Suzy Welch: 2 strategies for surviving a micromanager—and 1 that will get you fired

In fact, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch confesses that she herself was once a micromanager. “I second-guessed my team, and worse, I tried to do everyone’s job for them,” she tells CNBC Make It. CNBC contributor Suzy WelchBelow, Welch explains how to “deploy the two micromanager survival techniques that do work.” Find creative ways to expand their jobAnother common reason that bosses micromanage, Welch says, is because they don’t have enough responsibilities of thei


In fact, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch confesses that she herself was once a micromanager. “I second-guessed my team, and worse, I tried to do everyone’s job for them,” she tells CNBC Make It. CNBC contributor Suzy WelchBelow, Welch explains how to “deploy the two micromanager survival techniques that do work.” Find creative ways to expand their jobAnother common reason that bosses micromanage, Welch says, is because they don’t have enough responsibilities of thei
Suzy Welch: 2 strategies for surviving a micromanager—and 1 that will get you fired Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-13  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, problem, techniques, surviving, welch, micromanagerand, fired, youre, boss, sound, job, ways, suzy, strategies, micromanager


Suzy Welch: 2 strategies for surviving a micromanager—and 1 that will get you fired

Your boss is constantly checking up on your every move, insisting that you get approval for every action you take, and steering you to approach every problem exactly like they would. Sound familiar? You’re being micromanaged. And if you’ve ever experienced this at work, you’re far from alone. In fact, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch confesses that she herself was once a micromanager. “I second-guessed my team, and worse, I tried to do everyone’s job for them,” she tells CNBC Make It. “It was terrible for all of us, but it taught me the two best techniques to ‘escape’ a helicopter boss — and one surefire way not to.”

CNBC contributor Suzy Welch

Below, Welch explains how to “deploy the two micromanager survival techniques that do work.”

1. Over-deliver

Welch says one of the most common reasons employees find themselves being micromanaged is because their boss doesn’t trust them to do the job. “Maybe they should,” she says. “It doesn’t matter, and you certainly can’t convince them with words.” Rather, she says, you should “swamp them with evidence of your competence and character.” That means you’ll need to “anticipate their concerns, and put them to rest before they arise.” “Over-communicate,” she says. “Tell them what you’re doing all the time. Eliminate every possible surprise. And most important of all, don’t screw up.” And while some bosses may have patience for you messing up once or twice, “with micromanagers, that option is not available.” “Get over it,” she says, “and over-deliver on results.”

2. Find creative ways to expand their job

Another common reason that bosses micromanage, Welch says, is because they don’t have enough responsibilities of their own. “This may not sound like your problem to solve,” she says. “But it can be if you’re able to find creative ways to expand their job, with, say, potential clients to meet or strategic initiatives to shoot up the ladder.” “If this sounds like I’m suggesting you act like your boss’s boss,” Welch adds, “it’s because I am. And I get that’s not easy in some organizations. But if you can swing it — and you should try — this approach can really work.”

What not to do


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-13  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, problem, techniques, surviving, welch, micromanagerand, fired, youre, boss, sound, job, ways, suzy, strategies, micromanager


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America is in a financial literacy crisis, and advisors can fix the problem

Talking about money is one of the most important skills to being a fiscally responsible and literate person. And it is the missing link in financial literacy training. More from FA Playbook:Advisory firms turn to new AI advisory technology5 critical questions advisors should be able to answerMore financial advisors moving beyond just money mattersThe failure of these programs to solve the crisis proves that technical training is not enough. It really requires busting through the money talk taboo


Talking about money is one of the most important skills to being a fiscally responsible and literate person. And it is the missing link in financial literacy training. More from FA Playbook:Advisory firms turn to new AI advisory technology5 critical questions advisors should be able to answerMore financial advisors moving beyond just money mattersThe failure of these programs to solve the crisis proves that technical training is not enough. It really requires busting through the money talk taboo
America is in a financial literacy crisis, and advisors can fix the problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: kathleen burns kingsbury, paul smith, president ceo of cfa institute, ava diamond, mental fitness, nutritional psychology coach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, literacy, fear, advisors, financial, talk, problem, crisis, important, fix, taboo, skills, america, questions, money


America is in a financial literacy crisis, and advisors can fix the problem

Talking about money is one of the most important skills to being a fiscally responsible and literate person. However, 44% of Americans surveyed would rather discuss death, religion or politics than talk about personal finance with a loved one.

Why? Two major reasons are embarrassment and fear of conflict, even though the consequences can be grave: 50% of first marriages end in divorce, and financial conflict is often a key contributor. Additionally, in our society it is considered rude to discuss money and wealth.

This longstanding taboo also contributes to the gender wage gap, as women are more harshly judged when they speak up and negotiate their salaries. And it is the missing link in financial literacy training.

More from FA Playbook:

Advisory firms turn to new AI advisory technology

5 critical questions advisors should be able to answer

More financial advisors moving beyond just money matters

The failure of these programs to solve the crisis proves that technical training is not enough. It really requires busting through the money talk taboo and empowering parents, teachers and the next generation to openly and honestly share their thoughts and feelings about spending, saving and investing money.

Financial advisors are uniquely positioned to change the conversation around literacy and address the elephant in the room: the money talk taboo. For advisors, teaching financial communication skills and helping clients understand how their emotions influence their money decisions is just as important as showing them how to calculate compound interest.

By breaking through money silence, advisors grant clients permission to ask questions and seek answers without shame or fear of judgment. As the saying goes, You are as sick as your secrets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: kathleen burns kingsbury, paul smith, president ceo of cfa institute, ava diamond, mental fitness, nutritional psychology coach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, literacy, fear, advisors, financial, talk, problem, crisis, important, fix, taboo, skills, america, questions, money


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With Ghana expansion, Zipline’s medical drones now reach 22M people

Zipline’s drones take off and land from its distribution centers. “We really want to show that the right technology company with the right mission can help every person on the planet.” Access to vital health products worldwide has historically hampered the difficulty of supplying medicine from central storage to remotely located patients when and where they need it. In the U.S., this problem requires health systems to tolerate high medicine waste, expensive emergency trips and sub-optimal care s


Zipline’s drones take off and land from its distribution centers. “We really want to show that the right technology company with the right mission can help every person on the planet.” Access to vital health products worldwide has historically hampered the difficulty of supplying medicine from central storage to remotely located patients when and where they need it. In the U.S., this problem requires health systems to tolerate high medicine waste, expensive emergency trips and sub-optimal care s
With Ghana expansion, Zipline’s medical drones now reach 22M people Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: riley de leon, zipline international, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vital, products, 22m, ziplines, expansion, medical, medicine, reach, health, drones, systems, right, ghana, distribution, zipline, need, problem


With Ghana expansion, Zipline's medical drones now reach 22M people

Over the last six months Zipline has expanded from one distribution company in Rwanda delivering blood to 21 hospitals to operating six distribution centers in two countries, delivering more than 170 different vaccines, blood products and medications to 2,500 health facilities. Its reach now serves nearly 22 million people.

Dedicated to providing every human on Earth with instant access to vital medical supplies, Zipline employs aerospace veterans from SpaceX, Google, Boeing and NASA to design and operate its autonomous systems, which can deliver a package within 30 minutes after a health-care worker places an order by text. Zipline’s drones take off and land from its distribution centers.

“So much of the conversation these days is about this growing idea that tech is not benefiting a vast majority of people,” said Zipline CEO Keller Rinaudo. “We really want to show that the right technology company with the right mission can help every person on the planet.”

Access to vital health products worldwide has historically hampered the difficulty of supplying medicine from central storage to remotely located patients when and where they need it. In the U.S., this problem requires health systems to tolerate high medicine waste, expensive emergency trips and sub-optimal care strategies. In far too many other areas, the same problem means that people in need of lifesaving care do not get the medicine they need to survive.

More from CNBC Disruptor 50:

How Pinterest makes money: By filling your feed with promoted pins

‘Game of Thrones’ fans, this app teaches you how to speak in High Valyrian

Ahead of IPO buzz, Robinhood introduces new premium trading features


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: riley de leon, zipline international, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vital, products, 22m, ziplines, expansion, medical, medicine, reach, health, drones, systems, right, ghana, distribution, zipline, need, problem


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Italy faces a ‘worrying situation with no ideas for the future,’ former leader warns

Investors have lost confidence with Italy and its future remains uncertain, former prominent politicians in the country have told CNBC, taking aim at the current coalition government seated in Rome. Speaking at the Ambrosetti Workshop on the shores of Lake Como, Padoan told CNBC’s Steve Sedgwick that “the issue of lost confidence is still hanging over the country.” Meanwhile, Enrico Letta, the former prime minister of Italy called it a “worrying situation.” “There is a big problem for Italy and


Investors have lost confidence with Italy and its future remains uncertain, former prominent politicians in the country have told CNBC, taking aim at the current coalition government seated in Rome. Speaking at the Ambrosetti Workshop on the shores of Lake Como, Padoan told CNBC’s Steve Sedgwick that “the issue of lost confidence is still hanging over the country.” Meanwhile, Enrico Letta, the former prime minister of Italy called it a “worrying situation.” “There is a big problem for Italy and
Italy faces a ‘worrying situation with no ideas for the future,’ former leader warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, letta, warns, ideas, lost, situation, future, told, padoan, italy, problem, worrying, confidence, leader, faces


Italy faces a 'worrying situation with no ideas for the future,' former leader warns

Investors have lost confidence with Italy and its future remains uncertain, former prominent politicians in the country have told CNBC, taking aim at the current coalition government seated in Rome.

Former Italian Finance Minister Pier Carlo Padoan said the current Italian government has damaged confidence and investment into the southern European economy. Speaking at the Ambrosetti Workshop on the shores of Lake Como, Padoan told CNBC’s Steve Sedgwick that “the issue of lost confidence is still hanging over the country.”

Meanwhile, Enrico Letta, the former prime minister of Italy called it a “worrying situation.” “There is a big problem for Italy and big problem for Italy’s lack of investment and the duration of the public finance situation,” Letta told CNBC at the Ambrosetti Workshop.

“I think it is a worrying situation with no ideas for the future from the present government. It is just redistribution with no idea on how to grow. The country will face the second quarter for the year very very hard,” Letta said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, letta, warns, ideas, lost, situation, future, told, padoan, italy, problem, worrying, confidence, leader, faces


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Singapore Airlines grounds two 787-10s citing Rolls-Royce engine problem

The Trent 1000 TEN is the latest version of an engine that has had a problematic entry into service. As of late February, Rolls-Royce said 35 787s were grounded globally due to engine blades corroding or cracking prematurely. In February, the company raised a Trent 1000 accounting charge to 790 million pounds ($1.03 billion) from 554 million pounds at the half year, contributing to a full-year operating loss of 1.16 billion pounds. It also allocated another 100 million pounds in cash to the prob


The Trent 1000 TEN is the latest version of an engine that has had a problematic entry into service. As of late February, Rolls-Royce said 35 787s were grounded globally due to engine blades corroding or cracking prematurely. In February, the company raised a Trent 1000 accounting charge to 790 million pounds ($1.03 billion) from 554 million pounds at the half year, contributing to a full-year operating loss of 1.16 billion pounds. It also allocated another 100 million pounds in cash to the prob
Singapore Airlines grounds two 787-10s citing Rolls-Royce engine problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02  Authors: roslan rahman, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, problem, pounds, singapore, citing, version, small, engine, rollsroyce, trent, work, airlines, 1000, grounds, blades, million, turbine, 78710s


Singapore Airlines grounds two 787-10s citing Rolls-Royce engine problem

The Trent 1000 TEN is the latest version of an engine that has had a problematic entry into service. As of late February, Rolls-Royce said 35 787s were grounded globally due to engine blades corroding or cracking prematurely.

The manufacturer said it was aiming to reduce the number to 10 by the end of the year.

In February, the company raised a Trent 1000 accounting charge to 790 million pounds ($1.03 billion) from 554 million pounds at the half year, contributing to a full-year operating loss of 1.16 billion pounds. It also allocated another 100 million pounds in cash to the problem.

Rolls-Royce said on Tuesday that since the entry into service of the Trent 1000 TEN, it had communicated to operators that the high-pressure turbine blades in the engine would have a limited life.

“Working with operators, we have been sampling a small population of the Trent 1000 TEN fleet that has flown in more arduous conditions,” the manufacturer said in a statement.

“This work has shown that a small number of these engines need to have their blades replaced earlier than scheduled.”

Rolls-Royce said its engineers were already developing and testing an enhanced version of the turbine blade.

“We will now work closely with any impacted customers to deliver an accelerated programme to implement the enhanced blade and to ensure that we can deliver on our Trent 1000 TEN future commitments,” the company said.

“We regret any disruption this causes to airline operations.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02  Authors: roslan rahman, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, problem, pounds, singapore, citing, version, small, engine, rollsroyce, trent, work, airlines, 1000, grounds, blades, million, turbine, 78710s


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Lyft just had a lousy day but that’s its own problem, not the stock market’s

Maybe in this case they didn’t I think they probably just gauged demand and drew an unrealistic trendline.” Ablin said Lyft has come public in a stock market that is fully valued, but analysts said it is not bubbly like the when the IPO market was red hot before the tech bubble burst in 2000. Ablin said Lyft is not the first high-profile IPO to make a splashy debut and then immediately trade under water. Facebook later went on to famously become a lead stock in momentum trade, FANG, and Monday i


Maybe in this case they didn’t I think they probably just gauged demand and drew an unrealistic trendline.” Ablin said Lyft has come public in a stock market that is fully valued, but analysts said it is not bubbly like the when the IPO market was red hot before the tech bubble burst in 2000. Ablin said Lyft is not the first high-profile IPO to make a splashy debut and then immediately trade under water. Facebook later went on to famously become a lead stock in momentum trade, FANG, and Monday i
Lyft just had a lousy day but that’s its own problem, not the stock market’s Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-01  Authors: patti domm, mike blake
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, problem, public, stock, lyft, ipo, markets, ipos, worth, trading, probably, trade, lousy, thats, day, market


Lyft just had a lousy day but that's its own problem, not the stock market's

“What it shows is there are obviously a number of flippers and IPO valuation was probably stretched,” said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at Cresset Wealth Advisors. “Investment bankers generally want to leave something for retail investors. Maybe in this case they didn’t I think they probably just gauged demand and drew an unrealistic trendline.”

Ablin said Lyft has come public in a stock market that is fully valued, but analysts said it is not bubbly like the when the IPO market was red hot before the tech bubble burst in 2000.

Ablin said Lyft is not the first high-profile IPO to make a splashy debut and then immediately trade under water. Facebook for instance, launched in 2012 at $38. On its second day of trading, it fell nearly 11 percent from its first aftermarket close, and was still trading below the offer price more than a year later. Facebook later went on to famously become a lead stock in momentum trade, FANG, and Monday it was trading above $168.

“It’s when companies are growing fast but losing a lot of money, and we don’t know when it’s going to stop. That means they’re really hard to value. A lot of the trading in Lyft had to do with that it’s popular,” said Kathleen Smith, a principal at Renassiance Capital, which manages ETFs based on IPOs. Smith said Lyft will be added to its Renaissance IPO ETF on Friday.

She said the market is still figuring out what the company is worth. “This is the public market saying we don’t think it’s worth what it was offered at. It’s going to take some time for this to be figured out. The result is probably good for investors, not so good for companies. So the IPOs that follow, it, particularly the money-losing unicorns, are going to be priced more reasonably,” said Smith.

The arrival of Lyft and Levi Strauss, another recent high profile IPO [still above its offer price] was viewed as a sign that the dormant IPO market could be picking up, and there’s a series of other high interest IPOs in the cue behind them. Ride-share rival Uber, Pinterest, Slack, Airbnb and Palantir Technologies are all expected to go public this year. Dow Jones reported Monday that Slack, valued at more than $7 billion, is expected to trade on the NYSE in June or July.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-01  Authors: patti domm, mike blake
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, problem, public, stock, lyft, ipo, markets, ipos, worth, trading, probably, trade, lousy, thats, day, market


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Lyft IPO reignites talk about Silicon Valley’s contract labor problem – and the gig economy

As Lyft, Uber and other Silicon Valley companies have matured over the past decade, one of the many challenges they face has been how to manage a growing workforce of contract workers. Currently, Lyft has 1,600 full-time employees and 1.4 million contract drivers who have turned these side hustles into their full-time jobs. Both Uber and Lyft have been under fire in the last few years for cutting their fares paid to drivers — most recently, an approximate 25 percent per-mile rate cut for Uber dr


As Lyft, Uber and other Silicon Valley companies have matured over the past decade, one of the many challenges they face has been how to manage a growing workforce of contract workers. Currently, Lyft has 1,600 full-time employees and 1.4 million contract drivers who have turned these side hustles into their full-time jobs. Both Uber and Lyft have been under fire in the last few years for cutting their fares paid to drivers — most recently, an approximate 25 percent per-mile rate cut for Uber dr
Lyft IPO reignites talk about Silicon Valley’s contract labor problem – and the gig economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: riley de leon, mike blake, spencer platt, getty images, -tim sullivan, ceo of venture capital firm oceanic partners
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uber, million, reignites, labor, ipo, gig, economy, contract, past, talk, silicon, public, lyft, problem, drivers, valleys, pay, companies


Lyft IPO reignites talk about Silicon Valley's contract labor problem – and the gig economy

With their highly anticipated IPO today, Lyft is the first in a growing list of highly valued tech unicorns that have been eyeing the public market throughout the early part of 2019. On Friday the seven-year-old ride-hailing company went public at $87.24 a share with a valuation of $28 billion. It joins an exclusive club of disruptive companies — Airbnb, Uber, Slack and Pinterest — that have amassed huge sums of private capital with valuations never before seen on Wall Street.

As Lyft, Uber and other Silicon Valley companies have matured over the past decade, one of the many challenges they face has been how to manage a growing workforce of contract workers. Currently, Lyft has 1,600 full-time employees and 1.4 million contract drivers who have turned these side hustles into their full-time jobs. That large pool of independent contractors is expected to grow post-IPO, Lyft co-founders CEO Logan Green and president John Zimmer told CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin on “Squawk Box” Friday morning.

Now the debate on whether independent contractor status helps or hurts them has widened.

That’s because they make an average of about $17.50 per hour and do not receive employee benefits. They’re not eligible for overtime or a minimum hourly wage, and under federal law they don’t have the right to unionize. Both Uber and Lyft have been under fire in the last few years for cutting their fares paid to drivers — most recently, an approximate 25 percent per-mile rate cut for Uber drivers.

Despite the efforts of these ride-sharing giants to put their best foot forward for potential investors, this past week alone saw contract drivers picketing over 2018 pay cuts outside a Lyft IPO roadshow event in San Francisco. But for these massive gig economy companies, protests and lawsuits over pay and labor practices are nothing new. Last year Uber agreed to pay a $20 million settlement over claims that drivers should be classified as employees, not contractors.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: riley de leon, mike blake, spencer platt, getty images, -tim sullivan, ceo of venture capital firm oceanic partners
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uber, million, reignites, labor, ipo, gig, economy, contract, past, talk, silicon, public, lyft, problem, drivers, valleys, pay, companies


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Lyft IPO reignites talk about Silicon Valley’s contract labor problem – and the gig economy

As Lyft, Uber and other Silicon Valley companies have matured over the past decade, one of the many challenges they face has been how to manage a growing workforce of contract workers. Currently, Lyft has 1,600 full-time employees and 1.4 million contract drivers who have turned these side hustles into their full-time jobs. Both Uber and Lyft have been under fire in the last few years for cutting their fares paid to drivers — most recently, an approximate 25 percent per-mile rate cut for Uber dr


As Lyft, Uber and other Silicon Valley companies have matured over the past decade, one of the many challenges they face has been how to manage a growing workforce of contract workers. Currently, Lyft has 1,600 full-time employees and 1.4 million contract drivers who have turned these side hustles into their full-time jobs. Both Uber and Lyft have been under fire in the last few years for cutting their fares paid to drivers — most recently, an approximate 25 percent per-mile rate cut for Uber dr
Lyft IPO reignites talk about Silicon Valley’s contract labor problem – and the gig economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: riley de leon, mike blake, spencer platt, getty images, -tim sullivan, ceo of venture capital firm oceanic partners
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, silicon, labor, past, lyft, ipo, million, drivers, public, uber, talk, economy, pay, gig, companies, valleys, problem, reignites, contract


Lyft IPO reignites talk about Silicon Valley's contract labor problem – and the gig economy

With their highly anticipated IPO today, Lyft is the first in a growing list of highly valued tech unicorns that have been eyeing the public market throughout the early part of 2019. On Friday the seven-year-old ride-hailing company went public at $87.24 a share with a valuation of $28 billion. It joins an exclusive club of disruptive companies — Airbnb, Uber, Slack and Pinterest — that have amassed huge sums of private capital with valuations never before seen on Wall Street.

As Lyft, Uber and other Silicon Valley companies have matured over the past decade, one of the many challenges they face has been how to manage a growing workforce of contract workers. Currently, Lyft has 1,600 full-time employees and 1.4 million contract drivers who have turned these side hustles into their full-time jobs. That large pool of independent contractors is expected to grow post-IPO, Lyft co-founders CEO Logan Green and president John Zimmer told CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin on “Squawk Box” Friday morning.

Now the debate on whether independent contractor status helps or hurts them has widened.

That’s because they make an average of about $17.50 per hour and do not receive employee benefits. They’re not eligible for overtime or a minimum hourly wage, and under federal law they don’t have the right to unionize. Both Uber and Lyft have been under fire in the last few years for cutting their fares paid to drivers — most recently, an approximate 25 percent per-mile rate cut for Uber drivers.

Despite the efforts of these ride-sharing giants to put their best foot forward for potential investors, this past week alone saw contract drivers picketing over 2018 pay cuts outside a Lyft IPO roadshow event in San Francisco. But for these massive gig economy companies, protests and lawsuits over pay and labor practices are nothing new. Last year Uber agreed to pay a $20 million settlement over claims that drivers should be classified as employees, not contractors.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: riley de leon, mike blake, spencer platt, getty images, -tim sullivan, ceo of venture capital firm oceanic partners
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, silicon, labor, past, lyft, ipo, million, drivers, public, uber, talk, economy, pay, gig, companies, valleys, problem, reignites, contract


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Read Elon Musk’s email urging Tesla employees to help with deliveries

Tesla CEO Elon Musk sent an e-mail to all employees on Thursday urging them to volunteer to help out with deliveries, no matter their role. The move is typical — Tesla execs, including Musk, usually call for “all-hands on deck” to try to meet end-of-quarter goals. However, the company is making do with fewer hands than it had to help at the fourth quarter of 2018. Tesla recently made deep cuts to its workforce with layoffs in January, and some store closures following that. But in the e-mail to


Tesla CEO Elon Musk sent an e-mail to all employees on Thursday urging them to volunteer to help out with deliveries, no matter their role. The move is typical — Tesla execs, including Musk, usually call for “all-hands on deck” to try to meet end-of-quarter goals. However, the company is making do with fewer hands than it had to help at the fourth quarter of 2018. Tesla recently made deep cuts to its workforce with layoffs in January, and some store closures following that. But in the e-mail to
Read Elon Musk’s email urging Tesla employees to help with deliveries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: lora kolodny, silas stein, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, delivery, making, employees, company, email, urging, elon, deliveries, read, teslas, musks, store, problem, musk, production, help


Read Elon Musk's email urging Tesla employees to help with deliveries

Tesla CEO Elon Musk sent an e-mail to all employees on Thursday urging them to volunteer to help out with deliveries, no matter their role.

The move is typical — Tesla execs, including Musk, usually call for “all-hands on deck” to try to meet end-of-quarter goals.

However, the company is making do with fewer hands than it had to help at the fourth quarter of 2018.

Tesla recently made deep cuts to its workforce with layoffs in January, and some store closures following that. Even more store closures are yet to come, but the company has said it is still evaluating which locations should remain.

A Tesla spokesperson said that as of the week of March 4, the company employed more than 40,000 people. In its 2018 annual report, Tesla said it had 48,817 employees. The company has not disclosed exactly how many people it has laid off this year.

Last September, Musk acknowledged Tesla’s problems had shifted to delivery logistics from production delays. He said in a tweet then, responding to a customer upset over delivery delays: “Sorry, we’ve gone from production hell to delivery logistics hell, but this problem is far more tractable. We’re making rapid progress. Should be solved shortly.”

But in the e-mail to all employees on Thursday, the CEO painted Tesla’s delivery problem as a “good one to have.” He wrote, “This is the biggest wave in Tesla’s history, but it is primarily a function of our first delivery of mass manufactured cars on two continents simultaneously, and will not be repeated in subsequent quarters.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: lora kolodny, silas stein, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, delivery, making, employees, company, email, urging, elon, deliveries, read, teslas, musks, store, problem, musk, production, help


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China should quickly get out of its huge US trade problem

The vigilant members of the China-based American and international chambers of commerce, and the World Trade Organization, will serve as keen observers that China is properly implementing and enforcing its trade regulations. Third, China can benefit from an enhanced International Monetary Fund surveillance, technically called Article IV consultations. Fourth, the IMF consultations and the OECD’s biannual examinations would provide unimpeachable expert opinions on China’s monetary policies and it


The vigilant members of the China-based American and international chambers of commerce, and the World Trade Organization, will serve as keen observers that China is properly implementing and enforcing its trade regulations. Third, China can benefit from an enhanced International Monetary Fund surveillance, technically called Article IV consultations. Fourth, the IMF consultations and the OECD’s biannual examinations would provide unimpeachable expert opinions on China’s monetary policies and it
China should quickly get out of its huge US trade problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quickly, china, trade, examinations, chinas, economic, monetary, americas, american, huge, international, problem, policies


China should quickly get out of its huge US trade problem

First, approach the issue with a sense of urgency it deserves. Promptly begin to diversify Chinese exports away from U.S. markets, and strongly step up purchases of American goods and services to quickly stop and markedly reverse the trend of China’s growing bilateral trade surpluses.

Second, with such a sincere show of good faith, Beijing should adopt regulatory changes offering internationally comparable guarantees for the protection of intellectual property and prohibition of forced technology transfers to Chinese joint-venture partners. China’s apparently large panoply of non-tariff barriers to trade should also be dismantled.

The vigilant members of the China-based American and international chambers of commerce, and the World Trade Organization, will serve as keen observers that China is properly implementing and enforcing its trade regulations.

Third, China can benefit from an enhanced International Monetary Fund surveillance, technically called Article IV consultations. That would make sure that China’s monetary, fiscal and structural economic policies — which include both domestic and foreign trade — are fully in compliance with international rules and best practice policies.

In addition to that, China may also wish to engage in extensive biannual economic examinations with the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development to get an independent expert assessment of the entire spectrum of its economic policies. That’s what the OECD does well, and that could be a very useful source of unbiased advice. Such examinations would also shield China from widely publicized amateurish attacks on its economic management.

Fourth, the IMF consultations and the OECD’s biannual examinations would provide unimpeachable expert opinions on China’s monetary policies and its managed floating exchange rate. That would preserve China’s monetary sovereignty and offer much-needed advice about the country’s highly sensitive capital account transactions.

How China frames those steps within the ongoing trade negotiations with the United States is a matter of its own judgment.

But one thing should be clear: Dragging on the negotiating process while continuing to accumulate China’s huge surpluses on American trades is over. Washington has finally come to the point where it can no longer tolerate inconclusive talk fests while China laughs all the way to the bank.

To be sure, though, getting the trade surplus issue out of the way will not radically improve the U.S.-China relations. That’s impossible as long as America’s security experts consider China a “strategic competitor” and “a revisionist power” determined to challenge America’s world order.

One could expect, however, that a meaningful progress on bilateral trade problems could open more space to address acute security issues in a constructive manner, although, again, there is no guarantee for such an outcome. China’s contested maritime borders, Korean problems and Beijing’s Belt and Road transactions will remain America’s war and peace issues for the foreseeable future.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quickly, china, trade, examinations, chinas, economic, monetary, americas, american, huge, international, problem, policies


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