Southwest Airlines yanks Boeing 737 Max from schedules through early November with no end in sight to grounding

A number of Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked at Southern California Logistics Airport on March 27, 2019 in Victorville, California. Southwest Airlines is waiting out a global grounding of MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft at the airport. Uncertainty over when regulators will allow the Boeing 737 Max to fly again following two deadly crashes prompted Southwest Airlines, the largest U.S. operator of the jets, to remove them from its schedules through early November — a month longer tha


A number of Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked at Southern California Logistics Airport on March 27, 2019 in Victorville, California. Southwest Airlines is waiting out a global grounding of MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft at the airport. Uncertainty over when regulators will allow the Boeing 737 Max to fly again following two deadly crashes prompted Southwest Airlines, the largest U.S. operator of the jets, to remove them from its schedules through early November — a month longer tha
Southwest Airlines yanks Boeing 737 Max from schedules through early November with no end in sight to grounding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schedule, yanks, boeing, month, flights, schedules, end, early, california, airlines, crashes, max, planes, sight, grounding, southwest


Southwest Airlines yanks Boeing 737 Max from schedules through early November with no end in sight to grounding

A number of Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are parked at Southern California Logistics Airport on March 27, 2019 in Victorville, California. Southwest Airlines is waiting out a global grounding of MAX 8 and MAX 9 aircraft at the airport.

Uncertainty over when regulators will allow the Boeing 737 Max to fly again following two deadly crashes prompted Southwest Airlines, the largest U.S. operator of the jets, to remove them from its schedules through early November — a month longer than it estimated in late June.

Southwest’s move follows similar schedule changes announced over the last week by American and United.

Southwest said Thursday it will cancel about 180 flights a day out of about 4,000 flights because of the schedule change. Last month, the Dallas-based airline said it was targeting October for the planes’ return, which would have meant 150 daily flight cancellations.

The planes have been grounded since mid-March after two fatal crashes within five months killed 346 people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schedule, yanks, boeing, month, flights, schedules, end, early, california, airlines, crashes, max, planes, sight, grounding, southwest


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Boeing to take $4.9 billion hit in second quarter on 737 Max grounding

Workers stand near Boeing 737 MAX airplanes as they sit parked at a Boeing facility adjacent to King County International Airport, known as Boeing Field, on May 31, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Boeing on Thursday said it will take a $4.9 billion charge in the second quarter due to the worldwide grounding of its 737 Max planes after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Analysts expected the company to book a per-share profit of $1.80 for the second quarter, according to average estimates com


Workers stand near Boeing 737 MAX airplanes as they sit parked at a Boeing facility adjacent to King County International Airport, known as Boeing Field, on May 31, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Boeing on Thursday said it will take a $4.9 billion charge in the second quarter due to the worldwide grounding of its 737 Max planes after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Analysts expected the company to book a per-share profit of $1.80 for the second quarter, according to average estimates com
Boeing to take $4.9 billion hit in second quarter on 737 Max grounding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs phil lebeau, leslie josephs, phil lebeau
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, billion, second, quarter, grounding, max, charge, planes, hit, boeing, workers, 49, worldwide


Boeing to take $4.9 billion hit in second quarter on 737 Max grounding

Workers stand near Boeing 737 MAX airplanes as they sit parked at a Boeing facility adjacent to King County International Airport, known as Boeing Field, on May 31, 2019 in Seattle, Washington.

Boeing on Thursday said it will take a $4.9 billion charge in the second quarter due to the worldwide grounding of its 737 Max planes after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people.

The charge, which comes to $8.74 a share, is set to wipe out profits. Analysts expected the company to book a per-share profit of $1.80 for the second quarter, according to average estimates compiled by Refinitiv. The charge would reduce revenue and pre-tax earnings by $5.6 billion in the quarter, Boeing said.

The 737 Max jets have been grounded since mid-March and regulators have not said when they expect to allow the planes to fly again.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs phil lebeau, leslie josephs, phil lebeau
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, billion, second, quarter, grounding, max, charge, planes, hit, boeing, workers, 49, worldwide


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United Airlines posts higher profits and buys used Boeing 737s as Max grounding drags on

Strong travel demand pushed United Airlines Holdings second-quarter profit up more than 50% from a year ago, despite continued challenges from the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max. The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grounded worldwide since mid-March following two fatal crashes — one in Indonesia in October and another in Ethiopia in March — that killed a total of 346 people. United, which has 14 737 Max 9 jets, had expected the planes to return by Labor Day. American has 24 Boeing 737 Max jets


Strong travel demand pushed United Airlines Holdings second-quarter profit up more than 50% from a year ago, despite continued challenges from the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max. The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grounded worldwide since mid-March following two fatal crashes — one in Indonesia in October and another in Ethiopia in March — that killed a total of 346 people. United, which has 14 737 Max 9 jets, had expected the planes to return by Labor Day. American has 24 Boeing 737 Max jets
United Airlines posts higher profits and buys used Boeing 737s as Max grounding drags on Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, 737, demand, drags, planes, boeing, grounding, share, max, jets, posts, travel, profits, used, buys, higher


United Airlines posts higher profits and buys used Boeing 737s as Max grounding drags on

Strong travel demand pushed United Airlines Holdings second-quarter profit up more than 50% from a year ago, despite continued challenges from the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max.

United did not break out how the grounding, now in its fifth month, affected its bottom line but said it signed an agreement to buy 19 used Boeing 737-700 planes, older jets that it can use to meet growing demand. It expects those planes to be delivered in December.

The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grounded worldwide since mid-March following two fatal crashes — one in Indonesia in October and another in Ethiopia in March — that killed a total of 346 people. Regulators have not said when they expect to allow the planes to fly again, forcing airlines to cancel thousands of flights during the peak summer travel season and through the fall.

Airlines have scrambled to meet demand by combining flights and making other schedule tweaks.

On Friday, United removed the planes from its schedule through the start of November, with no end in sight to the grounding. United, which has 14 737 Max 9 jets, had expected the planes to return by Labor Day. American Airlines on Sunday also took the planes out of its schedules until early November, a move that would mean the cancellation of about 115 flights a day. American has 24 Boeing 737 Max jets in its fleet.

Delta Air Lines, which does not have the troubled plane in its fleet, said it has marginally benefited as rivals’ operations are hamstrung from the grounding.

In the three months ended June 30, net income rose 54% to $1.1 billion, or $4.02 a share, from $683 million, or $2.48 per share a year ago. On an adjusted basis, it earned $4.21 a share, beating analysts’ expectations of $4.09 a share.

Revenue rose close to 6% from a year ago to $11.4 billion, slightly above the $11.36 billion analysts had forecast, as demand for seats in every region where it operates climbed in the busy travel period.

The Chicago-based carrier also raised the low-end of its profit forecast for the year to $10.50 to $12 per share from an estimate of as low as $10 a share.

Executives from the second-largest U.S. carrier will hold a call with analysts on Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. ET, when they will likely face questions on how the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max could affect its operations through the end of the year.

Shares were up 0.6% in postmarket trading.

American and Southwest report second-quarter results on July 25.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, united, 737, demand, drags, planes, boeing, grounding, share, max, jets, posts, travel, profits, used, buys, higher


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Boeing again reports no new orders for 737 Max as planes stay grounded after crashes

Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored in an area adjacent to Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. After a pair of crashes, the 737 MAX has been grounded by the FAA and other aviation agencies since March, 13, 2019. The FAA has reportedly found a new potential flaw in the Boeing 737 Max software update that was designed to improve safety. The dearth of Max orders in June marked the third straight month without any new orders for the planes. The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grou


Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored in an area adjacent to Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. After a pair of crashes, the 737 MAX has been grounded by the FAA and other aviation agencies since March, 13, 2019. The FAA has reportedly found a new potential flaw in the Boeing 737 Max software update that was designed to improve safety. The dearth of Max orders in June marked the third straight month without any new orders for the planes. The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grou
Boeing again reports no new orders for 737 Max as planes stay grounded after crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, deliveries, month, planes, reported, grounded, orders, manufacturer, reports, stay, crashes, 737, boeing


Boeing again reports no new orders for 737 Max as planes stay grounded after crashes

Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored in an area adjacent to Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. After a pair of crashes, the 737 MAX has been grounded by the FAA and other aviation agencies since March, 13, 2019. The FAA has reportedly found a new potential flaw in the Boeing 737 Max software update that was designed to improve safety.

Boeing on Tuesday again reported no new orders for its 737 Max, as the worldwide grounding of its best-selling plane is about to enter its fifth month, dragging down aircraft deliveries.

Boeing delivered 239 commercial airplanes in the first half of the year, down 37% from the first six months of 2018. Deliveries are key for the company since that is generally when the manufacturer is paid for the aircraft.

The dearth of Max orders in June marked the third straight month without any new orders for the planes. The issues could give European manufacturer Airbus, which reported 389 commercial plane deliveries in the first six months of the year, the crown as the world’s biggest airplane maker. Airbus’ popular A320 planes compete with Boeing’s 737s in the single-aisle segment, which comprise most aircraft orders.

The Boeing 737 Max planes have been grounded since mid-March after two fatal crashes that claimed a total of 346 lives. Investigators found similarities between the two crashes and implicated an anti-stall system in both deadly incidents. Boeing has prepared software fixes for the planes but regulators have not said when they will permit the planes to fly again, prompting carriers to cancel thousands of flights. Both airlines and Boeing have been force to park the grounded jets.

Boeing cut production of the 737 Max by about a fifth to 42 jetliners a month in April. It had originally expected to ramp up production to 57 a month. The Chicago-based company has a backlog of about 4,600 737 jets.

Last month, Boeing won a vote of confidence in the troubled 737 Max when British Airways’ parent International Consolidated Airlines Group, said it plans to buy 200 of the jets. Boeing didn’t include the orders in its monthly tally because the order isn’t finalized. Over the weekend, flyadeal, a budget airline based in Saudi Arabia, canceled a provisional order for 30 Boeing 737 Max planes, and said it would take delivery of A320 jets from Airbus instead.

Boeing’s shares initially fell after the manufacturer reported its quarterly orders and deliveries, but closed up 0.6% at $353.09.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, deliveries, month, planes, reported, grounded, orders, manufacturer, reports, stay, crashes, 737, boeing


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The electric flight era is closer than you think

The electric flight era is closer than you think1:46 PM ET Wed, 26 June 2019Electric planes have been talked about as a possibility for many years, but now they’re on the tarmac and even up in the air. So can the world’s jet-setters start preparing to actually fly electric?


The electric flight era is closer than you think1:46 PM ET Wed, 26 June 2019Electric planes have been talked about as a possibility for many years, but now they’re on the tarmac and even up in the air. So can the world’s jet-setters start preparing to actually fly electric?
The electric flight era is closer than you think Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, preparing, start, think, theyre, talked, tarmac, worlds, electric, possibility, closer, planes, era, think146, flight


The electric flight era is closer than you think

The electric flight era is closer than you think

1:46 PM ET Wed, 26 June 2019

Electric planes have been talked about as a possibility for many years, but now they’re on the tarmac and even up in the air. So can the world’s jet-setters start preparing to actually fly electric?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, preparing, start, think, theyre, talked, tarmac, worlds, electric, possibility, closer, planes, era, think146, flight


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Airbus is pushing ahead in tech as it aims for single-pilot planes, says CTO

European aerospace giant Airbus is working on technologies that will cut the number of pilots needed in the cockpit, a company executive said on Thursday. Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. That change to cockpit staffing will solve problems like the shortage of pilots, particularly when growth in aviation is outpacing economic growth, she added. Ultimately, artificial intelligence will be


European aerospace giant Airbus is working on technologies that will cut the number of pilots needed in the cockpit, a company executive said on Thursday. Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. That change to cockpit staffing will solve problems like the shortage of pilots, particularly when growth in aviation is outpacing economic growth, she added. Ultimately, artificial intelligence will be
Airbus is pushing ahead in tech as it aims for single-pilot planes, says CTO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: huileng tan, blanche lim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pilots, elevator, tech, vittadini, airbus, aims, tasks, really, cto, technologies, intelligence, planes, growth, safety, ahead, pushing, singlepilot


Airbus is pushing ahead in tech as it aims for single-pilot planes, says CTO

That will take the company “on the way to possibly one day achieve the single-pilot operation target we are aiming at,” she told CNBC at the Innovfest Unbound conference in Singapore.

“Embedding more and more artificial intelligence into our systems will enable us to start by really relieving the pilots from more mundane tasks, routine tasks — so really to keep the human element in the chain for the strategic thinking and decision-making type of tasks,” said Grazia Vittadini, chief technology officer at Airbus.

European aerospace giant Airbus is working on technologies that will cut the number of pilots needed in the cockpit, a company executive said on Thursday.

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Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley.

That change to cockpit staffing will solve problems like the shortage of pilots, particularly when growth in aviation is outpacing economic growth, she added.

Ultimately, artificial intelligence will be the differentiating factor that will make planes autonomous, Vittadini said.

As to concerns stemming from fewer pilots on board, Vittadini said Airbus prioritizes safety above all else and will never go for a lower level of safety that what is currently available.

The scenario of planes going fully autonomous will take time — after all, it took 60 years to go from four to two pilots, she noted.

Passengers will be able to adapt to the new technologies, she projected.

“Our grandparents would have never stepped into an elevator without a lift boy. Today, an elevator ride is nothing exciting or of concern to any of us,” said Vittadini.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: huileng tan, blanche lim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pilots, elevator, tech, vittadini, airbus, aims, tasks, really, cto, technologies, intelligence, planes, growth, safety, ahead, pushing, singlepilot


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Boeing 737 Max likely grounded until the end of the year after new problem emerges

Boeing’s 737 Max could stay on the ground until late this year after a new problem emerged with the plane’s in-flight control chip. Boeing hopes to submit all of its fixes to the Federal Aviation Administration this fall, the Boeing official said. “We believe additional items will be remedied by a software fix.” Boeing will need to reach agreement with airlines and pilots unions on how much extra training pilots will need. The global Max fleet was grounded in mid-March following two fatal crashe


Boeing’s 737 Max could stay on the ground until late this year after a new problem emerged with the plane’s in-flight control chip. Boeing hopes to submit all of its fixes to the Federal Aviation Administration this fall, the Boeing official said. “We believe additional items will be remedied by a software fix.” Boeing will need to reach agreement with airlines and pilots unions on how much extra training pilots will need. The global Max fleet was grounded in mid-March following two fatal crashe
Boeing 737 Max likely grounded until the end of the year after new problem emerges Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: elijah shama
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issue, end, fix, software, boeing, likely, pilots, problem, official, emerges, planes, mcas, grounded, need, max, 737


Boeing 737 Max likely grounded until the end of the year after new problem emerges

Boeing’s 737 Max could stay on the ground until late this year after a new problem emerged with the plane’s in-flight control chip.

This latest holdup in the plane’s troubled recertification process has to do with a chip failure that can cause uncommanded movement of a panel on the aircraft’s tail, pointing the plane’s nose downward, a Boeing official said. Subsequent emergency tests to fix the issue showed it took pilots longer than expected to solve the problem, according to The Wall Street Journal.

This marks a new problem with the plane unrelated to the issues Boeing is already facing with the plane’s MCAS automated flight control system, an issue the company maintains can be remedied by a software fix. Boeing hopes to submit all of its fixes to the Federal Aviation Administration this fall, the Boeing official said.

“We’re expecting a September time frame for a full software package to fix both MCAS and this new issue,” the official said. “We believe additional items will be remedied by a software fix.”

Once that software package is submitted, it will likely take at least another two months before the planes are flying again. The FAA will need time to recertify the planes. Boeing will need to reach agreement with airlines and pilots unions on how much extra training pilots will need. And the airlines will need some time to complete necessary maintenance checks.

FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford declined to comment on a specific timeline for the plane’s recertification, saying, “We have steadfastly stayed away from offering any timelines.”

The global Max fleet was grounded in mid-March following two fatal crashes, in which a malfunction of MCAS was implicated. The crashes killed 346 people combined.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: elijah shama
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American Airlines becomes first US airline to order new Airbus plane

American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week. IAG also ordered 14 Airbus XLR planes for its Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines. Neither American Airlines nor Airbus would disclose the financial terms of the deal, but American Airlines president Robert Isom said the XLR will initially cost the airline more than the A321neo. American is the first U.S.-based airline to orde


American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week. IAG also ordered 14 Airbus XLR planes for its Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines. Neither American Airlines nor Airbus would disclose the financial terms of the deal, but American Airlines president Robert Isom said the XLR will initially cost the airline more than the A321neo. American is the first U.S.-based airline to orde
American Airlines becomes first US airline to order new Airbus plane Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: phil lebeau leslie josephs, phil lebeau, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, xlr, airbus, american, plane, airlines, boeing, airline, order, routes, air


American Airlines becomes first US airline to order new Airbus plane

American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week.

The deal for the A321XLR jetliners, announced at the Paris Air Show on Wednesday, makes the Fort Worth-based airline the first major U.S. carrier to agree to buy the longest-range narrowbody plane Airbus now offers. Under the agreement, American will convert 30 of its orders for the smaller Airbus A321neo in favor of the longer-range model, and order an 20 additional A321XLRs.

The planes could replace some older aircraft like Boeing 757s. The new planes are aimed at longer routes where there aren’t enough travelers to support the expense of operating a larger twin-aisle jet.

American’s endorsement of the new Airbus planes comes as Boeing is mulling an all-new double-aisle plane targeting mid-range routes. Analysts had expected Boeing to unveil the new offering at the Paris Air Show. But hopes faded as the Chicago-based company has been hobbled by the crisis left by two fatal crashes of its best-selling 737 Max planes, which have been grounded since mid-March.

Boeing did win a surprise vote of confidence in the 737 Max during this year’s air show with a 200-plane order from British Airways’ parent International Consolidated Airlines Group, the first order for the beleaguered jets since they were grounded three months ago. IAG also ordered 14 Airbus XLR planes for its Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines.

Neither American Airlines nor Airbus would disclose the financial terms of the deal, but American Airlines president Robert Isom said the XLR will initially cost the airline more than the A321neo.

“My feeling is this aircraft certainly gives us much greater utility in the long run and at the end of the day will be worth quite bit more to us,” Isom said in a video discussing the deal released by American Airlines.

The 321XLR is expected to open more routes between the U.S. and smaller, secondary cities in Europe. For example, American could fly it between Philadelphia and Basel, Switzerland. “This opportunity, with the enhancements being made to the XLR are really cool,” said Isom.

Since Airbus announced plans for the plane on Monday, the company has racked up eight orders for more than 160 XLRs. Air Lease Corporation, which leases hundreds of airplanes to airlines around the world, placed the initial order for 27 XLRs. Air Lease CEO John Plueger told CNBC the plane is “a blockbuster.”

American is the first U.S.-based airline to order the newest Airbus plane, but Denver-based Frontier Airlines will also be flying the XLR shortly after deliveries begin in 2023. Frontier’s parent company, private equity firm, Indigo Partners placed an order for 50 XLR planes, with initial plans to put 18 of them into Frontier’s fleet, and the others in its stable of discount carriers in Latin America and Europe.

After the Paris Air Show in June 2011 American Airlines announced a massive 460-plane order that included both Boeing planes and Airbus jets, American’s first order from the European manufacturer in more than 20 years. The Airbus order included 260 planes, half of them for the neo, or new-engine option that provided more fuel efficiency.

A month later, Boeing unveiled the 737 Max, its fuel-saving update to the line of planes that had been flying since the 1960s.

— CNBC’s Meghan Reeder also contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: phil lebeau leslie josephs, phil lebeau, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, xlr, airbus, american, plane, airlines, boeing, airline, order, routes, air


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‘Miracle on the Hudson’ pilot urges simulator training for the Boeing 737 Max

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits next to another 737 outside the company’s factory on March 11, 2019 in Renton, Washington. The US Airways captain famed for his January 2009 landing on the Hudson River told lawmakers on Wednesday that airline pilots should receive simulator training to fly the Boeing 737 Max before the planes return to service after two fatal crashes. Aviation officials haven’t signed off on software and training updates Boeing has developed to get the planes back in the air. Ca


A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits next to another 737 outside the company’s factory on March 11, 2019 in Renton, Washington. The US Airways captain famed for his January 2009 landing on the Hudson River told lawmakers on Wednesday that airline pilots should receive simulator training to fly the Boeing 737 Max before the planes return to service after two fatal crashes. Aviation officials haven’t signed off on software and training updates Boeing has developed to get the planes back in the air. Ca
‘Miracle on the Hudson’ pilot urges simulator training for the Boeing 737 Max Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, miracle, planes, urges, pilots, experience, told, max, hudson, pilot, 737, boeing, simulator, training


'Miracle on the Hudson' pilot urges simulator training for the Boeing 737 Max

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits next to another 737 outside the company’s factory on March 11, 2019 in Renton, Washington.

The US Airways captain famed for his January 2009 landing on the Hudson River told lawmakers on Wednesday that airline pilots should receive simulator training to fly the Boeing 737 Max before the planes return to service after two fatal crashes.

Aviation officials haven’t signed off on software and training updates Boeing has developed to get the planes back in the air. The jets, Boeing’s all-time bestseller, have been grounded for more than three months after two of the planes crashed within five months of one another, killing a total of 346 people.

“We should all want pilots to experience these challenging situations for the first time in a simulator, and not with passengers and crew on board,” Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, told the House aviation subcommittee.

The hearing was the second of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure’s aviation panel on the 737 Max, and included testimony by representatives from flight attendant and pilot labor unions, and major U.S. airlines.

Unlike the computer-based training pilots received before transitioning to the 737 Max from older models of the plane, or stationary simulators, a full-motion simulator would give pilots physical experience in maneuvers required in emergencies, Sullenberger said. Those include recovery procedures that could require a pilot to use both hands or the efforts of two pilots to move a wheel that would right a plane tipped downward, skills they can commit to “muscle memory,” he said.

Dan Carey, president the Allied Pilot Association that represents roughly 15,000 American Airlines pilots, said the union requested experience in a full-motion 737 Max simulator in Miami but said the airline said they could receive it after the planes were recertified by the FAA. Carey said the union is concerned about whether new training Boeing is proposing will be sufficient.

American Airlines has “been working closely with our pilots on the APA national safety committee on the suggested training and other issues concerning returning the 737 MAX back to revenue service,” said American spokesman Ross Feinstein. “We appreciate their input and collaboration.”

American has ordered a 737 Max simulator that is scheduled to arrive by the end of the year.

Sullenberger added to criticism over the Federal Aviation Administration’s certification of the planes and the jet’s design saying “these crashes are demonstrable evidence that our current system of aircraft design and certification has failed us.”

Lawmakers, the Justice Department and several other bodies are examining the plane’s certification.

Sullenberger’s landing after a bird strike on the Airbus jet he was flying in 2009 became known as the “Miracle on the Hudson.”

He told lawmakers Wednesday that pilots face a “startle factor” that should be taken into account when assessing abnormalities during flight.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, miracle, planes, urges, pilots, experience, told, max, hudson, pilot, 737, boeing, simulator, training


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Dutch airline KLM orders up to 35 planes as it looks to refresh Cityhopper fleet

PARIS — Brazilian aerospace firm Embraer announced Wednesday that Dutch airline KLM has committed to buying as many as 35 of its E195-E2 aircraft. KLM Cityhopper, which is a subsidiary of the main KLM airline, has offered a firm order to buy 15 jets with purchase rights for 20 more. The 15 firm deliveries from Embraer to KLM are expected to be made between 2021 and 2024. The Embraer E195-E2 is claimed to use 30% less fuel compared to KLM Cityhopper’s current fleet of Embraer E190s, leading Elber


PARIS — Brazilian aerospace firm Embraer announced Wednesday that Dutch airline KLM has committed to buying as many as 35 of its E195-E2 aircraft. KLM Cityhopper, which is a subsidiary of the main KLM airline, has offered a firm order to buy 15 jets with purchase rights for 20 more. The 15 firm deliveries from Embraer to KLM are expected to be made between 2021 and 2024. The Embraer E195-E2 is claimed to use 30% less fuel compared to KLM Cityhopper’s current fleet of Embraer E190s, leading Elber
Dutch airline KLM orders up to 35 planes as it looks to refresh Cityhopper fleet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, looks, orders, planes, refresh, current, fleet, elbers, embraer, cityhopper, e195e2, aircraft, deal, klm, airline, dutch, firm, 35, paris


Dutch airline KLM orders up to 35 planes as it looks to refresh Cityhopper fleet

An Embraer E195 jet airliner on display at the 2019 Paris Air Show opened at Le Bourget Airport.

PARIS — Brazilian aerospace firm Embraer announced Wednesday that Dutch airline KLM has committed to buying as many as 35 of its E195-E2 aircraft.

KLM Cityhopper, which is a subsidiary of the main KLM airline, has offered a firm order to buy 15 jets with purchase rights for 20 more. Based on current list prices the deal has a value of around $2.5 billion, although a steep discount on that figure is expected.

The deal, again based on Embarer’s catalog pricing, means that the conglomerate has taken orders of 78 aircraft, worth around $4.6 billion, during the Paris Air Show this week.

The 15 firm deliveries from Embraer to KLM are expected to be made between 2021 and 2024.

Speaking at the press conference, KLM President and CEO Pieter Elbers said previous purchases of Embraer’s E190 and E175 model had expanded the airline’s route network, but refused to be drawn on any new destinations thanks to the E195-E2’s longer range.

The Embraer E195-E2 is claimed to use 30% less fuel compared to KLM Cityhopper’s current fleet of Embraer E190s, leading Elbers to describe the plane as “environmentally friendly.”

Elbers added that existing Embraer aircraft in the KLM fleet had received “a lot of positive feedback” from customers.

He said the slot availability at the busy Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam would determine if the aircraft would be used as a replacement to older planes or also as an opportunity to expand.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, looks, orders, planes, refresh, current, fleet, elbers, embraer, cityhopper, e195e2, aircraft, deal, klm, airline, dutch, firm, 35, paris


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