Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says this piece of advice impacted him profoundly

Microsoft’s 52-year-old chief executive officer, Satya Nadella, has proven himself a formidable leader, pushing the company to an extra $500 billion in market capitalization since he taking the helm five years ago. “(Burgum) said, look, you’re going to work … at Microsoft more time than you are going to even spend with your kids,” Nadella recalled at a Stanford University Graduate School of Business speech in October. “I take great pride in these people whom I’ve mentored or go on to do great th


Microsoft’s 52-year-old chief executive officer, Satya Nadella, has proven himself a formidable leader, pushing the company to an extra $500 billion in market capitalization since he taking the helm five years ago.
“(Burgum) said, look, you’re going to work … at Microsoft more time than you are going to even spend with your kids,” Nadella recalled at a Stanford University Graduate School of Business speech in October.
“I take great pride in these people whom I’ve mentored or go on to do great th
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says this piece of advice impacted him profoundly Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meaning, microsoft, advice, going, nadella, ceo, work, great, think, thats, satya, profoundly, impact, impacted, piece


Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says this piece of advice impacted him profoundly

Microsoft’s 52-year-old chief executive officer, Satya Nadella, has proven himself a formidable leader, pushing the company to an extra $500 billion in market capitalization since he taking the helm five years ago.

But it was during his 30s that he received some advice from Doug Burgum, the current governor of North Dakota, which he says helped shape him into the businessman he is today.

“(Burgum) said, look, you’re going to work … at Microsoft more time than you are going to even spend with your kids,” Nadella recalled at a Stanford University Graduate School of Business speech in October.

“I said wow, that sounds pretty harsh,” Nadella added.

Still, there’s some truth to Burgum’s statement. Since work takes up so much of our lives, Nadella said he realized it’s important to think about a deeper meaning to work — one that’s more than transactional.

For the engineer, that comes down to relating to the people he works with, he said.

“I take great pride in these people whom I’ve mentored or go on to do great things,” Nadella said.

“The technologies will all be passed in time, but the people, what you did, how you behave … that’s the relationship that I think you seek out while being true to yourself, and what makes you happy.”

Governor Burgum’s advice to find meaning at work also made Nadella think about his purpose at Microsoft, he said in a May 2018 interview with CNBC.

It forced him to question: “Why am I at Microsoft? What is it that gives me the energy at Microsoft, day in and day after?” Nadella told CNBC’s Jon Fortt.

That motivation came, he said, from being able to connect his passions to work, and see its impact on the world.

“What defines me, I think, is curiosity, love of ideas, and the ability to translate that into impact,” he said.

Don’t miss: Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on the 3 qualities that make a great leader

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meaning, microsoft, advice, going, nadella, ceo, work, great, think, thats, satya, profoundly, impact, impacted, piece


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Former NFL and Twitter executive shares his No.1 piece of advice for negotiating your first raise

“My advice is to understand what the standard is for the job,” he tells CNBC Make It at SoFi’s recent “Get That Raise” event. Throughout his professional journey, he says he’s learned one key thing about asking for a raise that he thinks all young people should follow. As a long-standing executive in business and finance, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto knows what it’s like to negotiate your salary at work. Noto explains that knowing the standard for how much you should earn based on your performance is a


“My advice is to understand what the standard is for the job,” he tells CNBC Make It at SoFi’s recent “Get That Raise” event.
Throughout his professional journey, he says he’s learned one key thing about asking for a raise that he thinks all young people should follow.
As a long-standing executive in business and finance, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto knows what it’s like to negotiate your salary at work.
Noto explains that knowing the standard for how much you should earn based on your performance is a
Former NFL and Twitter executive shares his No.1 piece of advice for negotiating your first raise Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, negotiating, raise, york, no1, process, noto, piece, standard, shares, nfl, salary, tells, advice, position, executive, twitter


Former NFL and Twitter executive shares his No.1 piece of advice for negotiating your first raise

“My advice is to understand what the standard is for the job,” he tells CNBC Make It at SoFi’s recent “Get That Raise” event. “What is the average compensation for that position? What’s the above average compensation for that position, and establish with your employer where you are.”

Throughout his professional journey, he says he’s learned one key thing about asking for a raise that he thinks all young people should follow.

Prior to joining the personal-finance company in 2018, Noto worked as the chief operating officer at Twitter, the co-head of telecommunications, media and technology investment banking at Goldman Sachs and the executive vice president and chief financial officer for the National Football League.

As a long-standing executive in business and finance, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto knows what it’s like to negotiate your salary at work.

Anthony Noto onstage at TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2013 at The Manhattan Center on May 1, 2013 in New York City.

Noto explains that knowing the standard for how much you should earn based on your performance is a key component to negotiating the raise you deserve. “Having this framework and understanding that this is a principle-based conversation and not a demand is critical to the [negotiation] process,” he says, while emphasizing that the discussion should always be a “two-way street” between you and your employer.

In addition to setting a standard for appropriate pay, Noto says you should also set a reasonable time frame for when you will go in and ask for your raise.

“Being on the job for three months is probably not the right time because you haven’t built a track record,” he says. “But as you get your annual reviews and accomplish something really meaningful, you’ll then be ready to receive a promotion and a corresponding piece of compensation.”

New York Times bestselling author and award-winning journalist Elaine Welteroth agrees with Noto. She tells CNBC Make It that after researching their market value, candidates should always go into the negotiation process with a standard idea of the salary they’d like to make.

“Know your floor and know your ceiling,” says the former Teen Vogue editor-in-chief. “Go in at your ceiling and do not drop below your floor, because it will only lead to dissatisfaction.”

Welteroth adds that if the first salary offered is below your satisfactory level, then you should not be afraid to ask for more time to consider the offer.

“There are so many tactics that employers often use to intimidate you and make you feel as though you need to give an answer in the moment, but you actually do not,” she says. “I think the most powerful thing can sometimes be to just take your time.”

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Don’t miss: 12-time gold medalist Allyson Felix on the negotiating advice she wishes she knew at the start of her career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, negotiating, raise, york, no1, process, noto, piece, standard, shares, nfl, salary, tells, advice, position, executive, twitter


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The No.1 piece of advice this Lyft executive wishes she received at the start of her career

Though she’s received a lot of great advice throughout her professional journey, she tells CNBC Make It that there is one critical piece of advice she wishes she received early on. Sverchek explains that “one of the reasons I’ve been at Lyft for so long is that I’ve been very long-term focused. “When I started at Lyft, there were a few dads who had gone out on parental leave, but there were no moms,” she says. That conversation, Svercheck says, led to Lyft implementing its first official parenta


Though she’s received a lot of great advice throughout her professional journey, she tells CNBC Make It that there is one critical piece of advice she wishes she received early on.
Sverchek explains that “one of the reasons I’ve been at Lyft for so long is that I’ve been very long-term focused.
“When I started at Lyft, there were a few dads who had gone out on parental leave, but there were no moms,” she says.
That conversation, Svercheck says, led to Lyft implementing its first official parenta
The No.1 piece of advice this Lyft executive wishes she received at the start of her career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, leave, sverchek, no1, ive, today, wishes, executive, received, career, advice, think, parental, sure, piece, advocate, shes, lyft


The No.1 piece of advice this Lyft executive wishes she received at the start of her career

But the one piece of advice she wishes she had gotten: how to know when to use that power to your maximum benefit, and for the most leverage, she says.

“I think every generation that goes by is getting better and better at advocating for themselves,” she says. “And I think that is a really positive thing.”

Though she’s received a lot of great advice throughout her professional journey, she tells CNBC Make It that there is one critical piece of advice she wishes she received early on.

As a corporate lawyer, Kristin Sverchek has spent the last seven years of her career working as a full-time general counsel for Lyft.

Sverchek explains that “one of the reasons I’ve been at Lyft for so long is that I’ve been very long-term focused. That means that when I’ve chosen to be vocal on my own behalf, it’s because I have an ultimate goal in mind for myself.”

Earlier in her career, Sverchek says she often failed to think long-term and would ask for a raise or promotion off impulse whenever she felt she was being overlooked. “Looking back, I wish someone had told me to be a little more selective,” she says. “Choose my battles, not be so short sighted, and make sure that I’ve always got an end goal in mind.”

For young people looking to advocate for themselves at work today, Sverchek suggests being “very intentional about realizing what it is that you want for yourself, and make sure that each time you decide to speak up, you’re taking a step toward that end goal.”

“Is it a promotion that you want? A raise? What is it that you really want,” she asks. “Be very intentional so that when it comes time to advocate for yourself, your case is all the more compelling.”

To prepare, Sverchek says young people should make sure they have all of the evidence needed to prove why they’re deserving of the raise or promotion they’re advocating for. “Provide a persuasive argument and anticipate every question or concern that could be raised, and then answer those before they are raised,” she says. “And don’t give up. Even if the answer is ‘no’ today, it might be ‘yes’ in six to 12 months.”

In her own career, Sverchek explains how advocating for herself when she felt she was prepared and had a long-term plan has paid off.

Since joining Lyft in 2012, Sverchek says she’s taken the platform’s legal department from a team of one (herself) to more than 130 people, and she’s used her position as a mom and a leader to advocate for a company-wide parental leave policy.

“When I started at Lyft, there were a few dads who had gone out on parental leave, but there were no moms,” she says. “So when I got pregnant, I immediately talked to our VP of HR at the time and explained to him that we need to develop [a policy] not just for me, but for all the other women and men who will look to take parental leave in the future.”

That conversation, Svercheck says, led to Lyft implementing its first official parental leave policy in the fall of 2014. Today, she says, the company’s policy has been updated to include 18 weeks of flexible paid time off for biological, adoptive and foster parents.

“As an attorney, it’s my job to advocate on a daily basis, whether it is for the company, for my team, or for myself,” she says. “I like to think I’ve gotten pretty good at it.”

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Don’t miss: This Lyft executive asks a go-to interview question about failure at work — how to answer it


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, leave, sverchek, no1, ive, today, wishes, executive, received, career, advice, think, parental, sure, piece, advocate, shes, lyft


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‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p


Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p
‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. But when it comes to his own money, he’s fairly conservative. He saves a lot, and he knows the value of a dollar. When it comes to investing, he sticks to a pretty simple strategy: Invest in what you know. Serhant recently sat down with the Grow team to discuss the most valuable investing advice he’s received, how he learned about money at a young age, and more. Here is his story, as told to senior reporter Sam Becker.

Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’

The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. Things you use. Things you could see yourself using; things you actually like. Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. So, I invest in things or products that I enjoy, use, or think are really interesting. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both physical products as well as software — [and] investing in real estate.

When it comes to real estate, I used to really think that to be a wise investor, you have to invest what you actually have to spend, so don’t spend more than you can afford. But I’ve found that to be incorrect. The best investments I’ve made are the ones that actually push me outside of my comfort level. Because you need to work more. You need to do more to actually get a return on this investment. And that’s worked really, really well for me.

‘The best investment I ever made’

The best investment I ever made: I invest in my business all the time. I invested in our YouTube vlog, and I think it’s funny because before I started the vlog on YouTube, everyone thought it was stupid and crazy. Including me. Actually, mostly me. I thought it was dumb. Just another form of social media. I was just sick and tired of it and I had no idea what it was going to do to our business. But it is a massive way of driving business and driving brand awareness. So, by investing the money that I did into the vlog, more people buy my book, more people buy the course, more people reach out to me to buy and sell homes.

Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. Ryan Serhant Real estate broker, author, and TV star

How being ‘broke’ led to his real estate career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


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Mythbusters’ Adam Savage: This is my biggest piece of advice and my first paying job

1 Hour AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Adam Savage reveals his best advice he can give to any builder or young person looking to succeed and details what his first job was when he was just 12 years old.


1 Hour AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Adam Savage reveals his best advice he can give to any builder or young person looking to succeed and details what his first job was when he was just 12 years old.
Mythbusters’ Adam Savage: This is my biggest piece of advice and my first paying job Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveals, adam, succeed, flash, enabled, job, paying, piece, mythbusters, biggest, advice, browser, site, view, young, try, savage


Mythbusters' Adam Savage: This is my biggest piece of advice and my first paying job

1 Hour Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Adam Savage reveals his best advice he can give to any builder or young person looking to succeed and details what his first job was when he was just 12 years old.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03
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Apple took us on a surreal walk through San Francisco, looking at digital art on an iPhone

But the art wasn’t actually physically on the ground — instead, it was digital art, mere 1s and 0s, attached to several significant locations around the city, and viewed through the camera and display of an Apple iPhone. The hope among technologists is that augmented reality can be the next big computing platform, and companies like Facebook, Google, and Microsoft are also investing heavily in augmented reality technologies. “Augmented reality will prove to be as huge an invention as electricity


But the art wasn’t actually physically on the ground — instead, it was digital art, mere 1s and 0s, attached to several significant locations around the city, and viewed through the camera and display of an Apple iPhone. The hope among technologists is that augmented reality can be the next big computing platform, and companies like Facebook, Google, and Microsoft are also investing heavily in augmented reality technologies. “Augmented reality will prove to be as huge an invention as electricity
Apple took us on a surreal walk through San Francisco, looking at digital art on an iPhone Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, digital, art, reality, augmented, piece, took, phone, apple, francisco, surreal, walk, store, san, iphone, looking


Apple took us on a surreal walk through San Francisco, looking at digital art on an iPhone

Kif Leswing/CNBC

San Francisco looks different through an iPhone XS Max — it’s still a city, but now there are floating balls of fabric, speech bubbles, and words popping out from the trees and buildings. For more than two hours on Sunday, I ambled through the streets of San Francisco, taking in several art pieces scattered around the city by Apple. But the art wasn’t actually physically on the ground — instead, it was digital art, mere 1s and 0s, attached to several significant locations around the city, and viewed through the camera and display of an Apple iPhone. The walk, which launched on Saturday, is a new program at Apple stores called “AR[T],” which is a play on words on augmented reality, a technology that uses cameras and machine learning to place digital objects in the real world. Apple has developed software for iPhones called ARKit. Apple CEO Tim Cook has called the technology “big and profound.” The hope among technologists is that augmented reality can be the next big computing platform, and companies like Facebook, Google, and Microsoft are also investing heavily in augmented reality technologies. “I think in AR’s early days when it’s still trying to find its footing, user traction and killer apps, these types of organized initiatives by tech giants can slowly push the ball forward,” Mike Boland, chief analyst of ARtillery Intelligence said. “Apple is particular has invested a lot in AR and is banking certain parts of its future hardware lineup on AR, so these ARt walks are both a move to accelerate AR traction and to continue feeling out the demand signals and what will resonate with consumers.” “I have been working in augmented reality for the past 3 years and I am convinced it will be the medium in which we will experience most of the arts in the future,” said artist Sebastian Errazuriz, who was not involved in the project with Apple, but who has made similar public art in augmented reality. “Augmented reality will prove to be as huge an invention as electricity. We will all live augmented reality lives,” he continued.

The walk

Kif Leswing/CNBC

The AR[T] walk I attended started from Apple’s flagship store in Union Square in San Francisco. It’s available at six Apple stores in major cities, including New York, Hong Kong, and Paris. Over about two hours, we walked from the store to an alley, across Market Street to Yerba Buena Gardens, and to a historic church and back. I was lucky to be able to make a reservation on Apple’s website — most sessions through the end of the month are already full. Of the six sessions scheduled at the store for next weekend, all are booked as of Monday. However, when I arrived, there was plenty of space. There were only five of us when we departed the store, including a store employee who came along for the walk on his free time. We were led by two Apple employees with a separate store manager checking in during the walk to troubleshoot our path. If there are open slots in a walk, Apple stores will accommodate people who are there, an Apple representative said, so even if you can’t get a reservation, it still may be worth seeing if there are open spaces. The walk is guided by an Apple store employee and everyone gets to borrow an iPhone XS Max and pair of Beats Solo headphones for the trip. You can’t use your personal iPhone. Each one of the the Apple-loaned iPhones has a non-public AR[T] app installed that enables you to access the experiences. There’s a bit of a ritual to see the art. The tour guide turned each experience on and off from an iPad Pro, and also led discussions about what we saw. We’d walk to a location, like Maiden Lane, a cute little alley in downtown San Francisco. Then, we were told to find and point our phones at a “marker” like a sign, which allows the phone to place digital objects and creatures in the real world by giving the phone a point to orient the graphics around. Once you scan the marker — feeling a little haptic pulse when it’s locked in — then you get a few minutes to walk around and experience the art. At the end of each art piece, the guide asked us to all put our loaner phones together, then the guide would press buttons on his iPad, and all the phones would shut off, turn to black, and we’d be asked to put it in our pockets so we could walk to the next location.

The art

John Giorno’s “Now at the Dawn of My Life” Kif Leswing/CNBC

The draw for the ART walks is six pieces of art selected by the New Museum, a modern art museum based in New York. The art is often interactive and sometimes challenging, although at times you’re reminded that augmented reality is a nascent medium that artists and other creators are still learning how to use. Seven artists, including Nick Cave, John Giorno and Pipilotti Rist, made six pieces for the walk. The first piece we saw was by Cave, and it included creating and customizing a floating ball of digital cloth that walks with you down the alley. At the end, you point your phone towards the sky, and through its screen you can see a giant man with a bowl for his head standing on top of a building. Bowl Man sucks up all the cloth balls, and he changes color. Another piece, by Cao Fei, places a little factory on the ground with a series of conveyor belts moving boxes into the distance. That piece was designed to be interactive — we could pinch or stretch individual boxes, or press a switch that reversed the flow of the boxes.

Kif Leswing/CNBC In “This Is It,” a short fairy tale is presented through a portal accessed by putting your phone up to a tree.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, digital, art, reality, augmented, piece, took, phone, apple, francisco, surreal, walk, store, san, iphone, looking


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In swing state Michigan, 2020 Democrats mostly ignore a key piece of Trump’s trade agenda

During the first of two Democratic debate nights, Sens. Former Rep. John Delaney criticized Warren over a trade plan that he says would isolate the U.S. from the world. Steve Bullock all slammed President Donald Trump’s trade war with China. But a key piece of Trump’s trade agenda — one the president sees as a way to follow through on promises to Michigan, a state he narrowly won in 2016 — has gone largely untouched by Democrats on the campaign trail. But many congressional Democrats, led by Pel


During the first of two Democratic debate nights, Sens. Former Rep. John Delaney criticized Warren over a trade plan that he says would isolate the U.S. from the world. Steve Bullock all slammed President Donald Trump’s trade war with China. But a key piece of Trump’s trade agenda — one the president sees as a way to follow through on promises to Michigan, a state he narrowly won in 2016 — has gone largely untouched by Democrats on the campaign trail. But many congressional Democrats, led by Pel
In swing state Michigan, 2020 Democrats mostly ignore a key piece of Trump’s trade agenda Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, state, warren, deal, swing, ignore, trump, agenda, key, american, levin, piece, debate, michigan, democratic, democrats, trade


In swing state Michigan, 2020 Democrats mostly ignore a key piece of Trump's trade agenda

Senator Bernie Sanders, U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke and former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper (L-R) debate on the first night of the second 2020 Democratic U.S. presidential debate in Detroit, July 30, 2019. Lucas Jackson | Reuters

DETROIT — In a state shaped by free trade agreements, 2020 Democratic presidential hopefuls spent more time debating trade than they have at just about any point in the primary race. During the first of two Democratic debate nights, Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders slammed multinational corporations on Tuesday for moving manufacturing jobs overseas. Former Rep. John Delaney criticized Warren over a trade plan that he says would isolate the U.S. from the world. Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock all slammed President Donald Trump’s trade war with China. But a key piece of Trump’s trade agenda — one the president sees as a way to follow through on promises to Michigan, a state he narrowly won in 2016 — has gone largely untouched by Democrats on the campaign trail. Democrats have spent little time talking about the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, Trump’s replacement for the North American Free Trade Agreement that has stalled in Congress amid Democratic opposition. Warren took one swipe at the deal on Tuesday night, criticizing a provision that Democrats say would let drug companies charge exorbitant prices for certain products. The Massachusetts senator cited the measure in arguing that corporations use trade deals to “suck more profits out for themselves” and “leave the American people behind.” Still, Democrats have spent little time talking about the trade deal, even as the Trump administration works with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to ease Democratic concerns and push for the deal’s ratification in the coming months. Despite the increased attention on trade Tuesday night, some Michigan Democrats think the party can do more to hold Trump’s feet to the fire on the issue. “I guess what I would say is that I think most politicians don’t understand how strongly and deeply working people feel about trade policy and the impact it’s had on their lives,” said Rep. Andy Levin, a Democrat who represents a district north of Detroit, told CNBC on Wednesday. The congressman endorsed Warren this week in part because of her trade policy. Ten other Democratic contenders, including former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris, will take the debate stage Wednesday night in Detroit.

Trade remains a top Trump priority

Trade ranks among the White House’s top economic priorities ahead of the 2020 election. Trump is pushing for ratification of USMCA and a deal with China that would end a potentially damaging trade war. He sees the efforts as a way to follow through on his promises to boost American workers who lost their jobs after free trade deals encouraged firms to move positions overseas. But many congressional Democrats, led by Pelosi, argue the new North American trade deal does not do enough to protect American workers. They say it lacks a strong enough mechanism to enforce standards for higher wages and stronger unions in Mexico, which would in theory make it less appealing for U.S. companies to move operations to Mexico. America’s southern neighbor has already passed a labor law to address those concerns about offshoring — though Levin says companies have filed lawsuits to invalidate it. Carl Levin, the congressman’s uncle who represented Michigan in the U.S. Senate for 36 years, thinks the USMCA’s shortcomings and other Trump policies give Democrats a chance to hold the president accountable on trade.

“If they want to go after his phony trade promises and show why they’re phony, they’re going to have to get into the detail,” Levin, a Democrat who retired from the Senate in 2015, told CNBC on Tuesday ahead of the debate. Levin argued that, in addition to USMCA, a provision in the 2017 Republican tax law that taxes income made by U.S. companies’ foreign subsidiaries at half the rate of their income at home also shows Trump has not followed through on his promises to U.S. workers. It’s a message he and some local Democratic officials think presidential candidates can focus on more as they try to win back Michigan. The Trump campaign fired back at the Democrats’ criticism. “It wasn’t too long ago that Democrats admitted the failures of NAFTA, with former governor Jennifer Granholm admitting ‘NAFTA’ has ‘given us the shafta.’ Now, however, Democrats refuse to pass the USMCA, a deal that would be a clear win for the American people should Democrats in Congress do their job,” Trump campaign spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany said.

A tricky issue for swing-state Dems


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, state, warren, deal, swing, ignore, trump, agenda, key, american, levin, piece, debate, michigan, democratic, democrats, trade


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Glamour editor-in-chief would give her younger self this piece of money advice

Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry isn’t bashful when it comes to talking about money. “My advice for my 20-year-old self is to be more financially literate at a younger age,” says Barry, who’s a member of CNBC’s Financial Wellness Advisory Council. “Knowing your worth, knowing what you are spending, knowing what you are investing, knowing your credit rating. In the past 18 months since signing on as editor-in-chief, Barry’s team has made it a priority to start a dialogue surrounding money.


Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry isn’t bashful when it comes to talking about money. “My advice for my 20-year-old self is to be more financially literate at a younger age,” says Barry, who’s a member of CNBC’s Financial Wellness Advisory Council. “Knowing your worth, knowing what you are spending, knowing what you are investing, knowing your credit rating. In the past 18 months since signing on as editor-in-chief, Barry’s team has made it a priority to start a dialogue surrounding money.
Glamour editor-in-chief would give her younger self this piece of money advice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, self, glamour, financial, younger, money, piece, knowing, head, unable, started, barry, editorinchief, surrounding, advice, worked


Glamour editor-in-chief would give her younger self this piece of money advice

Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry isn’t bashful when it comes to talking about money. She feels strongly about the importance of being financially literate and highly recommends others educate themselves for the purpose of bettering their financial futures.

“My advice for my 20-year-old self is to be more financially literate at a younger age,” says Barry, who’s a member of CNBC’s Financial Wellness Advisory Council.

“I definitely spent a lot of my early twenties with my head in the sand like, ‘I don’t need to worry about money’ or ‘I don’t need to think about it that much,'” Barry says. “It wasn’t until I started thinking about things like saving, investing and how much money was going in and out of my account that I took my head out of the sand and started setting real goals.”

As the head of a women’s brand, Barry says she is especially concerned with the financial well-being of women.

“The sooner that we talk to younger women and girls about their financial literacy the better,” Barry says. “Knowing your worth, knowing what you are spending, knowing what you are investing, knowing your credit rating. That is so personal to us at Glamour, and it’s so important for women.”

Research backs up Barry. According to a survey from the Finra Foundation, more than half of Americans were unable to pass a basic financial literacy exam. When asked five questions covering aspects of economics and personal finance, 63% were unable to answer more than three correctly.

In the past 18 months since signing on as editor-in-chief, Barry’s team has made it a priority to start a dialogue surrounding money. When having conversations surrounding a sensitive topic like money, Barry says honesty and speaking to people from differing backgrounds is key.

“I, like most people, have had a complicated relationship with money at times,” Barry says. “I have worked as a freelancer, worked paycheck to paycheck, and I have even taken a job I much preferred over the higher paid one.

“It can sometimes feel very alienating if a person is coming in to tell you about money that has has only experienced plain sailing with all of the money conversations in their entire life.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, self, glamour, financial, younger, money, piece, knowing, head, unable, started, barry, editorinchief, surrounding, advice, worked


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As US-China relations sour, Taiwan’s value as a ‘chess piece’ may rise

Taiwan has always been a “chess piece” that Washington can play with in U.S.-China relations, said Zhiqun Zhu, a professor of political science and international relations at Bucknell University. “Taiwan’s value to the U.S. will only increase as tensions between the U.S. and China escalate,” Zhu told CNBC. Chinese President Xi Jinping has said before that China “must be and will be” reunified with Taiwan — by force if necessary. However, recent military and diplomatic actions from Washington hav


Taiwan has always been a “chess piece” that Washington can play with in U.S.-China relations, said Zhiqun Zhu, a professor of political science and international relations at Bucknell University. “Taiwan’s value to the U.S. will only increase as tensions between the U.S. and China escalate,” Zhu told CNBC. Chinese President Xi Jinping has said before that China “must be and will be” reunified with Taiwan — by force if necessary. However, recent military and diplomatic actions from Washington hav
As US-China relations sour, Taiwan’s value as a ‘chess piece’ may rise Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taiwans, sour, chess, ustaiwan, tsai, chinese, rise, china, grossman, uschina, trump, relations, beijing, taiwan, value, piece, president


As US-China relations sour, Taiwan's value as a 'chess piece' may rise

Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-Wen waves to assembled guests from the deck of the ‘Ming Chuan’ frigate during a ceremony to commission two Perry-class guided missile frigates from the U.S. into the Taiwan Navy, in the southern port of Kaohsiung on November 8, 2018. Chris Stowers | AFP | Getty Images

As the United States and China remain deadlocked in a deepening dispute over trade and technology, some experts say Taiwan’s value as a bargaining chip has increased. The self-governed island — which Beijing deems to be a renegade Chinese province — is one of many flashpoints in the rivalry between the world’s two superpowers. Taiwan has always been a “chess piece” that Washington can play with in U.S.-China relations, said Zhiqun Zhu, a professor of political science and international relations at Bucknell University. “Taiwan’s value to the U.S. will only increase as tensions between the U.S. and China escalate,” Zhu told CNBC. Under the Chinese Communist Party’s “One China” policy, the self-ruled island is part of mainland China. Chinese President Xi Jinping has said before that China “must be and will be” reunified with Taiwan — by force if necessary. However, recent military and diplomatic actions from Washington have been seen by Beijing as U.S. support for Taiwan’s independence movement. At the Shangri-la dialogue in Singapore last weekend, Chinese Lieutenant General Shao Yuanming said Washington’s support for Taipei has sent “terribly wrong signals to Taiwan’s independence forces, which could undermine regional peace and stability. ” “If anyone wants to separate Taiwan from the country, the Chinese military will resolutely defend the unity of our motherland at all costs,” Shao added.

‘Upgrade’ in US-Taiwan relations

The U.S. using Taiwan as a card is a new factor in the dynamic of the trilateral relationship that “really did not exist” before President Donald Trump came into power, said Bonnie Glaser, senior advisor for Asia at Washington-based think tank Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). “Trump is a transactional president and he often seems to be willing to put anything on the table,” she told CNBC. On the military front, the Trump administration has ramped up arms sales to Taipei over the years, invoking the ire of Beijing. Washington is reportedly preparing a sale of more than $2 billion worth of tanks and weapons to Taiwan. Diplomatic issues have also come to the fore. In May, high-level security officials from the U.S. and Taiwan met for the first time in nearly four decades, drawing an angry response from Beijing. Chinese Foreign Minister Lu Kang said Beijing is “strongly dissatisfied” with and “resolutely opposed” to any official meetings between the U.S. and Taiwan. “I believe we’re inching closer & closer to Beijing’s redline on US-Taiwan senior official mtgs–those that are publicized at least,” Derek Grossman, a senior defense analyst at California-based think tank RAND Corporation, said on Twitter after the U.S.-Taiwan meeting.

Chinese President Xi Jinping arrives for an event to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Message to Compatriots in Taiwan at the Great Hall of the People January 2, 2019 in Beijing, China. Mark Schiefelbein | Pool | Getty Images

Grossman told CNBC on email that his understanding is that such meetings “have been ongoing for some time in private.” “My hunch is that it was publicized this time via intentional leak from one or both sides to signal to China that the upgrade in U.S.-Taiwan relations is here to stay,” he added.

Taiwan’s next leader is key

Taiwan is set to have its presidential elections in January 2020 — and experts said the polls would likely determine the direction of cross-strait ties. Grossman said that if the incumbent Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-Wen is re-elected, which is “likely,” cross-strait tensions are likely to escalate further from 2020 to 2024. Glaser from CSIS echoed that sentiment, adding that if a candidate from the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party was elected, China would ratchet up military, diplomatic and economic pressure. “I think the Chinese would be worried that there’s always this potential for things to go in a very negative direction because the combination of Trump being president and the possibility that Tsai gets re-elected … could really embolden Tsai to move toward the direction of independence,” she added.

China could miscalculate and think the United States would get involved in a conflict, and that would really be a very dangerous situation. Bonnie Glaser senior advisor for Asia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies

According to Grossman, the best hope for keeping tensions under wraps would be if a candidate from the opposition Kuomintang (KMT) party wins the next Taiwan presidential race and recognizes the “One China” policy. That said, Grossman added, public opinion polling in Taiwan has shown that voters will not likely support the opposition KMT in doing so. “The Taiwanese have been observing how China’s ‘One Country, Two Systems’ approach has worked out in Hong Kong, and it isn’t too inspiring,” Grossman added. A public opinion survey conducted by the Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council in May also found that 83.6% of Taiwan opposes Xi’s “one country, two systems” policy.

A ‘small’ risk of escalation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taiwans, sour, chess, ustaiwan, tsai, chinese, rise, china, grossman, uschina, trump, relations, beijing, taiwan, value, piece, president


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As the final season of ‘Game of Thrones’ begins, here’s what the brands are doing

HBO just dropped the first episode of the eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones” and with it comes a host of brand promotions. From branded makeup to sneakers, fans can grab their own piece of the Seven Kingdoms. Here’s a look at some of them.


HBO just dropped the first episode of the eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones” and with it comes a host of brand promotions. From branded makeup to sneakers, fans can grab their own piece of the Seven Kingdoms. Here’s a look at some of them.
As the final season of ‘Game of Thrones’ begins, here’s what the brands are doing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, piece, final, brands, host, makeup, heres, seven, look, kingdomsheres, promotions, game, doing, season, sneakers, thrones, begins


As the final season of 'Game of Thrones' begins, here's what the brands are doing

HBO just dropped the first episode of the eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones” and with it comes a host of brand promotions. From branded makeup to sneakers, fans can grab their own piece of the Seven Kingdoms.

Here’s a look at some of them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, piece, final, brands, host, makeup, heres, seven, look, kingdomsheres, promotions, game, doing, season, sneakers, thrones, begins


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