Singapore revises property rules to counter ‘shoebox apartment’ problem

Singapore has announced stricter guidelines on the maximum number of units in new blocks of private flats and condominiums in a move to tackle what authorities have called “excessive development of shoebox units” in the island-state. The new rules reduce “developers’ leeway to prop up profit margins by launching smaller units,” said Christine Li, head of Singapore research at consultancy Cushman and Wakefield. The guidelines apply to applications for developments outside the city’s central area


Singapore has announced stricter guidelines on the maximum number of units in new blocks of private flats and condominiums in a move to tackle what authorities have called “excessive development of shoebox units” in the island-state. The new rules reduce “developers’ leeway to prop up profit margins by launching smaller units,” said Christine Li, head of Singapore research at consultancy Cushman and Wakefield. The guidelines apply to applications for developments outside the city’s central area
Singapore revises property rules to counter ‘shoebox apartment’ problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: munshi ahmed, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apartment, unit, revises, guidelines, area, square, rules, number, shoebox, counter, problem, units, including, maximum, singapore, property, developers


Singapore revises property rules to counter 'shoebox apartment' problem

Singapore has announced stricter guidelines on the maximum number of units in new blocks of private flats and condominiums in a move to tackle what authorities have called “excessive development of shoebox units” in the island-state.

Shares of some real estate firms, including City Developments, UOL Group and Oxley Holdings, fell in Thursday morning trade, underperforming the broader market.

The new rules reduce “developers’ leeway to prop up profit margins by launching smaller units,” said Christine Li, head of Singapore research at consultancy Cushman and Wakefield.

The guidelines apply to applications for developments outside the city’s central area received on or after Jan. 17 next year. They tighten rules first introduced in 2012.

Singapore this year unveiled its strongest property cooling measures in five years, including extra taxes on developers that had been paying record sums to buy land for residential use.

“With the revised guidelines, developers are encouraged to provide a wide range of unit sizes that will cater to the diverse needs of all segments of the market, including larger families,” the Urban Redevelopment Authority said in a circular posted on its website on Wednesday.

“The guidelines will also help moderate the reduction in dwelling unit sizes, safeguard the liveability of our residential estates and ensure that the local infrastructure will not be overly strained,” it added.

Under the revised rules, the maximum number of dwelling units per development will be calculated by a proposed building’s gross floor area divided by 85 square meters, versus 70 square meters under the current rules.

The new guidelines also added more areas of the island where the maximum number of units are calculated by total area divided by 100 square meters.

Cushman’s Li estimated that the 85 and 100 square metre limit would reduce the number of units by 18 percent and 30 percent, respectively. Cushman also expected a hit to the redevelopment market, as well as downward pressure on land prices.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: munshi ahmed, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apartment, unit, revises, guidelines, area, square, rules, number, shoebox, counter, problem, units, including, maximum, singapore, property, developers


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Businessman Theo Paphitis on how dyslexia boosted his career

Theo Paphitis is considered one of Britain’s most successful entrepreneurs, thanks to having helped revive several brands. With dyslexia estimated to affect at least 10 percent of any given population, according to Dyslexia International, a person with the learning difficulty can often face challenges concerning spelling, writing and reading. Paphitis is just one of many leaders who have spoken about their dyslexia, with Richard Branson, Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley all having recently comm


Theo Paphitis is considered one of Britain’s most successful entrepreneurs, thanks to having helped revive several brands. With dyslexia estimated to affect at least 10 percent of any given population, according to Dyslexia International, a person with the learning difficulty can often face challenges concerning spelling, writing and reading. Paphitis is just one of many leaders who have spoken about their dyslexia, with Richard Branson, Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley all having recently comm
Businessman Theo Paphitis on how dyslexia boosted his career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: alexandra gibbs, carl court – pa images, pa images, getty images, eamonn mccormack, wireimage
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wouldnt, confidence, learning, boosted, thats, look, theo, solution, problem, career, dyslexia, businessman, paphitis, hes


Businessman Theo Paphitis on how dyslexia boosted his career

Theo Paphitis is considered one of Britain’s most successful entrepreneurs, thanks to having helped revive several brands. The magnate has said however, that he may not have reached the level of success he’s now attained, if it wasn’t for a learning difficulty he’s had since he was young.

Speaking to BBC radio 5 live’s “Wake Up to Money” show, the serial businessman revealed that in spite of how painful it was, “dyslexia was an advantage” for him as it drove Paphitis to always look for an answer to any given issue.

“If I hadn’t have had dyslexia, I’m pretty certain I wouldn’t be here today, because I wouldn’t have gone down the path I went down,” the entrepreneur told the BBC.

With dyslexia estimated to affect at least 10 percent of any given population, according to Dyslexia International, a person with the learning difficulty can often face challenges concerning spelling, writing and reading. Paphitis is just one of many leaders who have spoken about their dyslexia, with Richard Branson, Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley all having recently commented on how it affects their livelihoods.

A report published by EY and charity Made by Dyslexia this month indicates, however, that dyslexic individuals “hold a unique set of skills” that are crucial to the future workforce. Such talents include creativity, complex problem solving, and cognitive flexibility, which are seen as “increasingly valuable” to a labor force that’s becoming ever more advanced and digitized.

For Paphitis, he credits his desire to problem solve as an ability that’s helped drive him in business.

“Even as an 11-year old, I can remember quite clearly, learning to get round the things I had to do and finding another solution. Whatever it was, I had to find another solution,” he said.

“So, it really gave me that confidence to be able to tackle anything in business — but not from an arrogant point of view or a false confidence. But a confidence of ‘How hard can it be?'” The entrepreneur added that his method was to “look at the problem, break it down, (and) find a solution to it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: alexandra gibbs, carl court – pa images, pa images, getty images, eamonn mccormack, wireimage
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wouldnt, confidence, learning, boosted, thats, look, theo, solution, problem, career, dyslexia, businessman, paphitis, hes


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Kavanaugh debacle and national debt are part of the same problem

Last month, a new stretch of road opened in southeast Pennsylvania that completed a project 62 years in the making. Ike, like all great leaders, was thinking long-term and well beyond his tenure. It’s the absence of such thinking that is the single biggest problem in Washington: No one seems to care how what they do today affects tomorrow. Little attention was paid to the damage being done to the long-term future of the Senate, the courts or the country. In an interview on CBS “This Morning,” Se


Last month, a new stretch of road opened in southeast Pennsylvania that completed a project 62 years in the making. Ike, like all great leaders, was thinking long-term and well beyond his tenure. It’s the absence of such thinking that is the single biggest problem in Washington: No one seems to care how what they do today affects tomorrow. Little attention was paid to the damage being done to the long-term future of the Senate, the courts or the country. In an interview on CBS “This Morning,” Se
Kavanaugh debacle and national debt are part of the same problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: andrew tisch, chairman of loews corporation, kevin lemarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, longterm, win, debt, senate, kavanaugh, problem, debacle, attention, project, thinking, national, weeks


Kavanaugh debacle and national debt are part of the same problem

Last month, a new stretch of road opened in southeast Pennsylvania that completed a project 62 years in the making.

The Interstate Highway System.

I was seven years old when President Dwight Eisenhower launched this ambitious effort to knit together our vast country—a project he knew would continue for decades after he was gone.

Ike, like all great leaders, was thinking long-term and well beyond his tenure. It’s the absence of such thinking that is the single biggest problem in Washington: No one seems to care how what they do today affects tomorrow.

The Kavanaugh Supreme Court hearing chaos was a case study in unbridled short-termism – as the tactics employed by both parties were exquisitely tailored to win the next news cycle, the next vote, the upcoming November election. Little attention was paid to the damage being done to the long-term future of the Senate, the courts or the country.

That’s a problem for tomorrow.

In an interview on CBS “This Morning,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell dismissed the angst and anger over the Kavanaugh hearings, saying it will “blow over.” Perhaps he is right. Weeks or months from now, we’ll be on to another controversy. But the short-term thinking that created this mess will remain.

Consider a gathering crisis that is getting almost no attention in this fall’s midterms: Our national debt is huge, it is growing, and absolutely no one in a position of real power cares to do anything about it. Everyone frets but no one acts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: andrew tisch, chairman of loews corporation, kevin lemarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, longterm, win, debt, senate, kavanaugh, problem, debacle, attention, project, thinking, national, weeks


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Convoy CEO: Inefficiency is a bigger problem than driver shortage for the trucking industry

Trucks are running across the country empty 30 to 40 percent of the time, Dan Lewis, CEO of digital freight matching company Convoy, told CNBC on ThursdayHe hopes to change all that by utilizing that free space. In fact, he believes inefficiency is the bigger problem than the driver shortage facing the trucking industry. “Trucks are running down the highway empty, they’re sitting for hours at facilities,” he said. “You can generate 20, 30 percent more capacity just by running the whole system mo


Trucks are running across the country empty 30 to 40 percent of the time, Dan Lewis, CEO of digital freight matching company Convoy, told CNBC on ThursdayHe hopes to change all that by utilizing that free space. In fact, he believes inefficiency is the bigger problem than the driver shortage facing the trucking industry. “Trucks are running down the highway empty, they’re sitting for hours at facilities,” he said. “You can generate 20, 30 percent more capacity just by running the whole system mo
Convoy CEO: Inefficiency is a bigger problem than driver shortage for the trucking industry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, truck, routes, trucks, ceo, convoy, shortage, inefficiency, matching, problem, told, hours, freight, bigger, running, driver, trucking, million, industry


Convoy CEO: Inefficiency is a bigger problem than driver shortage for the trucking industry

Trucks are running across the country empty 30 to 40 percent of the time, Dan Lewis, CEO of digital freight matching company Convoy, told CNBC on Thursday

He hopes to change all that by utilizing that free space.

“We think the next big thing in trucking is to actually automate the process of matching those hundreds of thousands, millions of trucks with all of the freight that needs to be moved every day,” he told Wilfred Frost.

In fact, he believes inefficiency is the bigger problem than the driver shortage facing the trucking industry.

“Trucks are running down the highway empty, they’re sitting for hours at facilities,” he said. “You can generate 20, 30 percent more capacity just by running the whole system more efficiently.”

Convoy uses software to create what it calls smarter routes that will batch shipments for truck drivers. According to its website, for every 1 percent improvement in truck routes and utilization, nearly 400 million gallons of fuel can be saved, as well as 100 million hours from being wasted and 3 billion miles from being driven each year.

Convoy counts Jeff Bezos among its investors.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, truck, routes, trucks, ceo, convoy, shortage, inefficiency, matching, problem, told, hours, freight, bigger, running, driver, trucking, million, industry


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Volvo shares slump as firm warns vehicles may be failing emission legal limits

Shares in the bus and truck maker Volvo Group fell sharply on Tuesday after the company admitted that a part designed to limit poisonous emissions is failing. The world’s second biggest truckmaker admitted Tuesday that some vehicles on the road are likely emitting illegal levels of nitrogen oxide. Volvo Group added in its statement that costs related to fixing the problem “could be material.” By midday, Volvo group shares listed on the Nasdaq Stockholm index were lower by more than 5 percent. Th


Shares in the bus and truck maker Volvo Group fell sharply on Tuesday after the company admitted that a part designed to limit poisonous emissions is failing. The world’s second biggest truckmaker admitted Tuesday that some vehicles on the road are likely emitting illegal levels of nitrogen oxide. Volvo Group added in its statement that costs related to fixing the problem “could be material.” By midday, Volvo group shares listed on the Nasdaq Stockholm index were lower by more than 5 percent. Th
Volvo shares slump as firm warns vehicles may be failing emission legal limits Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: david reid, erik abel, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emission, warns, shares, firm, failing, limits, legal, group, engines, truck, swedish, problem, recall, north, volvo, slump, vehicles


Volvo shares slump as firm warns vehicles may be failing emission legal limits

Shares in the bus and truck maker Volvo Group fell sharply on Tuesday after the company admitted that a part designed to limit poisonous emissions is failing.

The world’s second biggest truckmaker admitted Tuesday that some vehicles on the road are likely emitting illegal levels of nitrogen oxide. Volvo Group added in its statement that costs related to fixing the problem “could be material.”

By midday, Volvo group shares listed on the Nasdaq Stockholm index were lower by more than 5 percent.

“One of the components that is in the catalyst may degrade quicker than expected,” Claes Eliasson, senior vice president of Volvo Group’s communication team told CNBC by phone.

Eliasson added that some truck drivers were being alerted to the problem by a warning light in their cab.

Volvo said the number and type of engines or vehicles affected remained unknown, but the largest volume of potentially affected engines had been sold to customers in North America And Europe.

The firm said that its investigation had indicated that the degradation of the component didn’t appear to affect all vehicles and engines to the same extent.

Volvo said it did not know yet if a recall would be necessary, but in an email to CNBC on Tuesday, an equity analyst at Kepler Cheuvreux, Mats Liss, said it would be a probable outcome.

“Emissions are high on the political agenda, so I guess Volvo needs to make a recall,” he said.

Th European Union Commission said Tuesday that it will get in touch with Swedish authorities for more information about the apparent failing.

The Volvo Group delivered 81,259 trucks to Europe and North America in the first six months of 2018. In 2017, the firm’s annual sales amounted to 335 billion Swedish krona ($37.6 billion).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: david reid, erik abel, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emission, warns, shares, firm, failing, limits, legal, group, engines, truck, swedish, problem, recall, north, volvo, slump, vehicles


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Student loan debt isn’t just a millennial problem

How to deal with college debt 11:28 AM ET Tue, 30 May 2017 | 01:17As most now know, skyrocketing student debt can be particularly devastating for young adults. But it’s not just millennials who are delaying life’s major milestones because of their loan burdens, according to a new report by the Association of Young Americans, or AYA, and AARP, an association representing the interests of Americans over age 50. Debt from student loans is also standing in the way for Generation X and baby boomers,


How to deal with college debt 11:28 AM ET Tue, 30 May 2017 | 01:17As most now know, skyrocketing student debt can be particularly devastating for young adults. But it’s not just millennials who are delaying life’s major milestones because of their loan burdens, according to a new report by the Association of Young Americans, or AYA, and AARP, an association representing the interests of Americans over age 50. Debt from student loans is also standing in the way for Generation X and baby boomers,
Student loan debt isn’t just a millennial problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennial, way, association, loan, isnt, problem, young, aya, debt, student, americans, report


Student loan debt isn't just a millennial problem

How to deal with college debt 11:28 AM ET Tue, 30 May 2017 | 01:17

As most now know, skyrocketing student debt can be particularly devastating for young adults.

But it’s not just millennials who are delaying life’s major milestones because of their loan burdens, according to a new report by the Association of Young Americans, or AYA, and AARP, an association representing the interests of Americans over age 50.

Debt from student loans is also standing in the way for Generation X and baby boomers, the report said.

“The trillion dollar student loan crisis is having a tangible impact on all Americans across all generations,” said AYA founder Ben Brown.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennial, way, association, loan, isnt, problem, young, aya, debt, student, americans, report


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May says she still believes in a Brexit deal but Ireland a problem

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May told Parliament Monday that while negotiations with the European Union have resulted in progress, the status of the Irish border has remained a critical stumbling block. Over the weekend, rumors arose that a full withdrawal deal had been put in place after a sudden unscheduled meeting was announced between Britain’s Minister for Exiting the European Union, Dominic Raab, and the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier. However, it soon became clear that the sticking p


U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May told Parliament Monday that while negotiations with the European Union have resulted in progress, the status of the Irish border has remained a critical stumbling block. Over the weekend, rumors arose that a full withdrawal deal had been put in place after a sudden unscheduled meeting was announced between Britain’s Minister for Exiting the European Union, Dominic Raab, and the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier. However, it soon became clear that the sticking p
May says she still believes in a Brexit deal but Ireland a problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: david reid, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ireland, european, brexit, believes, uk, minister, union, parliament, problem, republic, northern, border, deal


May says she still believes in a Brexit deal but Ireland a problem

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May told Parliament Monday that while negotiations with the European Union have resulted in progress, the status of the Irish border has remained a critical stumbling block.

Over the weekend, rumors arose that a full withdrawal deal had been put in place after a sudden unscheduled meeting was announced between Britain’s Minister for Exiting the European Union, Dominic Raab, and the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier.

However, it soon became clear that the sticking point of how to treat the border between Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom, and the Republic of Ireland, which is a member of the European Union, had again caused talks to stall.

Speaking in the House of Commons Monday afternoon, May insisted that the two sides were edging toward a deal: “I do not believe that the EU and the U.K. are far apart,” May said, to a mix of jeers and cheers.

May repeated to the U.K. Parliament that she would never accept a situation where there was a border in the Irish Sea, forcing Northern Ireland to be treated differently to the rest of the U.K.

A separate “backstop” arrangement has been discussed which would ensure no hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, even if no formal Brexit deal can be reached.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: david reid, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ireland, european, brexit, believes, uk, minister, union, parliament, problem, republic, northern, border, deal


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Jack Dorsey: ‘Twitter does contribute to filter bubbles’

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is grappling with the unintended consequences of his invention, like many of his peers in the technology industry. “I think Twitter does contribute to filter bubbles and I think that’s wrong of us, we need to fix it,” he said. In his view, a big reason for that is the fact that users only follow accounts they agree with. And that means it’s very unlikely that they’ll see tweets that share an opposing point of view. At present, Dorsey admitted, “we’re not giving them (user


Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is grappling with the unintended consequences of his invention, like many of his peers in the technology industry. “I think Twitter does contribute to filter bubbles and I think that’s wrong of us, we need to fix it,” he said. In his view, a big reason for that is the fact that users only follow accounts they agree with. And that means it’s very unlikely that they’ll see tweets that share an opposing point of view. At present, Dorsey admitted, “we’re not giving them (user
Jack Dorsey: ‘Twitter does contribute to filter bubbles’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: christina farr, rolf vennenbernd, dpa, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vote, problem, filter, dorsey, topic, bubbles, does, contribute, users, view, following, twitter, way, think, jack, tweets


Jack Dorsey: 'Twitter does contribute to filter bubbles'

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is grappling with the unintended consequences of his invention, like many of his peers in the technology industry.

On stage at Wired’s 25th anniversary summit on Monday, he spoke in a forthright way about the problem of users only see views, news and opinions from one perspective.

“I think Twitter does contribute to filter bubbles and I think that’s wrong of us, we need to fix it,” he said.

In his view, a big reason for that is the fact that users only follow accounts they agree with. And that means it’s very unlikely that they’ll see tweets that share an opposing point of view.

He gave an example of how during the social media firestorm in the months before the Brexit vote, many users only saw tweets from people advocating for or against the United Kingdom remaining within the European Union.

A solution to that problem, in his view, is to provide them with a way to see tweets from both sides by following a topic rather than a person.

“If I’m following an account with a particular viewpoint versus the ability to follow a topic or interest or event … like Brexit to vote leave… there might be a few tweets that counter it,” he said.

At present, Dorsey admitted, “we’re not giving them (users) the tools to have the opportunity to break down the filter bubble.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: christina farr, rolf vennenbernd, dpa, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vote, problem, filter, dorsey, topic, bubbles, does, contribute, users, view, following, twitter, way, think, jack, tweets


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Dow futures point to more than 300-point jump, regaining some of this week’s steep losses

Futures climbed as tech shares rose sharply in the premarket. On Thursday, Wall Street closed sharply down, with the Dow falling over 540 points, bringing its two-day losses to more than 1,300 points. Sentiment was rocked around the globe in recent sessions, as investors grew nervous over the rise in interest rates and high valuations in tech shares. These losses have sent the major indexes down more than 5 percent, on pace for their biggest weekly declines since March. Sentiment was also lifted


Futures climbed as tech shares rose sharply in the premarket. On Thursday, Wall Street closed sharply down, with the Dow falling over 540 points, bringing its two-day losses to more than 1,300 points. Sentiment was rocked around the globe in recent sessions, as investors grew nervous over the rise in interest rates and high valuations in tech shares. These losses have sent the major indexes down more than 5 percent, on pace for their biggest weekly declines since March. Sentiment was also lifted
Dow futures point to more than 300-point jump, regaining some of this week’s steep losses Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: fred imbert, alexandra gibbs, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steep, losses, point, futures, dow, sent, stock, fed, sharply, problem, rose, rates, trump, tech, interest, weeks, 300point, jump, regaining


Dow futures point to more than 300-point jump, regaining some of this week's steep losses

Futures climbed as tech shares rose sharply in the premarket. Amazon and Apple both rose more than 2 percent, while Netflix surged more than 3.5 percent. Facebook, meanwhile, gained 1.5 percent and Twitter jumped 2.6 percent.

The move higher on U.S. stock futures follows an uptick in global equities. In Europe, the German Dax gained half a percent while France’s CAC 40 climbed 0.7 percent. Asian equities also rose, with the Shanghai Composite surging 0.9 percent and Japan’s Nikkei 225 gaining 0.5 percent.

On Thursday, Wall Street closed sharply down, with the Dow falling over 540 points, bringing its two-day losses to more than 1,300 points. Sentiment was rocked around the globe in recent sessions, as investors grew nervous over the rise in interest rates and high valuations in tech shares.

President Donald Trump has recently criticized the U.S. Federal Reserve for the decline in stock markets, saying Wednesday that he wasn’t happy with how the central bank continued to raise interest rates.

“The problem I have is with the Fed. The Fed is going wild. I mean, I don’t know what their problem is that they are raising interest rates and it’s ridiculous,” Trump said during a telephone interview on Wednesday with Fox News. Trump went onto blame the Fed for the stock market decline on Thursday, but added that while he was disappointed, he wouldn’t remove Jay Powell as Fed chair.

Stocks have also fallen this week as tech — the biggest S&P 500 sector by market cap weight — has lost nearly 6.8 percent through Thursday’s close. These losses have sent the major indexes down more than 5 percent, on pace for their biggest weekly declines since March.

Sentiment was also lifted by stronger-than-expected third-quarter results from J.P. Morgan Chase, which sent the company’s stock up by more than 1 percent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: fred imbert, alexandra gibbs, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steep, losses, point, futures, dow, sent, stock, fed, sharply, problem, rose, rates, trump, tech, interest, weeks, 300point, jump, regaining


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US Treasury yields jump as stocks bounce back

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose more than 250 points in volatile trading and gained as much as 414 points. Yields dipped from multiyear highs on Thursday, as investors sought safety from the stock market’s rout int he previous session. Slowing its rate hiking path would only increase the chances of entrenching inflation and, thus, force a more rapid rate rise down the road.” Sentiment around the globe was rocked in recent sessions, as investors grew nervous over the rise in interest rates.


The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose more than 250 points in volatile trading and gained as much as 414 points. Yields dipped from multiyear highs on Thursday, as investors sought safety from the stock market’s rout int he previous session. Slowing its rate hiking path would only increase the chances of entrenching inflation and, thus, force a more rapid rate rise down the road.” Sentiment around the globe was rocked in recent sessions, as investors grew nervous over the rise in interest rates.
US Treasury yields jump as stocks bounce back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: fred imbert, alexandra gibbs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rise, treasury, yields, rates, problem, stock, trump, markets, fed, interest, stocks, bounce, rate, sessions, jump


US Treasury yields jump as stocks bounce back

Equity markets reclaimed some ground after posting solid losses over the last two sessions. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose more than 250 points in volatile trading and gained as much as 414 points.

Yields dipped from multiyear highs on Thursday, as investors sought safety from the stock market’s rout int he previous session.

Strategists at MRB Partners said in a note Friday that rates should continue to rise in the long term as “the cyclical bond outlook” is still bearish.

“Fed policy is a long way from being restrictive, but the U.S. economy is overheating: the rate hiking cycle will persist,” they said. “The U.S. is far ahead of the other major economies in terms of inflation risks. … Even with a firm dollar, the Fed has little leeway to pause its rate cycle absent a significant financial market debacle. Slowing its rate hiking path would only increase the chances of entrenching inflation and, thus, force a more rapid rate rise down the road.”

Sentiment around the globe was rocked in recent sessions, as investors grew nervous over the rise in interest rates. President Donald Trump has recently criticized the U.S. Federal Reserve for the decline in stock markets, saying on Wednesday that he wasn’t happy with how the central bank continued to raise interest rates.

“The problem I have is with the Fed. The Fed is going wild. I mean, I don’t know what their problem is that they are raising interest rates and it’s ridiculous,” Trump said during a telephone interview on Wednesday with Fox News. Trump went onto blame the Fed for the stock market decline on Thursday, but added that while he was disappointed, he wouldn’t remove Jay Powell as Fed chair.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12  Authors: fred imbert, alexandra gibbs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rise, treasury, yields, rates, problem, stock, trump, markets, fed, interest, stocks, bounce, rate, sessions, jump


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