The UK government wants to fit all new homes with charging points for electric cars

The UK government unveiled plans which could see all new-build homes fitted with electric-car charging points. In addition, authorities want all newly-installed rapid and higher-powered public charge points to take debit or credit card payments by the spring of 2020. Currently, electric car users can apply for a grant of up to £500 off the cost of installing a charge point at their residence. Worldwide electric car sales hit 1.98 million in 2018, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA


The UK government unveiled plans which could see all new-build homes fitted with electric-car charging points. In addition, authorities want all newly-installed rapid and higher-powered public charge points to take debit or credit card payments by the spring of 2020. Currently, electric car users can apply for a grant of up to £500 off the cost of installing a charge point at their residence. Worldwide electric car sales hit 1.98 million in 2018, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA
The UK government wants to fit all new homes with charging points for electric cars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, car, fit, uk, charging, cars, electric, charge, homes, plans, million, iea, newbuild, vehicles, wants


The UK government wants to fit all new homes with charging points for electric cars

The UK government unveiled plans which could see all new-build homes fitted with electric-car charging points.

The plans, which were laid out in a consultation published Monday, would look to support what the government described as “the growing uptake of electric vehicles within the U.K.”

If put into practice, all new-build homes with dedicated parking spaces would have charging points to make vehicle charging cheaper and more convenient for drivers.

In addition, authorities want all newly-installed rapid and higher-powered public charge points to take debit or credit card payments by the spring of 2020.

In a statement Monday, Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said that there was “an appetite for cleaner, greener transport.”

“Home charging provides the most convenient and low-cost option for consumers — you can simply plug your car in to charge overnight as you would a mobile phone,” Grayling added.

Currently, electric car users can apply for a grant of up to £500 off the cost of installing a charge point at their residence.

While electric vehicles are becoming the car of choice for an increasing number of drivers, they nevertheless face challenges, not least when it comes to perceptions surrounding range and charging infrastructure.

Worldwide electric car sales hit 1.98 million in 2018, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA), with global stock reaching 5.12 million. China’s electric car market is the biggest on the planet, the IEA says, with Europe and the U.S. following behind.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, car, fit, uk, charging, cars, electric, charge, homes, plans, million, iea, newbuild, vehicles, wants


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Why billionaire Richard Branson talks about his goals before he has any idea how to accomplish them

Richard Branson, poses for photographers with a model of the LauncherOne rocket, from the window of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo. Richard Branson is used to shooting for the stars. habits is talking about plans that are yet to come to fruition,” Branson writes in a recent blog post. He calls this habit “talking ahead of yourself.” Sir Richard Branson is honored with star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on October 16, 2018 in Hollywood, California.


Richard Branson, poses for photographers with a model of the LauncherOne rocket, from the window of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo. Richard Branson is used to shooting for the stars. habits is talking about plans that are yet to come to fruition,” Branson writes in a recent blog post. He calls this habit “talking ahead of yourself.” Sir Richard Branson is honored with star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on October 16, 2018 in Hollywood, California.
Why billionaire Richard Branson talks about his goals before he has any idea how to accomplish them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, billionaire, accomplish, virgin, actually, branson, richard, talking, plans, goals, idea, hollywood, come, ahead, talks


Why billionaire Richard Branson talks about his goals before he has any idea how to accomplish them

Richard Branson, poses for photographers with a model of the LauncherOne rocket, from the window of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo.

Richard Branson is used to shooting for the stars. Last week, Virgin Galactic announced its plans to become the first publicly-traded space tourism company. It’s a bold feat, and one that Branson credits to dreaming big – and out loud. “One of my most enduring (and hopefully endearing!) habits is talking about plans that are yet to come to fruition,” Branson writes in a recent blog post. “Whenever I come up with an exciting new idea or hear a thrilling new proposal, I want to tell the world about it straight away.” He calls this habit “talking ahead of yourself.” “Far from being a problem, talking ahead of yourself can actually be very useful,” he writes. “By setting yourself future goals that many people deem unrealistic, you actually bring them closer to reality.”

Sir Richard Branson is honored with star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on October 16, 2018 in Hollywood, California. Axelle/Bauer-Griffin | FilmMagic | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, billionaire, accomplish, virgin, actually, branson, richard, talking, plans, goals, idea, hollywood, come, ahead, talks


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Huawei reportedly plans to lay off hundreds of employees in the US

Overall, Huawei has about 1,500 employs in the U.S. who mainly sell equipment to rural wireless carriers. The blacklist has hit Huawei hard. President Donald Trump, however, agreed to ease restrictions on Huawei and let U.S. companies do business with it so long as national security is not jeopardized. White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow has made clear that Trump was not granting Huawei a general amnesty. Rather, Commerce will simply grant more licenses to U.S. companies who want to do bus


Overall, Huawei has about 1,500 employs in the U.S. who mainly sell equipment to rural wireless carriers. The blacklist has hit Huawei hard. President Donald Trump, however, agreed to ease restrictions on Huawei and let U.S. companies do business with it so long as national security is not jeopardized. White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow has made clear that Trump was not granting Huawei a general amnesty. Rather, Commerce will simply grant more licenses to U.S. companies who want to do bus
Huawei reportedly plans to lay off hundreds of employees in the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-14  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plans, reportedly, journal, security, hundreds, employees, business, national, hit, lay, companies, restrictions, trump, huawei, long


Huawei reportedly plans to lay off hundreds of employees in the US

The layoffs are expected to hit Huawei’s U.S. development subsidiary Futurewei, according to the Journal. Futurewei employs 850 people in research labs throughout the U.S., including Texas, California and Washington state. Overall, Huawei has about 1,500 employs in the U.S. who mainly sell equipment to rural wireless carriers. Although the exact number of layoffs was unclear, a person familiar with the matter told the Journal that hundreds of people were expected to lose their jobs.

The Trump administration declared a national emergency in May over threats to national security and the Commerce Department added Huawei to a blacklist, which effectively bars U.S. companies from doing business with Huawei unless they receive special permission from Commerce.

The blacklist has hit Huawei hard. CEO and founder Ren Zhengfei said the company expects a $30 billion hit over the next couple years due to the U.S. restrictions. Huawei also recently announced that it was scrapping a new laptop.

President Donald Trump, however, agreed to ease restrictions on Huawei and let U.S. companies do business with it so long as national security is not jeopardized. That concession came as part of a truce reached by Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G-20 in Japan last month to restart trade talks and avoid further escalation for now.

White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow has made clear that Trump was not granting Huawei a general amnesty. Rather, Commerce will simply grant more licenses to U.S. companies who want to do business with Huawei so long as their are no national security concerns.

Read the full story in The Wall Street Journal


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-14  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plans, reportedly, journal, security, hundreds, employees, business, national, hit, lay, companies, restrictions, trump, huawei, long


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Planning to travel while on Medicare? Make sure you have coverage at your destination

Assuming you’re on Medicare — most adults age 65 or older are — coverage away from home depends partly on where you travel to, along with whether you’re on basic Medicare or get your benefits through an Advantage Plan. And while travel medical insurance can be the solution to plugging holes in coverage, it’s worthwhile first determining whether you need it. Retirees who choose to stick with that coverage — instead of going with an Advantage Plan — typically pair their coverage with a stand-alone


Assuming you’re on Medicare — most adults age 65 or older are — coverage away from home depends partly on where you travel to, along with whether you’re on basic Medicare or get your benefits through an Advantage Plan. And while travel medical insurance can be the solution to plugging holes in coverage, it’s worthwhile first determining whether you need it. Retirees who choose to stick with that coverage — instead of going with an Advantage Plan — typically pair their coverage with a stand-alone
Planning to travel while on Medicare? Make sure you have coverage at your destination Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plans, destination, travel, sure, care, coverage, advantage, medicare, surgery, youre, typically, plan, planning


Planning to travel while on Medicare? Make sure you have coverage at your destination

For many older Americans, retirement means freedom to explore beyond your backyard. Before you take off, however, check whether your health insurance travel with you. Assuming you’re on Medicare — most adults age 65 or older are — coverage away from home depends partly on where you travel to, along with whether you’re on basic Medicare or get your benefits through an Advantage Plan. It also can depend on whether the care you get is routine or due to an emergency. And while travel medical insurance can be the solution to plugging holes in coverage, it’s worthwhile first determining whether you need it. Original Medicare consists of Part A (hospital coverage) and Part B (outpatient care). Retirees who choose to stick with that coverage — instead of going with an Advantage Plan — typically pair their coverage with a stand-alone prescription-drug plan (Part D).

Julia Davila-Lampe | Moment Open | Getty Images

If this is your situation, coverage while traveling in the U.S. and its territories is fairly straightforward: You can go to any doctor or hospital that accepts Medicare (most do), whether for routine care or an emergency. It’s when you venture beyond U.S. borders that things get trickier. Generally speaking, Medicare does not provide any coverage when you’re not in the U.S. There are a few exceptions, such as when you’re on a ship within the territorial waters adjoining the country — within six hours of a U.S. port — or you’re traveling from state to state but the closest hospital to treat you is in a foreign country (i.e., you’re in Canada while heading to Alaska from the 48 contiguous states). About a third of retirees on original Medicare also purchase supplemental coverage through a Medigap policy (you cannot pair Medigap with an Advantage Plan). Those policies — which are standardized from state to state but vary in price — offer coverage for the cost-sharing parts of Medicare, such as copays and co-insurance.

Some Medigap policies — Plans C, D, F, G, M and N — offer coverage for travel. You pay a $250 annual deductible and then 20% of costs up to a lifetime maximum of $50,000. But, that amount may not go very far, depending on the type of medical services you need. “I tell our clients that a supplement is not designed for you to get a $50,000 surgery in France. It’s designed to get you healthy enough to get you back on U.S. soil to have the surgery,” said Roger Luchene, a Medicare agent with Hammer Financial Group in Schererville, Indiana. Also be aware that there is no overseas coverage through a Part D prescription drug plan. And, Medigap policies do not cover any costs related to Part D, whether you’re in the U.S. or elsewhere.

I tell our clients that a supplement is not designed for you to get a $50,000 surgery in France. It’s designed to get you healthy enough to get you back on U.S. soil to have the surgery. Roger Luchene Medicare agent with Hammer Financial Group

For retirees who get their Medicare benefits — Parts A, B and typically D — through an Advantage Plan, it’s important to check your coverage even if you’re not leaving U.S. soil. While these plans are required to cover your emergency care anywhere in the U.S., you may be on the hook for routine care outside of their service area. Or, other plans may let you visit out-of-network providers, but require you to pay more. “Check to see if your plan has some sort of U.S. coverage outside of your area,” said Elizabeth Gavino, founder of Lewin & Gavino in New York and an independent broker and general agent for Medicare plans. “The big carriers generally do, and depending on where you’re traveling, you could find in-network providers there.” More from Personal Finance:

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One reason Americans abroad want to give up citizenship

Retirees lose $3.4 trillion claiming Social Security too early Some Advantage Plans might also offer coverage for emergencies overseas, so it’s important to know whether your plan does and to what extent. Whether you have an Advantage Plan or original Medicare, travel medical insurance might be appropriate if you think your existing coverage is insufficient. “That type of insurance is not too expensive — maybe $90 for two weeks — and you can get a pretty substantial policy,” Gavino said. Such options are priced based on your age, the length of the coverage and the amount of it. On top of providing coverage for necessary health services, a policy typically includes extras such as non-medical required evacuation, lost luggage and even dental care required due to an injury. The plans typically come with a deductible — say, $250 or more — and coverage could range from about $50,000 in maximum benefits to upwards of $1 million or more. However, if you’re age 70 or older, you might face a lower lifetime maximum.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plans, destination, travel, sure, care, coverage, advantage, medicare, surgery, youre, typically, plan, planning


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Google’s plans for a mega-campus in San Jose lurk behind its recent $1 billion housing pledge

“Glad to do our part to support our future neighbors in San Jose,” CEO Sundar Pichai tweeted to the mayor of San Jose, Sam Liccardo. But the company’s pledge followed months of tense discussions and protests over rising housing prices in San Jose, where the company is planning a new mega-campus. The San Jose Diridon train station in San Jose, California, U.S., near where Google plans a major expansion. Jerry Strangis, who has worked in San Jose land use for three decades, said he’s supportive of


“Glad to do our part to support our future neighbors in San Jose,” CEO Sundar Pichai tweeted to the mayor of San Jose, Sam Liccardo. But the company’s pledge followed months of tense discussions and protests over rising housing prices in San Jose, where the company is planning a new mega-campus. The San Jose Diridon train station in San Jose, California, U.S., near where Google plans a major expansion. Jerry Strangis, who has worked in San Jose land use for three decades, said he’s supportive of
Google’s plans for a mega-campus in San Jose lurk behind its recent $1 billion housing pledge Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jose, community, lurk, google, plans, san, googles, land, area, bay, recent, billion, megacampus, pledge, housing, company


Google's plans for a mega-campus in San Jose lurk behind its recent $1 billion housing pledge

Google CEO Sundar Pichai Getty Images

Last month, when Google said it was investing $1 billion to build 20,000 Bay Area homes over the next decade, it seemed like a generous investment — and compared to what other companies have given, it is. “Glad to do our part to support our future neighbors in San Jose,” CEO Sundar Pichai tweeted to the mayor of San Jose, Sam Liccardo. But the company’s pledge followed months of tense discussions and protests over rising housing prices in San Jose, where the company is planning a new mega-campus. Now, community members and real estate experts point to the lack of detail in the announcement, and say it may not be as effective as the big round number makes it appear.

Google and other tech companies need space in the Bay Area to accommodate their talent, but there aren’t enough world-changing problems or pay upgrades to sway talent if they can’t find an affordable, safe place to live. This year, Microsoft pledged $500 million to develop affordable housing in and around its hometown of Seattle and Facebook also launched a similar project in the Bay Area. The tale is already playing out in San Francisco, where tech’s burgeoning presence combined with government inaction has led to an average rent of $3,500 for a one-bedroom apartment. Some tech workers recently told the Guardian that they are leaving the Bay Area because of housing costs and safety issues stemming from extreme inequality.

Housing is a hot-button issue in San Jose

Lurking behind Google’s $1 billion housing investment is its plan to build an 8 million square-foot campus for 20,000 employees near San Jose’s downtown — less than 15 miles from its Mountain View headquarters. For more than a year, local residents have expressed concern about rising rents and displacement as Google’s plans move forward. News reports in June 2017 first revealed Google’s interest in building a gigantic tech campus in downtown San Jose near Diridon Station, a major transit hub. Within one week of the news breaking, home prices in a three-mile radius of the site jumped 7%, and condos in the nearby Rose Garden neighborhood jumped $50,000 in a week, according to Brett Jennings, a broker and the founder of Brett Jennings Real Estate Experts. Six months later, nearby housing prices had jumped 25%, he added. “The Google effect,” he said. “We’re feeling it with buyers and sellers, and we’re also seeing it.” (Click image to enlarge.)

Google is planning a new mega-campus in the area near Diridon Station (red square), west of downtown San Jose. Within a week of the news breaking, housing prices in the Rose Garden neighborhood (shaded light grey) and other nearby neighborhoods skyrocketed. CNBC via Google Maps

Since then, several San Jose city council meetings have been disrupted by protesters expressing fear their families — some of which had been there several generations — would be forced to move as housing costs skyrocketed. In November, non-disclosure agreements signed by San Jose city members and Google spurred a lawsuit from organizations Working Partnerships USA and the First Amendment Coalition, alleging “secrecy” and lack of transparency on how the two parties would address community concerns such as housing. Finally, at a meeting in December, after 10 hours of contentious debate, the San Jose city council unanimously voted for the sale of more than $110 million in land to Google, paving the way for a 50-acre campus — essentially its second headquarters.

The San Jose Diridon train station in San Jose, California, U.S., near where Google plans a major expansion. Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The mayor called for a recess after protesters chained themselves to chairs. After a break, the public was forced into an overflow room and asked to watch the rest of the meeting from a TV screen, which fueled criticism the two parties were operating behind closed doors. Since that night, protesters have made scenes outside of Google’s marketing conference in San Jose and teamed up with employees and investors for a protest outside of the company’s annual shareholder meeting. They often carry large printed signs that read “Welcome to Googleville.” Jerry Strangis, who has worked in San Jose land use for three decades, said he’s supportive of Google’s housing commitment. But he believes it was a “clear” response to community pushback, which is the biggest threat to the potential campus. Earlier this year, community upheaval caused Amazon to pull out of plans to expand in New York. “What the city is doing and how Google is reacting to concerns and criticism about displacement with this housing initiative is really a byproduct of making this whole project work,” Strangis said. “They’ve acquired lots of the land but they also need to get the project approved and it’s pretty clear that this announcement will help make way for that.” Kelly Snider is a real estate development and land use consultant who has worked in Silicon Valley for the last 25 years. She believes the billion-dollar announcement was timed in order for the company to spur goodwill with community and to help its case in acquiring more land. She also said the company could potentially reap benefits and tax exceptions if Google’s land is deemed by cities as a “gift.” Google told CNBC it had heard criticism around the timing of the announcement, but that it also recognized that Bay Area housing had reached a crisis point.

The devil’s in the details

While local experts agree Google’s investment is a step in the right direction, they are skeptical the $1 billion figure will make much of a dent, especially since the funds will be spread out among several Bay Area cities. Google said the bulk of the housing commitment — $750 million — will go toward rezoning Google-owned land into land that can be used for housing. Critics claim that figure can be misleading to the average person because Google already agreed to rezone some of its land in areas like Mountain View prior to the announcement. Shortly after Google’s announcement, U.S. Senator Diane Feinstein, D-Calif., sent CEO Sundar Pichai a letter requesting more details. “I would like to know whether or not Google will use existing land it owns or if it (will) buy up additional commercial or industrial space,” her letter reads. “With respect to Google’s generous donation to homelessness efforts, is there a particular approach that Google is interested in investing in — such as navigation center or broader efforts to focus on comprehensive supportive services?” Nearly one month later, Feinstein hadn’t yet received answers or a formal response from the company, according to a spokesperson. However, the company clarified to CNBC that the company’s pledge will involve existing land. Community members said they are also concerned about the lack of detail on affordable housing. Jefferey Buchanan, director of policy at Silicon Valley non-profit Working Partnerships USA, said the investment probably won’t offset San Jose’s housing crisis. His firm estimates that the company will rely on 8,000 service workers at a future new tech campus. Service workers include food, janitorial and transportation contractors who earn much less money than the average Google employee. “We continue to see Google buying land in downtown and north San Jose and other parts of Silicon Valley, and yet we still have very few details on what affordable housing will entail,” he said. “There was concern around this initially and there continues to be because a blog post is not going to pay anybody’s rent here in Silicon Valley.” Silicon Valley Rising, a San Jose-based equality campaign organization, said its research found that Google needs to build more than 5,000 affordable homes in San Jose alone, not just regionally. The organization called Google’s housing investment a “win” but added “there is clearly still more it needs to do.” Google said it purposely kept the investment open-ended and that it doesn’t yet have a specific plan for affordable housing units yet, saying the individual cities will likely need to determine most of it. The company said it is soliciting applications from Bay Area developers in efforts to find the most efficient building models. In response to Senator Feinstein’s question about Google’s plans to fight homelessness, Google told CNBC it will seek organizations that focus on solutions for homelessness and displacement — similar to a $3 million donation it gave to a newly-opened San Francisco navigation center — but it hasn’t started that process yet. Despite the lack of detail, some local residents are just happy that tech companies are finally paying attention to the housing crisis. “It certainly benefits them to make sure they have places for their employees to live, and to also be a good community member,” said Leslye Corsiglia, co-founder and executive director of Silicon Valley at Home, a nonprofit that advocates for affordable housing. Corsiglia has worked with Google on its housing plans in Mountain View. “I think you can question whether or not it’s enough, but it’s certainly a lot and something other corporations are not doing.”

The expansion continues


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jose, community, lurk, google, plans, san, googles, land, area, bay, recent, billion, megacampus, pledge, housing, company


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Amazon plans to spend $700 million to retrain a third of its US workforce in new skills

Amazon.com on Thursday unveiled plans to retrain a third of its U.S. workforce — or 100,000 workers — by 2025 to help its employees move into more advanced jobs or find new careers. The retail and tech giant intends to expand its existing training programs and introduce new ones. The planned program is among the biggest corporate retraining initiatives ever announced, at a cost of roughly $7,000 per worker, or $700 million. Amazon and other companies have struggled to find technically qualified


Amazon.com on Thursday unveiled plans to retrain a third of its U.S. workforce — or 100,000 workers — by 2025 to help its employees move into more advanced jobs or find new careers. The retail and tech giant intends to expand its existing training programs and introduce new ones. The planned program is among the biggest corporate retraining initiatives ever announced, at a cost of roughly $7,000 per worker, or $700 million. Amazon and other companies have struggled to find technically qualified
Amazon plans to spend $700 million to retrain a third of its US workforce in new skills Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: terri cullen, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, training, employees, programs, program, plans, 700, spend, skills, million, workers, stores, amazon, workforce, retrain, fulfillment, technical


Amazon plans to spend $700 million to retrain a third of its US workforce in new skills

Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon and Blue Origin speaks during the JFK Space Summit, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, June 19, 2019.

Amazon.com on Thursday unveiled plans to retrain a third of its U.S. workforce — or 100,000 workers — by 2025 to help its employees move into more advanced jobs or find new careers.

The retail and tech giant intends to expand its existing training programs and introduce new ones. The training will be voluntary, and most of the programs are free.

Programs will help workers “access training to move into highly skilled technical and non- technical roles across the company’s corporate offices, tech hubs, fulfillment centers, retail stores, and transportation network, or pursue career paths outside of Amazon,” the company said in a statement.

Amazon’s retraining programs will include:

Amazon Technical Academy, which equips non-technical employees with the skills to transition into software engineering careers;

Associate2Tech, which trains fulfillment center associates to move into technical roles;

Machine Learning University, which offers employees with tech backgrounds the opportunity to access machine learning skills;

Amazon Career Choice, a pre-paid tuition program designed to train fulfillment center associates in high-demand occupations of their choice;

Amazon Apprenticeship, a Department of Labor certified program that offers paid intensive classroom training and on-the-job apprenticeships with Amazon; and

AWS Training and Certification, which provide employees with courses to build practical AWS Cloud knowledge.

The planned program is among the biggest corporate retraining initiatives ever announced, at a cost of roughly $7,000 per worker, or $700 million.

Amazon and other companies have struggled to find technically qualified U.S. employees. More advanced training for workers hired to work in Amazon warehouses is occurring in an increasingly competitive environment with the unemployment rate hovering below 4%.

Major retailers like Walmart and Target have been raising pay and boosting training to lure more quality employees and to make the experience in stores less stressful.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: terri cullen, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, training, employees, programs, program, plans, 700, spend, skills, million, workers, stores, amazon, workforce, retrain, fulfillment, technical


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Google Cloud adds its first North American sales head as it tries to catch up to Microsoft and Amazon

The latest appointment comes as Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian executes his plan to aggressively expand its sales team as the company tries to catch up to leading cloud competitors Amazon and Microsoft . Kirsten Kliphouse will lead North America sales as the company goes after enterprises, mid-market customers and small and midsize businesses, the company told CNBC. The new executive hires also come as the company announced three tuck-in acquisitions in less than two months. Google Cloud announc


The latest appointment comes as Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian executes his plan to aggressively expand its sales team as the company tries to catch up to leading cloud competitors Amazon and Microsoft . Kirsten Kliphouse will lead North America sales as the company goes after enterprises, mid-market customers and small and midsize businesses, the company told CNBC. The new executive hires also come as the company announced three tuck-in acquisitions in less than two months. Google Cloud announc
Google Cloud adds its first North American sales head as it tries to catch up to Microsoft and Amazon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, head, google, catch, plans, microsoft, amazon, announced, told, cloud, north, american, week, tries, company, sales


Google Cloud adds its first North American sales head as it tries to catch up to Microsoft and Amazon

The latest appointment comes as Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian executes his plan to aggressively expand its sales team as the company tries to catch up to leading cloud competitors Amazon and Microsoft . Kurian this week also brought on his former Oracle colleague of 20 years, Eduardo Lopez, as Google Cloud’s first sales head of Latin America.

Kirsten Kliphouse will lead North America sales as the company goes after enterprises, mid-market customers and small and midsize businesses, the company told CNBC. She will also oversee how customers use G-suite as well as broader Google services.

The new executive hires also come as the company announced three tuck-in acquisitions in less than two months. Google Cloud announced plans to acquire data analytics firm Looker for $2.6 billion in June. Last week, it announced Google’s cybersecurity company Chronicle would move from an Alphabet spin-out into Google’s cloud umbrella. Then, this week, it announced plans to acquire cloud storage company Elastifile for an undisclosed price.

“Kirsten and Eduardo are inspirational business leaders who will ensure we continue to build strong relationships with users, including HSBC, UPS, Whirlpool and many others, ” Rob Enslin, president of global customer operations for Google Cloud, told CNBC in an email. “Their expertise in running multi-billion dollar sales organizations and managing large teams will be invaluable as we focus on accelerating our growth.”

Kliphouse was most recently at Red Hat, which is now part of IBM, and previously spent almost a decade at Microsoft. She will step into an executive role rarely held by women in a male-dominated tech industry. She told CNBC she views the job as an “opportunity to influence” with her leadership.

“There have been many challenging moments, but it’s all worth it if I can help open more doors for the next generation of leaders, especially those of underrepresented backgrounds, who have historically not had a fair playing field,” Kliphouse said. “Being an active mentor and corporate sponsor has always been important to me, and I’ll continue to strongly focus on this area at Google Cloud.”

WATCH: Amazon, Google, pose risk to smaller cloud companies


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, head, google, catch, plans, microsoft, amazon, announced, told, cloud, north, american, week, tries, company, sales


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IMF sees prolonged anaemic growth in euro zone, urges ECB stimulus

The euro zone economy faces rising risks stemming from trade tensions, Brexit and Italy, the International Monetary Fund said on Thursday in an annual report, where it also backed the European Central Bank’s (ECB) plans for fresh stimulus. The report also said the euro remained slightly undervalued despite having appreciated last year, confirming a Reuters report last month. The IMF’s forecasts were slightly better than those released on Wednesday by the European Commission, the EU’s executive a


The euro zone economy faces rising risks stemming from trade tensions, Brexit and Italy, the International Monetary Fund said on Thursday in an annual report, where it also backed the European Central Bank’s (ECB) plans for fresh stimulus. The report also said the euro remained slightly undervalued despite having appreciated last year, confirming a Reuters report last month. The IMF’s forecasts were slightly better than those released on Wednesday by the European Commission, the EU’s executive a
IMF sees prolonged anaemic growth in euro zone, urges ECB stimulus Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, prolonged, sees, euro, banks, fund, anaemic, risks, stimulus, plans, imf, zone, urges, growth, ecb


IMF sees prolonged anaemic growth in euro zone, urges ECB stimulus

The euro zone economy faces rising risks stemming from trade tensions, Brexit and Italy, the International Monetary Fund said on Thursday in an annual report, where it also backed the European Central Bank’s (ECB) plans for fresh stimulus.

In the report, its last on the euro zone before the Fund’s managing director Christine Lagarde leaves in November to head the ECB, the IMF said the bank’s plans to keep monetary policy accommodative were “vital” as the currency bloc faces “a prolonged period of anaemic growth and inflation”.

The report also said the euro remained slightly undervalued despite having appreciated last year, confirming a Reuters report last month.

It urged countries with large trade surpluses, including Germany and the Netherlands, to invest more to help rebalance the exchange rate.

Output growth in the 19-nation currency bloc will slow to 1.3% this year from 1.9% in 2018, the Fund said, rebounding to 1.6% in 2020.

The IMF’s forecasts were slightly better than those released on Wednesday by the European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, which saw euro zone growth at 1.2% this year and 1.4% in 2020.

However, the Washington-based Fund sees growing risks from global trade tensions, uncertainty caused by Britain’s unclear path to leave the EU and Italy’s vulnerability caused by its high debt, of which a large portion is held by domestic banks.

Although yields on Italy’s bonds have recently fallen, the report said, a change in market sentiment could not be ruled out. That could force Italy’s anti-austerity government to adopt a “sharp fiscal tightening” even if growth slows, with risks of spillovers into other euro zone countries, the Fund said, confirming a Reuters report last month

The IMF also predicted inflation to remain far off the ECB’s close-to-2% target at least until 2022, and forecast a 1.3% rate this year, in line with ECB estimates.

“The undershooting of the inflation objective calls for prolonged monetary accommodation,” the Fund said, welcoming the central bank’s plans to maintain its easy-money policy.

The Fund raised doubts about possible plans for a tiered deposit rate, which would lower the charge banks pay on some of their excess cash.

“A regime of tiering (..) would have a very small impact on aggregate bank profitability and a questionable impact on credit conditions,” the report said, adding that the costs of negative rates were likely outweighed by indirect positive effects.

In case of a further worsening of inflation expectations, the IMF said that more accommodation may be necessary, and could include a new asset purchase program.

The new purchases would need to maintain the same distribution across euro zone states and could be broadened to a larger set of eligible assets, the fund said.

Whereas “there may be only limited room to cut rates,” the IMF did not rule out new stimulus measures, “such as new, cheaper liquidity facilities for banks.”

The report said the ECB’s new round of cheap multi-year loans for banks, known as TLTRO 3, was a good move, but said it also risked expanding banks’ exposure to their home country debt.

To prevent this, it said, “it is appropriate for the ECB to shorten the maturity of the new TLTROs and to offer less generous pricing terms than on TLTRO II”.

In its report, the Fund also called for centralised supervision of money-laundering risks at banks in the euro zone, after a string of cases that exposed national shortfalls in countering financial crime.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, prolonged, sees, euro, banks, fund, anaemic, risks, stimulus, plans, imf, zone, urges, growth, ecb


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This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni


She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni
This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

Warren cited data that indicates that more than 70% of black mothers and more than 40% of Latina mothers are the sole breadwinners in their families, compared to less than a quarter of white mothers. She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination.

In a Medium post, the Massachusetts senator writes that if elected, on day one of her presidency she would implement a set of executive actions that would “boost wages for women of color and open up new pathways to the leadership positions they deserve.”

On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks on during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “And it’s getting worse,” writes Warren. “The gap in weekly earnings between white and black women is higher today than it was 40 years ago. ”

To fix this problem, Warren says that as president she would deny federal contracts to companies with a poor track record of diversity and equal pay, implement a minimum wage salary of $15 an hour (since black and brown women disproportionately occupy low-wage jobs), ban companies from asking applicants about their salary and criminal histories, and ban companies from using forced arbitration and non-compete clauses that “make it harder for employees to fight wage theft, discrimination and harassment.”

Additionally, Warren points out that women of color also face a steeper climb to higher-level management positions. “Even though black women and Latinas are often the leaders and decision-makers in their own homes and communities, they hold only one spot on the Fortune 500 CEO list and less than 5% of Fortune 500 Board positions, ” she writes.

Currently, Mary Winston, who was appointed interim CEO of Bed, Bath & Beyond in May, is the only black woman leading a Fortune 500 company.

Warren writes that she would provide companies with resources to attract applicants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities and other minority-serving institutions. She says she would also create paid fellowship programs for federal jobs for minority and low-income candidates and she would require every federal agency to make diversity a core part of its strategic plan. This includes, she says, creating a government-wide mentorship program focused on black and brown employees.

“It’s time to build an America that recognizes the role that women of color play in their families and in the economy,” writes Warren, “that fairly values their work, and that delivers equal opportunity for everyone.”

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Don’t miss: Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


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Richard Branson’s Virgin Orbit gets one step closer to launching satellites from a 747 airplane

Virgin Orbit drops a Launcher One rocket from under the wing of its modified Boeing 747 in a key test before the company’s first launch. Sir Richard Branson’s other space company Virgin Orbit completed a key test of its Boeing 747-based launch system on Wednesday. And, instead of fuel, the test rocket is carrying a load of water and antifreeze to simulate weight. Hart said that the first rocket the company plans to launch to space is undergoing final checks at Virgin Orbit’s factory in Long Beac


Virgin Orbit drops a Launcher One rocket from under the wing of its modified Boeing 747 in a key test before the company’s first launch. Sir Richard Branson’s other space company Virgin Orbit completed a key test of its Boeing 747-based launch system on Wednesday. And, instead of fuel, the test rocket is carrying a load of water and antifreeze to simulate weight. Hart said that the first rocket the company plans to launch to space is undergoing final checks at Virgin Orbit’s factory in Long Beac
Richard Branson’s Virgin Orbit gets one step closer to launching satellites from a 747 airplane Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virgin, orbit, airplane, rocket, company, satellites, test, key, richard, space, gets, system, plans, launching, bransons, closer, step, launch


Richard Branson's Virgin Orbit gets one step closer to launching satellites from a 747 airplane

Virgin Orbit drops a Launcher One rocket from under the wing of its modified Boeing 747 in a key test before the company’s first launch.

Sir Richard Branson’s other space company Virgin Orbit completed a key test of its Boeing 747-based launch system on Wednesday.

Virgin Orbit flew its modified aircraft above the Mojave Desert in California and dropped a dummy rocket from tens of thousands of feet in the air, to test one of the key parts of its launch system. The company plans to use the rocket to launch satellites to space, with the “air launch” system giving a schedule flexibility that Virgin Orbit touts over more common ground-based launch systems like those of SpaceX and Rocket Lab.

“This drop test is the final major demonstration in a development program that’s been going on for four and a half years,” CEO Dan Hart told CNBC before the test. “It’s a huge deal … separating developmental work from the beginning of operations for us and getting to orbit.”

Instead of a payload, the rocket for the drop test has a hunk of metal in its nose. And, instead of fuel, the test rocket is carrying a load of water and antifreeze to simulate weight.

Hart said that the first rocket the company plans to launch to space is undergoing final checks at Virgin Orbit’s factory in Long Beach, California. With checks on that rocket will take place in the weeks following the drop test in the desert, with Hart forecasting Virgin Orbit’s first launch “hopefully will be before the end of the summer.”

“We’re poised to be able to launch our next rocket, which would be our first paying customer, two months, maybe 10 weeks, after the first flight,” Hart added.

Virgin Orbit is a spin-off of Branson’s space tourism company Virgin Galactic. While both of the companies launch spacecraft from the air – rather than the ground – that’s where the similarities end. Virgin Orbit uses a former commercial jet and will launch satellites the size of refrigerators to orbit, while Virgin Galactic has a one-of-a-kind aircraft and plans to send paying tourists on 10 minute rides at the edge of space.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virgin, orbit, airplane, rocket, company, satellites, test, key, richard, space, gets, system, plans, launching, bransons, closer, step, launch


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