TikTok’s rise is a problem for Facebook and Snapchat: ValueChampion

TikTok’s rise is a problem for Facebook and Snapchat: ValueChampion11 Hours AgoDJ Kang of ValueChampion says TikTok is a “niche” product, and explains how the Chinese short video app is different from Snapchat.


TikTok’s rise is a problem for Facebook and Snapchat: ValueChampion11 Hours AgoDJ Kang of ValueChampion says TikTok is a “niche” product, and explains how the Chinese short video app is different from Snapchat.
TikTok’s rise is a problem for Facebook and Snapchat: ValueChampion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, problem, valuechampion, facebook, valuechampion11, short, video, rise, tiktoks, tiktok, snapchat, product


TikTok's rise is a problem for Facebook and Snapchat: ValueChampion

TikTok’s rise is a problem for Facebook and Snapchat: ValueChampion

11 Hours Ago

DJ Kang of ValueChampion says TikTok is a “niche” product, and explains how the Chinese short video app is different from Snapchat.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, problem, valuechampion, facebook, valuechampion11, short, video, rise, tiktoks, tiktok, snapchat, product


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Amazon added a first-ever warning about counterfeit products to its earnings report

Amazon is warning investors of one of the biggest problems facing its online marketplace: counterfeit products. Under the “risk factors” section of its annual report, Amazon added a new line addressing counterfeit problems on its marketplace. The disclosure reflects Amazon’s increased concern over the counterfeit problem on its marketplace, as the words “counterfeit” and “pirated” were never mentioned in its annual filing before. More than half of the products sold on Amazon came from third-part


Amazon is warning investors of one of the biggest problems facing its online marketplace: counterfeit products. Under the “risk factors” section of its annual report, Amazon added a new line addressing counterfeit problems on its marketplace. The disclosure reflects Amazon’s increased concern over the counterfeit problem on its marketplace, as the words “counterfeit” and “pirated” were never mentioned in its annual filing before. More than half of the products sold on Amazon came from third-part
Amazon added a first-ever warning about counterfeit products to its earnings report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: eugene kim, simon dawson bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hopkins, goods, earnings, problem, thirdparty, sale, added, amazon, sellers, marketplace, counterfeit, report, warning, firstever, products


Amazon added a first-ever warning about counterfeit products to its earnings report

Amazon is warning investors of one of the biggest problems facing its online marketplace: counterfeit products.

Under the “risk factors” section of its annual report, Amazon added a new line addressing counterfeit problems on its marketplace.

“We also may be unable to prevent sellers in our stores or through other stores from selling unlawful, counterfeit, pirated, or stolen goods, selling goods in an unlawful or unethical manner, violating the proprietary rights of others, or otherwise violating our policies,” the filing said.

The disclosure reflects Amazon’s increased concern over the counterfeit problem on its marketplace, as the words “counterfeit” and “pirated” were never mentioned in its annual filing before. While Amazon publicly says it has a “zero tolerance” policy for counterfeit products and has built new technology to deal with the problem, its marketplace that allows third-party merchants sell goods continues to be plagued by knockoffs.

It’s a problem that could get worse, as Amazon is shifting more of its sales to third-party sellers. More than half of the products sold on Amazon came from third-party sellers in 2017 for the first time, and in its most recent quarter, Amazon said that third-party products accounted for 52 percent of all products sold.

Amazon’s counterfeit problem has drawn the attention of major retail brands as well. In October, The American Apparel & Footwear Association, which represents more than 1,000 brands, recommended that some Amazon sites should be added to the “Notorious Markets” list because of counterfeits, saying Amazon should rather “be a leader in the fight against counterfeits.”

Bigger brands like Daimler AG have also raised flags. In 2017, the German automaker filed a complaint alleging trademark infringement by Amazon for failing to prevent the sale of counterfeit Mercedes-Benz parts.

Earlier last year, a widely read blog post written by Elevation Labs’ founder Casey Hopkins pointed out how counterfeits make business tough for small companies like his. In the blog post, Hopkins wrote about his experience dealing with Chinese counterfeiters that flooded the marketplace with copies of his product, killing his brand reputation and sales along the way.

“Customers are unknowingly buying crap versions of the product, while both Amazon and the scammers are profiting, and the reputation you’ve built goes down the toilet,” Hopkins wrote.

In a statement, Amazon said, “We strictly prohibit the sale of counterfeit products and invest heavily—both funds and company energy—to ensure our policy against the sale of such products is followed.”

WATCH: We can’t be blind to Amazon’s subscription deceleration


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: eugene kim, simon dawson bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hopkins, goods, earnings, problem, thirdparty, sale, added, amazon, sellers, marketplace, counterfeit, report, warning, firstever, products


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Sanders and Schumer’s buyback plan is treating the wrong problem, says economist

A new proposal to restrict corporate buybacks is treating the symptom instead of the cause — and could result in companies shutting down in the U.S., economist Diane Swonk told CNBC on Monday. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, outlined their plan in a New York Times op-ed on Sunday. They want to prevent companies from buying back their own shares unless they pay workers at least $15 an hour and offer health benefits and paid ti


A new proposal to restrict corporate buybacks is treating the symptom instead of the cause — and could result in companies shutting down in the U.S., economist Diane Swonk told CNBC on Monday. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, outlined their plan in a New York Times op-ed on Sunday. They want to prevent companies from buying back their own shares unless they pay workers at least $15 an hour and offer health benefits and paid ti
Sanders and Schumer’s buyback plan is treating the wrong problem, says economist Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: michelle fox, yuri gripas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, economist, sanders, wrong, schumers, companies, unless, start, plan, problem, buyback, treating, workers, vermont, closing


Sanders and Schumer's buyback plan is treating the wrong problem, says economist

A new proposal to restrict corporate buybacks is treating the symptom instead of the cause — and could result in companies shutting down in the U.S., economist Diane Swonk told CNBC on Monday.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, outlined their plan in a New York Times op-ed on Sunday. They want to prevent companies from buying back their own shares unless they pay workers at least $15 an hour and offer health benefits and paid time off.

Swonk said those preconditions aren’t a good thing.

“It is treating the wrong problem,” the chief economist at Grant Thornton said on “Closing Bell.”

“Once you start doing this you are going to start closing down companies in the U.S. and having them go elsewhere even more so.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: michelle fox, yuri gripas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, economist, sanders, wrong, schumers, companies, unless, start, plan, problem, buyback, treating, workers, vermont, closing


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How Google CEO’s brilliant answer in a job interview helped him get hired

That means knowing how to answer each question, including the tricky ones designed to stump you. That’s a problem Google CEO Sundar Pichai faced in 2004, when he first interviewed at the company for the VP of product management position. There was just one problem: Google had just announced the email service that very same day, on April 1st. He responded by saying he couldn’t answer the question because he hadn’t been able to use the product. “It was only in the fourth interview when someone ask


That means knowing how to answer each question, including the tricky ones designed to stump you. That’s a problem Google CEO Sundar Pichai faced in 2004, when he first interviewed at the company for the VP of product management position. There was just one problem: Google had just announced the email service that very same day, on April 1st. He responded by saying he couldn’t answer the question because he hadn’t been able to use the product. “It was only in the fourth interview when someone ask
How Google CEO’s brilliant answer in a job interview helped him get hired Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: tom popomaronis, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images, -laszlo bock, former senior vp of people operations at google
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, pichai, problem, gmail, job, thought, hired, brilliant, product, ceos, answer, question, asked, interview, helped


How Google CEO's brilliant answer in a job interview helped him get hired

When it comes to job interviews, we all want to give answers that make us stand out from the rest of the candidates. That means knowing how to answer each question, including the tricky ones designed to stump you.

But what if you don’t know the answer to a question?

That’s a problem Google CEO Sundar Pichai faced in 2004, when he first interviewed at the company for the VP of product management position. In a 2017 chat with students at his alma mater, Indian Institute of technology, Pichai shared details about his interview experience at one of the world’s largest tech companies.

In the first few rounds, Pichai said the interviewers asked him what he thought of Gmail. There was just one problem: Google had just announced the email service that very same day, on April 1st. “I thought it was an April Fool’s Day joke,” Pichai said.

He responded by saying he couldn’t answer the question because he hadn’t been able to use the product. “It was only in the fourth interview when someone asked, ‘Have you seen Gmail?’ I said no. So he actually showed it to me. And then the fifth interviewer asked, ‘What do you think of Gmail?’ And I was able to start answering it then,” Pichai said at the talk.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: tom popomaronis, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images, -laszlo bock, former senior vp of people operations at google
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, pichai, problem, gmail, job, thought, hired, brilliant, product, ceos, answer, question, asked, interview, helped


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Jamie Dimon says Americans have ‘some of the worst outcomes’ in health care despite the best system

Jamie Dimon: US has the best health care in the world, but worst outcome 16 Hours Ago | 01:03J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon renewed his criticism of health care in the U.S. on Wednesday, saying Americans have some of the “worst outcomes” despite having the best system in the world, he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “With health care, we have the best in the world — doctors, hospitals, pharma, you name it — but we also have some of the worst outcomes,” he said in an interview at the World Economic Forum


Jamie Dimon: US has the best health care in the world, but worst outcome 16 Hours Ago | 01:03J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon renewed his criticism of health care in the U.S. on Wednesday, saying Americans have some of the “worst outcomes” despite having the best system in the world, he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “With health care, we have the best in the world — doctors, hospitals, pharma, you name it — but we also have some of the worst outcomes,” he said in an interview at the World Economic Forum
Jamie Dimon says Americans have ‘some of the worst outcomes’ in health care despite the best system Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: angelica lavito, adam galica
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, worst, care, world, ceo, dimon, health, look, system, best, problem, despite, outcomes, jamie


Jamie Dimon says Americans have 'some of the worst outcomes' in health care despite the best system

Jamie Dimon: US has the best health care in the world, but worst outcome 16 Hours Ago | 01:03

J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon renewed his criticism of health care in the U.S. on Wednesday, saying Americans have some of the “worst outcomes” despite having the best system in the world, he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

“With health care, we have the best in the world — doctors, hospitals, pharma, you name it — but we also have some of the worst outcomes,” he said in an interview at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “Obesity, wellness programs that could work better, the opioid problem, 40 million uninsured. So you know, to me, you look at the whole issue and what should we do about it.”

Dimon has been a vocal critic of how much the nation, and especially employers, pay for health care. He teamed up last year with Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos to form a joint venture aimed at tackling costs and hopefully providing better services for their employees.

In June, the trio named a prominent surgeon and health-care thought leader Dr. Atul Gawande to lead the still unnamed initiative. The group also hired Dana Gelb Safran, formerly a chief performance measurement and improvement officer at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts as “head of measurement.”

For now, the group is focused on building out its team and “looking at how to attack this problem,” Dimon said Wednesday.

“It’s a long-term view. We don’t expect any announcement anytime soon,” he said. “We will share if we come up with anything good, but we want to start small. Test a bunch of different things.”

Health-care spending represents nearly 18 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product, far more than other developed nations, a statistic that Dimon pointed to as one that’s unsustainable and that leaves American business at a disadvantage to foreign competitors.

“If you look at it as a competitive issue, that is a huge impediment to American business over the next 50 years,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: angelica lavito, adam galica
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, worst, care, world, ceo, dimon, health, look, system, best, problem, despite, outcomes, jamie


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Davos opens with US-China contest as ‘the key problem of our time’

Davos, Switzerland – Former U.S. National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley poses the most significant question hovering over the global future as the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting opens here Monday. “Can the United States and China be strategic competitors and strategic cooperators at the same time?” In some 25 years of attending Davos, first with the Wall Street Journal and now at the Atlantic Council, I’ve never sensed such concern among its attendees about emerging risk: Political, eco


Davos, Switzerland – Former U.S. National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley poses the most significant question hovering over the global future as the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting opens here Monday. “Can the United States and China be strategic competitors and strategic cooperators at the same time?” In some 25 years of attending Davos, first with the Wall Street Journal and now at the Atlantic Council, I’ve never sensed such concern among its attendees about emerging risk: Political, eco
Davos opens with US-China contest as ‘the key problem of our time’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-20  Authors: fred kempe, fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images, -fred kempe, president, ceo, the atlantic counsel
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contest, world, problem, political, western, weeks, economic, china, unprecedented, technologies, opens, uschina, davos, key, future


Davos opens with US-China contest as 'the key problem of our time'

Davos, Switzerland – Former U.S. National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley poses the most significant question hovering over the global future as the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting opens here Monday.

“Can the United States and China be strategic competitors and strategic cooperators at the same time?” Hadley asked. “It’s what the world requires, but it’s also never been done before.”

In short: What’s needed are unprecedented means to navigate unprecedented times.

In some 25 years of attending Davos, first with the Wall Street Journal and now at the Atlantic Council, I’ve never sensed such concern among its attendees about emerging risk: Political, economic, societal and climate. Most crucially, worry is growing over how emerging technologies – and the Sino-U.S. struggle for their commanding heights – will define or disrupt the industries and countries they inhabit.

Characteristically, World Economic Forum founder Klaus Schwab is appealing to his 3,000 participants to mold that uncertain future, representing as they do some of the most influential political, business and civil society actors of their times.

Yet the past week’s news captured some of the difficulties Western leaders face in shaping that future. The parliamentary defeat of Theresa May’s Brexit plan and President Donald Trump’s continued U.S. government shutdown have underscored the political ferment that will infect Western democracies for years to come. Both leaders cancelled their participation at Davos to deal with their immediate concerns at home.

The past week’s stories that got more of my attention, however, were the latest, contradictory episodes of the generational Chinese-U.S. drama as framed by Hadley.

On the positive side, news leaks suggested China was offering to settle its trade dispute with the U.S., through an epic offer to buy more than $1 trillion of goods. On the negative side, U.S. federal investigators were acting against China’s Huawei Technologies on allegations it stole technologies. At the same time, a bipartisan group of lawmakers in Congress has put forward legislation that would limit what U.S. companies could sell Chinese telecom operators.

Meanwhile, a North Korean emissary’s visit to Washington resulted in an agreement to arrange a second summit between President Trump and Kim Jong Un at end-February. Though this would appear to be a bilateral North Korean-US affair, how it is resolved will be a test of whether the U.S. and China can find collaborative solutions to major global problems when their interests clash.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-20  Authors: fred kempe, fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images, -fred kempe, president, ceo, the atlantic counsel
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contest, world, problem, political, western, weeks, economic, china, unprecedented, technologies, opens, uschina, davos, key, future


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Gundlach’s warning on ‘ocean of debt’ adds to worries over corporate bonds

After years of U.S. companies taking advantage of low interest rates to pile up cheap debt, Wall Street is beginning to take notice of a problem forming. Corporate debt outstanding ended 2018 at just over $9 trillion, a 64 percent increase over a decade’s time, according to the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association. The result has been a trickle of warnings from financial experts that the price tag for all that debt is coming due. The high-yield end of the bond market has been on


After years of U.S. companies taking advantage of low interest rates to pile up cheap debt, Wall Street is beginning to take notice of a problem forming. Corporate debt outstanding ended 2018 at just over $9 trillion, a 64 percent increase over a decade’s time, according to the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association. The result has been a trickle of warnings from financial experts that the price tag for all that debt is coming due. The high-yield end of the bond market has been on
Gundlach’s warning on ‘ocean of debt’ adds to worries over corporate bonds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: jeff cox, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worries, financial, bonds, gundlachs, problem, told, strong, trillion, debt, stocks, adds, companies, corporate, market, warning, ocean, bond


Gundlach's warning on 'ocean of debt' adds to worries over corporate bonds

After years of U.S. companies taking advantage of low interest rates to pile up cheap debt, Wall Street is beginning to take notice of a problem forming.

Corporate debt outstanding ended 2018 at just over $9 trillion, a 64 percent increase over a decade’s time, according to the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association. The surge came as the Federal Reserve kept its benchmark interest rate anchored near zero and allowed companies to reward shareholders, do deals and invest in their own operations.

However, credit quality is showing signs of weakening, with heavily indebted companies already feeling the pinch as the Fed raises rates gradually and global economic conditions start to weaken.

The result has been a trickle of warnings from financial experts that the price tag for all that debt is coming due.

The latest admonition comes from Jeffrey Gundlach, founder of DoubleLine Capital, who said in a warning published over the weekend that the debt load is about to become a bigger problem.

“We are talking about the creation of an ocean of debt,” Gundlach told Barron’s in a roundtable discussion, during which he noted that the Fed is engaging in “quantitative tightening” that will create “a problem for the stock market.”

Others have echoed the same point — Steve Eisman, immortalized in the Michael Lewis book “The Big Short” and now a portfolio manager at Neuberger Berman, recently told the Financial Times he is worried about liquidity issues in the bond market that could create a problem should conditions deteriorate and there is a sudden wave of sellers.

The high-yield end of the bond market has been on a roller coaster lately. Issuance dried up at the end of 2018, but the sector has been strong in the new year. The iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF, a proxy for the junk market, is up about 3.2 percent in 2019.

However, there are broader longer-range concerns about the $1.2 trillion high-yield market, as well as BBB-rated companies that are threatening to teeter into junk status.

Moody’s notes that investor protection, as measured through the strength of bond covenants, continues to hover around its weakest levels. The rating firm also noted that no corporate bonds priced in December, the first time that has happened since it began tracking covenant quality in 2011.

Gundlach, whose firm was managing more than $120 billion as of June 30, said he has “a lot of concern about bond supply and spending.”

On a broader level, though, he does not see the economy falling into a recession this year, though he believes stocks have been acting like they’re in a bear market.

“I’m not looking for a terrible economy, but an artificially strong one, due to stimulus spending,” he said. “I expect the market to fall further. I see almost a reverse of last year, in that stocks could be weak early in 2019 and stronger later in the year.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: jeff cox, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worries, financial, bonds, gundlachs, problem, told, strong, trillion, debt, stocks, adds, companies, corporate, market, warning, ocean, bond


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Finding a fix for retail’s trillion-dollar problem: Returns

As online sales boom, there’s an inevitable side effect: More merchandise is getting returned, boosting costs and complexity for retailers. These companies say higher rates of online shopping and more lax return policies are factors contributing to the rise of returns. Average return rates vary by category, but clothing and shoes bought online typically have the highest rates with 30 to 40 percent returned. Eric Moriarty, vice president of B-Stock Solutions, a liquidation marketplace said as e-c


As online sales boom, there’s an inevitable side effect: More merchandise is getting returned, boosting costs and complexity for retailers. These companies say higher rates of online shopping and more lax return policies are factors contributing to the rise of returns. Average return rates vary by category, but clothing and shoes bought online typically have the highest rates with 30 to 40 percent returned. Eric Moriarty, vice president of B-Stock Solutions, a liquidation marketplace said as e-c
Finding a fix for retail’s trillion-dollar problem: Returns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: courtney reagan, amanda lasky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trilliondollar, try, online, fix, returned, return, billion, returns, finding, rates, sales, retails, problem, sobie, retailers


Finding a fix for retail's trillion-dollar problem: Returns

As online sales boom, there’s an inevitable side effect: More merchandise is getting returned, boosting costs and complexity for retailers.

The shift can be staggering.

“Shoppers return 5 to 10 percent of what they purchase in store but 15 to 40 percent of what they buy online,” David Sobie, co-founder and CEO of Happy Returns told CNBC.

Not being able to see an item in person accounts for part of the difference, but consumers also shop differently online than in-store, Sobie said. They may order multiple sizes or colors to try on at home, and then ship or take back what they don’t want, with shipping paid for by the retailer, both ways in some cases.

With costs mounting, understanding why shoppers return items and dealing with the logistics is a key issue that retailers are only beginning to tackle. A number of new businesses are sprouting up to try and wrangle the problem for retailers. These companies say higher rates of online shopping and more lax return policies are factors contributing to the rise of returns. However, there are more options for what to do with the returns, which can help to keep tons of unwanted items out of landfills and save retailers’ profit margins.

Average return rates vary by category, but clothing and shoes bought online typically have the highest rates with 30 to 40 percent returned.

Eric Moriarty, vice president of B-Stock Solutions, a liquidation marketplace said as e-commerce becomes a bigger percentage of retail sales, more returns will be coming back.

“In 2018, it will be somewhere in the area of $400 billion worth of inventory … with $90 [billion] to $95 billion returned post-holiday,” he said.

In the next several years, as e-commerce grows globally, “the amount of returns is going to be over a trillion dollars a year,” Tobin Moore, CEO and co-founder of reverse logistics technology company Optoro, said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: courtney reagan, amanda lasky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trilliondollar, try, online, fix, returned, return, billion, returns, finding, rates, sales, retails, problem, sobie, retailers


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Despite years of recovery, Italy’s bank problems are still not solved

Italian banks have gone through mergers, fund-raising measures and a great deal of effort to reduce the level of their bad loans since the euro zone sovereign debt crisis of 2011. But despite these endeavors, onlookers still see the sector as the biggest problem for Italy’s economy. This means the banks are now in a much healthier position to absorb potential losses with larger capital buffers. This was one of the ways the region dealt with many structural issues that the debt crisis revealed. H


Italian banks have gone through mergers, fund-raising measures and a great deal of effort to reduce the level of their bad loans since the euro zone sovereign debt crisis of 2011. But despite these endeavors, onlookers still see the sector as the biggest problem for Italy’s economy. This means the banks are now in a much healthier position to absorb potential losses with larger capital buffers. This was one of the ways the region dealt with many structural issues that the debt crisis revealed. H
Despite years of recovery, Italy’s bank problems are still not solved Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: silvia amaro, stocknshares, getty images, alessia pierdomenico, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, banks, problems, solved, issues, capital, italian, debt, crisis, italys, zone, problem, bank, deal, recovery, despite


Despite years of recovery, Italy's bank problems are still not solved

Italian banks have gone through mergers, fund-raising measures and a great deal of effort to reduce the level of their bad loans since the euro zone sovereign debt crisis of 2011.

But despite these endeavors, onlookers still see the sector as the biggest problem for Italy’s economy.

“The big picture is that they have strengthened their balance sheets over the past few years, but they remain perhaps Italy’s weakest link,” Jack Allen, a senior European economist at Capital Economics, told CNBC via email.

The Italian banking system, on average, has increased its common equity tier 1 ratio from 6.9 percent in 2008 to 14.3 percent in 2017, according to analysis from the macroeconomic research firm. This means the banks are now in a much healthier position to absorb potential losses with larger capital buffers.

This was one of the ways the region dealt with many structural issues that the debt crisis revealed. However, more recently and on top of these legacy issues, Italian lenders have had to deal with another kind of problem: politics.

A general election in March last year showed strong public support for populist parties and, after months of uncertainty and intense negotiations, an anti-establishment coalition government came to power in June.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: silvia amaro, stocknshares, getty images, alessia pierdomenico, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, banks, problems, solved, issues, capital, italian, debt, crisis, italys, zone, problem, bank, deal, recovery, despite


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Apple has a China problem and an innovation problem, says Recode’s Kara Swisher

Swisher: Where are the exciting new products coming out of Apple? 11 Hours Ago | 09:56China may be Apple’s biggest problem right now, but a lack of innovation isn’t far behind, said Recode’s Kara Swisher. “Obviously, China’s at the top of the line,” Swisher told CNBC’s “Fast Money” in a phone interview on Wednesday, after Apple cut its first-quarter revenue guidance. But in addition to economic challenges, Apple also has to contend with issues surrounding the development of new products and serv


Swisher: Where are the exciting new products coming out of Apple? 11 Hours Ago | 09:56China may be Apple’s biggest problem right now, but a lack of innovation isn’t far behind, said Recode’s Kara Swisher. “Obviously, China’s at the top of the line,” Swisher told CNBC’s “Fast Money” in a phone interview on Wednesday, after Apple cut its first-quarter revenue guidance. But in addition to economic challenges, Apple also has to contend with issues surrounding the development of new products and serv
Apple has a China problem and an innovation problem, says Recode’s Kara Swisher Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-02  Authors: elizabeth gurdus, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interview, china, products, problem, economic, apple, recodes, exciting, innovation, kara, swisher, cut, revenue, told


Apple has a China problem and an innovation problem, says Recode's Kara Swisher

Swisher: Where are the exciting new products coming out of Apple? 11 Hours Ago | 09:56

China may be Apple’s biggest problem right now, but a lack of innovation isn’t far behind, said Recode’s Kara Swisher.

“Obviously, China’s at the top of the line,” Swisher told CNBC’s “Fast Money” in a phone interview on Wednesday, after Apple cut its first-quarter revenue guidance. “One of the successes of Apple was being successful in China, and so they’re seeing the downside of a market that’s contracting there.”

In CEO Tim Cook’s letter to shareholders, Apple slashed its revenue estimate to $84 billion, down from the $89 to $93 billion it had previously projected. It also cut its gross margin expectations to about 38 percent from between 38 percent and 38.5 percent.

Cook said the problems were weakness in China and fewer upgrades than expected to new iPhone models in other countries. He told CNBC’s Josh Lipton in an interview that U.S.-China trade disputes were likely exacerbating China’s economic issues.

Apple shares sank more than 7.5 percent in after-hours trading.

But in addition to economic challenges, Apple also has to contend with issues surrounding the development of new products and services.

“The innovation cycle has slowed down at Apple,” Swisher said. “Where is their exciting new product and where are their exciting new entrepreneurs within that company?”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-02  Authors: elizabeth gurdus, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interview, china, products, problem, economic, apple, recodes, exciting, innovation, kara, swisher, cut, revenue, told


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