Gorbachev says Trump’s nuclear treaty withdrawal ‘not the work of a great mind’

Mikhail Gorbachev, the former president of the Soviet Union, criticized President Donald Trump’s threat to withdraw from an international nuclear disarmament treaty, saying the move “is not the work of a great mind.” Trump announced at a rally Saturday that he will pull the U.S. from the “Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty,” (INF) citing Russian violations of the deal, although he did not give further details. Gorbachev, who led the Soviet Union from 1985 until its dissolution in 1991, had


Mikhail Gorbachev, the former president of the Soviet Union, criticized President Donald Trump’s threat to withdraw from an international nuclear disarmament treaty, saying the move “is not the work of a great mind.” Trump announced at a rally Saturday that he will pull the U.S. from the “Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty,” (INF) citing Russian violations of the deal, although he did not give further details. Gorbachev, who led the Soviet Union from 1985 until its dissolution in 1991, had
Gorbachev says Trump’s nuclear treaty withdrawal ‘not the work of a great mind’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: holly ellyatt, mikhail svetlov, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gorbachev, work, president, russia, withdrawal, world, trumps, treaty, great, russian, mind, nuclear, union, soviet


Gorbachev says Trump's nuclear treaty withdrawal 'not the work of a great mind'

Mikhail Gorbachev, the former president of the Soviet Union, criticized President Donald Trump’s threat to withdraw from an international nuclear disarmament treaty, saying the move “is not the work of a great mind.”

Trump announced at a rally Saturday that he will pull the U.S. from the “Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty,” (INF) citing Russian violations of the deal, although he did not give further details.

The 1987 treaty prohibits Russia and the U.S. from possessing, producing or test-flying a ground-launched cruise missile having a range of 500 to 5,500 kilometers or “to possess or produce launchers of such missiles.”

Gorbachev, who led the Soviet Union from 1985 until its dissolution in 1991, had signed the treaty with then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan.

Now 87-years-old, Gorbachev said Trump’s decision was “very strange” and a mistake.

“Do they really not understand in Washington what this can lead to?” Gorbachev told Russian news agency Interfax on Sunday, adding that the decision “will undermine all the efforts that were made by the leaders of the USSR and the United States themselves to achieve nuclear disarmament.”

Gorbachev said that “Washington’s aspiration to turn politics back cannot be supported, this must be declared not only by Russia, but by all who cherish the world, especially the world without nuclear weapons.”

The treaty marked a historic shift in U.S.-Russian relations and came at a time of Gorbachev-led reforms in Russia — most notably, his policies of “perestroika” and “glasnost” — essentially, a series of political and economic reforms and “openness.”

Gorbachev said Sunday that “all agreements aimed at nuclear disarmament and the limitation of nuclear weapons must be preserved for the sake of life on Earth.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: holly ellyatt, mikhail svetlov, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gorbachev, work, president, russia, withdrawal, world, trumps, treaty, great, russian, mind, nuclear, union, soviet


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Trump says ‘unknown Middle Easterners are mixed in’ migrant caravan

Trump also said that his administration would begin to cut off or reduce foreign aid to Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. Congress has softened some of the president’s previous demands to reduce U.S. foreign aid. The president’s attempt to cut foreign aid in this year’s budget was ultimately rebuffed by lawmakers. The administration then attempted to avoid spending the money allocated for foreign aid using a so-called “rescission” package, Reuters reported, but later dropped the plan. Since h


Trump also said that his administration would begin to cut off or reduce foreign aid to Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. Congress has softened some of the president’s previous demands to reduce U.S. foreign aid. The president’s attempt to cut foreign aid in this year’s budget was ultimately rebuffed by lawmakers. The administration then attempted to avoid spending the money allocated for foreign aid using a so-called “rescission” package, Reuters reported, but later dropped the plan. Since h
Trump says ‘unknown Middle Easterners are mixed in’ migrant caravan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, easterners, presidents, trump, unknown, immigration, middle, issue, foreign, word, national, caravan, mixed, migrant, president, aid


Trump says 'unknown Middle Easterners are mixed in' migrant caravan

President Donald Trump on Monday escalated his attacks on the caravan of migrants making their way to the United States from Central America, calling the situation a national emergency and declaring without evidence that “Criminals and unknown Middle Easterners are mixed in.”

“I have alerted Border Patrol and Military that this is a National Emergy,” the president wrote in the first of a series of Twitter posts about the caravan, apparently misspelling the word “emergency.”

Trump also said that his administration would begin to cut off or reduce foreign aid to Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. He said the three nations “were not able to do the job of stopping people from leaving their country.”

The White House did not respond to a request for more details about the president’s posts, and it’s unclear if he would have the authority to carry out the threats without approval from lawmakers.

The president has the power to formally declare a national emergency under the National Emergencies Act but is required to follow formal procedures, and it is not clear if he has done so.

Congress has softened some of the president’s previous demands to reduce U.S. foreign aid. The president’s attempt to cut foreign aid in this year’s budget was ultimately rebuffed by lawmakers. The administration then attempted to avoid spending the money allocated for foreign aid using a so-called “rescission” package, Reuters reported, but later dropped the plan.

The president, who has made restrictive immigration a key campaign issue as well as a signature aspect of his foreign policy, again on Monday raised the specter of involving the U.S. military to halt the entrance of the migrants and redoubled his call to “change laws.”

“Every time you see a Caravan, or people illegally coming, or attempting to come, into our Country illegally, think of and blame the Democrats for not giving us the votes to change our pathetic Immigration Laws! Remember the Midterms! So unfair to those who come in legally,” Trump wrote.

The president has sought to make immigration a decisive issue in the upcoming November midterms and has leveraged the image of the migrant caravan while campaigning around the country in order to do so. Immigration remains a key issue for GOP voters, consistently polling alongside jobs and the economy as the most important issue for Republicans.

The president’s Monday morning tweets mirror comments he made last week. On Thursday, the president wrote in a tweet that he would “in the strongest of terms, ask Mexico to stop this onslaught – and if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!”

Trump campaigned for the presidency on an “America First” foreign policy platform and infamously launched his bid by claiming that Mexico was sending criminals, including murderers and rapists, into the United States. In April, at an event that was nominally about celebrating the Republican tax bill, the president referred back to his false claim.

“Everybody said, oh, he was so tough. I used the word rape,” Trump said.

Since he took office, critics have called out as racist some of the president’s immigration policies, particularly around the implementation of his controversial Muslim “travel ban.” The Supreme Court upheld a version of the ban, which restricts immigration to the U.S. from a number of Muslim-majority countries, in a blockbuster ruling last term.

In January, the president reportedly railed against immigrants from African nations, Haiti and El Salvador in a meeting in the Oval Office.

“Why are we having all these people from s—hole countries come here?” Trump asked, according to The Washington Post. Trump, who denied using such harsh language, reportedly said the U.S. should have more immigrants from countries like Norway.

A spokesperson for the U.N. human rights office said of the remarks at the time that “there’s no other word one can use but racist.”

WATCH: Here are the businesses profiting from immigration enforcement


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, easterners, presidents, trump, unknown, immigration, middle, issue, foreign, word, national, caravan, mixed, migrant, president, aid


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Chart shows how everything has changed since Trump became president

Since Donald Trump won the presidency, he has presided over both one the most tumultuous political times in recent memory, as well as the best economy the country has seen since well before the financial crisis. The chart below, using mostly data compiled by Goldman Sachs, quantifies just how much things changed from the days just before the election in November 2016 through September 2018. Of course, the stock market has weakened in October, which has been its historically most volatile month.


Since Donald Trump won the presidency, he has presided over both one the most tumultuous political times in recent memory, as well as the best economy the country has seen since well before the financial crisis. The chart below, using mostly data compiled by Goldman Sachs, quantifies just how much things changed from the days just before the election in November 2016 through September 2018. Of course, the stock market has weakened in October, which has been its historically most volatile month.
Chart shows how everything has changed since Trump became president Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-20  Authors: jeff cox, jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, things, won, trump, weakened, took, volatile, president, shows, using, chart, times, changed, tumultuous


Chart shows how everything has changed since Trump became president

Since Donald Trump won the presidency, he has presided over both one the most tumultuous political times in recent memory, as well as the best economy the country has seen since well before the financial crisis. Consumer and small business confidence is up — but so are both the national debt and budget deficit.

The chart below, using mostly data compiled by Goldman Sachs, quantifies just how much things changed from the days just before the election in November 2016 through September 2018.

Of course, the stock market has weakened in October, which has been its historically most volatile month. The chart doesn’t include GDP, which has averaged 2.72 percent since Trump took over, compared to the 1.6 percent gain in 2016.

But the numbers provide a solid overview of how conditions have evolved during the 45th president’s time in office.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-20  Authors: jeff cox, jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, things, won, trump, weakened, took, volatile, president, shows, using, chart, times, changed, tumultuous


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Trump blasts Democrats on immigration amid migrant caravan crisis

Amid worsening tensions in the White House over refugees from Guatemala and Honduras flocking to the border, Trump took to Twitter and blamed Democrats for being weak on border security. With the November midterms just 17 days away, Trump has become more vocal about the border crisis. I want to build a wall,” Trump told the crowd. Meanwhile, former Vice President Joe Biden was also in Nevada, headlining a get-out-the vote rally for Democrats in Las Vegas. Trump has reportedly become frustrated b


Amid worsening tensions in the White House over refugees from Guatemala and Honduras flocking to the border, Trump took to Twitter and blamed Democrats for being weak on border security. With the November midterms just 17 days away, Trump has become more vocal about the border crisis. I want to build a wall,” Trump told the crowd. Meanwhile, former Vice President Joe Biden was also in Nevada, headlining a get-out-the vote rally for Democrats in Las Vegas. Trump has reportedly become frustrated b
Trump blasts Democrats on immigration amid migrant caravan crisis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-20  Authors: matthew j belvedere, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images, reuters ueslei marcelino tpx
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrant, caravan, democrats, wall, amid, immigration, blasts, house, white, crisis, trump, president, rally, issue, border


Trump blasts Democrats on immigration amid migrant caravan crisis

President Donald Trump on Saturday launched a new salvo in the fierce battle over immigration, blasting Democrats for obstructing his efforts to secure the border as thousands of Central American migrants flooded the dividing line between the U.S. and Mexico.

Amid worsening tensions in the White House over refugees from Guatemala and Honduras flocking to the border, Trump took to Twitter and blamed Democrats for being weak on border security. Calling attention to the “horrors taking place on the border,” the president urged Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-New York, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-California, to work with the White House on a solution.

With the November midterms just 17 days away, Trump has become more vocal about the border crisis. At an election rally on Friday in front of thousands of supporters in Arizona, a state bordered by Mexico.

“Democrats want to throw your borders wide open to criminals. I want to build a wall,” Trump told the crowd. “The Democrats don’t care that a flood of illegal immigration is going to bankrupt our country.”

The president held a rally in rural Nevada on Saturday afternoon. Meanwhile, former Vice President Joe Biden was also in Nevada, headlining a get-out-the vote rally for Democrats in Las Vegas.

The president and Republicans are trying to fire up their base ahead of next month’s hotly-contested election, in an effort to stave off a possible “blue wave” that could see Democrats elected in large numbers.

Trump has reportedly become frustrated by efforts to stymie his tough stance on immigration, an issue that launched his 2016 election bid. Several publications this week reported an expletive-filled shouting match between White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and National Security Adviser John Bolton over the issue, sparking new concerns Kelly could resign.

In September, the president signed a spending bill to keep the government open, despite previously calling the measure “ridiculous” because it did not include funding for a wall along the southern border. White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told CNBC shortly after the House followed the Senate in passing the funding measure that the administration would take up the wall issue after the midterms.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-20  Authors: matthew j belvedere, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images, reuters ueslei marcelino tpx
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, migrant, caravan, democrats, wall, amid, immigration, blasts, house, white, crisis, trump, president, rally, issue, border


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Italy crisis pretty worrisome: Former Eurogroup President Dijsselbloem

An Italian crisis would be an “implosion” and have severe consequences for the country’s banking system, the former chief of the Eurogroup told CNBC Friday. “If the Italian crisis becomes a major crisis, it will mainly implode into the Italian economy … as opposed to spreading around Europe,” he said. “Because of the way that the Italian economy and the Italian banks are financed, it’s going to be an implosion rather than an explosion.” The more worrisome figure for that office is the structur


An Italian crisis would be an “implosion” and have severe consequences for the country’s banking system, the former chief of the Eurogroup told CNBC Friday. “If the Italian crisis becomes a major crisis, it will mainly implode into the Italian economy … as opposed to spreading around Europe,” he said. “Because of the way that the Italian economy and the Italian banks are financed, it’s going to be an implosion rather than an explosion.” The more worrisome figure for that office is the structur
Italy crisis pretty worrisome: Former Eurogroup President Dijsselbloem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: everett rosenfeld, silvia amaro, emmanuel dunand, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spending, worrisome, zone, pretty, italian, implosion, dijsselbloem, structural, crisis, economy, deficit, 2019, eurogroup, president, italy


Italy crisis pretty worrisome: Former Eurogroup President Dijsselbloem

An Italian crisis would be an “implosion” and have severe consequences for the country’s banking system, the former chief of the Eurogroup told CNBC Friday.

Financial markets have fretted about Italy’s 2019 budget, amid new plans to increase public spending. There are strong concerns that such fiscal plan will derail the reduction of the country’s debt pile — which is the second largest in the euro zone, totaling 2.3 trillion euros ($2.6 trillion).

Speaking with CNBC on Friday, Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the previous head of the group that brings together the 19 euro zone finance ministers, told CNBC that if Italy were to turn into a crisis mode, it would be an “implosion,” given the way that its economy is organized.

“If the Italian crisis becomes a major crisis, it will mainly implode into the Italian economy … as opposed to spreading around Europe,” he said. “Because of the way that the Italian economy and the Italian banks are financed, it’s going to be an implosion rather than an explosion.”

The Italian government and the European Commission have been embroiled in a battle of words for the last couple of weeks over the new spending plans. On Thursday, the Brussels-based institution sent a letter to the Italian finance minister, Giovanni Tria, warning him that the 2019 budget draft seemed to point to a “particularly serious non-compliance with the budgetary policy obligations laid down” in European rules.

The problem in the commission’s eyes is not so much the headline deficit of 2.4 percent of gross domestic product, which is actually below the EU’s 3 percent threshold. The more worrisome figure for that office is the structural deficit. The new spending targets point to a structural deterioration of 0.8 percent of GDP in 2019. In contrast, Italy had committed last April to improve its structural deficit by 0.6 percent of GDP next year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: everett rosenfeld, silvia amaro, emmanuel dunand, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spending, worrisome, zone, pretty, italian, implosion, dijsselbloem, structural, crisis, economy, deficit, 2019, eurogroup, president, italy


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Trump-approved boycott appears to be hitting Harley-Davidson amid rising trade-ins for rival Indian brand

A boycott of Harley-Davidson encouraged by President Donald Trump seems to be having a significant impact on the iconic motorcycle manufacturer. While that didn’t cover the period from when the president’s dispute with the company began, Johnson said recent evidence suggests the boycott is adding to Harley’s woes. The issues this year continue a trend in which Polaris and Indian have been able to take market share. In addition, Indian has grown year-over-year sales in 42 of 46 months, while Harl


A boycott of Harley-Davidson encouraged by President Donald Trump seems to be having a significant impact on the iconic motorcycle manufacturer. While that didn’t cover the period from when the president’s dispute with the company began, Johnson said recent evidence suggests the boycott is adding to Harley’s woes. The issues this year continue a trend in which Polaris and Indian have been able to take market share. In addition, Indian has grown year-over-year sales in 42 of 46 months, while Harl
Trump-approved boycott appears to be hitting Harley-Davidson amid rising trade-ins for rival Indian brand Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: jeff cox, fabian bimmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, johnson, appears, hitting, trump, tradeins, market, indian, public, harley, rival, trumpapproved, harleydavidson, boycott, president, rising, brand, impact


Trump-approved boycott appears to be hitting Harley-Davidson amid rising trade-ins for rival Indian brand

A boycott of Harley-Davidson encouraged by President Donald Trump seems to be having a significant impact on the iconic motorcycle manufacturer.

Harley sales already had slipped 8.7 percent in the first half of 2018 while its main American competitor, Polaris and its Indian brand, saw a 4 percent gain, according to industry analyst Gerrick L. Johnson at BMO Capital Markets. While that didn’t cover the period from when the president’s dispute with the company began, Johnson said recent evidence suggests the boycott is adding to Harley’s woes.

Harley riders have been trading in their “hogs” in increasing numbers as the company fights through a public relations nightmare created when it said it was shifting some production overseas, Johnson said. The Milwaukee-based manufacturer said it was doing so in response to retaliatory tariffs abroad due to Trump’s duties on steel and aluminum imports from other countries.

While both companies have tried to tamp down the president’s influence on motorcycle sales, Johnson said the impact is unlikely to be a coincidence. Back in August, Trump used his Twitter account to lambaste the company for its production shift and seemed to back a boycott he said was already underway.

“While President Trump’s assessment of HOG’s actions in his tweets were often factually inaccurate, the damage has been done,” Johnson said in a research note. “Dealers are feeling an impact, and we find that the impact has become more acute over time.”

Johnson said he was cutting Harley’s stock from outperform to market perform and knocked the price target to $45 from $52, which still implies 11.5 percent upside from Thursday’s close. Harley shares were off 1.3 percent in premarket trading Friday morning after sliding 3.1 percent in Thursday’s broad market sell-off. The stock has tumbled just over 20 percent year to date.

CNBC has reached out to Harley-Davidson for comment. The company officially reports earnings on Monday.

It’s not so much a problem with Harley’s products — Johnson said, in fact, that the company has continued to bring good bikes to market, but to little avail.

“For the first time in 10 years of covering powersports we have seen a manufacturer develop innovative new products that are significantly better than what they replace, and yet not seen an increase in demand,” he wrote.

But the company, according to the analysis, has failed to capture young riders, due in part to overpricing, and it managed the public relations poorly around the production move and Trump’s subsequent reaction.

“The overlap between Donald Trump supporters and Harley riders is significant,” Johnson said. “Thus, it’s disconcerting to have the President call on these consumers to boycott the brand. In response to new European tariffs on American motorcycles, HOG may have had the right financial intentions but the way it communicated its strategy was a public relations debacle.”

Johnson suggested the company shouldn’t have been as public as it was in announcing the move and shouldn’t have decided to “poke” the president when doing so.

The issues this year continue a trend in which Polaris and Indian have been able to take market share. The company still only holds 7 percent of the market for “heavyweight” brands, compared to 50 percent for Harley-Davidson, but says it has about a 20 percent share in the mid-size market, which is geared toward younger riders.

In addition, Indian has grown year-over-year sales in 42 of 46 months, while Harley has done so just 12 times during the period.

Since the battle with Trump, Johnson said he has found “that a majority of dealers feel they have lost at least some sales.”

“It should be disconcerting to HOG investors that most Indian dealers we speak with are seeing an uptick in Harley trade-ins for whatever the reason may be,” the analyst wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: jeff cox, fabian bimmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, johnson, appears, hitting, trump, tradeins, market, indian, public, harley, rival, trumpapproved, harleydavidson, boycott, president, rising, brand, impact


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Trump says he backs pre-existing conditions coverage-his actions say no

President Donald Trump’s promise to protect pre-existing conditions coverage, perhaps the most popular Affordable Care Act provision, rings hollow. By doing so, the Trump administration tacitly supported the suit, which could roll back Obamacare’s coverage guarantees for people with pre-existing conditions if it succeeds. As Democrats try to flip control of the House, candidates across the country have attacked the GOP for threatening coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. Amid the br


President Donald Trump’s promise to protect pre-existing conditions coverage, perhaps the most popular Affordable Care Act provision, rings hollow. By doing so, the Trump administration tacitly supported the suit, which could roll back Obamacare’s coverage guarantees for people with pre-existing conditions if it succeeds. As Democrats try to flip control of the House, candidates across the country have attacked the GOP for threatening coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. Amid the br
Trump says he backs pre-existing conditions coverage-his actions say no Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, afp, getty images, jordan malter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, actions, trump, preexisting, say, repeal, republicans, provision, suit, protect, obamacares, coverage, president, coveragehis, conditions, backs


Trump says he backs pre-existing conditions coverage-his actions say no

President Donald Trump’s promise to protect pre-existing conditions coverage, perhaps the most popular Affordable Care Act provision, rings hollow. That’s because his administration is backing a lawsuit that would scrap it.

As Republicans face midterm election pressure from an energized Democratic base over their efforts to repeal Obamacare, the president tweeted Thursday that “all Republicans support people with pre-existing conditions” or “will after I speak to them” if they do not already. He added that “I am in total support.”

His administration’s actions suggest otherwise. The Justice Department has declined to defend the health care law in court against a suit from 20 GOP-led states challenging Obamacare’s constitutionality. They argue the rest of the law does not hold up after Republicans rolled back its individual mandate provision last year. By doing so, the Trump administration tacitly supported the suit, which could roll back Obamacare’s coverage guarantees for people with pre-existing conditions if it succeeds.

As Democrats try to flip control of the House, candidates across the country have attacked the GOP for threatening coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. Amid the broadsides, Republican lawmakers who have pushed to repeal Obamacare for years are pledging to protect the provision. The GOP has good reason for its sudden shift on the issue: about a quarter of Americans do not want pre-existing conditions protections to be reversed, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation survey earlier this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: jacob pramuk, saul loeb, afp, getty images, jordan malter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, actions, trump, preexisting, say, repeal, republicans, provision, suit, protect, obamacares, coverage, president, coveragehis, conditions, backs


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Trump: Arrests in killing of Jamal Khashoggi are ‘a good first step’

President Donald Trump called Saudi Arabia’s announcement of arrests in the death of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi a “good first step.” Trump has boasted of $110 billion in weapons sales to Saudi Arabia, although the transactions have yet to come to fruition. Trump said that he wants to talk to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman before the next steps in the process. Through its state press, Saudi Arabia said arrested 18 Saudi nationals after preliminary investigations linked the


President Donald Trump called Saudi Arabia’s announcement of arrests in the death of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi a “good first step.” Trump has boasted of $110 billion in weapons sales to Saudi Arabia, although the transactions have yet to come to fruition. Trump said that he wants to talk to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman before the next steps in the process. Through its state press, Saudi Arabia said arrested 18 Saudi nationals after preliminary investigations linked the
Trump: Arrests in killing of Jamal Khashoggi are ‘a good first step’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, killing, president, jamal, good, saudi, sales, press, killed, linked, prince, step, khashoggi, kingdom, arrests


Trump: Arrests in killing of Jamal Khashoggi are 'a good first step'

President Donald Trump called Saudi Arabia’s announcement of arrests in the death of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi a “good first step.”

Yet, he added that considers what happened to the writer to be “unacceptable.”

The president also said he would work with Congress on the matter, but that he would prefer not to hurt U.S. companies and jobs by cutting billions of dollars in arms sales to the kingdom. Trump has boasted of $110 billion in weapons sales to Saudi Arabia, although the transactions have yet to come to fruition.

Trump said that he wants to talk to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman before the next steps in the process.

Through its state press, Saudi Arabia said arrested 18 Saudi nationals after preliminary investigations linked them to the Khashoggi case.

The president said the death of Khashoggi was a “horrible event” that has not gone “unnoticed.”

Trump spoke during a defense roundtable in Arizona, where he was set to hold a political rally. His remarks followed Saudi Arabia’s announcement confirming that Khashoggi had indeed been killed.

However, the kingdom said the journalist and critic of the Saudi royal family was killed during an altercation with Saudi operatives at the nation’s consulate in Istanbul.

This account is vastly different from previously leaked stories that said Khashoggi was tortured and dismembered. Media reports said that the team who allegedly killed Khashoggi included men linked to the Saudi crown prince, who has denied involvement in the matter.

Trump told reporters Friday that he found the Saudi explanation to be credible. However, many others, including Trump ally and Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, weren’t buying the latest story.

-The Associated Press and CNBC’s Christine Wang and Amanda Macias contributed to this article.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, killing, president, jamal, good, saudi, sales, press, killed, linked, prince, step, khashoggi, kingdom, arrests


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Investor and Trump friend Tom Barrack not going to Saudi conference

Billionaire investor and one of President Donald Trump’s closest allies Tom Barrack will not be attending the Future Investment Initiative conference in Saudi Arabia, CNBC has learned. Mnuchin and Barrack were slated to be on a panel together next Tuesday in Riyadh. Barrack, a Lebanese American, became close to the president and his operation during the 2016 presidential election. He was one of the lead business figures who helped raise funds for then-candidate Trump and later introduced him to


Billionaire investor and one of President Donald Trump’s closest allies Tom Barrack will not be attending the Future Investment Initiative conference in Saudi Arabia, CNBC has learned. Mnuchin and Barrack were slated to be on a panel together next Tuesday in Riyadh. Barrack, a Lebanese American, became close to the president and his operation during the 2016 presidential election. He was one of the lead business figures who helped raise funds for then-candidate Trump and later introduced him to
Investor and Trump friend Tom Barrack not going to Saudi conference Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: brian schwartz, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, friend, investor, going, trump, conference, trumps, tom, funds, later, real, president, business, saudi, barrack, attending


Investor and Trump friend Tom Barrack not going to Saudi conference

Billionaire investor and one of President Donald Trump’s closest allies Tom Barrack will not be attending the Future Investment Initiative conference in Saudi Arabia, CNBC has learned.

Barrack will no longer be attending as his speaking session was cancelled by the conference hosts after Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin pulled out of attending on Thursday, according to a source with direct knowledge of the matter.

Mnuchin and Barrack were slated to be on a panel together next Tuesday in Riyadh.

Barrack is the latest prominent business figure who have dropped out of taking part in the conference, also known as “Davos in the Desert,” following the disappearance of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi.

A spokesman for Barrack declined to comment.

Barrack, a Lebanese American, became close to the president and his operation during the 2016 presidential election. He was one of the lead business figures who helped raise funds for then-candidate Trump and later introduced him to his previous campaign chairman Paul Manafort. Barrack later served as chairman of Trump’s inaugural committee

Barrack himself has strong business ties to the Middle East. He reportedly has $200 million invested into the region. His real estate investment firm, Colony Capital, manages at least $34 billion in assets, including $18 billion in over 16 commercial real estate and distressed debt-focused funds.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: brian schwartz, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, friend, investor, going, trump, conference, trumps, tom, funds, later, real, president, business, saudi, barrack, attending


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Saudi Arabia claims Khashoggi was killed in a fight, contrary to other accounts

Saudi Arabia said it “is taking the necessary measures to clarify the circumstances in the case of Saudi citizen Jamal Khashoggi” and that “all those involved will be brought to justice.” We are saddened to hear confirmation of Mr. Khashoggi’s death, and we offer our deepest condolences to his family, fiancée, and friends.” In the weeks following Khashoggi’s disappearance, the international community increasingly pressed Saudi Arabia for the dissident’s whereabouts. On Thursday, Trump acknowledg


Saudi Arabia said it “is taking the necessary measures to clarify the circumstances in the case of Saudi citizen Jamal Khashoggi” and that “all those involved will be brought to justice.” We are saddened to hear confirmation of Mr. Khashoggi’s death, and we offer our deepest condolences to his family, fiancée, and friends.” In the weeks following Khashoggi’s disappearance, the international community increasingly pressed Saudi Arabia for the dissident’s whereabouts. On Thursday, Trump acknowledg
Saudi Arabia claims Khashoggi was killed in a fight, contrary to other accounts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: christine wang, chris mcgrath, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claims, khashoggi, saudi, killed, fight, death, arabia, international, contrary, president, press, accounts, kingdom, prince, khashoggis


Saudi Arabia claims Khashoggi was killed in a fight, contrary to other accounts

The kingdom also fired Deputy Chief of General Intelligence Ahmad bin Hassan Asiri and royal court advisor Abdullah Al-Qahtani. The kingdom also said a committee would be formed to restructure its intelligence agency under the supervision of Prince Mohammed, “to modernize its regulations and define its powers precisely.”

On Thursday, The New York Times reported that Saudi officials close to the crown prince planned on blaming Asiri for Khashoggi’s death. The Times said by making Asiri a scapegoat, the government could help shield the crown prince from blame.

Through its state press, the kingdom said it has detained 18 Saudi nationals after preliminary investigations linked them to the case.

Saudi Arabia said it “is taking the necessary measures to clarify the circumstances in the case of Saudi citizen Jamal Khashoggi” and that “all those involved will be brought to justice.”

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders issued the following statement:

“The United States acknowledges the announcement from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia that its investigation into the fate of Jamal Khashoggi is progressing and that it has taken action against the suspects it has identified thus far. We will continue to closely follow the international investigations into this tragic incident and advocate for justice that is timely, transparent, and in accordance with all due process. We are saddened to hear confirmation of Mr. Khashoggi’s death, and we offer our deepest condolences to his family, fiancée, and friends.”

In the weeks following Khashoggi’s disappearance, the international community increasingly pressed Saudi Arabia for the dissident’s whereabouts. U.S. President Donald Trump also faced mounting criticism for being too soft in his response. On Thursday, Trump acknowledged Khashoggi was likely dead and said he would consider “very severe consequences” if Saudi Arabia is found responsible.

But Trump’s resistance to act swiftly sparked comparisons to how he has spoken deferentially about other autocratic leaders accused of human rights abuses, such as Russia’s Vladimir Putin and North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. On Tuesday, the president told The Associated Press that he saw a case of “you’re guilty until proven innocent.”

Trump on Friday called the arrests a “good first step.” Yet he also mentioned that he would be reluctant to undo arms deals with the kingdom if the U.S. were to slap Saudi Arabia with sanctions over Khashoggi’s death.

Vice President Mike Pence said that the U.S. will not “solely rely” on information provided by Saudi Arabia, a longtime U.S. ally in the Middle East.

Several members of Congress have called for swift sanctions on oil-rich Saudi Arabia in the uproar over Khashoggi. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., quickly expressed his doubts about the Saudi account of the journalist’s death, saying “It’s hard to find this latest ‘explanation’ as credible.”

The announcement comes more than two weeks after Khashoggi was last seen in public, entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. Khashoggi was a frequent critic of Saudi Arabia’s royal family and wrote columns for The Washington Post.

In his last column for the Post, Khashoggi highlighted the need for independent and free press in Arab nations. He said the international community had turned a blind eye to the increasing rate at which Arab governments were silencing the press.

“These actions no longer carry the consequence of a backlash from the international community. Instead, these actions may trigger condemnation quickly followed by silence,” Khashoggi wrote.

— CNBC’s Jacob Pramuk, Christina Wilkie and Kevin Breuninger contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: christine wang, chris mcgrath, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claims, khashoggi, saudi, killed, fight, death, arabia, international, contrary, president, press, accounts, kingdom, prince, khashoggis


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