Facebook is trying to woo YouTube stars with new ways to make money

For many online video stars, YouTube is top of mind when it comes to the best place to post a video. Facebook is sweetening its offerings for video creators, whether they’re viral video stars or media companies, luring them to its platform with new tools to help them make money through advertising and direct payments from Facebook users. Facebook Watch, the platform’s video offering that includes original programming and uploaded video from creators, launched globally last year after being intro


For many online video stars, YouTube is top of mind when it comes to the best place to post a video. Facebook is sweetening its offerings for video creators, whether they’re viral video stars or media companies, luring them to its platform with new tools to help them make money through advertising and direct payments from Facebook users. Facebook Watch, the platform’s video offering that includes original programming and uploaded video from creators, launched globally last year after being intro
Facebook is trying to woo YouTube stars with new ways to make money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youtube, trying, woo, facebook, stars, subscriptions, cut, platforms, users, creators, video, money, ways, platform


Facebook is trying to woo YouTube stars with new ways to make money

For many online video stars, YouTube is top of mind when it comes to the best place to post a video. Facebook is trying to change that.

Facebook is sweetening its offerings for video creators, whether they’re viral video stars or media companies, luring them to its platform with new tools to help them make money through advertising and direct payments from Facebook users.

The new or updated offerings are similar to some already offered on YouTube and start-ups such as Patreon. The changes were announced at its “Facebook Creator Day” in Malibu, California, on Tuesday, held ahead of VidCon, a conference for the online video industry that starts Wednesday in Anaheim.

Facebook Watch, the platform’s video offering that includes original programming and uploaded video from creators, launched globally last year after being introduced in 2017. In June, Facebook said it had reached more than 720 million users monthly and 140 million users daily who spend at least one minute on Watch. In comparison, Google-owned YouTube says more than 1.9 billion logged-in users watch video on the platform every month.

Some advertisers said that even though Facebook’s numbers were up, they wanted more specifics on the data, as well as better functionality for users to discover videos.

YouTube has spawned a class of superstar creators, some of whom rake in millions of dollars every month. Instagram has been a boon for influencers, but IGTV, Instagram’s answer to YouTube, has struggled to find the same kind of success. Creators have also complained about finding their revenue footing on Facebook Watch.

“A lot of creators are focusing almost all of their attention on YouTube, Instagram and emerging platforms,” said Joe Gagliese, co-founder and managing partner of influencer marketing agency Viral Nation.

Gagliese said part of the difficulty in implementing new features is that people aren’t used to seeing certain types of ads or subscriptions on Facebook. YouTube, on the other hand, has been more focused on monetization for creators since the beginning, he said.

“Changing a human’s opinion on anything can be difficult,” he said. Facebook’s algorithm changes have also affected the reach of content, which has been a turnoff for creators, he said.

Facebook’s slew of updates include new ad options — for instance, letting creators show only ad formats that don’t interrupt the video, such as a pre-roll ad. That feature is available now, the company said.

Facebook will also update its “Brand Collabs Manager,” which lets advertisers find creators for branded content partnerships. For instance, creators can share their own audience for ads targeting. It’s similar to YouTube’s lucrative Preferred product, which connects big-name advertisers with YouTube’s hottest creators.

Facebook is also tweaking how much creators earn from their fans through more direct payments. The company’s “Fan subscriptions” program lets viewers pay creators each month for exclusive content and other rewards. It’s similar to the start-up Patreon, which lets an individual collect payments from fans.

But while Patreon takes up to a 12% cut, Facebook starting next year will take a 30% cut from these subscriptions on its web platform. Facebook won’t take a further cut where mobile platforms are already taking a 30% transaction fee from creators. Currently, Facebook doesn’t take a revenue share for fan subscriptions, so creators keep 100% of their earnings on the web platform and 70% on mobile platforms. Going forward, creators will keep a 70% cut of the revenue from fan subscriptions regardless of whether it’s on web or mobile platforms.

Facebook is also testing an expansion of Facebook Stars, a program it already has for creators who stream video games. Stars lets users buy packs of virtual stars that can be given to creators. Facebook takes a cut of each Star pack purchase. For example, if a Facebook user buys a pack of 100 stars for $1.40, Facebook keeps 28.6%, leaving the user $1 to gift to creators. The more a Facebook user spends on Stars, the less share Facebook will take. Creators get 1 cent per Star sent by a fan.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youtube, trying, woo, facebook, stars, subscriptions, cut, platforms, users, creators, video, money, ways, platform


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French lawmakers back fines for companies like Facebook and Google that leave hate speech online

The approval comes as world leaders are hotly debating the balance between free speech and content moderation online. Germany is known for its relatively firm laws on hate speech, which prohibits praising Nazi ideology, for example. But the online hate speech measure has sparked pushback from activists and academics who fear the law suppresses speech and say it puts too much responsibility on internet companies to regulate it. Last week, Facebook agreed to give French judges identification data


The approval comes as world leaders are hotly debating the balance between free speech and content moderation online. Germany is known for its relatively firm laws on hate speech, which prohibits praising Nazi ideology, for example. But the online hate speech measure has sparked pushback from activists and academics who fear the law suppresses speech and say it puts too much responsibility on internet companies to regulate it. Last week, Facebook agreed to give French judges identification data
French lawmakers back fines for companies like Facebook and Google that leave hate speech online Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawmakers, hours, french, leave, google, online, remove, speech, companies, law, fines, facebook, platforms, content, hate


French lawmakers back fines for companies like Facebook and Google that leave hate speech online

Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg (L) meets with French President Emmanuel Macron (R) at the Elysee presidential palace following the “Tech for Good” summit in Paris on May 23, 2018.

French lawmakers backed a bill Thursday that would give platforms and search engines like Facebook and Google 24 hours to remove hate speech before being hit with fines up to the equivalent of $1.4 million, The Financial Times reported.

The approval comes as world leaders are hotly debating the balance between free speech and content moderation online. Facebook and Google-owned YouTube both came under fire in March when videos of an attack on a mosque in New Zealand continued to pop up on their platforms in the hours after the event. The incident renewed scrutiny of the companies’ ability to screen out sensitive content.

The French law would require platforms to remove content that incites terrorism, hate or violence, among other things, according to The Associated Press, and requires search engines to stop referencing the content.

France’s proposed law follows a 2018 measure in Germany known as NetzDG, which also gives online platforms 24 hours to remove flagged content that violates its hate speech laws or face fines up to 50 million euros ($56 million).

Germany is known for its relatively firm laws on hate speech, which prohibits praising Nazi ideology, for example. But the online hate speech measure has sparked pushback from activists and academics who fear the law suppresses speech and say it puts too much responsibility on internet companies to regulate it.

The French law, which has prompted similar warnings, must still be approved in a final vote expected to take place on Tuesday, according to state-owned network France 24.

Last week, Facebook agreed to give French judges identification data of French users suspected of hate speech, according to France’s minister for digital affairs, Cedric O. The decision followed Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s meetings with French President Emmanuel Macron, whose party proposed the new hate speech law.

Google and Facebook did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

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WATCH: Why Facebook’s business model is only now coming under fire


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawmakers, hours, french, leave, google, online, remove, speech, companies, law, fines, facebook, platforms, content, hate


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Twitter, Facebook seem like fairly unbiased platforms, says tech expert

Twitter, Facebook seem like fairly unbiased platforms, says tech expert13 Hours AgoAngel investor Balaji Srinivasan Greycroft board partner Kamran Ansari join “Squawk Alley” to discuss whether Big Tech is ready for the 2020 election.


Twitter, Facebook seem like fairly unbiased platforms, says tech expert13 Hours AgoAngel investor Balaji Srinivasan Greycroft board partner Kamran Ansari join “Squawk Alley” to discuss whether Big Tech is ready for the 2020 election.
Twitter, Facebook seem like fairly unbiased platforms, says tech expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ready, join, unbiased, srinivasan, squawk, platforms, fairly, tech, facebook, twitter, expert, partner, kamran


Twitter, Facebook seem like fairly unbiased platforms, says tech expert

Twitter, Facebook seem like fairly unbiased platforms, says tech expert

13 Hours Ago

Angel investor Balaji Srinivasan Greycroft board partner Kamran Ansari join “Squawk Alley” to discuss whether Big Tech is ready for the 2020 election.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ready, join, unbiased, srinivasan, squawk, platforms, fairly, tech, facebook, twitter, expert, partner, kamran


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If Facebook and Google don’t fix their problems, advertising execs say they could go somewhere else

The other question, posed by a number of Democratic presidential candidates: Should Facebook and Google be broken up? The largest companies in the industry teamed up to announce a new “Alliance for Responsible Content” at this year’s festival. “We’re working with Google, Facebook, Twitter, and 16 advertisers, together with all of the major holding companies. For other companies here, the pressure on Google and Facebook poses an opportunity. And AT&T’s ad tech division, Xandr, is also hoping to b


The other question, posed by a number of Democratic presidential candidates: Should Facebook and Google be broken up? The largest companies in the industry teamed up to announce a new “Alliance for Responsible Content” at this year’s festival. “We’re working with Google, Facebook, Twitter, and 16 advertisers, together with all of the major holding companies. For other companies here, the pressure on Google and Facebook poses an opportunity. And AT&T’s ad tech division, Xandr, is also hoping to b
If Facebook and Google don’t fix their problems, advertising execs say they could go somewhere else Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: julia boorstin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, really, content, execs, platforms, say, companies, ad, fix, tech, advertisers, facebook, problems, advertising, google, dont


If Facebook and Google don't fix their problems, advertising execs say they could go somewhere else

This year as executives from the world’s biggest brands and ad agencies gathered on the French Riviera for the annual Cannes Lions advertising festival, Facebook and Google, which control the majority of all digital advertising, are facing unprecedented scrutiny.

Governments around the world are looking to hold these two giants — called the “digital duopoly” — accountable for the content posted on their platforms and for the way they protect users data.

The other question, posed by a number of Democratic presidential candidates: Should Facebook and Google be broken up? These potential regulatory challenges come as executives from around the world meet to discuss where to invest the $600 billion expected to be spent on advertising worldwide this year.

The largest companies in the industry teamed up to announce a new “Alliance for Responsible Content” at this year’s festival. Sixteen of the world’s largest advertisers along with the ad agencies and tech platforms — Facebook, Twitter and Google — are working to create standards for what’s considered appropriate content and expectations of how they’ll prevent offensive and inappropriate content from surfacing.

This comes as Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., proposes new legislation that would remove the tech companies’ protection from liability from the content on their platforms by overhauling Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.

“Brand safety is critical for every brand. No one wants to see your ad suggesting people buy next to a jihadist video,” said Michael Kassan, CEO of MediaLink, whose parent company Ascential runs the conference. “It’s about protecting that. The platforms have the same level of responsibility. If your network was putting things like that on the air, the FCC would be looking very carefully.”

“When I talk to our clients, they’re really concerned about the platforms on which their messages are received. They want to be in brand-safe platforms,” said Mark Read, CEO of WPP, one of the world’s largest advertisers.

“We’re working with Google, Facebook, Twitter, and 16 advertisers, together with all of the major holding companies. … It’s really an initiative to bring people together for collective action to make sure the platforms are safe places for our clients to reach their consumers,” Read said.

The chief brand officer of one of those participating companies, Procter & Gamble’s Marc Pritchard, said this is about more than just removing terrorist content.

“We really expect to ensure that the platforms have control over their content and the quality of their content,” Pritchard said. “The other piece, which we’ve called out many times before, if we want to have more civility when it comes to editorial comments, so we have a civil internet. Just as we have on TV, like we have on radio, like we have in print.”

WPP’s Read said these companies should be held to a higher standard, but he also said he does not believe that it would help consumers to break the companies up.

“Clearly with the shift online these two companies are ever more powerful. But you have to ask ourselves, ‘What are we really trying to achieve by the people who’s going to be broken up?'” Read said. “And is that really going to make the world a better place? The great benefit of these platforms for consumers is most of their products are free.”

Michael Roth, CEO of IPG, said brands will start to move their dollars if things don’t change.

“Everyone talks about government regulation breaking [Google and Facebook] up. But what really will happen is our clients will start not spending with them. And that will be the biggest effect eventually if it doesn’t get corrected,” Roth said.

Kassan said that this is a “Network” moment, with the advertisers saying they’re “mad as hell and not going to take it anymore.” He said they’ll have to “not just move their lips, but also move their feet.” And now, Roth and Kassan agree that there are a growing wealth of ad options, including Amazon, Snap and Hulu.

For other companies here, the pressure on Google and Facebook poses an opportunity. Conde Nast, the magazine publisher that’s been investing heavily in digital video, is positioning itself as means for brands to access YouTube’s viewers without the risk.

“We’re the largest premium publisher on YouTube today,” Conde Nast CEO Roger Lynch said. “And so advertisers who may not want to advertise just broadly on YouTube will advertise through us on YouTube.”

Lynch said he knows they are working with advertisers who won’t advertise on YouTube, but will advertise through Conde Nast on YouTube.

And AT&T’s ad tech division, Xandr, is also hoping to benefit from the growing scrutiny facing its much larger rivals.

“I think it’s becoming more and more difficult for technology platforms to claim they have no responsibility for the content that is shared on their platforms,” Xandr CEO Brian Lesser said. “I don’t know if it’s about breaking up, and don’t know the extent of what Sen. Hawley is introducing, but I do think it is time for the big digital platforms to take some responsibility for the content.”

As for the question of whether regulation of the biggest ad platforms would be bad for the tech industry, Kassan said it’s a question of what the regulation looks like.

“You had Enron and then you ended up with Sarbanes-Oxley,” Kassan said, referring to the law that changed how the financials of public companies were regulated after the collapse of Enron. “I would suggest that Sarbanes-Oxley was an overreaction. My hope would be we don’t see that happen in tech. And the challenge of course is those who are making the decisions in the various regulatory agencies are not as steeped in the tech. You hope that the decision-making process is not done in a vacuum.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: julia boorstin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, really, content, execs, platforms, say, companies, ad, fix, tech, advertisers, facebook, problems, advertising, google, dont


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Lego marketing chief says the challenge with online advertising is that so much content is ‘damaging’ to kids

Lego faces a conundrum when it comes to online advertising, according to Chief Marketing Officer Julia Goldin. That’s because the toymaker’s target audience is children, and the big internet companies aren’t doing enough to protect them from unsafe content, she says. “Platforms need to have more transparency and take more responsibility,” Goldin said on Thursday in an onstage interview at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. “Right now, they are on platforms where they are expo


Lego faces a conundrum when it comes to online advertising, according to Chief Marketing Officer Julia Goldin. That’s because the toymaker’s target audience is children, and the big internet companies aren’t doing enough to protect them from unsafe content, she says. “Platforms need to have more transparency and take more responsibility,” Goldin said on Thursday in an onstage interview at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. “Right now, they are on platforms where they are expo
Lego marketing chief says the challenge with online advertising is that so much content is ‘damaging’ to kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chief, need, online, kids, marketing, content, thats, safety, platforms, damaging, lego, responsibility, challenge, advertising, goldin


Lego marketing chief says the challenge with online advertising is that so much content is 'damaging' to kids

Lego faces a conundrum when it comes to online advertising, according to Chief Marketing Officer Julia Goldin. That’s because the toymaker’s target audience is children, and the big internet companies aren’t doing enough to protect them from unsafe content, she says.

“Platforms need to have more transparency and take more responsibility,” Goldin said on Thursday in an onstage interview at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. “We also need to take more responsibility for how we work with platforms, both individually as brands but collectively as an industry.”

Speaking at a session hosted by The Economist and featuring marketing leaders from Procter & Gamble and Taco Bell, Goldin addressed the increasing concern surrounding the safety of online content and the regulatory issues facing tech giants. Questions about how marketing executives are pressuring Facebook and Google to change their practices came up repeatedly at Cannes, the ad industry’s most important annual awards event.

Goldin is focused on the safety of kids.

“Right now, they are on platforms where they are exposed to content that is actually damaging to them and their privacy is not protected,” Goldin said. “I don’t think we should accept that.”

Goldin added that Lego doesn’t advertise on the major sites when the company doesn’t “feel that it’s safe.” When asked if the company promotes its products on YouTube, she said, Lego is “really focused on adults” on that site and is “very careful about where we actually will put advertising that’s targeted to children.”

YouTube did not provide CNBC with a response to Goldin’s comments.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-21  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chief, need, online, kids, marketing, content, thats, safety, platforms, damaging, lego, responsibility, challenge, advertising, goldin


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Instagram user posts altered video of Mark Zuckerberg

Instagram user posts altered video of Mark Zuckerberg4 Hours AgoSome are calling to break up Facebook with one of the main concerns being its dominance in the digital ad market. Another area that could prove to be a problem is the time users spend on all Facebook’s platforms. CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports.


Instagram user posts altered video of Mark Zuckerberg4 Hours AgoSome are calling to break up Facebook with one of the main concerns being its dominance in the digital ad market. Another area that could prove to be a problem is the time users spend on all Facebook’s platforms. CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports.
Instagram user posts altered video of Mark Zuckerberg Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: stephen lam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prove, platforms, spend, user, posts, reports, video, problem, altered, instagram, mark, zuckerberg4, users, zuckerberg


Instagram user posts altered video of Mark Zuckerberg

Instagram user posts altered video of Mark Zuckerberg

4 Hours Ago

Some are calling to break up Facebook with one of the main concerns being its dominance in the digital ad market. Another area that could prove to be a problem is the time users spend on all Facebook’s platforms. CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: stephen lam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prove, platforms, spend, user, posts, reports, video, problem, altered, instagram, mark, zuckerberg4, users, zuckerberg


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A festive mood at Apple’s conference for app makers, even as storm clouds gather

But you couldn’t tell that from the festive mood at Apple’s annual developer conference, WWDC. Viewed from WWDC, the state of Apple’s developer ecosystem remains strong, with a large number of talented programmers who are clamoring to make software for Apple’s platforms, including iPhones, iPads, and Mac computers. Apple’s developer ecosystem is critical for the company, because one key selling point for the iPhone is its access to high-quality, often exclusive applications and games. Apple App


But you couldn’t tell that from the festive mood at Apple’s annual developer conference, WWDC. Viewed from WWDC, the state of Apple’s developer ecosystem remains strong, with a large number of talented programmers who are clamoring to make software for Apple’s platforms, including iPhones, iPads, and Mac computers. Apple’s developer ecosystem is critical for the company, because one key selling point for the iPhone is its access to high-quality, often exclusive applications and games. Apple App
A festive mood at Apple’s conference for app makers, even as storm clouds gather Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, user, apps, apples, platforms, makers, android, app, conference, mood, festive, gather, developers, clouds, apple, developer, storm, store


A festive mood at Apple's conference for app makers, even as storm clouds gather

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, California, June 3, 2019. Mason Trinca | Reuters

As Apple CEO Tim Cook took the stage in San Jose, California, on Monday, dark clouds were forming over the company in Washington, DC. The Justice Department was given jurisdiction for a potential antitrust probe of Apple, according to a Reuters report on Monday, and CEO Tim Cook went on national television to defend the company a day later. The main antitrust arguments against Apple involve its control over developers who sell on the App Store, which is the only way for most people to install apps on an iPhone. But you couldn’t tell that from the festive mood at Apple’s annual developer conference, WWDC. The 5,000-plus attendees were mostly programmers who make apps for Apple’s platforms, and they were there to meet up with colleagues, get tutorials from Apple employees, and party with like-minded people. Antitrust was the farthest thing from most people’s minds. Viewed from WWDC, the state of Apple’s developer ecosystem remains strong, with a large number of talented programmers who are clamoring to make software for Apple’s platforms, including iPhones, iPads, and Mac computers. Apple’s developer ecosystem is critical for the company, because one key selling point for the iPhone is its access to high-quality, often exclusive applications and games. Apple also takes 30% of the price of any app sold through its App Store platforms, which converts this thriving developer ecosystem a growing revenue stream for the company as it focuses investor attention on its growing stable of online services. Apple’s developers are generally excited about Apple software. They say that Apple’s tools are the best-in-class, that its iPhone App Store provides easy access to billions of paying customers, and that they personally prefer to use Apple products — as you have to do to make iPhone apps.

$1,599 tickets

WWDC was a difficult ticket to get. Some developers won a lottery to buy $1,599 tickets to attend the weeklong celebration of Apple’s products and software. Others were sent by their companies, which paid their way. Some talented high school and college kids attended the conference on Apple’s dime, with the idea that they might work for Apple or build a killer app one day. All attendees got a custom reversible jacket when they arrived. Many programmers in San Jose this week expressed enthusiasm over several new Apple announcements. One popular feature was Sign in with Apple, which replaces Google’s and Facebook’s systems for signing into apps, but with a greater emphasis on privacy. Another popular announcement was SwiftUI, a new programming framework that drastically reduces the amount of boilerplate code needed to write a new app. SwiftUI is still in an early stage, with many developers saying they didn’t plan to use it for years, but one programmer has already published an online tutorial book about the two-day old technology. Many developers believe Apple’s developer tools and devices enable them to make apps for iOS that aren’t possible on other platforms. “When it comes to new user experiences, and particularly creative user experiences that require user experience innovation, we always start at iOS. The main reason is that the platform is much more curated and you’re dealing with a more refined set of APIs and devices, so you can drive for a higher performance point there,” WeTransfer Chief Innovation Officer Georg Petschnigg told CNBC before the show started. He’s developed a lot of iOS apps, but recently launched a new app to tap into Android’s larger user base.

Simpler to develop for

Apple’s platforms target a much smaller variety of devices and have fewer versions in use than Google Android, making them easier to develop for. Even Apple CEO Tim Cook mentioned this advantage during a speech on Monday when he said the “other guys” — Google — only has 10% of users on the most recent version of Android.

Stacey Lisik, Apple senior director of OS program management, speaks during Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, California, June 3, 2019. Mason Trinca | Reuters

“Ultimately, I felt that iOS had fewer form factors. Android, you have a huge amount of hardware, and even on the minimum OS version, it’s like, what do you choose? Those are the kind of trade-offs you have to think about,” said Jesse Chor, the head of mobile for Splunk. He recently headed up the development of a Splunk Connected Experiences set of apps which are available for iPhone and Apple Watch, but not Android. “When you are on iPhone and you push a new app, 97% of your user base is on the newest version within 48 hours,” Mammoth Media founder Benoit Vatere told CNBC. His company develops two main apps, Wishbone and Yarn, for both Android and iOS. By way of response, Google said that it released new cross-platform developer tools at its developer conference earlier this year, and that it’s improving Android to make it easier to developers to target a wider range of versions of Android without doing extra work.

Still the cash king

One reason why Apple’s platform remains popular among developers is that its audience is willing to pay. Apple App Store users spent $46.6 billion around the world in 2018, app analytics firm Sensor Tower estimates. That’s 1.9 times what Google Play did last year. In the U.S. specifically, iPhone users spent $79 per device compared to the average Android user who bought $56 of apps, in-app purchases, and online services through Google Play. “According to our estimates, the world’s App Store users spent nearly twice as much in apps last year as Google Play’s did, despite the latter’s considerably larger market global market share,” Sensor Tower cofounder Alex Malafeev told CNBC. On a website launched the week before WWDC, Apple noted that it had paid over $120 billion to developers over the past 10 years. On that website it said that “even though other stores have more users and more app downloads, the App Store earns more money for developers.” “Revenue per user remains way stronger on Apple compared to Android,” Vatere agreed.

Burbling issues beneath the surface

Despite the positive atmosphere in San Jose, some developers expressed concerns about Apple’s dominance in hushed tones at the conference or at unofficial side-events held in adjoining hotels. Governments are placing more attention than ever on Apple’s control of its platforms and how it might compete with its own developers. The European Union is investigating a claim from Spotify that Apple disadvantaged it in favor of its own Apple Music service. Some developers who made parental control apps felt targeted by Apple’s App Store review process called “App Review” when Apple released a competing feature called Screen Time. Several developers said that the phenomenon of Apple making apps that compete with its own developers so old it has name: Sherlocking, after an obsolete piece of Apple software from the early 2000’s that competed with an app called Watson. The Verge put together a list of 9 apps that were Sherlocked at WWDC this year. One developer who saw Apple announce a competitive feature at WWDC said that he had no warning about the move, despite an existing relationship with Apple’s developer relations group. He said he asked his contact at Apple multiple times if Apple was going to compete with him and didn’t get a response. Still, he said he wanted to continue making apps for Apple’s platforms, but that he might think about expanding into areas where big tech companies are unlikely to compete with him in the future. He didn’t want to be named because he has an ongoing relationship with Apple.

Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of Software Engineering, speaks during an announcement of new products at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference Monday, June 4, 2018, in San Jose, Calif. Marcio Jose Sanchez | AP


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, user, apps, apples, platforms, makers, android, app, conference, mood, festive, gather, developers, clouds, apple, developer, storm, store


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Facebook’s newer platforms are doing ‘very, very well,’ says analyst

Facebook’s newer platforms are doing ‘very, very well,’ says analyst6 Hours AgoBrian White of Monness, Crespi, Hardt & Co explains his Buy rating on Facebook.


Facebook’s newer platforms are doing ‘very, very well,’ says analyst6 Hours AgoBrian White of Monness, Crespi, Hardt & Co explains his Buy rating on Facebook.
Facebook’s newer platforms are doing ‘very, very well,’ says analyst Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, white, doing, monness, hardt, rating, hours, facebook, newer, platforms, facebooks, analyst, explains


Facebook's newer platforms are doing 'very, very well,' says analyst

Facebook’s newer platforms are doing ‘very, very well,’ says analyst

6 Hours Ago

Brian White of Monness, Crespi, Hardt & Co explains his Buy rating on Facebook.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, white, doing, monness, hardt, rating, hours, facebook, newer, platforms, facebooks, analyst, explains


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Trump’s White House just put up an online form for people to complain about social media censorship

The Trump Administration on Wednesday opened an online form where Americans can share instances in which they’ve been censored by social media platforms like Facebook and YouTube. The form asks users to share their contact information, social media links, their citizenship and residency status and links or screenshots of any social media content they’ve posted that was censored by Facebook or its Instagram service, Twitter, or Google’s YouTube. The White House’s new form comes as more politician


The Trump Administration on Wednesday opened an online form where Americans can share instances in which they’ve been censored by social media platforms like Facebook and YouTube. The form asks users to share their contact information, social media links, their citizenship and residency status and links or screenshots of any social media content they’ve posted that was censored by Facebook or its Instagram service, Twitter, or Google’s YouTube. The White House’s new form comes as more politician
Trump’s White House just put up an online form for people to complain about social media censorship Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, white, theyve, censorship, facebook, platforms, social, media, house, links, online, form, twitter, share, trumps, complain


Trump's White House just put up an online form for people to complain about social media censorship

Twitter CEO and co-founder Jack Dorsey gestures while interacting with students at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in New Delhi on November 12, 2018.

The Trump Administration on Wednesday opened an online form where Americans can share instances in which they’ve been censored by social media platforms like Facebook and YouTube.

The form asks users to share their contact information, social media links, their citizenship and residency status and links or screenshots of any social media content they’ve posted that was censored by Facebook or its Instagram service, Twitter, or Google’s YouTube.

“This permission grants the U.S. Government a license to use, edit, display, publish, broadcast, transmit, post, or otherwise distribute all or part of the Content (including edited, composite, or derivative works made therefrom),” reads the user agreement for the form.

The White House’s new form comes as more politicians are pushing for regulation against online platforms, with a focus on Facebook specifically. Multiple 2020 Democratic presidential candidates including Elizabeth Warren, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris have said they would consider breaking up Facebook.

Meanwhile, Facebook is expecting to be hit with a fine of up to $5 billion by the Federal Trade Commission related to the company’s March 2018 Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which a political consulting firm improperly accessed the data of 87 million Facebook users.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, white, theyve, censorship, facebook, platforms, social, media, house, links, online, form, twitter, share, trumps, complain


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YouTube and its users face an existential threat from the EU’s new copyright directive

Like other content creators who have built brands and businesses on tech platforms like YouTube, they fear their livelihood and creative outlet could be threatened by a new copyright directive passed by the European Union in March. If creators take their work elsewhere, that would mean fewer videos to watch on YouTube and fewer chances for YouTube to generate ad revenue. But under the new directive, YouTube would likely have to rethink this claiming process. “It could create serious limitations


Like other content creators who have built brands and businesses on tech platforms like YouTube, they fear their livelihood and creative outlet could be threatened by a new copyright directive passed by the European Union in March. If creators take their work elsewhere, that would mean fewer videos to watch on YouTube and fewer chances for YouTube to generate ad revenue. But under the new directive, YouTube would likely have to rethink this claiming process. “It could create serious limitations
YouTube and its users face an existential threat from the EU’s new copyright directive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, platforms, directive, youtube, creators, users, tech, face, threat, video, existential, copyright, videos, copyrighted, content, eus


YouTube and its users face an existential threat from the EU's new copyright directive

Susan Wojcicki, CEO of YouTube. Michael Newberg | CNBC

Samuel Jones largely lives off the money he makes from YouTube as a TV and film reviewer. “In terms of paying rent, buying food, buying cigarettes, it’s all YouTube money,” he said. While his channel’s co-creator Max Bardsley is in university, Jones works on “NitPix ” full-time. The U.K.-based pair also nurture a small fashion business on the side that mostly provides some spending change. Recently, Jones and Bardsley have been thinking about a backup plan. Like other content creators who have built brands and businesses on tech platforms like YouTube, they fear their livelihood and creative outlet could be threatened by a new copyright directive passed by the European Union in March. Under the new rules, which member states have two years to formally write into law, tech platforms like YouTube could be held liable for hosting copyrighted content without the proper rights and licensing. That’s a big change from the status quo, which generally assumes platforms are not legally liable for their users’ uploads so long as they take down infringing content once flagged. But according to the directive, companies like YouTube can soon be held liable unless they can also prove they made “best efforts” to get authorization for the content and prevent it from being shared without rights in the first place. YouTube and other tech platforms have argued that the only practical way to avoid liability will be to install even more restrictive content filters than the ones they currently have to prevent infringement. The EU directive does not require tech companies to do that and it makes exceptions for using copyrighted material in parody or commentary, as would be the case in Jones and Bardsley’s reviews. But experts say it will be difficult for platforms to create automated filters that can distinguish this context, at least at first. That could mean a channel like “NitPix” would have to avoid using any movie or TV clips in their reviews to ensure their videos upload to the site in a timely manner. Jones and Bardsely, along with four other YouTube creators interviewed for this article, remain optimistic that the final version of the laws will be more flexible than the vague language of the directive. But YouTube isn’t leaving things up to chance.

A threat to YouTube

YouTube is ready to put up a fight against the EU measure, which threatens to force it to block a wide swath of content and slow down the process of uploading videos to the site to avoid liability. If YouTube chose to block copyrighted content with stricter upload filters, everything from a family video of a couple’s first wedding dance to a potentially viral dance challenge video like a “Harlem Shake ” flash mob could be blocked from the site. Frustrated creators and users may flee the platform if it no longer provides the outlet for their creativity or boredom. If creators take their work elsewhere, that would mean fewer videos to watch on YouTube and fewer chances for YouTube to generate ad revenue. The company is already under pressure to grow ad revenue after changes to its algorithms over the past year have likely hurt engagement in favor of winning back scorned advertisers worried about their brands appearing next to unseemly videos. Alphabet CFO Ruth Porat blamed YouTube in part for the company’s decelerating ad revenue growth in its first quarter 2019, which sent Google’s stock plunging more than 7% following the report. “While YouTube clicks continue to grow at a substantial pace in the first quarter, the rate of YouTube click growth rate decelerated versus a strong Q1 last year, reflecting changes that we made in early 2018, which we believe are overall additive to the user and advertiser experience,” Porat said on a call with analysts after the report. YouTube recognizes the importance of keeping its creators happy on the platform. In an April 30 blog post, CEO Susan Wojcicki said YouTube will aim to further promote a wider array of creator videos in its trending tab to answer concerns that the same creators seemed to be featured all the time. Wojcicki also said YouTube is working on improving its “Manual Claiming” tool so that YouTubers aren’t unfairly penalized for copyright claims stemming from extremely short or incidental content usage. But under the new directive, YouTube would likely have to rethink this claiming process. “The incentive structure here for YouTube would be to delete everything where it has its doubts about its illegality,” said Stephan Dreyer, a senior researcher of media law and media governance at the Hans-Bredow-Institut in Germany. “In cases of doubt, the machine must always decide against the content creator and that’s something that paragraph 7 does not really cope with,” he added, alluding to the section that allows for commentary and parody exceptions. In its final iteration, the directive makes specific exceptions for content that is used for criticism, quotation or parody, which legal experts said should wipe away fears of what critics labeled a “meme ban. ” Opponents of the directive originally argued the measure would prevent the spread of memes since copyrighted images that make up the basis of many of these satirical posts could end up filtered off of platforms. But even after the text was revised, tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets in Germany the week of the EU parliamentary vote, pledging to “save your internet.” YouTube did not make a representative available for an interview for this article, but it has said on its site that revisions made to the directive before its passage were an “improvement.” But the company still remains wary of how it will be implemented. “While we support the rights of copyright holders — YouTube has deals with almost all the music companies and TV broadcasters today — we are concerned about the vague, untested requirements of the new directive,” Wojcicki wrote in the blog post. “It could create serious limitations for what YouTube creators can upload. This risks lowering the revenue to traditional media and music companies from YouTube and potentially devastating the many European creators who have built their businesses on YouTube.”

Creators’ frustrations

YouTube creators often use copyrighted material as a way to highlight a point or comment on a specific piece of media. In many of these cases, this use is allowed under the principles of “fair use,” similar to the exceptions made in the EU’s final version of the directive. In interviews, YouTube creators said these materials aren’t just an added plus for their videos — they’re a core part of what makes them work. “I don’t want to have to spend half the video or three-quarters of the video just explaining things that I could show instead, and I think that when you do that, it kind of detracts from the video’s appeal,” said James Dancey, whose political commentary-focused channel “The Right Opinion ” has over 300,000 subscribers. “We have an audience that I feel like is waiting on us to deliver quality content, and one of the things I’ve realized as a YouTuber is there are many people who find my videos make a difference to their day.” Arun Maini, who runs the technology review channel “Mrwhosetheboss ” with over 2 million subscribers, said he intersperses relevant copyrighted material in about half of his videos as a way to keep viewers engaged. He dreads the thought of producing a six-minute video of simply talking to the camera. Beyond being boring, he thinks this sort of video could actually hurt a creator’s following. “If anything, you’d be better off not even trying because you’d be making such bad content that you’d be damaging your channel,” Maini said. Overall, creators are optimistic the directive won’t excessively impact their channels, if only because they believe the new laws won’t work. But they do anticipate headaches from YouTube’s own filtering system, whose current iteration known as Content ID, is already a thorn many creators’ sides. “Content ID is the only real existing model we have to work on to see what the filters would be like, and it’s been an absolute nightmare for me working under Content ID” said Dan Bull, a YouTube creator with over 1.5 million subscribers on his channel. Bull, who creates rap videos about the internet, gaming and politics, said he’s had videos flagged by the filter because it could not detect that he had a nonexclusive license. He said he’s also learned of instances where the system incorrectly redirects revenue after someone makes a false copyright claim. YouTube did not answer CNBC’s questions about Content ID or its characterizations by creators. Bull said his problems with Content ID have already changed his creative process. He’s reluctant to create videos with fair use content because it’s become so burdensome to deal with. “I don’t really want to make parody music anymore. I used to really enjoy making parody songs, but now when I think about that, I think about what a headache it would be with the copyright claims,” Bull said. “It seems to be contrary to the entire principle of what copyright was for.” The “NitPix” creators said they temporarily had one of their TV reviews removed from the platform due to copyright, but it was later reinstated. They said they haven’t had problems with it in more than a year. Given the technical limitations that already exist, legal experts say the complexity of such a system will advantage the already-dominant players. Corynne McSherry, legal director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which has fiercely opposed the EU directive, said building this type of system is a task that “even the YouTubes of the world will not be able to accomplish,” leaving open the question of how up-and-coming platforms will tackle it.

Entrenching large platforms

A key criticism of Article 17 of the EU directive has been that it will further entrench large platforms’ foothold in digital distribution dominance. The directive gives more leniency to companies with under 10 million euros in annual revenue with a product available to the public for less than three years. But legal experts say that in trying to get tech companies to pay their fair share for copyrighted content, the directive has created a new problem that only the tech giants can solve. “A likely effect of [Article 17] will be to entrench the exact tech giants that everyone’s been complaining about all this time,” McSherry said. Legal experts interviewed for this article said platforms will likely pursue broad licensing agreements to avoid liability. YouTube already has agreements with record labels that give it certain rights to use its artists’ music in exchange for royalty payments. Experts suggested that YouTube could broaden the scope of its licenses to include a wide array films, TV shows and games as well so that licensed content is cleared by its filters. But since such broad licenses would require platforms to shell out lots of cash, this solution could actually prove even more exclusionary for emerging platforms. “I don’t really want a world where YouTube is the only platform I can look to for videos,” McSherry said. “All we are doing is making sure they can continue to be the dominant video player and make sure they can exercise enormous power over our video experience.”

Hope in impracticality


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, platforms, directive, youtube, creators, users, tech, face, threat, video, existential, copyright, videos, copyrighted, content, eus


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