Democrats need to realize that impeaching Trump may not accomplish anything at all

It’s hard to deny that anti-Trump sentiment and a desire to oust him from office is a unifying issue for Democrats. Do the Democrats really need more anti-Trump publicity? A recent study by the conservative Media Research Council found that 96 percent of network news stories covering President Trump were negative since the impeachment inquiry began. The White House and several Trump supporters have been arguing that the impeachment process is solidifying the president’s chances at re-election. T


It’s hard to deny that anti-Trump sentiment and a desire to oust him from office is a unifying issue for Democrats.
Do the Democrats really need more anti-Trump publicity?
A recent study by the conservative Media Research Council found that 96 percent of network news stories covering President Trump were negative since the impeachment inquiry began.
The White House and several Trump supporters have been arguing that the impeachment process is solidifying the president’s chances at re-election.
T
Democrats need to realize that impeaching Trump may not accomplish anything at all Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, realize, democrats, accomplish, impeachment, house, antitrump, trump, impeaching, negative, president, presidential, need


Democrats need to realize that impeaching Trump may not accomplish anything at all

Now that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has asked House committee chairmen to draft articles of impeachment for President Donald Trump, it’s a virtual certainty that he will be impeached and tried in the U.S. Senate.

But Democrats should consider at least four burning questions before moving forward:

1. Does this energize the Democrats for 2020, or take their eyes off the ball?

It’s hard to deny that anti-Trump sentiment and a desire to oust him from office is a unifying issue for Democrats.

Some pundits argue that while impeaching Trump is not likely to lead to his removal by the Republican-majority in the U.S. Senate, failing to at least bring him up for an impeachment trial risks turning off the Democratic base.

But that argument seems like a stretch, judging by the constant rage we see against Trump from his opponents on the left. Would Democratic voters really stay home and not vote for Trump’s 2020 opponent if no impeachment vote passes?

It’s also hard to imagine large numbers of voters angrily voting against Trump at the top of the ballot, and then simply leaving the bottom of the ballot blank or opting for pro-Trump GOP candidates in Congressional races

2. Do the Democrats really need more anti-Trump publicity?

As the impeachment process moves forward and likely moves to a trial in the Senate, the Democrats are getting what amounts to a free 24/7 negative political ad against Trump on the TV news networks.

So what else is new?

In case you haven’t noticed. Just about all the TV news coverage of this president has been negative and those networks have barely covered anything else. A recent study by the conservative Media Research Council found that 96 percent of network news stories covering President Trump were negative since the impeachment inquiry began. But that’s only four percentage points higher than the same group’s results from a study about one year ago.

Democrats should focus more on positive stories about their own still crowded field of presidential candidates, and something that defines them other than just being anti-Trump. They need something more like the inspirational story of Barack Obama’s quest to become the first African-American to win the White House in 2008, or a young Bill Clinton’s push to move us past the older generation’s Cold War focus in 1992. Focusing only on replacing Trump won’t get that done.

3. This helps Trump… a little.

The White House and several Trump supporters have been arguing that the impeachment process is solidifying the president’s chances at re-election. Their argument is that the Democrats are coming off as vindictive and derelict in their duties as lawmakers by focusing on attacking Trump.

That seems a little too optimistic. But what is demonstrably true is that a good section of President Trump’s loyal base has indeed been fired up. The Trump re-election campaign has been using the impeachment as an excuse to ask for more donations and online engagement, and by all accounts it’s paying off. One can argue that added funds don’t make a major difference for an incumbent president who already has the power of his office and Air Force One to spread his message across the world.

But it doesn’t hurt.

4. It’s not all about Trump.

The need to present something other than an attack on the president is about more than just inspiring personalities. Yes, anti-Trump sentiment came off as a key national theme for the Democrats running for Congress in the 2018 elections. But the Democrats would be wise to remember that they retook the House in a midterm contest that saw healthcare consistently ranked as the top voter concern. The Republicans’ failure to repeal and replace Obamacare as promised surely added to their midterm woes last year and a failure to get anywhere on the issue in this session of Congress could be a similar liability for the Democrats in 2020.

Since the midterm election, things have only gotten worse with healthcare costs rising and the percentage of Americans without health insurance rising. The Democrats still have a shot at crafting a unified message on healthcare packed with plenty of attacks on the Trump administration and the Republicans for failing to rein in costs.

But good luck getting that message the attention and repetition in the news media it would need to get noticed in the midst of the impeachment obsession. Don’t even think about the Democrats putting together a major Obamacare overhaul bill right now either.

It’s not often that a #1 voter issue doesn’t even get much lip service from politicians. But that’s happening now.

Of course the impeachment will still go forward, despite the above questions and concerns. It’s also not too late for the Democrats in Congress and on the presidential campaign trail to make the proper adjustments to avoid all the impeachment-related pitfalls they face. But that will take a lot more foresight than we’re seeing evidence of right now.

The most likely outcome is that what was once considered the absolute nadir for a presidential administration will end up barely moving the electoral needle one way or another.

Jake Novak is a political and economic analyst at Jake Novak News and former CNBC TV producer. You can follow him on Twitter @jakejakeny.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, realize, democrats, accomplish, impeachment, house, antitrump, trump, impeaching, negative, president, presidential, need


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Joe Biden claims he said ‘facts’ not ‘fat’ to Iowa voter: Listen to the tape yourself

Look, what “facts” are you going to believe, the ones you hear with your own ears or from Joe Biden’s spin room? Biden and the Democratic presidential contender’s spokeswoman are denying — strongly — that he called a retired Iowa farmer “fat” after the man challenged him about Hunter Biden at a campaign event Thursday. Biden’s team claims he said “facts” not “fat” during the confrontation in New Hampton. And he challenged Gorman to do push-ups or go running with him after suggesting that the far


Look, what “facts” are you going to believe, the ones you hear with your own ears or from Joe Biden’s spin room?
Biden and the Democratic presidential contender’s spokeswoman are denying — strongly — that he called a retired Iowa farmer “fat” after the man challenged him about Hunter Biden at a campaign event Thursday.
Biden’s team claims he said “facts” not “fat” during the confrontation in New Hampton.
And he challenged Gorman to do push-ups or go running with him after suggesting that the far
Joe Biden claims he said ‘facts’ not ‘fat’ to Iowa voter: Listen to the tape yourself Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iowa, look, gorman, farmer, challenged, listen, man, fat, voter, biden, joe, president, confrontation, facts, claims, tape


Joe Biden claims he said 'facts' not 'fat' to Iowa voter: Listen to the tape yourself

Look, what “facts” are you going to believe, the ones you hear with your own ears or from Joe Biden’s spin room?

Biden and the Democratic presidential contender’s spokeswoman are denying — strongly — that he called a retired Iowa farmer “fat” after the man challenged him about Hunter Biden at a campaign event Thursday.

Video of the confrontation clearly reveals otherwise.

Biden’s team claims he said “facts” not “fat” during the confrontation in New Hampton.

Biden’s disputed dig came as he angrily denied an allegation by the man, who said, without evidence, that Biden had gotten his son a position at a Ukraine gas company while serving as vice president under President Barack Obama.

Biden called the man, later identified as 83-year-old Merle Gorman, “a damn liar” for that claim.

And he challenged Gorman to do push-ups or go running with him after suggesting that the farmer led a “sedentary” lifestyle in contrast to Biden himself.

“But look, fat, look. Here’s the deal,” Biden told Gorman.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iowa, look, gorman, farmer, challenged, listen, man, fat, voter, biden, joe, president, confrontation, facts, claims, tape


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House GOP leader says ‘we get USMCA done’ this year despite Dem focus on Trump impeachment

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy predicted Friday that Congress will pass the North American Free Trade Agreement replacement by the end of the year, despite Democrats’ focus on impeaching President Donald Trump. House Democrats have a lot on their plates before the planned Dec. 20 holiday recess. The Judiciary Committee scheduled a hearing Monday on the evidence gathered in the Trump impeachment inquiry after Pelosi on Thursday told the House committees investigating the president to procee


House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy predicted Friday that Congress will pass the North American Free Trade Agreement replacement by the end of the year, despite Democrats’ focus on impeaching President Donald Trump.
House Democrats have a lot on their plates before the planned Dec. 20 holiday recess.
The Judiciary Committee scheduled a hearing Monday on the evidence gathered in the Trump impeachment inquiry after Pelosi on Thursday told the House committees investigating the president to procee
House GOP leader says ‘we get USMCA done’ this year despite Dem focus on Trump impeachment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dem, vote, impeachment, democrats, gop, usmca, house, despite, pelosi, leader, agreement, trump, told, president, focus, inquiry


House GOP leader says 'we get USMCA done' this year despite Dem focus on Trump impeachment

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy predicted Friday that Congress will pass the North American Free Trade Agreement replacement by the end of the year, despite Democrats’ focus on impeaching President Donald Trump.

“I actually believe we get USMCA done,” the California Republican told CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” referring to the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, which would supplant NAFTA, now 25 years old. “I do expect it to come.”

In addition to Republicans on Capitol Hill, top Trump officials have also been pushing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to allow a ratification vote by the end of the year. The USMCA, agreed to by all three nations in October 2018, is regarded as one of the administration’s key economic accomplishments to date.

Positive indications were made in mid-November when Pelosi said that final agreement on the deal was “imminent.” Days later, though, she said there may not be time to finish negotiations before 2020.

House Democrats have a lot on their plates before the planned Dec. 20 holiday recess. The Judiciary Committee scheduled a hearing Monday on the evidence gathered in the Trump impeachment inquiry after Pelosi on Thursday told the House committees investigating the president to proceed with impeachment articles.

As time dwindles, an increasing number of Republicans have accused Democrats of disregarding economic policy as they move forward with impeachment.

McCarthy on Friday accused Pelosi of prioritizing the impeachment inquiry and jeopardizing the United States’ growth by not calling a vote on USMCA. “She’s more concerned with maybe tearing down this president instead of building this country up,” he added. “She has given everything to impeachment.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., made similar comments in November. “If the House cannot pass the USMCA this year, there is no way they’ll be able to claim the people’s business has not taken a backseat to impeachment,” he told reporters at the time.

A spokesperson for Pelosi did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Pelosi has repeatedly said she believes the House can legislate and carry out the impeachment inquiry at the same time.

— CNBC’s Jacob Pramuk contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dem, vote, impeachment, democrats, gop, usmca, house, despite, pelosi, leader, agreement, trump, told, president, focus, inquiry


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Mark Cuban says President Trump calls him to ask about the stock market

Mark Cuban’s relationship with President Donald Trump has had its ups and downs. But the billionaire star of ABC’s “Shark Tank” says Trump still wants to hear his thoughts on the stock market. “He called me the other day, for real,” the Dallas Mavericks owner tells Hart about Trump. Cuban says Trump asked him. The president also reached out to Cuban in February 2019, after Cuban’s Mavericks pulled off a trade to land former New York Knicks star Kristaps Porzingis, Cuban tells Hart.


Mark Cuban’s relationship with President Donald Trump has had its ups and downs.
But the billionaire star of ABC’s “Shark Tank” says Trump still wants to hear his thoughts on the stock market.
“He called me the other day, for real,” the Dallas Mavericks owner tells Hart about Trump.
Cuban says Trump asked him.
The president also reached out to Cuban in February 2019, after Cuban’s Mavericks pulled off a trade to land former New York Knicks star Kristaps Porzingis, Cuban tells Hart.
Mark Cuban says President Trump calls him to ask about the stock market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, ask, stock, market, star, trump, trade, cuban, hart, think, president, tells, calls, mark


Mark Cuban says President Trump calls him to ask about the stock market

Mark Cuban’s relationship with President Donald Trump has had its ups and downs. But the billionaire star of ABC’s “Shark Tank” says Trump still wants to hear his thoughts on the stock market.

That’s what Cuban told comedian and actor Kevin Hart in the latest episode of “Cold as Balls,” a web show Hart hosts on his Laugh Out Loud YouTube channel.

“He called me the other day, for real,” the Dallas Mavericks owner tells Hart about Trump. In the episode published Tuesday, Cuban says the president called him “two and a half weeks ago,” noting that he received a call from a private number in the Washington, D.C. area code and answered the phone to discover it was Trump.

“He’s like, ‘What do you think about the stock market?'” Cuban says Trump asked him. “I’m like, ‘Oh, hi Donald. What do you think about the stock market?'” Cuban says, laughing.

The president also reached out to Cuban in February 2019, after Cuban’s Mavericks pulled off a trade to land former New York Knicks star Kristaps Porzingis, Cuban tells Hart.

“He sent me an email,” Cuban says of Trump. “He scanned the back cover of The New York Post and he said, ‘Great trade.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, ask, stock, market, star, trump, trade, cuban, hart, think, president, tells, calls, mark


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Joe Biden says Trump is ‘ripping the soul out of this country’ and ‘we’re likely to inherit a recession’

Joe Biden: Look, remember, everything landed on the presidents plate but locusts. John Harwood: President Trump has been very strong in ripping Fed Chair Powell. Joe Biden: I don’t think the president of the United States today has any notion of geopolitical concerns. Joe Biden: I don’t know. I sometimes sit back and wonder, “Whoa, I don’t know whether …” – well, I shouldn’t speculate because I don’t know, to be honest.


Joe Biden: Look, remember, everything landed on the presidents plate but locusts.
John Harwood: President Trump has been very strong in ripping Fed Chair Powell.
Joe Biden: I don’t think the president of the United States today has any notion of geopolitical concerns.
Joe Biden: I don’t know.
I sometimes sit back and wonder, “Whoa, I don’t know whether …” – well, I shouldn’t speculate because I don’t know, to be honest.
Joe Biden says Trump is ‘ripping the soul out of this country’ and ‘we’re likely to inherit a recession’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, harwood, likely, recession, tax, trump, inherit, things, dont, biden, soul, president, know, think, look, ripping, going, joe, country


Joe Biden says Trump is 'ripping the soul out of this country' and 'we're likely to inherit a recession'

Former Vice President Joe Biden, who has been on the campaign trail in Iowa this week, sat down with CNBC’s John Harwood on Thursday to discuss a range of topics, including trade, health care, taxes and President Donald Trump’s standing among world leaders.

Biden has lagged behind Democratic presidential rivals Mayor Pete Buttigieg, and Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders in recent polls of voters in Iowa, which will hold the first-in-the-nation nominating contest in February. Yet he has consistently led the field in national polling averages.

Here is a transcript of Biden and Harwood’s interview.

John Harwood: Mr. Vice President, thanks for joining us.

Joe Biden: Thanks for being out here.

John Harwood: How’s that bus tour? Had a wild exchange this morning.

Joe Biden: Well, that was actually a little bit of fun. The fact is that we have a great bus tour. We have about 660 miles. We’re going in day six. We’ve had a couple thousand people show up. They’re enthusiastic. It was interesting the response of the crowd when that fellow spoke up.

John Harwood: Let me ask you a little bit about how you get your program passed. You’ve made the argument that Trump’s an aberration. If you beat him, you can then bring things back to normal, implement your middle-class economic agenda in the way that we’ve become used to. We’re now in a situation where Republican senators are repeating what is known to be Russian propaganda, including propaganda about you. How do you bring that back to normal?

Joe Biden: Well, I don’t hold grudges, for real. You’ve watched me a long time. I think a lot of Republicans in the Senate are really under enormous pressure. When you have a Republican Party and that old joke, this ain’t your father’s Republican Party, saying that a poll showing they think he’s better than Abraham Lincoln, you know something’s wrong. And so I think there’s going to be a lot of people who are going to be prepared to deal with things that they know we should be talking about.

John Harwood: But to the point about not your father’s Republican Party, some of the things on your tax and spending agenda are things that Republicans blocked when you were the vice president, before Trump.

Joe Biden: Yes, I agree. But now we’ve had Trump. There’s two ways people get inspired, John. They get inspired by inspirational people like John Kennedy and they get inspired by very bad people, bad presidents like Donald Trump.

And what people have now seen is that his tax policy has been a disaster for the middle-class, disaster for them, and that there is plenty of room to be able to do things that make a lot of sense. I have always been at the view that the tax policy is not about punishing people. It’s about giving everybody a shot, giving everybody an equal prospect. And so when I call for – for example, there’s overwhelming evidence now that the idea that the capital gains tax is promoting growth is just not the case. We should charge people the same tax for their capital gains as their tax rate is. And I think we should raise the tax rate back to, for example, I take it back to where it was before it was reduced.

It could go higher, but at 39.5%, 40% basically if you have that as the capital gains, that raises, I brought along, I’m not going to bore you with it, but you’ve seen it, I brought along a graph is how much money each of these things raise.

John Harwood: I have seen that graph.

Joe Biden: But I think they’re all realistic now. I think that the possibility of saying to people, “Look, we ought to start rewarding work as much as we do well.” And you have a significant number of Republicans who aren’t multimillionaires thinking that makes a lot of sense.

John Harwood: Let me go back, though, to the divisions. A few years ago after the Affordable Care Act passed, I interviewed President Obama and asked him if he was concerned that we’re getting divided, not just by party and ideology, but also by race.

He said, “No, people are going to say that the Affordable Care Act benefits white and black alike and that is a way that’s going to bridge that divide.” It didn’t happen. Do you think it will be easier for you to do that than it was for him because you’re a white man?

Joe Biden: No. John, I think it did happen. Look at the 2018 election. I went into 24 States with over 65 candidates on health care. The thing about Barack was, I used to always say to him, “We ought to take a victory lap on what happened in Obamacare.”

He said, “We don’t have time.” Everything but locusts landed on his desk. It wasn’t until Republicans started taking it away that all of a sudden people said, “Whoa, I didn’t know that that’s where I got that from.”

And look what we did. We won back 41 seats, Republican seats in purple and red areas. You didn’t hear any Republicans out there saying, “I’m going to take away your preexisting condition coverage.” Because they figured it out. The one thing that Trump has done, he pulled the band-aid off and said, “This is who I am. This is what we’ve done.”

Whether it’s, for example, the idea that we’re in a position where there is no minimum tax on corporations that don’t pay anything, make billions and billions of dollars. Where I come from in Delaware, a lot of Republicans do, they think, Whoa, that doesn’t work. That’s not fair. Other corporations don’t think it is fair. So there’s a lot of things that have been exposed now.

John Harwood: Let me ask you about another aspect of the divide. What we’ve seen is a geographic divide economically. And more diverse, better educated, more digitally focused cities are doing better, higher incomes. Places like Chickasaw County here in Iowa are falling behind, lesser levels of education and more and more levels of cultural resentment, which has been to the benefit of the Republican Party. What do you do about that?

Joe Biden: Well, that’s also shifted too. The president has said, Trump said he’s going to take care of the forgotten man. He got elected and forgot them. Look what Chickasaw County out here now. Basically, a conservative area in the past, but now all of a sudden they’re realizing his foreign policy is killing them, killing them. His failure to invest in any education is killing them. Being able to bring teachers, the attitude toward rural hospitals is killing them.

John Harwood: But we’ve seen farmers say, “I’m sticking with the president. He’s on my side. He’s giving us aid to compensate.”

Joe Biden: There are going to be people sticking with them. Remember, we lost by about 172,000 votes. Okay? So you don’t have to win back, you don’t have to fundamentally change anything. But you’ve got to let people know that all the meetings I’ve had, I’ve talked about the incredible opportunity of rural America leading American through the 21st century, for real.

We’re the only country in the world that has been able to take grave crises and turn them into real opportunities. Global warming – agriculture is going to be the epicenter of the first, and I predict to you, the first area of zero net, zero carbon because of the way in which the technology’s changing, where farmers can make a lot of money not just growing and selling their crop, but with crop cover, with dealing with absorbing carbon. with setting up.

I know is not going to sound good on television, but you know there’s an awful lot of chicken manure in Delaware because it was a big area. There’s an awful lot of hog manure and cattle. Well guess what? We’ve learned now how to pelletize that. Take out the methane, use it for energy and be able to sell this pure stuff that is not damaging the environment abroad. We’re going to see little factories springing up all over this area. Or for example, ethanol. Ethanol, the salaries ethanol plants are not 15 bucks an hour, $45 an hour. They’ve generated significant economic income.

John Harwood: Let me ask you about one specific farm issue.

Joe Biden: Sure.

John Harwood: Farm exports have been hurt by the trade war. He’s had subsidies to compensate. If you become president, do those tariffs come off on day one?

Joe Biden: Those tariffs come off in terms of farmers, but other tariffs may go on in terms of the violation of the stealing of intellectual property, violating WTO.

John Harwood: So for all the people saying that the tariffs are creating uncertainty and harming the economy, you think some of them are justified?

Joe Biden: Well, for example, on steel dumping it’s justified. It’s justified. The excess of steel, they dump it at a lower cost. It is in fact designed to drive down our steel market and our steel production. But the idea of us making the farmer pay for what they’ve worked like hell to do, provide and have a market in China, makes no sense. It’s not about the (trade) deficit. What it’s about is what they’re doing unfairly to change world trade rules.

Look, we make up 25% of the world’s economy. When we were prepared to bring our allies with us, China has to listen. But this time, we have to have labor and environmentalist at the table, at the table. And then what happens is we can begin to once again set the rules of fair trade internationally.

John Harwood: On the divide we’re talking about, Sanders and Warren have made a case for closing the divide with large universal programs that everybody benefits from. Given how popular Medicare and Social Security as universal programs are, why are they wrong?

Joe Biden: Well because they’re not being honest about how much it will cost. If you take a look at where the Democratic Party is and where the American people are, they’re not supporting Medicare for All. First of all, it’s going to take their own admission four to 10 years for it to happen, number one. It’s going to cost between $30 trillion and $40 trillion over 10 years. It’s not realistic, going to raise taxes on middle-class people. It’s the exact opposite of the thing we have to do.

I have a really bold plan. I’m taking what Obamacare, adding a public option to it, meaning Medicare for people who want to buy into that, or if they’re already eligible for Medicaid, they automatically get enrolled. I’m further subsidizing the plans that exist under Obamacare, so the largest deduction you’d have to pay for a copay would be $1,000 in a gold plan and you’re allowed to keep your insurance if you like it.

John Harwood: Nancy Pelosi says Medicare for All is not an idea that she’s in favor of. You’re saying it’s not a good idea even if you could pass it?

Joe Biden: Well, I think it’s not a necessary idea. Theoretically, it makes sense on the merits. But the fact is there’s no way to get it done. Our entire budget for one year, every single thing doesn’t add up to what it would cost for Medicare for one year. It’s about whether or not we can do something big that can get done and benefit people. The one thing I don’t like about the Medicare for All, there’s about 160 million people who’ve negotiated and taking pay cuts to get better insurance coverage with their companies, and they like it.

John Harwood: Do you think it is a problem – economically, politically, even morally – for Democrats to be in a position of offering lots of free stuff?

Joe Biden: I think there are important things we have to offer for free for people who need basic health care, basic education, basic needs that relate to how they can live their lives. I think for many people that has to be free. Look, he’s just cut back on food stamps, for God’s sake, going into Christmas.

John Harwood: Right. But you’ve seen the objection. People say, “Oh those Democrats, they’re just promising this and that.”

Joe Biden: You have to right the market a little bit here. If you have all of the tax breaks, essentially all the tax breaks, all of the benefits flowing through the top one 10th of 1% – there’s never been as great a concentration of wealth, including going back to the Great Depression, ever.

One of the things that worries me most about that, John, is the middle class is getting killed. The middle class right now is in a position where more than half of them don’t think the children will ever have the same standard of living they have.

John Harwood: But this is where the Sanders and Warren wealth tax comes in. It polls pretty well. Critics, Republicans, also some prominent Democrats say two things about it, two objections. One, it’s not workable. And two, it’s punitive. Do you agree with both of those objections?

Joe Biden: Parts of the plan, those objections apply. But here’s the deal: my view is you have to reform the entire tax code, not just have a single tax on a single group of people. For example, if in fact we’re able to – and I think we can get it passed – make you pay on capital gains, clipping coupons, your money making money, the same rates you pay in your regular taxes. If, in fact, you eliminate a thing called stepped up basis, which is not an inheritance tax.

John Harwood: That’s one of the things that you guys tried and couldn’t do under Obama.

Joe Biden: No, but we can now. Once the carny show comes through – with the guy with the pea in the shell, three shells and there’s no pea under any shell – the second time it comes around, they figure it out.

They know that there are a number of things that don’t make any sense in the tax code, punish the working class, the middle-class and benefit unduly people who, in fact, don’t need those tax cuts.

And here’s the point, John. It is a political dynamic that allows the demagogues to go out and spread and split the country in two. It’s not just we need a middle class. It’s not just being fair. It’s taking away the argument he’s used so well. “The reason why you’re not having your job is not paying as much because of all those immigrants. The reason why is …” and so on. And we’ve got to end it. And there’s a way to do it. It’s within our wheelhouse to be able to do it.

John Harwood: Treasury Secretary Mnuchin today said that he opposed a financial transaction tax, which some in the race of supported, because it would destroy financial markets. Is that why you’ve rejected that idea?

Joe Biden: No. I still think we should do that. I think we should have a financial transaction tax. But I focused on what I think I could get done, get done quickly and pay for everything I’m talking about, Because look, the president has increased with his profligate tax cut to the very wealthy the deficit by $1 trillion, $900 billion. It can’t be sustained. It can’t be sustained.

And the argument I use when he passed it though, when I was against it, I was asked to go to the House and speak in the steps of the Capitol and what I pointed out was it’s all designed to be able to justify doing away with the entire safety net. “The reason why we have to cut the safety net now is we have this terrible deficit.” When they controlled the Congress before ’18, what was the first thing the budget committee do? They move to increase taxes on Medicare by over $500 billion.

John Harwood: But now, here’s what some Democrats are saying. They’re saying that we’ve seen that politically deficits don’t matter all that much. Economically, it’s actually helped Trump’s economy in the short-term. Given all that, would it be okay with you to increase spending more than the amount you could raise taxes to pay for it?

Joe Biden: It depends on the circumstance we find ourselves when we get elected. Look what we had to do. We, in order to be able to get out of the financial recession, which was the greatest recession, sort of a depression in American history, the president asked me to chair the recovery act, which had $900 billion in it, and we did it. Most even conservative economists acknowledged it probably saved us from a depression. But what we did at the same time was we were able to invest it in things that in fact grew the economy at the same time.

That’s the exact opposite of what Trump has done. What he has done hasn’t grown the economy. It hasn’t grown the economy. There are circumstances where you have to spend in order to generate economic growth, but there has to be a way that you can catch up to that. Otherwise, you end up in a situation where you have to make terrible, terrible choices.

John Harwood: Do you still favor the balanced budget amendment that you voted for in 1995?

Joe Biden: No, because we’re in a different place now. I hope it’s not true, but we’re likely to inherit a recession, at least a significant economic slowdown. That doesn’t make sense.

John Harwood: Do you think that vote was a mistake?

Joe Biden: No, not then. Everything’s context. One of the reasons I like giving an interview with you is you know the context. I’m not being a wise guy. 1995 was a very different place than we find ourselves today.

This is about how do we grow the economy. For example, it makes a lot of sense that we say that okay, why is it if you give a charitable contribution, I won’t say you, I mean you editorially, someone in the 20% tax bracket gets to take a 20% break for that. Well, somebody who is in the 40% tax bracket, they in fact get to deduct 40% of it. Well, why is that? What does that do? I limit, for example, no tax break that you get. No deduction can you take that’s more than what 28%.

John Harwood: Another thing Obama tried to do, couldn’t get done.

Joe Biden: But we’ll get it done. Because things have changed.

John Harwood: Right. A couple of economic points quickly, cause I know our time is short. Sen. Warren came out today with a new proposal on limiting mega mergers. Looking back on your time in the Obama administration, do you think you guys were too slack on antitrust enforcement, and that concentration among big corporations is a big economic problem?

Joe Biden: It is a big economic problem. And one of the things that I’ve said I would do as president is set up within the Justice Department an entire new entity to go back and look at the mega mergers that have occurred and those who that are being proposed to occur. There’s a lot of concentration of power. And make a judgment whether or not it made sense for that to happen.

One of the things that always happens from one administration to the next, even within the same party is you go back and you look at the consequences and what was done. There’s too much concentration of power. And I don’t disagree with Elizabeth’s point – how we go about making that judgment remains to be seen. I don’t think you go about and making judgment by picking a particular company. I think you talk about what happened when we concentrated the power.

John Harwood: Do you think you guys should have done more in the Obama administration?

Joe Biden: Look, remember, everything landed on the presidents plate but locusts. We finally got to the place where we got not only the car out of the ditch and kept from going over the cliff, we put new tires on it. We began to tune the engine. It was running 40 miles an hour. We were ready to make it run faster. We lost. The Democrats lost the election.

And so we’re faced with a different problem now. How do we go back and regain the momentum that we’d gotten going. There’s a lot of things you can go back in every administration and say, “Well, maybe would have done something differently.” But at the moment, there wasn’t much else that could be done at that time.

John Harwood: President Trump has been very strong in ripping Fed Chair Powell. Do you think Powell is doing a good job, and is he the kind of person you would keep or put on the Fed?

Joe Biden: I’m not going to get into the personalities, but I do say this: the president should not be trying to pressure the Fed. We did not do that. That’s supposed to be an independent entity out here. It’s just like how he pressures the military and intervenes in the chain of command. It’s his way of abusing power across the board. It’s a big mistake. A big mistake, and I would not do that.

John Harwood: You’ve got an ad out today that says the world’s laughing at President Trump. Very strong ad on the wake of this recent NATO meeting. And the President Trump responded not directly to the ad, but he said, “All we found over there was deep respect for the United States.” In the meeting. Do you think he actually believes that, or do you think that privately, he fears that he’s being mocked, ridiculed, that he’s not respected?

Joe Biden: How could he not know that? How could he not know that? He turned around and he called the prime minister of Canada two faced. He turned around … the idea he doesn’t know that. I mean, look, this president thinks if he says the lie long enough and often enough and repeats it enough, somehow people will believe it. Look, the reason why is just I’m not happy that the president of the United States got mocked. But what it says is we lack the respect of the rest of the world that we had in spades before.

John Harwood: Well, here’s the related question that if he does know, and the question is does he care?

I ask for this reason. First of all, you may remember John Kerry who endorsed you today, got mocked in 2004 as being too French. A couple of the people in those videos where Emmanuel Macron and Justin Trudeau. Do you think as an elite, non-elite matter, he doesn’t care?

Joe Biden: I don’t think it’s about being elite. I think it’s about being smart or not so smart. I think it’s about being mean spirited or not mean spirited. It’s about coddling Russia is trying to break up Europe and NATO or sticking with our friends.

John Harwood: That’s the point I was getting to. Those people in that video were leaders of NATO. Vladimir Putin wants NATO weakened and divided. Nancy Pelosi today when she was announcing the drafting of articles of impeachment said that in essence, the Russia of 2016 scandal and the Ukraine scandal are different pieces of the same story, that all roads lead to Putin. Do you see it that way yourself?

Joe Biden: I do, in Europe. Absolutely, positively. I know Putin. I’ve had private time with Putin. I’ve looked in his eyes, as they say. This is a guy who had one overarching desire: to break up NATO and to have America pull away from Europe, the Euro Atlantic Alliance. Because that’s the one thing he cannot penetrate if it’s strong.

But if you have 28 nations all going their own way, he becomes significantly more powerful. And what happens when you live next door to the bear and you don’t have anybody protecting you and doesn’t have that shotgun out to make sure the bear doesn’t get you? Then, in fact, you begin to make accommodations.

John Harwood: And why do you think President Trump wants to help him?

Joe Biden: I don’t think the president of the United States today has any notion of geopolitical concerns. I remember he said, seriously, a couple of months into his administration, “You know this job’s harder than running a real estate empire.” He knows nothing about foreign policy. He knows nothing about nuclear deterrent. He knows nothing. I actually, privately, encouraged a number of generals, senior state department people, foreign policy experts to stay in the administration. Don’t leave. Look what’s happened.

John Harwood: But is your judgment, then, that it’s ignorance, that he doesn’t understand geopolitics, as opposed to he is purposely helping Russia and Putin because he’s compromised in some way?

Joe Biden: All I know is the results are the same. I can’t read his mind. He has done things that seem to me to be completely contrary to reality. When he stands before in the whole world at a G 20 meeting and says that I believe Vladimir Putin did not interfere in our elections and these 18 intelligence agencies that work for us, in fact, do. They think he did, but I think they’re wrong. What is that about?

John Harwood: That’s the question.

Joe Biden: I don’t know. But the result is the same. It has drastically weakened our standing around the world. Poll came out not long ago, Gallup and Pew showing that we ranked just below China in respect and just above Russia. What’s going on? Look, when we are not leading, we’ve led the world by the example, not just of our power, but the power of our example.

There’s three things I’ve learned. I’ve learned Vladimir Putin doesn’t want me to be president. That’s why he’s spending a lot of money on these bots trying to tell any lies about me. I’ve learned that Kim Jong Un thinks I am a rabid dog, should be beaten to death with a stick, and he gets a love letter from Trump. And I learned that Donald Trump doesn’t want me to be the nominee.

This president is the most unusual politician I’ve ever worked with. And he doesn’t seem to have any sense of who we are. He’s ripping the soul out of this country. He really is. I sometimes sit back and wonder, “Whoa, I don’t know whether …” – well, I shouldn’t speculate because I don’t know, to be honest.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, harwood, likely, recession, tax, trump, inherit, things, dont, biden, soul, president, know, think, look, ripping, going, joe, country


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Cramer: Like or hate Trump, ‘these are the best numbers of our lives’ on jobs

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Friday no matter your view on President Donald Trump there’s no denying we’re living in the best labor market in more than a generation. “You can’t contradict that these are the best numbers of our lives. You can’t,” Cramer, 64, said following the government report showing the U.S. economy created a better-than-expected 266,000 nonfarm jobs in November, with the unemployment rate dipping to 3.5%, matching a 50-year low. Referring to Trump, Cramer said Friday on “Squawk Box


CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Friday no matter your view on President Donald Trump there’s no denying we’re living in the best labor market in more than a generation.
“You can’t contradict that these are the best numbers of our lives.
You can’t,” Cramer, 64, said following the government report showing the U.S. economy created a better-than-expected 266,000 nonfarm jobs in November, with the unemployment rate dipping to 3.5%, matching a 50-year low.
Referring to Trump, Cramer said Friday on “Squawk Box
Cramer: Like or hate Trump, ‘these are the best numbers of our lives’ on jobs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, best, dont, president, numbers, unemployment, report, cramer, jobs, hate, lives, trump, number


Cramer: Like or hate Trump, 'these are the best numbers of our lives' on jobs

CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Friday no matter your view on President Donald Trump there’s no denying we’re living in the best labor market in more than a generation.

“You can’t contradict that these are the best numbers of our lives. You can’t,” Cramer, 64, said following the government report showing the U.S. economy created a better-than-expected 266,000 nonfarm jobs in November, with the unemployment rate dipping to 3.5%, matching a 50-year low. Economists had expected the jobless rate to hold steady at 3.6% last month.

“People don’t want to say good things” about the economy, said Cramer, echoing comments he made Thursday evening on “Mad Money,” telling investors: “Don’t let the armageddonists and the negativists and the hucksters scare you away from owning stocks.”

Referring to Trump, Cramer said Friday on “Squawk Box,” shortly after the jobs report was released, “It doesn’t matter whether you hate him or like him, these are real numbers.”

“This is the best number I’ve ever seen in my life,” Cramer said, zeroing in on the unemployment rate. “Fifty years ago, that number was a curse. Now it’s a blessing.” He added, “I don’t see inflation. I don’t see recession.”

Cramer said the strong U.S. job market is going to allow America to win the trade war with China. “The president can walk away from the table with this number.” He added: “In the end, the Chinese are going to have to put jobs here.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, best, dont, president, numbers, unemployment, report, cramer, jobs, hate, lives, trump, number


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Kudlow says a trade deal is close, but Trump is prepared to ‘walk away’ if some conditions not met

Larry Kudlow, White House National Economic Council director, said the U.S. and China are “close” to a trade deal but that the administration was prepared to walk away if it did not get the terms they wanted. We will walk away,” Kudlow said on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Friday. “The president has said that if we can not get the enforcement and the assurances, then we will not go forward.” The two countries are in talks to finalize a so-called phase one trade deal as 15% tariffs on $165 bil


Larry Kudlow, White House National Economic Council director, said the U.S. and China are “close” to a trade deal but that the administration was prepared to walk away if it did not get the terms they wanted.
We will walk away,” Kudlow said on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Friday.
“The president has said that if we can not get the enforcement and the assurances, then we will not go forward.”
The two countries are in talks to finalize a so-called phase one trade deal as 15% tariffs on $165 bil
Kudlow says a trade deal is close, but Trump is prepared to ‘walk away’ if some conditions not met Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fact, walk, away, good, kudlow, tariffs, close, president, trade, conditions, talks, met, trump, deal, prepared


Kudlow says a trade deal is close, but Trump is prepared to 'walk away' if some conditions not met

Larry Kudlow, White House National Economic Council director, said the U.S. and China are “close” to a trade deal but that the administration was prepared to walk away if it did not get the terms they wanted.

“The president has said many times if the deal is no good, if the assurances with respects to preventing future thefts, if the enforcement procedure is no good he has said we will not go for it. We will walk away,” Kudlow said on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Friday. “The president has said that if we can not get the enforcement and the assurances, then we will not go forward.”

The two countries are in talks to finalize a so-called phase one trade deal as 15% tariffs on $165 billion in Chinese imports are set to kick in Dec. 15. Kudlow said the two sides are moving closer to a deal.

“The deal is close. It’s probably even closer than in mid-November,” Kudlow said. “Deputy level met again … The reality is constructive talks, almost daily talks. We are in fact close…There’s no arbitrary deadlines, but the fact remains December 15 is a very important date with respect to a no go or go on tariffs.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fact, walk, away, good, kudlow, tariffs, close, president, trade, conditions, talks, met, trump, deal, prepared


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Trump’s tricky decision: Hit Chinese goods with new tariffs or hold off?

U.S. President Donald Trump poses for a photo with China’s President Xi Jinping before their bilateral meeting during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019. In this multifront, multiyear trade war, with shifting deadlines and political headwinds, it has paid for investors to beware the ides of March. “If enough substantive progress had been made, he might” be willing to delay, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC this week. Republicans and Democrats alike would worry the Whit


U.S. President Donald Trump poses for a photo with China’s President Xi Jinping before their bilateral meeting during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019.
In this multifront, multiyear trade war, with shifting deadlines and political headwinds, it has paid for investors to beware the ides of March.
“If enough substantive progress had been made, he might” be willing to delay, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC this week.
Republicans and Democrats alike would worry the Whit
Trump’s tricky decision: Hit Chinese goods with new tariffs or hold off? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: kayla tausche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decision, hold, mnuchin, tariffs, goods, president, chinese, talking, trump, trade, secretary, tricky, donald, trumps, deal, hit


Trump's tricky decision: Hit Chinese goods with new tariffs or hold off?

U.S. President Donald Trump poses for a photo with China’s President Xi Jinping before their bilateral meeting during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019.

In this multifront, multiyear trade war, with shifting deadlines and political headwinds, it has paid for investors to beware the ides of March. May. August. October. And now, December.

In less than two weeks, President Donald Trump must decide whether to slap tariffs on $156 billion in consumer goods made in China — including toys, phones, laptops and clothes, right before the holidays — or move the goal post yet again in lieu of the comprehensive trade deal he’s been seeking.

“If enough substantive progress had been made, he might” be willing to delay, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC this week. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Thursday the two sides were still “on track,” for a deal and still talking, but he did not say whether the tariffs would be shelved.

During the Oval Office announcement of the latest truce, Mnuchin assured the public there would be more than enough time to finish the deal and permanently avert further tariffs.

That was two months ago.

Trump now has a complicated calculus to consider: Postponing the tariffs would avoid a market sell-off and higher holiday prices — and the ire of CEOs like Tim Cook and Jamie Dimon whom Trump has come to not only trust but revere. But doing so with anything short of a deal-signing — which Trump said in October was the next step — would mark the fifth instance this year that he delayed or canceled tariffs as a gesture of goodwill, further exposing him to criticism that the “phase one” deal exists only as a talking point.

Enacting the tariffs would cause its own problems. Republicans and Democrats alike would worry the White House was gambling with a U.S. economy already seeing some cracks in its strength. American farmers, many in swing states, would see exports further shrink and endure deeper financial suffering, not to mention continued retaliation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: kayla tausche
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decision, hold, mnuchin, tariffs, goods, president, chinese, talking, trump, trade, secretary, tricky, donald, trumps, deal, hit


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United Airlines’ next CEO a ‘details guy’ who will have labor contracts and the 737 Max on his plate

United Airlines’ next CEO helped orchestrate a stunning turnaround of the one-time industry laggard. Shares are up 87% since Kirby became president at United. “This aggressiveness will only infiltrate UAL’s ranks at a more rapid pace with him as CEO, for better or for worse. “He’s always been the details guy operating in the background,” said Seth Kaplan, an airline analyst. If they do sign off, the start of Kirby’s role as CEO could include the reintroduction of the planes to the public.


United Airlines’ next CEO helped orchestrate a stunning turnaround of the one-time industry laggard.
Shares are up 87% since Kirby became president at United.
“This aggressiveness will only infiltrate UAL’s ranks at a more rapid pace with him as CEO, for better or for worse.
“He’s always been the details guy operating in the background,” said Seth Kaplan, an airline analyst.
If they do sign off, the start of Kirby’s role as CEO could include the reintroduction of the planes to the public.
United Airlines’ next CEO a ‘details guy’ who will have labor contracts and the 737 Max on his plate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guy, ceo, airlines, munoz, president, uniteds, labor, contracts, details, kirbys, 737, flight, max, airline, plate, united, kirby, pilots


United Airlines' next CEO a 'details guy' who will have labor contracts and the 737 Max on his plate

United Airlines president Scott Kirby speaks before the departure of the “Flight for the Planet”, the most eco-friendly commercial flight in history of aviation, according to the airline, from O’Hare International Airport to Los Angeles, in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., June 5, 2019.

United Airlines’ next CEO helped orchestrate a stunning turnaround of the one-time industry laggard. His challenge: keeping it up.

Scott Kirby, United’s current president who left American Airlines in 2016 and landed at its Chicago-based rival in August 2016, on Thursday was named CEO Oscar Munoz’s successor, a shift that’s set to take effect in May.

Industry members describe Kirby as a gifted and no-nonsense airline executive. His brainchild was United’s aggressive plan to grow as much as 6% a year from 2018 through 2020, which was met with resounding disappointment on Wall Street when Oscar Munoz unveiled it in January last year. Instead Kirby’s plan paid off, and United has grown revenue and profits. Shares are up 87% since Kirby became president at United.

“He doesn’t suffer fools, empowers people he trusts, has no tolerance for stupidity or laziness, and wants to win by a million,” wrote Wolfe Research analyst Hunter Keay, a Wolfe Research airline analyst, in a note. “This aggressiveness will only infiltrate UAL’s ranks at a more rapid pace with him as CEO, for better or for worse. Kirby showed investors and competitors alike that capacity discipline in the low fuel era, at least, is for losers.”

A high-ranking employee described Kirby, who rose up the ranks, starting with America West, during several airline mergers, as an action-taker. Munoz is more analytical and takes more time making decisions.

United declined to make Kirby available for comment, but in a video to employees, he said: “As we look forward in the next few years, we’ll continue the growth.

“We have an incredibly strong position and an incredibly bright future ahead,” he added. “And personally, I’m excited to spend even more time out with all of you, listening to you, sharing your enthusiasm for the future and together, building the best airline in the history of aviation.”

One of Kirby’s biggest challenges will be ironing out labor contracts. United’s more than 12,500 pilots are in the midst of contract negotiations. The Air Line Pilots Association, the pilots’ labor union, expects to get a contract done under Munoz’s tenure at CEO, which ends in May, its president, Capt. Todd Insler, told CNBC, but talks may still drag on. Among their demands, pilots want better health benefits and are looking to protect mainline flying from outsourcing to smaller regional carriers.

“With the United Pilot Agreement nearly one year past the amendable date, we fully expect completing pilot negotiations will be his primary goal,” Insler said in a statement. “By doing so, ALPA and the Company can once again dedicate our collective efforts to beating our global competitors and growing United Airlines.”

United’s more than 23,000 flight attendants have a contract that’s amendable starting next August.

Munoz, who will transition to executive chairman next year for a one-year term, enjoyed relatively strong relations with the company labor unions as he was able to get contracts done with pilots and flight attendants, their first since the thorny 2010 merger with Continental Airlines.

It was just one of a litany of challenges Munoz overcame since he took the top job in September 2015. A month into his tenure he had a heart attack, and three months later a heart transplant. There was a proxy battle and high-profile public relations disasters including the violent dragging of a passenger off a regional jet in April 2017, a viral video of which circulated worldwide prompting calls on social media for a boycott of the airline, and additional training for employees.

After his heart transplant, Insler, said he asked Munoz over the phone why he wasn’t retiring “to a beach somewhere?” and that Munoz replied that he would return because United employees were his family.

Despite relatively warm relations under Munoz and Kirby, there were tensions.

Under Munoz and Kirby’s time, executives shelved a controversial change of an employee bonus program to a lottery system after outrage from staff. Flight attendants last year picketed at some of the country’s largest airports to protest United’s decision to cut cabin crew staffing in order to save money.

“Oscar’s efforts to put in place talent like Scott Kirby, who is without a doubt the best network man in the industry, is also paying off,” said Ken Diaz, president of the United chapter of the Association of Flight Attendants, in a statement. “It is critical that the entire executive team works together with labor and addresses concerns raised from the frontline as we work diligently to keep everyone safe, with proper staffing that also allows us to care for the people on our planes.”

Capt. Dennis Tajer, spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association, which represents some 15,000 pilots at Kirby’s former employer, American, called Scott talented and a “stern negotiator.”

Kirby, who studied computer science at the U.S. Air Force Academy and earned a master’s degree in operations research at George Washington University, will have to prove that he can maintain good relationships with employees, whose interests are often at odds with investors’. At the helm, he will also have to prove he can manage a crisis.

“He’s always been the details guy operating in the background,” said Seth Kaplan, an airline analyst. “Next time something goes wrong — and something will go wrong, this is the airline industry — is there a softer side to Scott?”

Another challenge for Kirby will be the Boeing 737 Max, which has been grounded since mid-March after a fatal crash in Indonesia and another in Ethiopia within a span of five months. United had 14 of the planes in its fleet and has taken the plane out of its schedule until March, although it isn’t yet clear when regulators will allow the jets to fly again. If they do sign off, the start of Kirby’s role as CEO could include the reintroduction of the planes to the public.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guy, ceo, airlines, munoz, president, uniteds, labor, contracts, details, kirbys, 737, flight, max, airline, plate, united, kirby, pilots


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Elizabeth Warren releases doctor’s note describing good health as voters weigh ages of 2020 presidential contenders

Sen. Elizabeth Warren released a doctor’s note on Friday saying that the 70-year-old progressive is in good health, as voters consider the vitality of her and her fellow septuagenarians vying for the Democratic nomination. The clean bill of health comes as voters consider whether the race’s oldest contenders are up to the grueling task of running the country. About one sixth of voters are concerned about his age, according to the Los Angeles Times poll. Sanders made public a doctor’s note during


Sen. Elizabeth Warren released a doctor’s note on Friday saying that the 70-year-old progressive is in good health, as voters consider the vitality of her and her fellow septuagenarians vying for the Democratic nomination.
The clean bill of health comes as voters consider whether the race’s oldest contenders are up to the grueling task of running the country.
About one sixth of voters are concerned about his age, according to the Los Angeles Times poll.
Sanders made public a doctor’s note during
Elizabeth Warren releases doctor’s note describing good health as voters weigh ages of 2020 presidential contenders Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, good, releases, times, president, presidential, voters, weigh, note, health, warren, elizabeth, medical, release, trump, doctors, concerned


Elizabeth Warren releases doctor's note describing good health as voters weigh ages of 2020 presidential contenders

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks to guests during a campaign stop at the Val Air Ballroom on November 25, 2019 in West Des Moines, Iowa.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren released a doctor’s note on Friday saying that the 70-year-old progressive is in good health, as voters consider the vitality of her and her fellow septuagenarians vying for the Democratic nomination.

“Senator Warren is in excellent health and has been throughout the 20 years I have served as her physician,” Beverly Woo, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, wrote in a letter dated Wednesday and obtained by NBC News.

Woo wrote that there are “no medical conditions or health problems that would keep her from fulfilling the duties of the President of the United States.”

The memo noted that Warren has never smoked, used drugs or had a problem with alcohol, and that she exercises regularly and eats healthfully. Her only medical condition, hypothyroidism, is being treated by a daily dose of levothyroxine. Blood tests in January, taken at her most recent physical, came back normal.

The clean bill of health comes as voters consider whether the race’s oldest contenders are up to the grueling task of running the country.

A survey conducted for The Los Angeles Times and released on Thursday showed that a third of voters are concerned that Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. and former Vice President Joe Biden could be hampered in the job because of their ages.

Sanders, 78, and Biden, 77, lead Warren in support in national surveys. But voters are less concerned about Warren’s health.

Only 7% of voters told the pollsters conducting the survey they shared the same concerns about her. Warren has made a show of her endurance during the race, frequently spending hours on her feet after campaign events taking photos and chatting with supporters.

Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York who entered the primary contest last month, is 77. About one sixth of voters are concerned about his age, according to the Los Angeles Times poll.

Sanders, Biden and Bloomberg did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Biden has said that he will release his medical records before votes are cast, and has criticized those who have questioned his vigor, challenging one Iowa voter to pushup and IQ contests on Thursday.

Sanders, who was hospitalized in October after a heart attack, has said he will release his medical records by year’s end. Sanders made public a doctor’s note during his 2016 run that pronounced him to be in good shape.

President Donald Trump, who is 73, has had numerous physicals while in office. In February, his physician said that Trump was in “very good health.” (Trump was 72 at the time.)

In November, the president made an unannounced visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center that the White House said was the first part of his routine annual physical.

The White House did not release details about the visit, but press secretary Stephanie Grisham said following the examination that Trump was healthy, “as demonstrated by his repeated vigorous rally performances in front of thousands of Americans several times a week.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, good, releases, times, president, presidential, voters, weigh, note, health, warren, elizabeth, medical, release, trump, doctors, concerned


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