EU to investigate Amazon over possible anti-competitive business practices

EU Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager addresses a press conference on two state aid cases at the European Commission in Brussels on October 4, 2017. EU antitrust regulators will investigate Amazon to determine if the e-commerce giant’s use of merchant data breaches competition rules, the European Commission said on Wednesday. The investigation centers on Amazon’s “dual role” as both a retailer and a marketplace, Vestager said. The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, be


EU Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager addresses a press conference on two state aid cases at the European Commission in Brussels on October 4, 2017. EU antitrust regulators will investigate Amazon to determine if the e-commerce giant’s use of merchant data breaches competition rules, the European Commission said on Wednesday. The investigation centers on Amazon’s “dual role” as both a retailer and a marketplace, Vestager said. The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, be
EU to investigate Amazon over possible anti-competitive business practices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, margrethe, amazon, data, competition, eu, marketplace, business, vestager, commission, european, possible, rules, investigate, anticompetitive, practices


EU to investigate Amazon over possible anti-competitive business practices

EU Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager addresses a press conference on two state aid cases at the European Commission in Brussels on October 4, 2017.

EU antitrust regulators will investigate Amazon to determine if the e-commerce giant’s use of merchant data breaches competition rules, the European Commission said on Wednesday.

Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said the EU opened a formal investigation to see if Amazon uses data from independent retailers who sell on the company’s marketplace to its own advantage. The investigation centers on Amazon’s “dual role” as both a retailer and a marketplace, Vestager said.

“Based on the Commission’s preliminary fact-finding, Amazon appears to use competitively sensitive information – about marketplace sellers, their products and transactions on the marketplace,” the regulator said in a statement.

The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, began questioning merchants about how Amazon collects their data last year. If the EU determines Amazon breached competition rules, it could fine the company up to 10% of global annual revenues.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, margrethe, amazon, data, competition, eu, marketplace, business, vestager, commission, european, possible, rules, investigate, anticompetitive, practices


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Europe will reportedly launch a major probe into Amazon’s business practices in days

The European Union’s antitrust chief is planning to open a formal investigation into Amazon in coming days, Bloomberg reported Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the case. The investigation itself does not come as a surprise, as EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager had already launched a preliminary probe into Amazon in September and was expected to announce whether a full probe would take place. The preliminary investigation focused on how Amazon uses data on its third-party mercha


The European Union’s antitrust chief is planning to open a formal investigation into Amazon in coming days, Bloomberg reported Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the case. The investigation itself does not come as a surprise, as EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager had already launched a preliminary probe into Amazon in September and was expected to announce whether a full probe would take place. The preliminary investigation focused on how Amazon uses data on its third-party mercha
Europe will reportedly launch a major probe into Amazon’s business practices in days Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, days, office, probe, business, investigation, vestagers, european, reportedly, reported, vestager, preliminary, practices, amazon, major, launch, amazons, europe, data


Europe will reportedly launch a major probe into Amazon's business practices in days

The European Union’s antitrust chief is planning to open a formal investigation into Amazon in coming days, Bloomberg reported Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the case.

The investigation itself does not come as a surprise, as EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager had already launched a preliminary probe into Amazon in September and was expected to announce whether a full probe would take place. The preliminary investigation focused on how Amazon uses data on its third-party merchants that sell through Amazon.

Vestager explained the key questions she had about Amazon’s business model in a September interview with CNBC.

“They host a lot of little guys, and at the same time, they’re a big guy in the same market,” Vestager said. “So how do they treat the data that they get from the little guy? Does that give them an advantage that cannot be matched?”

The probe follows a crackdown on Big Tech under Vestager’s time in office. During her term, the European Commission has slapped Google with a combined $9.5 billion in antitrust fines since 2017 and authorities across the region have scrutinized Apple and Facebook for their competition and data practices. The reported Amazon investigation follows news that Vestager’s office plans to fine Qualcomm more than $1 billion for allegedly trying to prevent other chipmakers from gaining business from Apple, according to Bloomberg.

A spokesperson for the European Commission declined to comment. Amazon and did not immediately return a request for comment.

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Watch: An inside look at how Amazon Prime Now delivers food and household items in less than two hours


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, days, office, probe, business, investigation, vestagers, european, reportedly, reported, vestager, preliminary, practices, amazon, major, launch, amazons, europe, data


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Broadcom in EU antitrust spotlight, faces interim measures

The European Commission also said it plans to impose interim measures during the probe to avoid “serious and irreparable harm” to the market. It sent a statement of objections, or charge sheet, to the company setting out reasons why such measures are needed. Broadcom said it believes it complies with European Competition rules and that the concerns are “without merit.” Broadcom’s anti-competitive practices prevent its customers, and ultimately consumers, from enjoying the benefits of choice and


The European Commission also said it plans to impose interim measures during the probe to avoid “serious and irreparable harm” to the market. It sent a statement of objections, or charge sheet, to the company setting out reasons why such measures are needed. Broadcom said it believes it complies with European Competition rules and that the concerns are “without merit.” Broadcom’s anti-competitive practices prevent its customers, and ultimately consumers, from enjoying the benefits of choice and
Broadcom in EU antitrust spotlight, faces interim measures Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spotlight, tv, practices, measures, european, interim, modem, antitrust, fines, competition, company, faces, broadcom, eu


Broadcom in EU antitrust spotlight, faces interim measures

EU antitrust regulators will investigate whether U.S. chipmaker Broadcom uses exclusivity restrictions to block rivals in the TV and modem chipsets markets, a move that could lead to hefty fines for the company and an order to end such practices.

The European Commission also said it plans to impose interim measures during the probe to avoid “serious and irreparable harm” to the market. It sent a statement of objections, or charge sheet, to the company setting out reasons why such measures are needed.

Broadcom said it believes it complies with European Competition rules and that the concerns are “without merit.”

The San Jose, Calif.-based company’s communications chips power Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and GPS connectivity in smartphones.

Broadcom’s anti-competitive practices prevent its customers, and ultimately consumers, from enjoying the benefits of choice and innovation, European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said in a statement.

Such practices include exclusive purchasing obligations, tying rebates or other benefits to exclusive or minimum purchase requirements, product bundling, abusive IP-related strategies and deliberately making it difficult for Broadcom products to function with rival products, it said.

EU competition enforcers said interim measures were warranted because of Broadcom’s likely dominance in the TV and modem chipset markets and deals between the company and seven major customers that resulted in the latter buying chips only from Broadcom.

In a filing with U.S. regulators, Broadcom said it did not expect a material impact on its set-top box or broadband modem business from the Commission’s move.

It said the Commission’s planned interim measures would not preclude Broadcom from continuing to sell any products.

The Commission can levy fines of up to 10% of a company’s global revenues for breaching EU rules. Alphabet unit Google and Qualcomm have been hit with heavy fines in recent years for their anti-competitive practices.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spotlight, tv, practices, measures, european, interim, modem, antitrust, fines, competition, company, faces, broadcom, eu


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WSJ: Emails show Mark Zuckerberg was aware of problematic privacy practices

WSJ: Emails show Mark Zuckerberg was aware of problematic privacy practices15 Hours AgoCNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports on a new story from the Wall Street Journal which says that Facebook uncovered emails that may show that CEO Mark Zuckerberg was aware of problematic privacy policies. This comes as a federal privacy investigation into the company is underway.


WSJ: Emails show Mark Zuckerberg was aware of problematic privacy practices15 Hours AgoCNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports on a new story from the Wall Street Journal which says that Facebook uncovered emails that may show that CEO Mark Zuckerberg was aware of problematic privacy policies. This comes as a federal privacy investigation into the company is underway.
WSJ: Emails show Mark Zuckerberg was aware of problematic privacy practices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mark, aware, emails, privacy, wsj, underway, zuckerberg, practices, wall, uncovered, problematic


WSJ: Emails show Mark Zuckerberg was aware of problematic privacy practices

WSJ: Emails show Mark Zuckerberg was aware of problematic privacy practices

15 Hours Ago

CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports on a new story from the Wall Street Journal which says that Facebook uncovered emails that may show that CEO Mark Zuckerberg was aware of problematic privacy policies. This comes as a federal privacy investigation into the company is underway.


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This is a $15 trillion opportunity for farmers to fight climate change

Indigo Agriculture, the Boston-based start-up that uses natural microbiology to revolutionize the way farmers grow crops, has unveiled a first-of-a-kind program to tackle climate change worldwide. The company launched the Terraton Initiative on Wednesday to accelerate carbon sequestration from agricultural soil on a massive scale. A marketplace to capture CO2To catalyze the initiative, Indigo is creating the Indigo Carbon marketplace. Growers who join Indigo Carbon for the 2019 crop season are e


Indigo Agriculture, the Boston-based start-up that uses natural microbiology to revolutionize the way farmers grow crops, has unveiled a first-of-a-kind program to tackle climate change worldwide. The company launched the Terraton Initiative on Wednesday to accelerate carbon sequestration from agricultural soil on a massive scale. A marketplace to capture CO2To catalyze the initiative, Indigo is creating the Indigo Carbon marketplace. Growers who join Indigo Carbon for the 2019 crop season are e
This is a $15 trillion opportunity for farmers to fight climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: lori ioannou, joel dreyfuss
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, study, opportunity, change, soil, farming, 15, farmers, carbon, companies, sequestration, fight, trillion, institute, climate, practices, worldwide, indigo


This is a $15 trillion opportunity for farmers to fight climate change

Indigo Agriculture, the Boston-based start-up that uses natural microbiology to revolutionize the way farmers grow crops, has unveiled a first-of-a-kind program to tackle climate change worldwide. The company launched the Terraton Initiative on Wednesday to accelerate carbon sequestration from agricultural soil on a massive scale. The goal: to capture 1 trillion metric tons (a teraton) of carbon dioxide worldwide from 3.6 billion acres of farmland through a marketplace that gives farmers incentives to implement regenerative farming practices. Capturing atmospheric carbon dioxide from agricultural soil is a way to restore soil health while returning carbon levels to those prior to the Industrial Revolution, according to the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Today many environmental experts say agricultural farming emits 25% to 35% of all CO 2 into the atmosphere — more than all modes of transportation combined. The trend has contributed to extreme changes in weather that are reducing crop yields and making livestock more vulnerable to disease. All this threatens the global food supply as demand from a booming global population grows. “The potential for agricultural soils to capture and store atmospheric carbon dioxide is the most hopeful solution I know of to address climate change,” said David Perry, Indigo’s CEO. “The technology and know-how for regenerative farming already exists, so we can begin to make a difference right now.” “And this can be done on a massive scale,” says the company’s co-founder and chief innovation officer, Geoffrey von Maltzahn. These practices include minimal tillage of the soil, cover cropping, crop rotations, using fewer chemicals and fertilizers, and incorporating livestock grazing. These are all ways to increase soil’s carbon content and water retention so less CO 2 is released into the atmosphere. As Maltzahn explains, soils play a key role in the carbon cycle by soaking up carbon from dead plant matter. Plants absorb CO 2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and pass carbon to the ground when dead roots and leaves decompose. But it can cause carbon to be released from the soil at a faster rate than it is replaced. This net release of carbon to the atmosphere contributes to global warming.

A marketplace to capture CO2

To catalyze the initiative, Indigo is creating the Indigo Carbon marketplace. Growers who join Indigo Carbon for the 2019 crop season are eligible to receive $15 per metric ton of carbon dioxide sequestered. In partnership with the Ecosystem Services Market Consortium and other organizations, such as The Rodale Institute and the Soil Health Institute, Indigo will use its digital agronomy capabilities and software imagery analysis to measure and verify soil carbon sequestration and on-farm emission levels.

At the same time, Indigo is partnering initially with the Soil Health Institute, the Rodale Institute, and a network of grower partners to launch the largest longitudinal study of soil carbon on record. The goal of the study, which will include tens of thousands of farms followed for a decade or more, is to quantify farming practices that maximize soil carbon sequestration and understand the impact of these practices on farm profitability and crop nutrition. The results of this study will form the blueprint for maximizing soil carbon sequestration. Indigo intends to make the data from this study available to other research institutions.

We are willing to put our balance sheet at risk for the first year, because we have a high degree of confidence we will have buyers and other partners to help cover the costs. David Perry Indigo Agriculture CEO

Initially, Indigo will market the initiative to its 10,000 grower customers worldwide through its account managers and agronomists. They will be testing soil samples to determine carbon and nutrient concentrations. But the exchange is open to everyone. To encourage innovation and participation in the effort, Indigo is launching several open calls to action. This includes the Carbon Cup, a nationwide sequestration competition to spark on-farm innovation. Broken down on a region-by-region basis, first-place growers competing in the Carbon Cup will receive recognition and a monetary prize for their efforts. Additionally, Indigo is launching a series of challenges, calling on innovators and entrepreneurs to develop technologies for maximizing soil carbon sequestration rates, improving soil carbon measurements and reducing the need for chemical and fertilizer inputs. Winning innovations will be awarded $1 million contracts by Indigo. Source: Mauna Loa Observatory The hope is that this effort will encourage more innovation in sustainable farming practices worldwide and encourage all parties in the food chain — from food companies and packaged goods companies to retailers — to align business practices toward this goal. Many companies are seeking ways to be carbon neutral, and many investors, insurance companies and nonprofits are eager to support such endeavors. One of the first companies on board is Anheuser-Busch. It has agreed to buy 2.2 billion of Indigo sustainable rice that is grown with specific environmental attributes. Growers contracting with Indigo to produce rice for Anheuser-Busch will reduce water and nitrogen use by 10% and achieve at least 10% savings in greenhouse-gas emissions compared to state benchmarks.

Sparking a revolution in farming


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: lori ioannou, joel dreyfuss
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, study, opportunity, change, soil, farming, 15, farmers, carbon, companies, sequestration, fight, trillion, institute, climate, practices, worldwide, indigo


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Google is tech’s top spender on lobbying — Facebook and Amazon are also at record levels

Last year, the company spent $21.7 million on lobbying, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Amazon and Facebook also reached record levels of lobbying expenditures in 2018. Even before the latest regulatory developments, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle were ratcheting up pressure on tech companies. Lobbying spending by tech companies has been on a steady rise in recent years and is way up over the past decade. Amazon, which spent $14.4 million on lobbying last year, and Faceboo


Last year, the company spent $21.7 million on lobbying, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Amazon and Facebook also reached record levels of lobbying expenditures in 2018. Even before the latest regulatory developments, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle were ratcheting up pressure on tech companies. Lobbying spending by tech companies has been on a steady rise in recent years and is way up over the past decade. Amazon, which spent $14.4 million on lobbying last year, and Faceboo
Google is tech’s top spender on lobbying — Facebook and Amazon are also at record levels Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-09  Authors: aditi roy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, practices, amazon, facebook, spender, techs, google, companies, company, money, spending, record, levels, lobbying, spent, million


Google is tech's top spender on lobbying — Facebook and Amazon are also at record levels

Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Google, is sworn in during a House Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018.

As the biggest U.S. technology companies face increasing scrutiny from regulators related to privacy practices and market control, they’re spending a lot more money to try and influence lawmakers. No company in America is pouring more money into those efforts than Google.

Last year, the company spent $21.7 million on lobbying, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. For two straight years, it’s been the top corporate spender, outranking traditional front-runners like Boeing and AT&T. Amazon and Facebook also reached record levels of lobbying expenditures in 2018.

For years, with their market caps climbing alongside their consumer influence, the largest U.S. tech companies have prepared for the day when their business practices would be more thoroughly scrutinized. It appears that time is now. Between last Friday and Monday, reports surfaced that the Justice Department is preparing an antitrust probe of Google and has been given jurisdiction over Apple as part of a broader review into the tech industry. The Federal Trade Commission has assumed oversight of Amazon and Facebook.

Even before the latest regulatory developments, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle were ratcheting up pressure on tech companies. One of the biggest critics is Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democratic presidential candidate, who’s been promoting a “break up big tech” campaign.

Lobbying spending by tech companies has been on a steady rise in recent years and is way up over the past decade. In 2009, Google spent just $4 million dollars on lobbying, a number that increased fivefold by last year, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

The company started spending more on lobbying in 2011 and 2012 as it faced challenges from the FTC. In 2012, Google paid more than $22.5 million in fines to settle FTC charges related to privacy, and the next year it agreed to change some of its business practices following concerns that the company was stifling competition.

Amazon, which spent $14.4 million on lobbying last year, and Facebook, which doled out $12.6 million, are also among the top 20 U.S. corporate spenders. Facebook’s costs rose 45% from 2016 and almost sixtyfold from 2009. The company expects to be fined up to $5 billion from an FTC investigation that began after last year’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, probing whether Facebook violated a 2011 agreement it made with the agency that required getting explicit consent to share user data.

Amazon’s spending climbed 27% from two years earlier and almost eightfold over a decade.

Microsoft poured $9.6 million into lobbying, up from about $8.7 million each of the two previous years. And Apple spent $6.68 million last year, down slightly from 2017 but well above 2016. The companies are spending on issues ranging from competition to privacy.

The U.S. is well behind Europe in enforcement. In March, Google was slapped with a $1.7 billion fine, which it’s appealing, from the European Commission for stifling competition in online advertising. Since 2017, the EU has charged the company with two other fines totaling close to $8 billion for anti-competitive practices.

While the amount of money big tech firms are spending on political lobbying is a tiny fraction of their large cash hoards, the increased allocation shows the significance decisions made in Washington, D.C., could have on their future growth.

WATCH: Schiffer says tech regulation pressure is intensifying


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-09  Authors: aditi roy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, practices, amazon, facebook, spender, techs, google, companies, company, money, spending, record, levels, lobbying, spent, million


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If you want to know what a US tech crackdown may look like, check out what Europe did

European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager speaks during a news conference at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels, April 15, 2015. As U.S. regulators and lawmakers step up their efforts to reign in big tech companies, Europe offers some valuable lessons. Here’s how Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple have fared among EU regulators so far. The European Commission first went after Google in 2017 with a $2.7 billion fine for abusing its dominance as a search engine. The European Com


European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager speaks during a news conference at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels, April 15, 2015. As U.S. regulators and lawmakers step up their efforts to reign in big tech companies, Europe offers some valuable lessons. Here’s how Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple have fared among EU regulators so far. The European Commission first went after Google in 2017 with a $2.7 billion fine for abusing its dominance as a search engine. The European Com
If you want to know what a US tech crackdown may look like, check out what Europe did Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, antitrust, look, europe, commission, data, practices, check, facebook, competition, know, tech, european, crackdown, eu, google


If you want to know what a US tech crackdown may look like, check out what Europe did

European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager speaks during a news conference at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels, April 15, 2015. Francois Lenoir | Reuters

Europe has made its name as the top cop of tech regulation. The European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union, has imposed a combined $9.5 billion in antitrust fines against Google since 2017, and its boss hints Amazon and Apple might be next in line. Facebook, meanwhile, has been subject to probes from competition and data protection authorities across the EU since the region’s strict new set of privacy rules called the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) went into effect last year. As U.S. regulators and lawmakers step up their efforts to reign in big tech companies, Europe offers some valuable lessons. “You’ve seen a lot of proxy wars go on here because of the nature of the fact that we’ve got one Europe-wide regulator for antitrust, and the laws are clear, and that regulator definitely has teeth,” Mark MacGann, Uber’s former head of public policy in Europe and founder of venture capital and advisory firm Moonshot Ventures, told CNBC in an interview.

When it comes to enforcement, the European Commission has opted for fines and mandates for tech companies to their change in business practices, rather than arguing to break them up, said John Cassels, a partner who specializes in competition law at European firm Fieldfisher, in an interview. This tactic could put Europe’s approach at odds with some U.S. lawmakers touting strong rhetoric about dismantling big tech companies. The EU’s fines have done little to dent any tech companies’ profits. “The Commission looked like it was going to go as far as some sort of break-up but actually it’s sort of shied away from that recently,” Cassels said. Here’s how Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple have fared among EU regulators so far.

Google

Alphabet subsidiary Google has faced the toughest antitrust action. In March, the European Commission levied a $1.7 billion fine on the tech giant for abusing its dominance in the online advertising market, citing “illegal” practices of restricting competitors’ ads in search results. Google said this week it is appealing.

The fine marked the third consecutive year of antitrust rulings on Google from the EU. In 2018, the regulator charged Google with a record $5.1 billion fine for anti-competitive practices on its Android devices, saying the company had forced device makers to pre-install its own apps. Analysts at Evercore ISI wrote in note last week they expect the U.S. Department of Justice could take cues from this specific case, which forced Google to offer browser and search-app alternatives on Android devices. “We believe this could be an area where US investigators take a much closer look then previously, given the now far greater importance of the mobile ecosystem vs 2011,” the Evercore analysts wrote. The European Commission first went after Google in 2017 with a $2.7 billion fine for abusing its dominance as a search engine. The EU accused Google of favoring its own comparison shopping service over competitors’ in search results.

Legal experts said the 2017 findings, which were released after a nearly seven-year investigation, could also serve as a guide for antitrust action in the U.S. when it comes to Google’s search practices. But they also cautioned it’s easier to prove market dominance under EU legal standards than in the U.S. “In the U.S. the thresholds are higher and the FTC and DOJ are sort of put to the test by courts,” Fieldfisher’s Cassels said.

Facebook

Facebook’s EU headquarters is in Ireland, and the social media giant is facing several inquiries from the Data Protection Commission there. The complaints range from Facebook failing to provide access to personal data to how the company targets ads on its platform. “You’re going to see a lot of decisions over the coming months by national regulators in Europe especially in Ireland,” MacGann said.

Experts also point to the findings of a three-year long investigation of Facebook by Germany’s antitrust watchdog, which could serve as a guide for a possible FTC investigation because it tackles both data collection and monopoly concerns. In February, the German regulator found Facebook had abused its market dominance in the way it collects, merges and uses user data across its platforms, including WhatsApp and Instagram. It ordered the company to stop merging data on separate apps without users’ deliberate consent. Facebook appealed the order.

Amazon

Germany’s antitrust watchdog is also investigating Amazon. At stake is whether the retail giant prevents fair competition in its online marketplace in the country. The regulator cited “numerous complaints” it had received from sellers about Amazon’s business practices. Amazon’s role in e-commerce has prompted recent probes by national competition authorities in Austria and Italy, too. In the case of Italy, regulators singled out Amazon’s practices in both online retailing and logistics. Amazon has said it is fully cooperating with authorities. Meanwhile Margrethe Vestager, the head of competition policy in Europe, told CNBC in April the EU’s investigation of Amazon is in an “advanced” stage. The European Commission is examining whether Amazon is taking advantage of merchants’ data.

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Apple


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-07  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, antitrust, look, europe, commission, data, practices, check, facebook, competition, know, tech, european, crackdown, eu, google


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Google appeals $1.7 billion EU antitrust fine over ‘illegal’ advertising practices

European Union Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager gives a joint press at the EU headquarters in Brussels on July 18, 2018. -Google has appealed a $1.7 billion fine from the European Commission for stifling competition in the online advertising industry, the company said Wednesday. In March, the executive arm of the European Union slapped Google with its third antitrust fine, this time for abusing its dominance in the online advertising market through its AdSense business. The EU said Go


European Union Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager gives a joint press at the EU headquarters in Brussels on July 18, 2018. -Google has appealed a $1.7 billion fine from the European Commission for stifling competition in the online advertising industry, the company said Wednesday. In March, the executive arm of the European Union slapped Google with its third antitrust fine, this time for abusing its dominance in the online advertising market through its AdSense business. The EU said Go
Google appeals $1.7 billion EU antitrust fine over ‘illegal’ advertising practices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, eu, court, fine, advertising, competition, google, union, commission, european, antitrust, billion, appeals, online, 17, illegal


Google appeals $1.7 billion EU antitrust fine over 'illegal' advertising practices

European Union Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager gives a joint press at the EU headquarters in Brussels on July 18, 2018. –

Google has appealed a $1.7 billion fine from the European Commission for stifling competition in the online advertising industry, the company said Wednesday.

In March, the executive arm of the European Union slapped Google with its third antitrust fine, this time for abusing its dominance in the online advertising market through its AdSense business. The EU said Google’s practice of restricting online search advertisements from competitors was “illegal” under the bloc’s antitrust rules.

The Telegraph first reported that Google had filed an appeal for the latest fine in the General Court of the European Union in Brussels on Tuesday. Google confirmed the action in an email to CNBC Wednesday.

A European Commission spokesperson told CNBC: “The Commission will defend its decision in Court.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, eu, court, fine, advertising, competition, google, union, commission, european, antitrust, billion, appeals, online, 17, illegal


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Justice Department is reportedly preparing antitrust probe of Google

Google CEO Sundar Pichai takes the stage during the presentation of new Google hardware in San Francisco on Oct. 4, 2016. The U.S. Justice Department is planning an antitrust investigation into Alphabet’s Google subsidiary, The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday. The effort will touch on web search and other parts of Google, the report said. Google wouldn’t be the first U.S. technology company to face scrutiny from the Justice Department. The Justice Department had no comment.


Google CEO Sundar Pichai takes the stage during the presentation of new Google hardware in San Francisco on Oct. 4, 2016. The U.S. Justice Department is planning an antitrust investigation into Alphabet’s Google subsidiary, The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday. The effort will touch on web search and other parts of Google, the report said. Google wouldn’t be the first U.S. technology company to face scrutiny from the Justice Department. The Justice Department had no comment.
Justice Department is reportedly preparing antitrust probe of Google Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: jordan novet jennifer elias, jordan novet, jennifer elias
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Justice Department is reportedly preparing antitrust probe of Google

Google CEO Sundar Pichai takes the stage during the presentation of new Google hardware in San Francisco on Oct. 4, 2016.

The U.S. Justice Department is planning an antitrust investigation into Alphabet’s Google subsidiary, The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday. The effort will touch on web search and other parts of Google, the report said.

The report comes amid discussion from politicians and the public about whether large technology companies should be broken up. Government pushback on Alphabet in search could hit at the core one of the most highly valued publicly traded companies in the world.

Alphabet racked up $136.8 billion in revenue in 2018, with 85% of it coming from advertising. Google controls more than 70% of the search engine market, according to NetMarketShare.

Google has faced antitrust pressure in the past.

In 2013, Google said it would change some practices after it agreed to a settlement with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. The FTC had been concerned that some of Google’s business practices could stifle competition

In 2010, the company received an antitrust complaint from the European Commission regarding ranking of shopping search results and ads, which resulted in Google being fined $2.7 billion in 2017, according to Alphabet’s latest annual report. In 2016, the EC complained about practices related to Google’s Android operating system, leading to a $5.1 billion charge in 2018.

And in March the European Union ordered Google to pay around $1.7 billion because of advertising behavior.

Recently, Google has also come under political pressure in the U.S.

President Trump has been critical of big tech, including accusing Google of political bias in its search results. In March, Trump tweeted accusations that Google’s YouTube and Twitter favored Democratic opponents over him and Republicans.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who announced her 2020 presidential candidacy in December, has pressed for breaking up tech companies like Google. In a widely read post published on Medium in March, Warren said she was interested in appointing regulators who would be interested in undoing what she called “anti-competitive mergers,” including Google’s DoubleClick, Nest and Waze.

“Current antitrust laws empower federal regulators to break up mergers that reduce competition,” Warren wrote.

Google wouldn’t be the first U.S. technology company to face scrutiny from the Justice Department. That agency launched a major antitrust case against Microsoft in 1998 that led to several rules the company had to follow for years.

The Justice Department had no comment. Google didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.

Read the full Wall Street Journal report here.

WATCH: How Facebook might change to accommodate regulation


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: jordan novet jennifer elias, jordan novet, jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, googles, antitrust, google, report, reportedly, department, billion, warren, practices, probe, search, justice, preparing


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US judge rules Qualcomm practices violate antitrust law

“Qualcomm’s licensing practices have strangled competition in the CDMA and the premium LTE modem chip markets for years, and harmed rivals, OEMs, and end consumers in the process,” U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh wrote in a ruling on Tuesday. Qualcomm’s operating segment relating to its chip and software business is called Qualcomm CDMA Technologies (QCT). Qualcomm’s operating segment relating to the licensing of its patents is called Qualcomm Technology Licensing (QTL). The FTC complaint also accu


“Qualcomm’s licensing practices have strangled competition in the CDMA and the premium LTE modem chip markets for years, and harmed rivals, OEMs, and end consumers in the process,” U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh wrote in a ruling on Tuesday. Qualcomm’s operating segment relating to its chip and software business is called Qualcomm CDMA Technologies (QCT). Qualcomm’s operating segment relating to the licensing of its patents is called Qualcomm Technology Licensing (QTL). The FTC complaint also accu
US judge rules Qualcomm practices violate antitrust law Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, patents, qualcomm, rules, violate, licensing, practices, license, relating, segment, operating, law, judge, used, standard, antitrust


US judge rules Qualcomm practices violate antitrust law

Qualcomm unlawfully suppressed competition in the market for cellphone chips and used its dominant position to impose excessive licensing fees, a U.S. judged ruled, sending the company’s shares down 13% in premarket trade.

“Qualcomm’s licensing practices have strangled competition in the CDMA and the premium LTE modem chip markets for years, and harmed rivals, OEMs, and end consumers in the process,” U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh wrote in a ruling on Tuesday.

Qualcomm’s operating segment relating to its chip and software business is called Qualcomm CDMA Technologies (QCT). Qualcomm’s operating segment relating to the licensing of its patents is called Qualcomm Technology Licensing (QTL).

Koh sided with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which in 2017 filed a lawsuit against Qualcomm, accusing the company of using “anticompetitive” tactics to maintain its monopoly on a key semiconductor used in mobile phones.

In its complaint, the FTC said the patents that Qualcomm sought to license are standard essential patents, which means that the industry uses them widely and they are supposed to be licensed on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms.

The FTC complaint also accused Qualcomm of refusing to license some standard essential patents to rival chipmakers, and of entering into an exclusive deal with Apple.

Qualcomm’s licensing practices have been the subject of government investigations in the U.S. since at least 2014 and in Asia and Europe since at least 2009, according to the court filing.

Qualcomm did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment.

Shares of the company fell 13% to $67.50 in trading before the bell on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, patents, qualcomm, rules, violate, licensing, practices, license, relating, segment, operating, law, judge, used, standard, antitrust


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