Scotland will prepare for an independence referendum before May 2021

Scotland should hold an independence referendum before the current Scottish parliamentary term ends in May 2021 and will prepare legislation for this to happen, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said on Wednesday. “A choice between Brexit and a future for Scotland as an independent European nation should be offered in the lifetime of this parliament,” Sturgeon told Holyrood, Scotland’s devolved parliament. Sturgeon is under pressure from her nationalist movement to provide a clear way forward in th


Scotland should hold an independence referendum before the current Scottish parliamentary term ends in May 2021 and will prepare legislation for this to happen, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said on Wednesday. “A choice between Brexit and a future for Scotland as an independent European nation should be offered in the lifetime of this parliament,” Sturgeon told Holyrood, Scotland’s devolved parliament. Sturgeon is under pressure from her nationalist movement to provide a clear way forward in th
Scotland will prepare for an independence referendum before May 2021 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: jeff j mitchell, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sturgeon, vote, united, britain, stage, referendum, brexit, 2021, prepare, scotland, parliament, kingdom, independence


Scotland will prepare for an independence referendum before May 2021

Scotland should hold an independence referendum before the current Scottish parliamentary term ends in May 2021 and will prepare legislation for this to happen, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said on Wednesday.

“A choice between Brexit and a future for Scotland as an independent European nation should be offered in the lifetime of this parliament,” Sturgeon told Holyrood, Scotland’s devolved parliament.

She said a devolved parliament bill would be drawn up before the end of 2019.

The permission of Britain’s sovereign parliament at this stage was not needed, she said, but would be eventually be necessary “to put beyond doubt or challenge our ability to apply the bill to an independence referendum.”

Sturgeon is under pressure from her nationalist movement to provide a clear way forward in the quest for an independent Scotland.

But Britain is mired in political chaos due to Brexit and it is still unclear whether, when or even if Britain will leave the European Union.

Scotland, part of the United Kingdom for more than 300 years, rejected independence by 10 percentage points in a 2014 referendum.

Differences over Brexit have strained the United Kingdom. Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to stay in the EU in a 2016 referendum, while Wales and England vote to leave.

Those who want to maintain the United Kingdom argue that Brexit has made no difference to how Scots feel, and the secession vote should not be repeated.

But Sturgeon argued that leaving the world’s largest trading bloc endangers Britain and Scotland’s economic well-being.

“We face being forced to the margins, sidelined within a UK that is itself increasingly sidelined on the international stage. Independence by contrast would allow us to protect our place in Europe,” she said.

“We need a more solid foundation on which to build our future as a country.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: jeff j mitchell, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sturgeon, vote, united, britain, stage, referendum, brexit, 2021, prepare, scotland, parliament, kingdom, independence


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Prepare for $80 oil this summer as ‘wounded bulls’ rise, RBC warns

International oil prices will average $75 a barrel in 2019, and consumers may find themselves contending with bouts of $80 crude this summer, RBC Capital Markets said. The global investment bank revised its oil price forecast higher Thursday, pointing to a cocktail of market conditions. The bank also boosted its outlook for U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude from $61.30 per barrel to $67 for 2019. The long-to-short ratio reached 13 times “at the peak of the oil price euphoria last fall” and aver


International oil prices will average $75 a barrel in 2019, and consumers may find themselves contending with bouts of $80 crude this summer, RBC Capital Markets said. The global investment bank revised its oil price forecast higher Thursday, pointing to a cocktail of market conditions. The bank also boosted its outlook for U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude from $61.30 per barrel to $67 for 2019. The long-to-short ratio reached 13 times “at the peak of the oil price euphoria last fall” and aver
Prepare for $80 oil this summer as ‘wounded bulls’ rise, RBC warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: tom dichristopher, juan pelegrin, moment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wti, 80, oil, times, price, prepare, crude, wounded, bank, warns, bulls, rbc, rise, prices, barrel, west, summer


Prepare for $80 oil this summer as 'wounded bulls' rise, RBC warns

International oil prices will average $75 a barrel in 2019, and consumers may find themselves contending with bouts of $80 crude this summer, RBC Capital Markets said.

The global investment bank revised its oil price forecast higher Thursday, pointing to a cocktail of market conditions. Those include steep OPEC supply cuts, robust demand, geopolitical risk and investor positioning that leaves crude futures with plenty of room to run.

RBC’s $75 call for international Brent crude is up from a previous 2019 forecast of $69.50 per barrel. The bank also boosted its outlook for U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude from $61.30 per barrel to $67 for 2019.

“We see price risk asymmetrically skewed to the upside spurred by geopolitically infused rallies that could shoot prices toward or even beyond our high-end, bull-case scenario and test the $80/bbl mark for intermittent periods this summer,” RBC strategists Michael Tran, Helima Croft and Christopher Louney said in a research note.

Brent hit $71.78 and WTI rose to $64.79 this week, the highest levels since early November.

While Brent and WTI have rallied 32% and 40.5%, respectively, this year, the oil trade is not as crowded as it was last year. There are currently about 4.5 times as many long positions in crude futures — bets that oil will rise — as there are short positions, or wagers that the commodity price will fall.

The long-to-short ratio reached 13 times “at the peak of the oil price euphoria last fall” and averaged 8.5 times in 2018, RBC notes.

“In short, there is room to run to the upside given that geopolitical hotspots are still a clear and present danger for the market, but many wounded bulls remain following the Q4’18 washout,” the analysts said, referring to the collapse in oil prices at the end of last year.

RBC expects the 14-nation OPEC producer group to extend its deal to cap output and boost oil prices, keeping the cost of crude near the $75-$80 range many nations need to balance their budgets.

The bank sees signs of strong demand in the Atlantic Basin, where bellwether barrels from the North Sea and West Africa are finding buyers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: tom dichristopher, juan pelegrin, moment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wti, 80, oil, times, price, prepare, crude, wounded, bank, warns, bulls, rbc, rise, prices, barrel, west, summer


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Climate change will crush real estate values for investors who don’t prepare, new report says

And for real estate investors in particular, risk is rising exponentially in the age of climate change. Damage to U.S. real estate from extreme storms hit a record high in 2017. Natural disasters, including floods, mudslides and wildfires, cost more than $300 billion in damage, the bulk of it to residential and commercial real estate. All of these statistics are not just alarming, they are sounding the alarm bells for the real estate investment sector, because it is most vulnerable. “Understandi


And for real estate investors in particular, risk is rising exponentially in the age of climate change. Damage to U.S. real estate from extreme storms hit a record high in 2017. Natural disasters, including floods, mudslides and wildfires, cost more than $300 billion in damage, the bulk of it to residential and commercial real estate. All of these statistics are not just alarming, they are sounding the alarm bells for the real estate investment sector, because it is most vulnerable. “Understandi
Climate change will crush real estate values for investors who don’t prepare, new report says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: diana olick, scott olson, getty images, carolyn cole, los angeles times
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, investors, values, estate, assets, change, potential, prepare, climate, real, dont, mitigation, report, resources, risk, crush


Climate change will crush real estate values for investors who don't prepare, new report says

For any investor, measuring opportunity against risk is critical. And for real estate investors in particular, risk is rising exponentially in the age of climate change.

To that end, big real estate firms are pouring significant resources into calculating climate risk and its likely effect on property portfolios — everything from increasingly extreme weather to a rise in sea levels.

“This process will be painful for investors who are caught off guard, but those who are prepared have the potential to outperform,” a new report from the Urban Land Institute said.

Damage to U.S. real estate from extreme storms hit a record high in 2017. Natural disasters, including floods, mudslides and wildfires, cost more than $300 billion in damage, the bulk of it to residential and commercial real estate.

In 2018, from May through July, much of the East Coast, down to Florida, saw rainfall up to three times normal levels, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Nine of the top 10 years for one-day extreme precipitation events have occurred since 1990, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), because as the atmosphere warms, clouds hold more water.

All of these statistics are not just alarming, they are sounding the alarm bells for the real estate investment sector, because it is most vulnerable.

“Understanding and mitigating climate risk is a complex and evolving challenge for real estate investors,” said ULI’s CEO, Edward Walter. “Risks such as sea level rise and heat stress will increasingly highlight the vulnerability not only of individual assets and locations, but of entire metropolitan areas.”

The report highlights how real estate investment companies are now prioritizing the risk of climate change and creating new approaches to better gauge and develop mitigation strategies.

“Building for resilience, on a portfolio, property and citywide basis, is paramount to staying competitive. Factoring in climate risk is becoming the new normal for our industry,” added Walter.

Some of the strategies, according to the report, include:

Mapping physical risk for current portfolios and potential acquisitions;

Incorporating climate risk into due diligence and other investment decision-making processes;

Incorporating additional physical adaptation and mitigation measures for assets at risk;

Exploring a variety of strategies to mitigate risk, including portfolio diversification and investing directly in the mitigation measures for specific assets; and

Engaging with policymakers on local resilience strategies.

“Investors see climate considerations as a necessary layer of fiduciary responsibility to their stakeholders, as well as an opportunity to identify markets and assets that will benefit from a changing climate,” according to the report. “While early adapters have committed resources to gain knowledge and improve awareness of climate risk, in the coming years, methods are likely to become more sophisticated.”

It also highlights the potential return on investment from putting resources into mitigation strategies for real estate assets.

Heitman, a Chicago-based real estate investment firm with nearly $34 billion in assets under management globally, worked with ULI on the report and is putting heavy resources, both financial and personnel, into measuring and balancing climate risk.

“The industry didn’t seem to be pricing in these kinds of risks,” said Mary Ludgin, senior managing director and head of global investment research at Heitman. “When we began the project of trying to identify the climate risk inherent in individual properties, we first looked to our insurers. They were less of a help than we were expecting.”

That is because insurers reprice annually, and therefore do not look at long-term models. FEMA flood plains are reassessed about every five years, but they still don’t account for the increasingly extreme weather and heavier rainfall that parts of the United States are now seeing.

“We can’t try to determine what’s going to happen in 12 months beyond, because insurance is set up for what your risk is today. And it wouldn’t meet actuarial science to charge you for a future potential,” said David Maurstad, FEMA’s deputy associate administrator for federal insurance and mitigation and chief executive of the National Flood Insurance Program.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: diana olick, scott olson, getty images, carolyn cole, los angeles times
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, investors, values, estate, assets, change, potential, prepare, climate, real, dont, mitigation, report, resources, risk, crush


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7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou


She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou
7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here's how to tackle them

Nevertheless, approaching difficult conversations is not only an important workplace skill, it could also be what enables your next step forward, said Sarah Sheehan, Bravely’s chief customer officer, who co-founded the company with Hervey as a platform for confidential professional advice.

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work.

1. Consider viewpoints beyond your own

“It’s easy to think about yourself and only yourself when you’re dealing with something challenging at work, but take the time to think through how someone might see it from the other side, and whether certain circumstances could be creating the situation at hand,” said Sheehan.

Your manager is a person, too, noted Sheehan, so sometimes the best thing you can do is to put yourself in their shoes and try to think things through from a new perspective.

2. Expect the best, but prepare for the worst

While you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted.

“Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. That way, you might be less likely to react with emotion,” she said.

3. Say it out loud

Finally, try rehearsing the conversation, either to yourself or someone else, to hone your message and perfect your delivery, said Sheehan.

“It will no doubt feel awkward at first,” she said, adding that “forcing yourself to say the words will help you hone how you deliver it, control the tone (which is super important!), and ensure you stick the landing.”

Don’t miss: Think your boss hates you? You could be onto something

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


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Brexit ‘no-deal’ threat leaves smaller UK firms scrambling to prepare

On her way to an EU-Arab League summit over the weekend, Prime Minister Theresa May announced she would not provide British parliamentarians with a meaningful vote on an altered Brexit deal perhaps until March 12. “Those costs have already been incurred as a contingency measure,” explains Alex Veitch from the Freight Transport Association, who previously worked inside a no-deal Brexit planning team at the U.K.’s tax authority when it consisted of fewer than a dozen people. But he says it is only


On her way to an EU-Arab League summit over the weekend, Prime Minister Theresa May announced she would not provide British parliamentarians with a meaningful vote on an altered Brexit deal perhaps until March 12. “Those costs have already been incurred as a contingency measure,” explains Alex Veitch from the Freight Transport Association, who previously worked inside a no-deal Brexit planning team at the U.K.’s tax authority when it consisted of fewer than a dozen people. But he says it is only
Brexit ‘no-deal’ threat leaves smaller UK firms scrambling to prepare Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: willem marx, sean gallup, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tock, prepare, businesses, week, tick, summit, nodeal, threat, leaves, scrambling, firms, trading, brexit, uk, deal, smaller, thanks


Brexit 'no-deal' threat leaves smaller UK firms scrambling to prepare

Another day, another potentially key Brexit date.

On her way to an EU-Arab League summit over the weekend, Prime Minister Theresa May announced she would not provide British parliamentarians with a meaningful vote on an altered Brexit deal perhaps until March 12. Lawmakers wanted that opportunity this week. Instead, the embattled leader has again sought to delay proceedings as she battles to guarantee a supportive majority in the House of Commons.

Officials in Brussels, and businesses on both sides of the English Channel, have been quick to express their dismay at her decision, as a “no deal” deadline looms ever closer. And after a visit last week with a logistics firm that has recently opened a new fulfilment center in Southampton, thanks in part to the Brexit-related uncertainty about Britain’s future trading relationship, it is possible to understand the context for that apparent frustration. It seems particularly acute in the freight and transportation sector.

PFS U.K. is a subsidiary of a large U.S. e-commerce company that employs more than 2,600 people worldwide and provides shipping and operations support to a slew of brands. It first expanded to Europe almost 20 years ago, and its operations on this side of the Atlantic have for some time been headquartered in the Belgian city of Liege, just an hour or so from the political heart of the European Union.

But late last year, after several clients requested that PFS offer them a separate, U.K.-specific fulfilment location, the company took control of a vast new warehouse space on the English south coast. General Manager Lisa Cooley moved from Tennessee to take charge, and explained quite candidly how much work had been required in such a tight span of time. “It’s a little chaotic in the beginning,” she acknowledged, before underlining that thanks to next-day delivery expectations, time is rarely on the side of her consumer retail clients.

The costs associated with separate shipping capacities, extra warehousing space, and an expanded workforce to combat the potential challenge of cross-border trading tariffs will all eat into the margins of companies like PFS, forcing them to pass the higher expenditure on to their clients, and then in turn to the end consumer.

“Those costs have already been incurred as a contingency measure,” explains Alex Veitch from the Freight Transport Association, who previously worked inside a no-deal Brexit planning team at the U.K.’s tax authority when it consisted of fewer than a dozen people. But he says it is only the larger businesses that can afford to devote time and money to this kind of no-deal planning.

The Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) says its members have continued to hold off on this kind of spending, and says many would need between six weeks and two months to get ready for a no-deal Brexit. According to Craig Beaumont, an external affairs director at the FSB, many such firms have now, “simply run out of time to prepare.”

Political allies and opponents of May have repeatedly requested that she remove the possibility of “no deal,” and in recent days European leaders like Donald Tusk and Angela Merkel have discussed with her a postponement of the March 29 deadline. But once again after the summit in Egypt ended, the British leader refused to bend — publicly, at least — to those demands. Tick tock, tick tock.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-26  Authors: willem marx, sean gallup, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tock, prepare, businesses, week, tick, summit, nodeal, threat, leaves, scrambling, firms, trading, brexit, uk, deal, smaller, thanks


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These tools can prepare investors for threats lurking in the market

Investors are often told that uncertainty is inevitable. Well, for those whose stomachs harden at the unknown, there’s some good news. A growing number of tools prepare you for the threats lurking around the market, from a trade war to climate change, by letting you test them out on your investments before they ever happen. HiddenLevers, based in Atlanta and used by some 3,000 advisors, has a library of unpleasant possibilities it can unleash on your portfolio. For example, a user can now see ho


Investors are often told that uncertainty is inevitable. Well, for those whose stomachs harden at the unknown, there’s some good news. A growing number of tools prepare you for the threats lurking around the market, from a trade war to climate change, by letting you test them out on your investments before they ever happen. HiddenLevers, based in Atlanta and used by some 3,000 advisors, has a library of unpleasant possibilities it can unleash on your portfolio. For example, a user can now see ho
These tools can prepare investors for threats lurking in the market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: annie nova, source, hidden levers, cathy curtis, -thomas verbraken, executive director of risk management at msci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investments, user, market, threats, upside, unpleasant, updated, unleash, used, unknown, prepare, way, tools, lurking, war, investors


These tools can prepare investors for threats lurking in the market

Investors are often told that uncertainty is inevitable. No risk, no reward. Well, for those whose stomachs harden at the unknown, there’s some good news.

A growing number of tools prepare you for the threats lurking around the market, from a trade war to climate change, by letting you test them out on your investments before they ever happen. Many of these programs are only available to you through a financial advisor, though at least one company is discussing a way to develop an app that would be accessible to anyone.

“Examining real-life scenarios allows you to understand ahead of time what type of potential downside and upside you have,” said David Ristau, director of business development at HiddenLevers.

HiddenLevers, based in Atlanta and used by some 3,000 advisors, has a library of unpleasant possibilities it can unleash on your portfolio. The pool is constantly updated. For example, a user can now see how a second government shutdown would rattle their investments.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: annie nova, source, hidden levers, cathy curtis, -thomas verbraken, executive director of risk management at msci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investments, user, market, threats, upside, unpleasant, updated, unleash, used, unknown, prepare, way, tools, lurking, war, investors


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Tax refunds are down 8.4 percent so far this year—here’s how experts say you should prepare

You may be getting less money than you expect in your tax refund this year. Refunds dropped 8.4 percent during the first week of tax filing season, the Internal Revenue Service reports. The average refund this year so far has been $1,865, compared with $2,035 during the same period a year ago. The drop could be an early indicator of how the tax changes introduced in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act are affecting Americans. About 28 percent of Americans don’t understand exactly what changed and almost h


You may be getting less money than you expect in your tax refund this year. Refunds dropped 8.4 percent during the first week of tax filing season, the Internal Revenue Service reports. The average refund this year so far has been $1,865, compared with $2,035 during the same period a year ago. The drop could be an early indicator of how the tax changes introduced in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act are affecting Americans. About 28 percent of Americans don’t understand exactly what changed and almost h
Tax refunds are down 8.4 percent so far this year—here’s how experts say you should prepare Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: megan leonhardt, kirsty l, -logan allec, -barry kleiman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, estimate, 84, changes, prepare, experts, refund, refunds, cuts, say, thought, yearheres, far, changed, jobs, introduced, tax


Tax refunds are down 8.4 percent so far this year—here's how experts say you should prepare

You may be getting less money than you expect in your tax refund this year. Or worse, you may be on the hook to pay.

Refunds dropped 8.4 percent during the first week of tax filing season, the Internal Revenue Service reports. The average refund this year so far has been $1,865, compared with $2,035 during the same period a year ago.

The drop could be an early indicator of how the tax changes introduced in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act are affecting Americans. “If I were to estimate, two-thirds will pay more than they thought and one-third will get more than they thought,” one New York City tax preparer told NBC News.

In recent years, it’s been fairly easy to estimate what your tax return would be, especially if you didn’t change jobs or go through a significant life event. But the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, passed in December 2017, enacted a number of broad changes: It introduced new tax brackets, included an expanded child care credit and changed the way itemized deductions are factored in, for example.

These shifts, which are in effect for the first time for the full 2018 tax year, have created a lot of uncertainty. About 28 percent of Americans don’t understand exactly what changed and almost half have no idea how the changes affect their tax bracket.

Given all that, here’s what experts say you should do now.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: megan leonhardt, kirsty l, -logan allec, -barry kleiman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, estimate, 84, changes, prepare, experts, refund, refunds, cuts, say, thought, yearheres, far, changed, jobs, introduced, tax


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Farmers already hurt by Trump’s trade war prepare for more pain — from the government shutdown

That means a delay for farmers waiting for much-needed funds. “It’s going to be millions of dollars to pulse farmers when these harvest prices actually get announced,” McGreevy said. On Monday, the president urged farmers to stick with him when he addressed the Farm Bureau at its annual convention in New Orleans. “So it’s really important to get these harvest prices announced and get that money in growers’ hands.” Last week, the Agriculture Department said it would extend the deadline for farmer


That means a delay for farmers waiting for much-needed funds. “It’s going to be millions of dollars to pulse farmers when these harvest prices actually get announced,” McGreevy said. On Monday, the president urged farmers to stick with him when he addressed the Farm Bureau at its annual convention in New Orleans. “So it’s really important to get these harvest prices announced and get that money in growers’ hands.” Last week, the Agriculture Department said it would extend the deadline for farmer
Farmers already hurt by Trump’s trade war prepare for more pain — from the government shutdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: michelle fox, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prepare, trade, farmers, trumps, hurt, prices, harvest, deadline, department, president, delay, pain, right, shutdown, announced, war


Farmers already hurt by Trump's trade war prepare for more pain — from the government shutdown

Those are supposed to be announced on Friday, resulting in payouts by the end of January. However, the analysts who analyze the data are on furlough. That means a delay for farmers waiting for much-needed funds.

“It’s going to be millions of dollars to pulse farmers when these harvest prices actually get announced,” McGreevy said.

Now in its 24th day, the shutdown is the longest in U.S. history, and there appears to be no resolution in sight. The sticking point is President Donald Trump’s insistence that funding for his border wall be included in the spending package.

On Monday, the president urged farmers to stick with him when he addressed the Farm Bureau at its annual convention in New Orleans.

He also said his policies would help the agriculture industry, even if they caused short-term pain.

However, there are still some longer-term implications caused by the delay, said McGreevy.

“Farmers are struggling right now. All prices are low, and we’re trying to cash flow, and we’re making spring planting decisions right now,” he said. “So it’s really important to get these harvest prices announced and get that money in growers’ hands.”

Last week, the Agriculture Department said it would extend the deadline for farmers hurt by the trade war to apply for aid. The deadline was originally set for Jan. 15 but will now be delayed for the number of days that the department is closed due to the shutdown.

— CNBC’s Jacob Pramuk and AJ Vielma; Reuters and AP contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: michelle fox, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prepare, trade, farmers, trumps, hurt, prices, harvest, deadline, department, president, delay, pain, right, shutdown, announced, war


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Nancy Pelosi reclaims House speaker’s gavel as Democrats prepare to take on Trump

To reclaim the speaker’s gavel, Pelosi navigated 2018 midterm elections in which she took a drubbing from Republicans and even many Democrats. Some Democrats who called for new leadership ended up opposing Pelosi for speaker, but she secured enough votes to lead the House again. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., nominated Pelosi for speaker on Thursday afternoon to loud applause from House Democrats and polite clapping from even some Republicans. After holding off opposition both from the GOP and wi


To reclaim the speaker’s gavel, Pelosi navigated 2018 midterm elections in which she took a drubbing from Republicans and even many Democrats. Some Democrats who called for new leadership ended up opposing Pelosi for speaker, but she secured enough votes to lead the House again. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., nominated Pelosi for speaker on Thursday afternoon to loud applause from House Democrats and polite clapping from even some Republicans. After holding off opposition both from the GOP and wi
Nancy Pelosi reclaims House speaker’s gavel as Democrats prepare to take on Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-02  Authors: jacob pramuk, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nancy, house, speakers, trump, democrats, gavel, republicans, party, pelosi, support, trumps, prepare, reclaims, voters, speaker


Nancy Pelosi reclaims House speaker's gavel as Democrats prepare to take on Trump

Later int he day, Trump congratulated Pelosi and said “hopefully we’re going to have a lot of things that we can get done together.” He cited infrastructure as an area in which they can cooperate.

To reclaim the speaker’s gavel, Pelosi navigated 2018 midterm elections in which she took a drubbing from Republicans and even many Democrats. After her party gained a net 40 GOP-held seats in November, she struck a series of deals to hold off rebellion within her party. Some Democrats who called for new leadership ended up opposing Pelosi for speaker, but she secured enough votes to lead the House again.

Democrats plan a flurry of activity with their new 235-199 majority in the House. They aim to pass bills Thursday night to reopen the nine unfunded U.S. departments, though the Senate has pledged not to take up the proposals as Trump threatens to veto them.

Democrats also plan to quickly pass a sweeping anti-corruption bill, among other largely symbolic measures meant to set a tone for their majority. In her remarks, Pelosi outlined several areas on which Democrats want to focus:

shielding the Affordable Care Act and Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security benefits

addressing climate change

cutting drug prices

overhauling U.S. infrastructure

strengthening gun background checks

ending discrimination against LGBTQ Americans

protecting young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

Pelosi has stressed that she wants to focus first on noncontroversial measures with broad public support. She said the “overdue” proposals to boost background checks, strengthen LGBTQ protections and shield so-called Dreamers “have bipartisan support in this body.”

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., nominated Pelosi for speaker on Thursday afternoon to loud applause from House Democrats and polite clapping from even some Republicans. The representative said “Nancy Pelosi is just getting started.”

In introducing Pelosi, McCarthy called her an “experienced leader,” a “fighter for her causes” and a “true trailblazer.” He said a period of divided government “no excuse for gridlock and inaction.”

However, he said “Republicans will always choose personal freedom over government control.”

After holding off opposition both from the GOP and within her party, Pelosi faces new challenges in the nearly two years before the November 2020 presidential election. Democrats want to challenge Trump’s policies and investigate what they call corruption in his administration. But they do not want to go too far and alienate the independent and moderate voters who they may need to win the presidency or keep the House in the next election.

Democratic leaders have pledged to go after Trump’s tax returns and probe his personal businesses, among a bevy of other potential investigations. However, they see pushing for the president’s impeachment as one way to drive voters back toward Trump.

In an interview with NBC’s “TODAY” that aired Thursday morning, Pelosi said Democrats would wait to see the conclusion of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation before deciding whether to impeach Trump.

“We shouldn’t be impeaching for a political reason, and we shouldn’t avoid impeachment for a political reason,” she said.

Pelosi has represented the San Francisco-area for more than 30 years. She has led House Democrats for more than 16 of those years.

Her first stint as speaker came lasted from 2007 to 2011, when she oversaw the House’s response to the 2008 financial crisis and spearheaded the chamber’s passage of the Affordable Care Act.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-02  Authors: jacob pramuk, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nancy, house, speakers, trump, democrats, gavel, republicans, party, pelosi, support, trumps, prepare, reclaims, voters, speaker


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