, building, product, airpods, morrison, suddenly, competitor, popularity, voice, microsoft, apple


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Volkswagen plans to take on Tesla’s Model X in China

Volkswagen plans to build a fully electric sports utility vehicle (SUV) for China from 2021, taking on the Chinese market leader Tesla’s Model X as the German carmaker ramps up production of zero emissions vehicles. The planned new SUV is the latest move in Volkswagen’s aggressive growth strategy in China, where electric cars are given preferential treatment by authorities. VW Chief Executive Herbert Diess said the ID ROOMZ will be the flagship electric car to be launched by Volkswagen in China.


Volkswagen plans to build a fully electric sports utility vehicle (SUV) for China from 2021, taking on the Chinese market leader Tesla’s Model X as the German carmaker ramps up production of zero emissions vehicles. The planned new SUV is the latest move in Volkswagen’s aggressive growth strategy in China, where electric cars are given preferential treatment by authorities. VW Chief Executive Herbert Diess said the ID ROOMZ will be the flagship electric car to be launched by Volkswagen in China.
Volkswagen plans to take on Tesla’s Model X in China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cars, car, production, teslas, china, id, suv, volkswagen, vw, plans, groups, electric, roomz, model


Volkswagen plans to take on Tesla's Model X in China

Volkswagen plans to build a fully electric sports utility vehicle (SUV) for China from 2021, taking on the Chinese market leader Tesla’s Model X as the German carmaker ramps up production of zero emissions vehicles.

The planned new SUV is the latest move in Volkswagen’s aggressive growth strategy in China, where electric cars are given preferential treatment by authorities.

VW said its ID ROOMZZ, which it presented in Shanghai on Sunday, will have three rows of seats and an operating range of up to 450 kms. The concept car is capable of a “level 4 autonomous driving”, VW said.

VW Chief Executive Herbert Diess said the ID ROOMZ will be the flagship electric car to be launched by Volkswagen in China.

“We plan to produce more than 22 million electric cars in the next 10 years,” Diess said, adding that around half of VW’s engineers were working on products destined for China.

Diess said the ID ROOMZ would eventually be rolled out to other markets.

To enhance the VW Group’s research and development capabilities, Volkswagen and its premium brand Audi will combine their R&D operations in China.

VW brand’s head of e-mobility Thomas Ulbrich said the carmaker will start ramping up production of 33 electric cars by mid-2023, using VW Group’s modular electric car (MEB) platform to build electric cars for the Skoda, Seat, Audi and VW brands.

Ulbrich said VW Group is converting 16 factories worldwide to enable mass production of electric vehicles, of which eight plants will be making VW branded car.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cars, car, production, teslas, china, id, suv, volkswagen, vw, plans, groups, electric, roomz, model


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The Trump administration is forcing this health start-up that took Chinese money into a fire sale

As the Trump administration cracks down on Chinese investment in corporate America, one health tech start-up is facing an abnormal situation: PatientsLikeMe is being forced to find a buyer after the U.S. government has ordered its majority owner, a Chinese firm, to divest its stake. In 2017, the start-up raised $100 million and sold a majority stake to Shenzhen-based iCarbonX, which was started by genomic scientist Jun Wang and is backed by Chinese giant Tencent. CFIUS is now forcing a divestitu


As the Trump administration cracks down on Chinese investment in corporate America, one health tech start-up is facing an abnormal situation: PatientsLikeMe is being forced to find a buyer after the U.S. government has ordered its majority owner, a Chinese firm, to divest its stake. In 2017, the start-up raised $100 million and sold a majority stake to Shenzhen-based iCarbonX, which was started by genomic scientist Jun Wang and is backed by Chinese giant Tencent. CFIUS is now forcing a divestitu
The Trump administration is forcing this health start-up that took Chinese money into a fire sale Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: christina farr, ari levy, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images, michael kappeler, picture alliance
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, forcing, rhodium, took, billion, majority, icarbonx, sale, money, patientslikeme, chinese, administration, investment, started, startup, health, trump


The Trump administration is forcing this health start-up that took Chinese money into a fire sale

As the Trump administration cracks down on Chinese investment in corporate America, one health tech start-up is facing an abnormal situation: PatientsLikeMe is being forced to find a buyer after the U.S. government has ordered its majority owner, a Chinese firm, to divest its stake.

PatientsLikeMe provides an online service that helps patients find people with similar health conditions. In 2017, the start-up raised $100 million and sold a majority stake to Shenzhen-based iCarbonX, which was started by genomic scientist Jun Wang and is backed by Chinese giant Tencent.

That deal has recently drawn the attention of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), which is aggressively cracking down on Chinese investments in American companies, particularly when national security and trade secrets are at risk.

CFIUS is now forcing a divestiture by iCarbonX, meaning PatientsLikeMe has to find a buyer, according to several people with knowledge of the matter. PatientsLikeMe started receiving notifications from CFIUS late last year, said the people, who asked not to be named because the details are confidential.

The move could have dire implications for the start-up community, as Chinese investors are scared away or forbidden from participating in deals that can help emerging businesses.

As a result of the Trump administration’s clampdown, Chinese direct investment in the U.S. has plummeted 90 percent in two years, from $46 billion in 2016 to $4.8 billion in 2018, according to data from research firm Rhodium Group. Another $20 billion in divestitures is still pending, says Rhodium.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: christina farr, ari levy, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images, michael kappeler, picture alliance
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, forcing, rhodium, took, billion, majority, icarbonx, sale, money, patientslikeme, chinese, administration, investment, started, startup, health, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

What Europe’s copyright overhaul means for YouTube, Facebook and the way you use the internet

If you’re an internet user in Europe, chances are the way you use platforms like YouTube and Facebook could be about to shift drastically in the coming years. The European Parliament recently passed sweeping changes to the EU’s almost two decades-old copyright rules, and critics are worried it could be a misfire that ultimately results in online censorship. With the new rules, liability now lies with tech giants to ensure their platforms aren’t open to copyright breaches. Detractors have said th


If you’re an internet user in Europe, chances are the way you use platforms like YouTube and Facebook could be about to shift drastically in the coming years. The European Parliament recently passed sweeping changes to the EU’s almost two decades-old copyright rules, and critics are worried it could be a misfire that ultimately results in online censorship. With the new rules, liability now lies with tech giants to ensure their platforms aren’t open to copyright breaches. Detractors have said th
What Europe’s copyright overhaul means for YouTube, Facebook and the way you use the internet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: ryan browne, robert michael, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, european, overhaul, youtube, facebook, europes, copyright, theyre, pull, particular, way, means, platforms, rules, internet, tech


What Europe's copyright overhaul means for YouTube, Facebook and the way you use the internet

If you’re an internet user in Europe, chances are the way you use platforms like YouTube and Facebook could be about to shift drastically in the coming years.

The European Parliament recently passed sweeping changes to the EU’s almost two decades-old copyright rules, and critics are worried it could be a misfire that ultimately results in online censorship.

The aptly-named directive on “Copyright in the Digital Single Market” is all part of the bloc’s efforts to update its laws to reflect the challenges posed by the age of information.

First introduced by the European Commission in 2016, the new copyright law contains two particular sections that have attracted heavy scrutiny from activists and internet giants alike: Articles 11 and 13 (or 15 and 17 as they’re now numbered after a recent update).

The former is aimed at giving news organizations more protections to ensure they’re paid fairly for the dissemination of their stories online. Services like Google News will be under particular pressure, as the rules will mean tech firms need to agree to licenses with publishers to share their articles.

In fact, Google has gone as far as to suggest that it may even be forced to pull its news aggregation platform from Europe as a result of the new legislation.

But the biggest source of worry for the people and companies protesting the new measures by far is Article 13. Currently, the onus is on rightsholders to flag copyright violations with tech firms, who can then take action to pull content if they find it’s in breach of copyright.

With the new rules, liability now lies with tech giants to ensure their platforms aren’t open to copyright breaches. Detractors have said this would lead to controversial pre-filter systems, where everything from memes to GIFs are blocked from online platforms.

For its part, the European Parliament has said this won’t be the case, and that memes, GIFs, hyperlinks and snippets of articles will still be able to be shared freely. But that hasn’t allayed the concerns of tech companies, freedom of speech campaigners and regular internet users themselves.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: ryan browne, robert michael, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, european, overhaul, youtube, facebook, europes, copyright, theyre, pull, particular, way, means, platforms, rules, internet, tech


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

What Europe’s copyright overhaul means for YouTube, Facebook and the way you use the internet

If you’re an internet user in Europe, chances are the way you use platforms like YouTube and Facebook could be about to shift drastically in the coming years. The European Parliament recently passed sweeping changes to the EU’s almost two decades-old copyright rules, and critics are worried it could be a misfire that ultimately results in online censorship. With the new rules, liability now lies with tech giants to ensure their platforms aren’t open to copyright breaches. Detractors have said th


If you’re an internet user in Europe, chances are the way you use platforms like YouTube and Facebook could be about to shift drastically in the coming years. The European Parliament recently passed sweeping changes to the EU’s almost two decades-old copyright rules, and critics are worried it could be a misfire that ultimately results in online censorship. With the new rules, liability now lies with tech giants to ensure their platforms aren’t open to copyright breaches. Detractors have said th
What Europe’s copyright overhaul means for YouTube, Facebook and the way you use the internet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: ryan browne, robert michael, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, european, overhaul, youtube, facebook, europes, copyright, theyre, pull, particular, way, means, platforms, rules, internet, tech


What Europe's copyright overhaul means for YouTube, Facebook and the way you use the internet

If you’re an internet user in Europe, chances are the way you use platforms like YouTube and Facebook could be about to shift drastically in the coming years.

The European Parliament recently passed sweeping changes to the EU’s almost two decades-old copyright rules, and critics are worried it could be a misfire that ultimately results in online censorship.

The aptly-named directive on “Copyright in the Digital Single Market” is all part of the bloc’s efforts to update its laws to reflect the challenges posed by the age of information.

First introduced by the European Commission in 2016, the new copyright law contains two particular sections that have attracted heavy scrutiny from activists and internet giants alike: Articles 11 and 13 (or 15 and 17 as they’re now numbered after a recent update).

The former is aimed at giving news organizations more protections to ensure they’re paid fairly for the dissemination of their stories online. Services like Google News will be under particular pressure, as the rules will mean tech firms need to agree to licenses with publishers to share their articles.

In fact, Google has gone as far as to suggest that it may even be forced to pull its news aggregation platform from Europe as a result of the new legislation.

But the biggest source of worry for the people and companies protesting the new measures by far is Article 13. Currently, the onus is on rightsholders to flag copyright violations with tech firms, who can then take action to pull content if they find it’s in breach of copyright.

With the new rules, liability now lies with tech giants to ensure their platforms aren’t open to copyright breaches. Detractors have said this would lead to controversial pre-filter systems, where everything from memes to GIFs are blocked from online platforms.

For its part, the European Parliament has said this won’t be the case, and that memes, GIFs, hyperlinks and snippets of articles will still be able to be shared freely. But that hasn’t allayed the concerns of tech companies, freedom of speech campaigners and regular internet users themselves.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: ryan browne, robert michael, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, european, overhaul, youtube, facebook, europes, copyright, theyre, pull, particular, way, means, platforms, rules, internet, tech


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Cars in Europe could soon be fitted with technology to stop drivers speeding

A range of mandatory safety features for new vehicles, including technology that could limit speed, are set to be introduced in the European Union (EU). The proposed safety features include the introduction of intelligent speed-assistance technology, or ISA. ISA systems can “limit engine power” to stop drivers from going above the speed limit. Other proposed safety features include advanced emergency braking, cameras that assist with reversing, and lane-keeping assistance. At the beginning of Ma


A range of mandatory safety features for new vehicles, including technology that could limit speed, are set to be introduced in the European Union (EU). The proposed safety features include the introduction of intelligent speed-assistance technology, or ISA. ISA systems can “limit engine power” to stop drivers from going above the speed limit. Other proposed safety features include advanced emergency braking, cameras that assist with reversing, and lane-keeping assistance. At the beginning of Ma
Cars in Europe could soon be fitted with technology to stop drivers speeding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: anmar frangoul, silas stein, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drivers, technology, soon, car, proposed, isa, speeding, safety, limit, speed, features, fitted, european, cars, stop, europe


Cars in Europe could soon be fitted with technology to stop drivers speeding

A range of mandatory safety features for new vehicles, including technology that could limit speed, are set to be introduced in the European Union (EU).

In an announcement Tuesday, the European Commission — the EU’s executive arm — said that EU institutions had come to a provisional political agreement on the new measures. That agreement is now subject to formal approval from the European Parliament and Council, with the new technologies set to be introduced in 2022.

The proposed safety features include the introduction of intelligent speed-assistance technology, or ISA. According to the European Transport Safety Council (ETSC), ISA uses technology such as GPS, digital mapping and cameras to give vehicles location and speed limit information.

ISA systems can “limit engine power” to stop drivers from going above the speed limit. The ETSC says it recommends ISA technologies that can be temporarily overridden. This would mean that drivers could, in scenarios such as overtakes on lower-speed sections of road, override the system by putting their foot down on the accelerator.

The mandatory ISA system proposed by the Commission would not automatically slow a car down, but warn a driver that they were travelling above a road’s speed limit.

Several major car manufacturers already offer various iterations of ISA systems in their vehicles.

Other proposed safety features include advanced emergency braking, cameras that assist with reversing, and lane-keeping assistance. Vehicles will also provide warnings if they detect a driver is drowsy or distracted and will use data recorders to document accidents.

“Every year, 25,000 people lose their lives on our roads,” EU Commissioner Elzbieta Bienkowska said in a statement.

“The vast majority of these accidents are caused by human error,” she added. “We can and must act to change this. With the new advanced safety features that will become mandatory, we can have the same kind of impact as when the safety belts were first introduced.”

A number of major car firms are looking to introduce increasingly sophisticated and connected safety features to their vehicles.

Just last week, Volvo Cars announced it would install in-car cameras and sensors to monitor drivers for signs of intoxication and distraction.

The firm said the technology would be used to monitor drivers and, when needed, enable the car “to intervene if a clearly intoxicated or distracted driver does not respond to warning signals and is risking an accident involving serious injury or death.”

Actions the car could take include limiting speed to slowing down and then parking the car in a safe place. Installation of the technology will start in the early 2020s.

At the beginning of March, the company announced it would introduce a 180 kilometers per hour (112 miles per hour) speed limit on all its cars from 2020.

Follow CNBC International on Twitter and Facebook.

Clarification: This story has been updated to reflect how the ISA system proposed by the European Commission would work.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: anmar frangoul, silas stein, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, drivers, technology, soon, car, proposed, isa, speeding, safety, limit, speed, features, fitted, european, cars, stop, europe


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Cars in Europe could soon be fitted with technology to stop drivers speeding

A range of mandatory safety features for new vehicles, including technology that could limit speed, are set to be introduced in the European Union (EU). The proposed safety features include the introduction of intelligent speed-assistance technology, or ISA. ISA systems can “limit engine power” to stop drivers from going above the speed limit. Other proposed safety features include advanced emergency braking, cameras that assist with reversing, and lane-keeping assistance. At the beginning of Ma


A range of mandatory safety features for new vehicles, including technology that could limit speed, are set to be introduced in the European Union (EU). The proposed safety features include the introduction of intelligent speed-assistance technology, or ISA. ISA systems can “limit engine power” to stop drivers from going above the speed limit. Other proposed safety features include advanced emergency braking, cameras that assist with reversing, and lane-keeping assistance. At the beginning of Ma
Cars in Europe could soon be fitted with technology to stop drivers speeding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: anmar frangoul, silas stein, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speed, cars, europe, car, soon, drivers, speeding, safety, limit, european, technology, features, proposed, isa, stop, fitted


Cars in Europe could soon be fitted with technology to stop drivers speeding

A range of mandatory safety features for new vehicles, including technology that could limit speed, are set to be introduced in the European Union (EU).

In an announcement Tuesday, the European Commission — the EU’s executive arm — said that EU institutions had come to a provisional political agreement on the new measures. That agreement is now subject to formal approval from the European Parliament and Council, with the new technologies set to be introduced in 2022.

The proposed safety features include the introduction of intelligent speed-assistance technology, or ISA. According to the European Transport Safety Council (ETSC), ISA uses technology such as GPS, digital mapping and cameras to give vehicles location and speed limit information.

ISA systems can “limit engine power” to stop drivers from going above the speed limit. The ETSC says it recommends ISA technologies that can be temporarily overridden. This would mean that drivers could, in scenarios such as overtakes on lower-speed sections of road, override the system by putting their foot down on the accelerator.

The mandatory ISA system proposed by the Commission would not automatically slow a car down, but warn a driver that they were travelling above a road’s speed limit.

Several major car manufacturers already offer various iterations of ISA systems in their vehicles.

Other proposed safety features include advanced emergency braking, cameras that assist with reversing, and lane-keeping assistance. Vehicles will also provide warnings if they detect a driver is drowsy or distracted and will use data recorders to document accidents.

“Every year, 25,000 people lose their lives on our roads,” EU Commissioner Elzbieta Bienkowska said in a statement.

“The vast majority of these accidents are caused by human error,” she added. “We can and must act to change this. With the new advanced safety features that will become mandatory, we can have the same kind of impact as when the safety belts were first introduced.”

A number of major car firms are looking to introduce increasingly sophisticated and connected safety features to their vehicles.

Just last week, Volvo Cars announced it would install in-car cameras and sensors to monitor drivers for signs of intoxication and distraction.

The firm said the technology would be used to monitor drivers and, when needed, enable the car “to intervene if a clearly intoxicated or distracted driver does not respond to warning signals and is risking an accident involving serious injury or death.”

Actions the car could take include limiting speed to slowing down and then parking the car in a safe place. Installation of the technology will start in the early 2020s.

At the beginning of March, the company announced it would introduce a 180 kilometers per hour (112 miles per hour) speed limit on all its cars from 2020.

Follow CNBC International on Twitter and Facebook.

Clarification: This story has been updated to reflect how the ISA system proposed by the European Commission would work.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: anmar frangoul, silas stein, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speed, cars, europe, car, soon, drivers, speeding, safety, limit, european, technology, features, proposed, isa, stop, fitted


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Shell switches over 700,000 customers to renewable electricity

Shell has re-branded energy and broadband provider First Utility as Shell Energy and switched the firm’s residential customers in Britain to a 100 percent renewable electricity supply. In an announcement Monday, Shell said that customers of Shell Energy would be offered renewable electricity from sources such as biomass, solar and wind, as standard. Shell announced it had agreed to buy First Utility in December 2017, and the acquisition was completed in February 2018. “Shell recognizes the world


Shell has re-branded energy and broadband provider First Utility as Shell Energy and switched the firm’s residential customers in Britain to a 100 percent renewable electricity supply. In an announcement Monday, Shell said that customers of Shell Energy would be offered renewable electricity from sources such as biomass, solar and wind, as standard. Shell announced it had agreed to buy First Utility in December 2017, and the acquisition was completed in February 2018. “Shell recognizes the world
Shell switches over 700,000 customers to renewable electricity Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: anmar frangoul, daniel bockwoldt, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, electricity, renewable, switched, needs, 700000, energy, energies, shell, utility, customers, world, switches


Shell switches over 700,000 customers to renewable electricity

Shell has re-branded energy and broadband provider First Utility as Shell Energy and switched the firm’s residential customers in Britain to a 100 percent renewable electricity supply.

In an announcement Monday, Shell said that customers of Shell Energy would be offered renewable electricity from sources such as biomass, solar and wind, as standard. Over 700,000 homes were switched to renewables, Shell said.

Shell announced it had agreed to buy First Utility in December 2017, and the acquisition was completed in February 2018.

“This is a good example of our approach to building a significant electricity business, in line with customer needs,” Mark Gainsborough, executive vice president, Shell New Energies, said in a statement Monday.

“Shell recognizes the world needs more energy with lower emissions and this will give customers more flexibility, greater control and cleaner energy,” he added.

Shell New Energies was set up in 2016 and focuses on new fuels for transport, including advanced biofuels, and power.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: anmar frangoul, daniel bockwoldt, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, electricity, renewable, switched, needs, 700000, energy, energies, shell, utility, customers, world, switches


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Read Elon Musk’s email urging Tesla employees to help with deliveries

Tesla CEO Elon Musk sent an e-mail to all employees on Thursday urging them to volunteer to help out with deliveries, no matter their role. The move is typical — Tesla execs, including Musk, usually call for “all-hands on deck” to try to meet end-of-quarter goals. However, the company is making do with fewer hands than it had to help at the fourth quarter of 2018. Tesla recently made deep cuts to its workforce with layoffs in January, and some store closures following that. But in the e-mail to


Tesla CEO Elon Musk sent an e-mail to all employees on Thursday urging them to volunteer to help out with deliveries, no matter their role. The move is typical — Tesla execs, including Musk, usually call for “all-hands on deck” to try to meet end-of-quarter goals. However, the company is making do with fewer hands than it had to help at the fourth quarter of 2018. Tesla recently made deep cuts to its workforce with layoffs in January, and some store closures following that. But in the e-mail to
Read Elon Musk’s email urging Tesla employees to help with deliveries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: lora kolodny, silas stein, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, delivery, making, employees, company, email, urging, elon, deliveries, read, teslas, musks, store, problem, musk, production, help


Read Elon Musk's email urging Tesla employees to help with deliveries

Tesla CEO Elon Musk sent an e-mail to all employees on Thursday urging them to volunteer to help out with deliveries, no matter their role.

The move is typical — Tesla execs, including Musk, usually call for “all-hands on deck” to try to meet end-of-quarter goals.

However, the company is making do with fewer hands than it had to help at the fourth quarter of 2018.

Tesla recently made deep cuts to its workforce with layoffs in January, and some store closures following that. Even more store closures are yet to come, but the company has said it is still evaluating which locations should remain.

A Tesla spokesperson said that as of the week of March 4, the company employed more than 40,000 people. In its 2018 annual report, Tesla said it had 48,817 employees. The company has not disclosed exactly how many people it has laid off this year.

Last September, Musk acknowledged Tesla’s problems had shifted to delivery logistics from production delays. He said in a tweet then, responding to a customer upset over delivery delays: “Sorry, we’ve gone from production hell to delivery logistics hell, but this problem is far more tractable. We’re making rapid progress. Should be solved shortly.”

But in the e-mail to all employees on Thursday, the CEO painted Tesla’s delivery problem as a “good one to have.” He wrote, “This is the biggest wave in Tesla’s history, but it is primarily a function of our first delivery of mass manufactured cars on two continents simultaneously, and will not be repeated in subsequent quarters.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: lora kolodny, silas stein, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, delivery, making, employees, company, email, urging, elon, deliveries, read, teslas, musks, store, problem, musk, production, help


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post