World Federation of Advertisers ask tech companies to be responsible

Tech companies may get caught hosting content like terrorist videos or targeted comments from pedophiles, but their massive audiences make their platforms next to impossible for advertisers to quit in the end. But at least one major advertising group, representing close to a trillion dollars worth of buying power a year, has started to formulate plans to get tech companies to clean up their mess. Since the internet companies receive so much revenue from advertising, “They cannot completely ignor


Tech companies may get caught hosting content like terrorist videos or targeted comments from pedophiles, but their massive audiences make their platforms next to impossible for advertisers to quit in the end. But at least one major advertising group, representing close to a trillion dollars worth of buying power a year, has started to formulate plans to get tech companies to clean up their mess. Since the internet companies receive so much revenue from advertising, “They cannot completely ignor
World Federation of Advertisers ask tech companies to be responsible Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-20  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wfa, federation, plan, advertisers, content, shooting, ask, platforms, members, world, youtube, companies, advertising, responsible, tech


World Federation of Advertisers ask tech companies to be responsible

Advertisers haven’t been afraid to pull money out of Facebook or YouTube campaigns, following the exposures of controversial content hosted on the platforms, but they always seem to come crawling back.

They’re caught in a Catch-22. Tech companies may get caught hosting content like terrorist videos or targeted comments from pedophiles, but their massive audiences make their platforms next to impossible for advertisers to quit in the end.

But at least one major advertising group, representing close to a trillion dollars worth of buying power a year, has started to formulate plans to get tech companies to clean up their mess.

The World Federation of Advertisers (WFA), whose members include PepsiCo, P&G and Diageo, called on its members to put pressure on platforms to do more to prevent their services and technology from being “hijacked by those with malicious intent” in brands’ capacity as “the funders of the online advertising system.”

Raja Rajamannar, Mastercard’s CMO, took the role of president of the WFA in late March. Since the internet companies receive so much revenue from advertising, “They cannot completely ignore the rightful preferences of the advertisers,” he said in an interview with CNBC this week.

And he said it’s about a broader issue than just providing a “safe” place for brands. For something like the New Zealand shooting that was live-streamed on Facebook and passed around on YouTube and Twitter, “it is not a brand safety issue. It’s a societal safety issue, and as marketers we have a responsibility to society.”

The WFA in late March urged its members to “think carefully about where they place advertising” and consider a moral responsibility bigger than the effectiveness than social media platforms for brands. The call came after reports of comments from pedophile groups on YouTube videos, content regarding self-harm and suicide on Instagram and the live-streaming of a mosque shooting in New Zealand on Facebook.

But despite the problems, walking away isn’t as obvious as it might seem to be, Rajamannar said.

“There are these big social media giants who have got a humongous reach, they’ve got a humongous ability to precisely target the right kind of an audience, which you cannot ignore,” he said. “You cannot walk away from that scale just like that.”

The potential trade-offs to that scale have been more evident for marketers in recent months.

“Do you want live streaming of a shooting happening? You definitely don’t want that,” he said. “There is some tangible action that is happening. Is it adequate? No. And should it be expedited? Yes.”

He said the request for platforms in the near-term is a clear plan.

“We are saying, ‘Show us the game plan.’ We want to see the game plan clearly,” he said.

Rajamannar said one common answer from platforms to how they’re fixing content issues is that the companies are adding more people. Facebook and YouTube have hired thousands of individuals in recent years to monitor content on their respective platforms.

“That’s not exactly a plan. So we are saying, is it a technology-based solution … Is it people-based? Is it a hybrid? We are asking them to think through their strategy and come and share with us,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-20  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wfa, federation, plan, advertisers, content, shooting, ask, platforms, members, world, youtube, companies, advertising, responsible, tech


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Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp suffer hours-long outage in US, Europe

Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp were down Sunday. All three social media platforms, including Facebook Messenger, were not loading as of early Sunday morning. Downdetector.com, a site that monitors site outages, shows Facebook was down since 6:30 a.m. EST in much of the world, with thousands of reported outages concentrated in northeastern U.S., Europe and the Philippines. An email requesting comment about the outage was sent to Facebook and Instagram. There are more than 1.52 billion daily act


Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp were down Sunday. All three social media platforms, including Facebook Messenger, were not loading as of early Sunday morning. Downdetector.com, a site that monitors site outages, shows Facebook was down since 6:30 a.m. EST in much of the world, with thousands of reported outages concentrated in northeastern U.S., Europe and the Philippines. An email requesting comment about the outage was sent to Facebook and Instagram. There are more than 1.52 billion daily act
Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp suffer hours-long outage in US, Europe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, site, hourslong, platforms, europe, social, media, suffer, outage, whatsapp, instagram, facebook, users, outages


Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp suffer hours-long outage in US, Europe

Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp were down Sunday.

All three social media platforms, including Facebook Messenger, were not loading as of early Sunday morning.

Downdetector.com, a site that monitors site outages, shows Facebook was down since 6:30 a.m. EST in much of the world, with thousands of reported outages concentrated in northeastern U.S., Europe and the Philippines.

Facebook appeared to be back up and running for most users by 9 a.m. EST.

It was not immediately clear what caused the outage or how long the platforms would be down.

An email requesting comment about the outage was sent to Facebook and Instagram.

#FacebookDown, #instagramdown and #whatsappdown were all trending on Twitter globally.

Facebook acquired Instagram in 2012 and WhatsApp in 2014.

There are more than 1.52 billion daily active Facebook users, according to the social media network’s website.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, site, hourslong, platforms, europe, social, media, suffer, outage, whatsapp, instagram, facebook, users, outages


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Many now use digital sources to make investment decisions: Brunswick

Many now use digital sources to make investment decisions: Brunswick22 Hours AgoCraig Mullaney of Brunswick says says it is important for chief executive officers to be themselves when communicating through online platforms.


Many now use digital sources to make investment decisions: Brunswick22 Hours AgoCraig Mullaney of Brunswick says says it is important for chief executive officers to be themselves when communicating through online platforms.
Many now use digital sources to make investment decisions: Brunswick Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brunswick, sources, investment, executive, important, online, digital, mullaney, hours, decisions, officers, platforms


Many now use digital sources to make investment decisions: Brunswick

Many now use digital sources to make investment decisions: Brunswick

22 Hours Ago

Craig Mullaney of Brunswick says says it is important for chief executive officers to be themselves when communicating through online platforms.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brunswick, sources, investment, executive, important, online, digital, mullaney, hours, decisions, officers, platforms


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Tech firms could face EU fines for failing to remove terrorist content within one hour

Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. The legislation targets any material — such as text, images, sound recordings or videos — that incites or solicits terrorist offences, provides instructions for the carrying out of terrorist offences, or solicits participation in the activities of a terrorist group. It will also apply to content providing guidance on how to make and use explosives, firearm


Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley. The legislation targets any material — such as text, images, sound recordings or videos — that incites or solicits terrorist offences, provides instructions for the carrying out of terrorist offences, or solicits participation in the activities of a terrorist group. It will also apply to content providing guidance on how to make and use explosives, firearm
Tech firms could face EU fines for failing to remove terrorist content within one hour Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offences, failing, authorities, firms, platforms, face, tech, content, hour, terrorist, eu, legislation, solicits, removal, remove, fines


Tech firms could face EU fines for failing to remove terrorist content within one hour

By signing up for newsletters, you are agreeing to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .

Each morning, the “Beyond the Valley” newsletter brings you all the latest from the vast, dynamic world of tech – outside the Silicon Valley.

Companies that have been issued a substantial number of removal orders may also be asked by authorities to take further measures, such as regular reporting to authorities or increasing staff numbers. Lawmakers also agreed that additional measures ordered by authorities should take a company’s financial capabilities into account, as well as “the freedom to receive and impart information and ideas in an open and democratic society.”

Smaller platforms would be given a slight advantage, with a 12-hour window to remove content after their first removal order, as well as an explanation from authorities about their obligations under the law.

The legislation targets any material — such as text, images, sound recordings or videos — that incites or solicits terrorist offences, provides instructions for the carrying out of terrorist offences, or solicits participation in the activities of a terrorist group. It will also apply to content providing guidance on how to make and use explosives, firearms and other weapons for terrorist purposes.

The law would protect content that was being distributed for educational, journalistic or research purposes. The expression of controversial views on sensitive political matters would not be subject to the legislation.

Daniel Dalton, member of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs, said in a press release Monday there was a clear problem with terrorist material being circulated unchecked — but he added the legislation would not prohibit free speech.

“This propaganda can be linked to actual terrorist incidents and national authorities must be able to act decisively,” he said. “Any new legislation must be practical and proportionate if we are to safeguard free speech. Without a fair process we risk the over-removal of content as businesses would understandably take a safety-first approach to defend themselves. It also absolutely cannot lead to a general monitoring of content by the back door.”

Big Tech has faced intensified scrutiny since a video of last month’s attacks on two New Zealand mosques was shared repeatedly on several social media sites.

U.K. lawmakers published a proposal for new legislation on Monday that would slap companies with hefty fines, block websites and hold executives personally liable if their platforms host harmful content.

Last week, Australia passed a similar law that could see tech firms and their executives fined or jailed for failing to remove harmful content from their platforms.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offences, failing, authorities, firms, platforms, face, tech, content, hour, terrorist, eu, legislation, solicits, removal, remove, fines


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Britain plans social media regulation to battle harmful content

Britain proposed new online safety laws on Monday that would slap penalties on social media companies and technology firms if they fail to protect their users from harmful content. Easy access to damaging material particularly among young people has caused growing concern worldwide and came into the spotlight in Britain after the death of 14-year-old schoolgirl Molly Russell, which her parents said came after she had viewed online material on depression and suicide. Governments across the world


Britain proposed new online safety laws on Monday that would slap penalties on social media companies and technology firms if they fail to protect their users from harmful content. Easy access to damaging material particularly among young people has caused growing concern worldwide and came into the spotlight in Britain after the death of 14-year-old schoolgirl Molly Russell, which her parents said came after she had viewed online material on depression and suicide. Governments across the world
Britain plans social media regulation to battle harmful content Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battle, online, social, forward, britain, platforms, paper, material, needed, plans, content, regulation, regulations, harmful, media


Britain plans social media regulation to battle harmful content

Britain proposed new online safety laws on Monday that would slap penalties on social media companies and technology firms if they fail to protect their users from harmful content.

Easy access to damaging material particularly among young people has caused growing concern worldwide and came into the spotlight in Britain after the death of 14-year-old schoolgirl Molly Russell, which her parents said came after she had viewed online material on depression and suicide.

Governments across the world are wrestling over how to better control content on social media platforms, often blamed for encouraging abuse, the spread of online pornography, and for influencing or manipulating voters.

Global worries were recently stoked by the live streaming of the mass shooting at a mosque in New Zealand on one of Facebook’s platforms, after which Australia said it would fine social media and web hosting companies and imprison executives if violent content is not removed “expeditiously”.

In a policy paper widely trailed in British media, the government said it would look into possibly using fines, blocking access to websites, and imposing liability on senior tech company management for failing to limit the distribution of harmful content.

It would also set up a regulator to police the rules.

TechUK, an industry trade group, said the paper was a significant step forward, but one which needed to be firmed up during its 12-week consultation. It said some aspects of the government’s approach were too vague.

“It is vital that the new framework is effective, proportionate and predictable,” techUK said in a statement, adding not all concerns could be addressed through regulation.

Facebook said it was looking forward to working with the government to ensure new regulations were effective, repeating its founder Mark Zuckerberg’s line that regulations were needed to have a standard approach across platforms.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battle, online, social, forward, britain, platforms, paper, material, needed, plans, content, regulation, regulations, harmful, media


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Facebook, Google execs could reportedly be liable for harmful content under UK plans

Executives from the likes of Facebook and Google could reportedly be held liable for harmful content shared on their platforms under U.K. government plans. Britain is set to unveil legislation on Monday that brings about a new legally-binding duty of care on social media firms to make their platforms safer, The Guardian reported, citing a leaked government document. Those powers will likely initially come under Britain’s media watchdog Ofcom, the newspaper reported, before a new body is establis


Executives from the likes of Facebook and Google could reportedly be held liable for harmful content shared on their platforms under U.K. government plans. Britain is set to unveil legislation on Monday that brings about a new legally-binding duty of care on social media firms to make their platforms safer, The Guardian reported, citing a leaked government document. Those powers will likely initially come under Britain’s media watchdog Ofcom, the newspaper reported, before a new body is establis
Facebook, Google execs could reportedly be liable for harmful content under UK plans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: ryan browne, niall carson, pa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attack, media, liable, content, executives, platforms, reported, plans, shared, harmful, social, google, uk, execs, reportedly, facebook


Facebook, Google execs could reportedly be liable for harmful content under UK plans

Executives from the likes of Facebook and Google could reportedly be held liable for harmful content shared on their platforms under U.K. government plans.

Britain is set to unveil legislation on Monday that brings about a new legally-binding duty of care on social media firms to make their platforms safer, The Guardian reported, citing a leaked government document.

A white paper due to be released by the government next week will reportedly include proposals for an independent regulator with the power to dish out fines and hold company executives personally liable for breaches.

Those powers will likely initially come under Britain’s media watchdog Ofcom, the newspaper reported, before a new body is established.

The news comes as social media giants face increasing calls to clean up their platforms in the wake of the Christchurch, New Zealand mosque attack. The gunman, who killed 50 people, livestreamed the attack on Facebook, with subsequent copies of the footage being shared on YouTube and Twitter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: ryan browne, niall carson, pa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attack, media, liable, content, executives, platforms, reported, plans, shared, harmful, social, google, uk, execs, reportedly, facebook


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Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook’s livestream feature after Christchurch attacks

Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. Although reluctant


Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. Although reluctant
Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook’s livestream feature after Christchurch attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, video, zuckerberg, feature, livestreaming, attacks, content, tech, facebooks, remove, platforms, resists, livestream, alter, facebook, youre, pressure, thats


Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook's livestream feature after Christchurch attacks

Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform.

Speaking to ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos on Thursday, the Facebook founder and CEO admitted that the artificial intelligence it uses to filter harmful content failed to flag the video, adding that its reach may have been limited if livestreams were subject to a broadcast delay.

“But it would also fundamentally break what livestreaming is for people. Most people are livestreaming a birthday party or hanging out with friends when they can’t be together,” he said. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. So if you had a delay [it] would break that.”

Although reluctant to introduce a delay on Facebook’s livestream feature, Zuckerberg accepted that the company needed to work harder to “mitigate and remove as much of the negative (content) as possible.”

He also told ABC that the way the company was run had significantly changed in recent years, with the policing of harmful content among the major issues Facebook was focusing on.

“Ninety-nine percent of the ISIS and Al-Qaeda content that we take down are AI systems identifying the move before any person sees it — so that’s a good example of being proactive, and I think what we should hold all companies to account [for],” he said.

Footage of last month’s mosque massacre was livestreamed on Facebook by the shooter last month.

Facebook, Twitter and Google rushed to remove the content from their platforms, but users were still able to find versions of the video hours after the tech giants said they had taken it down.

On Thursday, Australian lawmakers passed legislation that could see social media executives face jail time and hefty fines if their platforms fail to remove violent content.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, video, zuckerberg, feature, livestreaming, attacks, content, tech, facebooks, remove, platforms, resists, livestream, alter, facebook, youre, pressure, thats


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Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook’s livestream feature after Christchurch attacks

Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. Although reluctant


Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. Although reluctant
Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook’s livestream feature after Christchurch attacks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, video, zuckerberg, feature, livestreaming, attacks, content, tech, facebooks, remove, platforms, resists, livestream, alter, facebook, youre, pressure, thats


Zuckerberg resists pressure to alter Facebook's livestream feature after Christchurch attacks

Mark Zuckerberg has expressed reluctance to alter the Facebook feature that hosted video footage of the deadly terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

The tech giant came under criticism after video of the attack, which killed 50 people, was livestreamed and widely circulated on its platform.

Speaking to ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos on Thursday, the Facebook founder and CEO admitted that the artificial intelligence it uses to filter harmful content failed to flag the video, adding that its reach may have been limited if livestreams were subject to a broadcast delay.

“But it would also fundamentally break what livestreaming is for people. Most people are livestreaming a birthday party or hanging out with friends when they can’t be together,” he said. “One of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, … you’re not just broadcasting, you’re communicating, and people are commenting back. So if you had a delay [it] would break that.”

Although reluctant to introduce a delay on Facebook’s livestream feature, Zuckerberg accepted that the company needed to work harder to “mitigate and remove as much of the negative (content) as possible.”

He also told ABC that the way the company was run had significantly changed in recent years, with the policing of harmful content among the major issues Facebook was focusing on.

“Ninety-nine percent of the ISIS and Al-Qaeda content that we take down are AI systems identifying the move before any person sees it — so that’s a good example of being proactive, and I think what we should hold all companies to account [for],” he said.

Footage of last month’s mosque massacre was livestreamed on Facebook by the shooter last month.

Facebook, Twitter and Google rushed to remove the content from their platforms, but users were still able to find versions of the video hours after the tech giants said they had taken it down.

On Thursday, Australian lawmakers passed legislation that could see social media executives face jail time and hefty fines if their platforms fail to remove violent content.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: chloe taylor, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, video, zuckerberg, feature, livestreaming, attacks, content, tech, facebooks, remove, platforms, resists, livestream, alter, facebook, youre, pressure, thats


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Facebook deletes hundreds of fake accounts ahead of Indian elections

Facebook deletes hundreds of fake accounts ahead of Indian elections2:11 PM ET Tue, 2 April 2019Alex Stamos, former Facebook chief security officer, joins ‘The Exchange’ to discuss how Facebook and other social media platforms could fight disinformation on their platforms and weighs in on what regulation could be done.


Facebook deletes hundreds of fake accounts ahead of Indian elections2:11 PM ET Tue, 2 April 2019Alex Stamos, former Facebook chief security officer, joins ‘The Exchange’ to discuss how Facebook and other social media platforms could fight disinformation on their platforms and weighs in on what regulation could be done.
Facebook deletes hundreds of fake accounts ahead of Indian elections Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elections, security, ahead, deletes, accounts, platforms, weighs, stamos, hundreds, indian, officer, media, fake, joins, facebook, regulation, social


Facebook deletes hundreds of fake accounts ahead of Indian elections

Facebook deletes hundreds of fake accounts ahead of Indian elections

2:11 PM ET Tue, 2 April 2019

Alex Stamos, former Facebook chief security officer, joins ‘The Exchange’ to discuss how Facebook and other social media platforms could fight disinformation on their platforms and weighs in on what regulation could be done.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elections, security, ahead, deletes, accounts, platforms, weighs, stamos, hundreds, indian, officer, media, fake, joins, facebook, regulation, social


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What Europe’s copyright overhaul means for YouTube, Facebook and the way you use the internet

If you’re an internet user in Europe, chances are the way you use platforms like YouTube and Facebook could be about to shift drastically in the coming years. The European Parliament recently passed sweeping changes to the EU’s almost two decades-old copyright rules, and critics are worried it could be a misfire that ultimately results in online censorship. With the new rules, liability now lies with tech giants to ensure their platforms aren’t open to copyright breaches. Detractors have said th


If you’re an internet user in Europe, chances are the way you use platforms like YouTube and Facebook could be about to shift drastically in the coming years. The European Parliament recently passed sweeping changes to the EU’s almost two decades-old copyright rules, and critics are worried it could be a misfire that ultimately results in online censorship. With the new rules, liability now lies with tech giants to ensure their platforms aren’t open to copyright breaches. Detractors have said th
What Europe’s copyright overhaul means for YouTube, Facebook and the way you use the internet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: ryan browne, robert michael, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, european, overhaul, youtube, facebook, europes, copyright, theyre, pull, particular, way, means, platforms, rules, internet, tech


What Europe's copyright overhaul means for YouTube, Facebook and the way you use the internet

If you’re an internet user in Europe, chances are the way you use platforms like YouTube and Facebook could be about to shift drastically in the coming years.

The European Parliament recently passed sweeping changes to the EU’s almost two decades-old copyright rules, and critics are worried it could be a misfire that ultimately results in online censorship.

The aptly-named directive on “Copyright in the Digital Single Market” is all part of the bloc’s efforts to update its laws to reflect the challenges posed by the age of information.

First introduced by the European Commission in 2016, the new copyright law contains two particular sections that have attracted heavy scrutiny from activists and internet giants alike: Articles 11 and 13 (or 15 and 17 as they’re now numbered after a recent update).

The former is aimed at giving news organizations more protections to ensure they’re paid fairly for the dissemination of their stories online. Services like Google News will be under particular pressure, as the rules will mean tech firms need to agree to licenses with publishers to share their articles.

In fact, Google has gone as far as to suggest that it may even be forced to pull its news aggregation platform from Europe as a result of the new legislation.

But the biggest source of worry for the people and companies protesting the new measures by far is Article 13. Currently, the onus is on rightsholders to flag copyright violations with tech firms, who can then take action to pull content if they find it’s in breach of copyright.

With the new rules, liability now lies with tech giants to ensure their platforms aren’t open to copyright breaches. Detractors have said this would lead to controversial pre-filter systems, where everything from memes to GIFs are blocked from online platforms.

For its part, the European Parliament has said this won’t be the case, and that memes, GIFs, hyperlinks and snippets of articles will still be able to be shared freely. But that hasn’t allayed the concerns of tech companies, freedom of speech campaigners and regular internet users themselves.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: ryan browne, robert michael, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, online, european, overhaul, youtube, facebook, europes, copyright, theyre, pull, particular, way, means, platforms, rules, internet, tech


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