6 signs you’re way more productive than the average person

If you consider yourself to be someone who is easily overwhelmed with work, you’re in good company. And that’s understandable, especially with all of the everyday office distractions. A 2018 study from the workplace learning platform Udemy revealed the biggest workplace distractions that harm employee productivity. If you identify with any of the tendencies below, be assured that you’re a lot more productive than your peers. You avoid context-switchingContext-switching is when you stop what you’


If you consider yourself to be someone who is easily overwhelmed with work, you’re in good company. And that’s understandable, especially with all of the everyday office distractions. A 2018 study from the workplace learning platform Udemy revealed the biggest workplace distractions that harm employee productivity. If you identify with any of the tendencies below, be assured that you’re a lot more productive than your peers. You avoid context-switchingContext-switching is when you stop what you’
6 signs you’re way more productive than the average person Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: benjamin spall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, average, distractions, productive, person, workplace, work, slack, office, signs, youre, productivity, working, task, way


6 signs you're way more productive than the average person

On a scale of one to 10, how would you rate your level of productivity? If you consider yourself to be someone who is easily overwhelmed with work, you’re in good company. In the current “always on” work culture, even the most productive people feel like they don’t accomplish much on a daily. And that’s understandable, especially with all of the everyday office distractions. A 2018 study from the workplace learning platform Udemy revealed the biggest workplace distractions that harm employee productivity. The team collected data from more than 1,000 working Americans (ages 18 or older) and found that the biggest distractions and productivity killers were colleague interruptions (80%), office noise (70%) and smartphones (65%). The good news is that you might be more skilled at managing your time than you realize. If you identify with any of the tendencies below, be assured that you’re a lot more productive than your peers.

1. You have a strategy for dealing with offline interruptions

Interruptions from colleagues and general office noise (i.e. printers, phones and outside sirens) were cited as the top two causes of workplace disruptions, according to the Udemy study. If you’ve developed strategies for how to deal with this, you’re already ahead of the game. These might range from wearing noise-canceling headphones to making it a habit to step outside once or twice a day to reset your focus. It also helps to have places in mind where you can retreat to if the interruptions become too unbearable. This might be a home office, coffee shop, library or even a private meeting room in your office that you can book. The most productive people also know how to set boundaries with their colleagues and aren’t afraid to say things like, “Sorry, I’m in the middle of something right now. Can I get back to you later?”

2. You’re rarely surprised by how fast time has gone by

Have you ever had to look something up on Google Maps for work only to find yourself, 20 minutes later, with a dozen browser tabs open as you try in vain to find the best pizza spot in town? It happens to the best of us. Productive people keep track of time — not in an obsessive way, but they often monitor how long they’re spending on a certain task to see if they need to speed up or start wrapping up and moving on to the next project.

We’re all human, so we have a tendency to procrastinate at every chance we get, but there are many helpful tools out there to help us manage every minute of our day, including website blockers that disable access to distracting websites.

3. You limit your communication channels

These days, there are more than enough ways in which anyone can get in contact with us at any time. From phone calls to text messages, emails to Slack notifications and Twitter DMs to Instagram comments, that’s a lot to stay on top of. The key to not letting all these communication channels distract you is to simply limit your access to them. If you’re the type to get frustrated with never-ending Slack notifications and prefer to do work communication over email, there’s no shame in being direct with your colleagues. In fact, most of them will appreciate your candidness. No one likes to sit around waiting and wondering why you haven’t responded to the Slack message they sent two hours ago.

4. You prioritize your daily, and weekly tasks

In his book, “Deep Work: Rules for Staying Focused Success in a Distracted World,” Cal Newport, an associate professor of computer science at Georgetown University, notes that most people simply don’t know how to prioritize efficiently. On either Sunday night or Monday morning, review your tasks for the week ahead and see if the timeline makes sense. If one task is more important and may take you longer to complete, consider moving it to an earlier day in the week. Then, repeat the process at the end of each workday. Keep in mind that urgent requests may come up, and a task you thought would take just a half hour could end up taking three.

5. You avoid context-switching

Context-switching is when you stop what you’re working on to check your email or text messages for just a few minutes, then get back to what you were previously working on. This tendency can be a threat to your productivity: Each time you switch from one thing to another (before making progress on either), you experience a “transaction cost,” which drains your energy and slows you down.

6. You get enough sleep


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: benjamin spall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, average, distractions, productive, person, workplace, work, slack, office, signs, youre, productivity, working, task, way


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Why you shouldn’t hate on the millennial that wears headphones at work

In the era of open-office floor plans designed to increase collaboration at the expense of privacy, more workers are finding a new space for isolation — headphones. “I listen to music on my headphones because it helps me drown out noise and distractions in the office,” said Reichert. Experts say that contrary to concerns about fostering a team environment, listening to music at work may make workers more productive. The company polled more than 1,000 workers in an office environment and found th


In the era of open-office floor plans designed to increase collaboration at the expense of privacy, more workers are finding a new space for isolation — headphones. “I listen to music on my headphones because it helps me drown out noise and distractions in the office,” said Reichert. Experts say that contrary to concerns about fostering a team environment, listening to music at work may make workers more productive. The company polled more than 1,000 workers in an office environment and found th
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: caroline gao, special to cnbccom, luis alvarez, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shouldnt, workers, environment, study, millennial, listening, openoffice, headphones, wears, work, music, productive, hate, say, professionals


Why you shouldn't hate on the millennial that wears headphones at work

In the era of open-office floor plans designed to increase collaboration at the expense of privacy, more workers are finding a new space for isolation — headphones.

Such is the case with Christopher Reichert, android software developer at OfferUp, a company that has fully adapted the open-concept workspace. “I listen to music on my headphones because it helps me drown out noise and distractions in the office,” said Reichert.

“While I like working in an open-office environment because it make spontaneous collaboration easier, more distractions can happen both because of noise and because it’s easier for people to start conversations and pull you away from what you’re trying to focus on,” he said.

Experts say that contrary to concerns about fostering a team environment, listening to music at work may make workers more productive.

A study conducted by the staffing firm Accountemps, a subsidiary of global human resources firm Robert Half, found that an increasing number of professionals like listening to music at work and are actually more productive when they do so. The company polled more than 1,000 workers in an office environment and found that 85% like listening to music. In particular, the study found that 71% of professionals say they feel more productive when listening to music.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: caroline gao, special to cnbccom, luis alvarez, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shouldnt, workers, environment, study, millennial, listening, openoffice, headphones, wears, work, music, productive, hate, say, professionals


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US, China resume trade talks in Beijing after ‘productive working dinner’

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday he had a “productive working dinner” the previous night in Beijing, kicking off a day of talks aimed at resolving the bitter trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies. Mnuchin did not elaborate and it was not immediately clear with whom he had dined on Thursday night. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said the United States may drop some tariffs if a trade deal is reached while keeping others in place to ensure Beijing’s


U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday he had a “productive working dinner” the previous night in Beijing, kicking off a day of talks aimed at resolving the bitter trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies. Mnuchin did not elaborate and it was not immediately clear with whom he had dined on Thursday night. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said the United States may drop some tariffs if a trade deal is reached while keeping others in place to ensure Beijing’s
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: lucy nicholson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productive, talks, resume, tariffs, beijing, dinner, washington, chinese, transfer, united, china, technology, trade, working


US, China resume trade talks in Beijing after 'productive working dinner'

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday he had a “productive working dinner” the previous night in Beijing, kicking off a day of talks aimed at resolving the bitter trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies.

Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer were in the Chinese capital for the first face-to-face meetings between the two sides in weeks after missing an initial end-of-March goal for a summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping to sign a pact.

“We had a very productive working dinner last night, and we are looking forward to meeting today,” Mnuchin said as he left his hotel to meet with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, who is due to visit Washington next week to continue the talks.

Mnuchin did not elaborate and it was not immediately clear with whom he had dined on Thursday night.

Trump imposed tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese imports last year in a move to force China to change the way it does business with the rest of the world and to pry open more of China’s economy to U.S. companies.

On Thursday, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said Beijing will sharply expand market access for foreign banks and securities and insurance companies, adding to speculation that China may soon announce new rules to allow foreign financial firms to increase their presence at home.

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said the United States may drop some tariffs if a trade deal is reached while keeping others in place to ensure Beijing’s compliance.

“We’re not going to give up our leverage,” he told reporters in Washington on Thursday.

Mnuchin and Lighthizer greeted a waiting Liu at the Diaoyutai State Guest House just before 9 a.m. (0100) on Friday for what China’s Commerce Ministry has said would be a full day of talks.

Among Trump’s demands are for Beijing to end practices that Washington alleges result in the systematic theft of U.S. intellectual property and the forced transfer of American technology to Chinese companies.

U.S. companies say they are often pressured into handing over technological know-how to Chinese joint venture partners, local officials or regulators as a condition for doing business in China.

The U.S. government says that technology is often subsequently transferred to and used by Chinese competitors.

The issue has proved a tough one for negotiators as U.S. officials say China has previously refused to acknowledge the problem exists to the extent alleged by the United States, making discussing a resolution difficult.

China says it has no technology transfer requirements enshrined in its laws and any such transfers are a result of legitimate transactions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: lucy nicholson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productive, talks, resume, tariffs, beijing, dinner, washington, chinese, transfer, united, china, technology, trade, working


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Mnuchin hopes for ‘productive’ US-China trade meetings in Beijing

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Wednesday he hopes for “productive” trade meetings in China this week, as the two countries seek to hammer out an agreement amid a festering dispute that has seen both level tariffs at each other. Mnuchin, asked by reporters as he left his Beijing hotel what his hopes were for the visit, said “productive meetings”. He did not elaborate. Mnuchin, along with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, arrived in the Chinese capital on Tuesday. Trump’


U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Wednesday he hopes for “productive” trade meetings in China this week, as the two countries seek to hammer out an agreement amid a festering dispute that has seen both level tariffs at each other. Mnuchin, asked by reporters as he left his Beijing hotel what his hopes were for the visit, said “productive meetings”. He did not elaborate. Mnuchin, along with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, arrived in the Chinese capital on Tuesday. Trump’
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: evan vucci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, beijing, reporters, productive, president, tariffs, hopes, deal, deadline, mnuchin, meetings, trade, trump, uschina


Mnuchin hopes for 'productive' US-China trade meetings in Beijing

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Wednesday he hopes for “productive” trade meetings in China this week, as the two countries seek to hammer out an agreement amid a festering dispute that has seen both level tariffs at each other.

U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports from China are scheduled to rise to 25 percent from 10 percent if the two sides cannot reach a deal by a March 1 deadline, increasing pain and costs in sectors from consumer electronics to agriculture.

Mnuchin, asked by reporters as he left his Beijing hotel what his hopes were for the visit, said “productive meetings”. He did not elaborate.

Mnuchin, along with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, arrived in the Chinese capital on Tuesday.

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Tuesday that he could let the deadline for a trade agreement “slide for a little while,” but that he would prefer not to and expects to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping to close the deal at some point.

Trump’s advisers have previously described March 1 as a “hard deadline,” but Trump told reporters for the first time that a delay was now possible.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: evan vucci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, beijing, reporters, productive, president, tariffs, hopes, deal, deadline, mnuchin, meetings, trade, trump, uschina


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Steven Mnuchin says trade talks ‘very productive’ so far, confirms he’s headed to Beijing next week

Mnuchin said the administration had “very productive meetings” with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He. The White House has set a March 2 deadline to iron out myriad issues with Chinese over trade. “We are trying to reach a comprehensive agreement on a long range of issues,” Mnuchin told CNBC. Mnuchin will be part of a delegation that heads to Beijing in hopes of resolving the remaining issues. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is expected to lead the negotiations with help from Mnuchin and o


Mnuchin said the administration had “very productive meetings” with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He. The White House has set a March 2 deadline to iron out myriad issues with Chinese over trade. “We are trying to reach a comprehensive agreement on a long range of issues,” Mnuchin told CNBC. Mnuchin will be part of a delegation that heads to Beijing in hopes of resolving the remaining issues. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is expected to lead the negotiations with help from Mnuchin and o
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, far, trade, confirms, deal, productive, issues, steven, mnuchin, headed, chinese, week, china, administration, deadline, working, talks, hes


Steven Mnuchin says trade talks 'very productive' so far, confirms he's headed to Beijing next week

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin expressed confidence on Wednesday in the progress of trade talks with China and said he and a U.S. delegation are heading to China next week with the intent to make a deal before a March deadline.

“We are committed to continue these talks,” Mnuchin said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “We’re putting in an enormous amount of effort to hit this deadline and get a deal. That’s our objective.”

Mnuchin said the administration had “very productive meetings” with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He.

The White House has set a March 2 deadline to iron out myriad issues with Chinese over trade.

In particular, the administration is looking for concessions on the ability of U.S. companies to sell in China, to stop the theft of intellectual property and other structural issues.

A tit-for-tat trade war last year saw the U.S. slap a barrage of tariffs on Chinese imports, prompting retaliation against a list of American goods. The sides suspended the tariffs in hopes of working out a long-range deal. President Donald Trump recently said he expects “a very big deal” to happen soon on trade.

“We are trying to reach a comprehensive agreement on a long range of issues,” Mnuchin told CNBC. “The good news is we have been talking about these issues over the last year.”

Mnuchin will be part of a delegation that heads to Beijing in hopes of resolving the remaining issues. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is expected to lead the negotiations with help from Mnuchin and other administration officials.

J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon said at the World Economic Forum in Davos two weeks ago that he expects at the least an extension of the tariff deadline as negotiations progress.

“I don’t think it would be productive to speculate on the outlook, because we have a lot of work left to do,” Mnuchin told CNBC.

“There are a wide range of issue we’re working on around the clock,” he added. “If we can’t get to the deadline, it’s not because we haven’t been working around the clock.”

Mnuchin also described the U.S. economy as “still very strong” and said a meeting this week between Trump and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell was “quite productive.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: jeff cox
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Trump teases ‘important announcements’ as he touts ‘very productive’ China trade talks

President Donald Trump on Tuesday hinted at “important announcements” regarding his administration’s high-stakes trade talks with China. Trump tweeted last week that China had agreed to slash the tariffs, although the Chinese government did not confirm or deny it at the time. According to The Wall Street Journal, which cited Chinese officials, Chinese President Xi Jinping has told senior members of his government to follow through on his recent agreement with Trump. The U.S. and China have resta


President Donald Trump on Tuesday hinted at “important announcements” regarding his administration’s high-stakes trade talks with China. Trump tweeted last week that China had agreed to slash the tariffs, although the Chinese government did not confirm or deny it at the time. According to The Wall Street Journal, which cited Chinese officials, Chinese President Xi Jinping has told senior members of his government to follow through on his recent agreement with Trump. The U.S. and China have resta
Trump teases ‘important announcements’ as he touts ‘very productive’ China trade talks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, trade, xi, china, teases, tariffs, announcements, chinese, touts, productive, president, truce, talks, trump, important


Trump teases 'important announcements' as he touts 'very productive' China trade talks

President Donald Trump on Tuesday hinted at “important announcements” regarding his administration’s high-stakes trade talks with China.

“Very productive conversations going on with China! Watch for some important announcements!” the president tweeted.

Trump’s optimistic tweet came soon after Bloomberg News reported that China’s government would consider slashing tariffs on U.S. car imports to 15 percent from 40 percent. Auto stocks jumped on the news in premarket trading. Overall, stocks pointed to a higher open as markets looked to bounce back from last week’s rout.

Trump tweeted last week that China had agreed to slash the tariffs, although the Chinese government did not confirm or deny it at the time. In July, China cut tariffs on auto imports to 15 percent from 25 percent, but then soon hiked duties on U.S.-made cars to 40 percent as retaliation for the Trump administration’s aggressive trade moves.

Other signs of potential progress emerged Tuesday. According to The Wall Street Journal, which cited Chinese officials, Chinese President Xi Jinping has told senior members of his government to follow through on his recent agreement with Trump. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer are the main U.S. negotiators in calls with Chinese negotiators.

The U.S. and China have restarted trade negotiations after Trump and Xi reached a truce in their nations’ escalating trade war. The two leaders spoke during a working dinner at the G-20 summit in Argentina on Dec. 1.

As part of the truce, the U.S. and China agreed to a 90-day window to negotiate some significant sticking points between the world’s two largest economies. As part of the interim agreement, Trump said he would hold off on boosting tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods to 25 percent from 10 percent.

Trump’s tweet Tuesday also came during the battle over a Chinese executive who was arrested in Canada, the same day Trump and Xi dined in Argentina, and faces extradition to the United States. Meng Wanzhou, CFO of Chinese telecom giant Huawei, is being held by Canadian authorities in a case related to the company’s alleged sale of equipment containing U.S. components to Iran in violation of international sanctions on the Islamic Republic.

There are concerns that the Huawei case could upset the delicate but broad trade talks between the U.S. and China, although the renewed talks and Trump’s claims indicate it has yet to disrupt the negotiations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: mike calia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, trade, xi, china, teases, tariffs, announcements, chinese, touts, productive, president, truce, talks, trump, important


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Dr. Oz shares the morning routine that keeps him productive all day

Mehmet Oz — famously known as Dr. Oz — dishes out health and wellness advice every day on “The Dr. Oz Show.” With so much going on, he maintains a consistent morning routine to prepare for a productive day. Dr. Oz calls his morning routine “classic,” because he says he never changes anything or mixes it up. “It’s the same morning, every morning, that way I don’t have to reinvent the wheel,” Dr. Oz tells CNBC Make It. Typically, if he’s shooting his daily talk show, Dr. Oz wakes up at 6 a.m., and


Mehmet Oz — famously known as Dr. Oz — dishes out health and wellness advice every day on “The Dr. Oz Show.” With so much going on, he maintains a consistent morning routine to prepare for a productive day. Dr. Oz calls his morning routine “classic,” because he says he never changes anything or mixes it up. “It’s the same morning, every morning, that way I don’t have to reinvent the wheel,” Dr. Oz tells CNBC Make It. Typically, if he’s shooting his daily talk show, Dr. Oz wakes up at 6 a.m., and
Dr. Oz shares the morning routine that keeps him productive all day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dr, decisions, oz, going, shares, chi, breakfast, morning, routine, productive, keeps, dont, day


Dr. Oz shares the morning routine that keeps him productive all day

Mehmet Oz — famously known as Dr. Oz — dishes out health and wellness advice every day on “The Dr. Oz Show.” He also still works as a physician at NY Presbyterian-Columbia Medical Center, performing dozens of heart operations annually. With so much going on, he maintains a consistent morning routine to prepare for a productive day.

Dr. Oz calls his morning routine “classic,” because he says he never changes anything or mixes it up.

“It’s the same morning, every morning, that way I don’t have to reinvent the wheel,” Dr. Oz tells CNBC Make It. “It’s one of the ways I remind myself that I control some parts of my world.”

Typically, if he’s shooting his daily talk show, Dr. Oz wakes up at 6 a.m., and heads to the studio in New York City. On set, Dr. Oz goes through script rehearsals from 7 to 8:30 a.m. while munching on his breakfast.

“My breakfast is a small cup of Greek yogurt with some blackberries put into it, and I don’t change that,” Dr. Oz says.

“Our ability to make decisions is limited, and so you have a certain amount of chi energy that you can make decisions with. Don’t waste it in the morning figuring out what you’re having for breakfast.” (In Chinese philosophy, chi is a kind of vital life force.)

Indeed, other successful moguls and leaders follow the same strategy: Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been known to often wear the same kind of gray t-shirts to avoid decision fatigue, and Barack Obama has said when he was president he would usually wear gray or blue suits to cut down the number of decisions he had to make in a day.

After his breakfast, if he’s on-set, Oz rehearses and tapes his show.

Dr. Oz tells CNBC Make It his afternoons are not as structured and they vary from meetings, to seeing patients at the hospital to juggling his many other responsibilities.

But one thing is for sure, says Dr. Oz: “Whatever’s going on, whatever issues are going that I have to be creative on, I have the chi to get through the rest of the day, because I didn’t waste all of my energy in the morning.

Snacks help with productivity too, so he always them on hand.

“Just in case, I always have nuts in my pockets,” Oz says. “I like almonds, cashews and hazelnuts and walnuts…they give your body nutrients so that you can actually take those energies from the trees and put them in your own body, and that’s what you need in order to make wise decisions.”

Don’t miss: This is John Legend’s morning routine — including his unusual breakfast

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: sarah berger
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You switch tasks every 40 seconds, productivity expert says—here are his 5 tips for staying focused

You focus on one thing for 40 seconds, on average, before getting distracted and moving on to something else. It also takes you an average of 25 minutes to resume working on that original task. All of this is according to productivity expert Chris Bailey, who is the author of the recently released book “Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distractions.” Non-stop technology distractions that include email, social media and Slack messaging alerts makes staying focused on one task m


You focus on one thing for 40 seconds, on average, before getting distracted and moving on to something else. It also takes you an average of 25 minutes to resume working on that original task. All of this is according to productivity expert Chris Bailey, who is the author of the recently released book “Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distractions.” Non-stop technology distractions that include email, social media and Slack messaging alerts makes staying focused on one task m
You switch tasks every 40 seconds, productivity expert says—here are his 5 tips for staying focused Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: courtney connley, getty images, compassionate eye foundation morsa images, digitalvision, peopleimages
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tasks, thing, productive, 40, productivity, expert, takes, seconds, minutes, distractions, sayshere, focused, wired, switch, task, bailey, world, staying, tips


You switch tasks every 40 seconds, productivity expert says—here are his 5 tips for staying focused

You focus on one thing for 40 seconds, on average, before getting distracted and moving on to something else. When this happens, it takes you 50 percent longer to complete your work, compared to when you stick to one task from start to finish without interruption. It also takes you an average of 25 minutes to resume working on that original task.

All of this is according to productivity expert Chris Bailey, who is the author of the recently released book “Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distractions.” For a year, Bailey ran a productivity project where he conducted intense research on how we can be as productive as possible in a world full of technology.

“The fascinating thing that I discovered about our attention is that we are wired to be distracted,” he tells CNBC Make It. “We are wired to pay attention to anything that is pleasurable, threatening or novel. And this has actually served us pretty well up until this point in our evolution.”

Non-stop technology distractions that include email, social media and Slack messaging alerts makes staying focused on one task more and more difficult.

But, according to Bailey, for every minute you spend taming the many workplace distractions you face, you gain an extra 10 minutes in productivity.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: courtney connley, getty images, compassionate eye foundation morsa images, digitalvision, peopleimages
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tasks, thing, productive, 40, productivity, expert, takes, seconds, minutes, distractions, sayshere, focused, wired, switch, task, bailey, world, staying, tips


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Stella & Dot CEO: Here’s what to say when a guy is mansplaining you

Here’s another short script that Herrin suggests women can use in these one-on-one discussions: “You talked over me, and it made me feel bad and undervalued. What would be more productive for me is if we got to share the air. Granted, you never know how the man might react to that conversation, but women shouldn’t shy away from those difficult moments, Herrin said. Don’t miss:LearnVest CEO: Being your own boss is ‘like getting punched in the face every day’SoulCycle CEO on her college wake-up ca


Here’s another short script that Herrin suggests women can use in these one-on-one discussions: “You talked over me, and it made me feel bad and undervalued. What would be more productive for me is if we got to share the air. Granted, you never know how the man might react to that conversation, but women shouldn’t shy away from those difficult moments, Herrin said. Don’t miss:LearnVest CEO: Being your own boss is ‘like getting punched in the face every day’SoulCycle CEO on her college wake-up ca
Stella & Dot CEO: Here’s what to say when a guy is mansplaining you Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-09  Authors: adam bryant, marla aufmuth, getty images entertainment, getty images, ari perilstein
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, leader, stella, let, mansplaining, heres, guy, productive, meeting, ceo, women, thing, dot, share, wouldnt, herrin


Stella & Dot CEO: Here's what to say when a guy is mansplaining you

Here’s another short script that Herrin suggests women can use in these one-on-one discussions: “You talked over me, and it made me feel bad and undervalued. What would be more productive for me is if we got to share the air. How about next time you let me lead? Wouldn’t this company be more productive if everybody got to speak at the meeting, and wouldn’t you be a hero for being a person who showed that you were a leader who let other people be heard?”

Granted, you never know how the man might react to that conversation, but women shouldn’t shy away from those difficult moments, Herrin said.

“Confrontation is not a bad thing when it comes to direct communication with candor,” she added. “You can be candid and kind at the same time. And to advance women in the workplace, women have to recognize that there should be nothing controversial or negative with directly communicating and giving real-time feedback on how productive a meeting was.”

“And if you can share how you feel so that you’re speaking from a place of inarguable truth rather than accusation, the other person’s going to be a lot more open-minded. They’re going to respect you.”

Adam Bryant is a CNBC contributor and managing director of Merryck & Co., a senior leadership development and executive mentoring firm. A veteran journalist, Bryant interviewed more than 500 leaders for the “Corner Office” feature he created at The New York Times. Check out more interviews in the Two Questions series, as well as CNBC’s ongoing coverage of women in business, Closing The Gap. Parts of this interview were edited for clarity and space.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-09  Authors: adam bryant, marla aufmuth, getty images entertainment, getty images, ari perilstein
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, leader, stella, let, mansplaining, heres, guy, productive, meeting, ceo, women, thing, dot, share, wouldnt, herrin


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Richard Branson believes the key to success is a three-day workweek

Hard work is key, but enjoying what you do and having fun is just as crucial, said the adventurous, fun-loving founder of Virgin. “It’s easier to attract top talent when you are open and flexible,” Branson said in a recent blog post. “Many people out there would love three-day or even four-day weekends,” said Branson. His businesses serve 53 million customers, employ 69,000 people in 53 countries and reaps nearly $22 billion in annual revenue. When Branson isn’t focusing on growing the Virgin bu


Hard work is key, but enjoying what you do and having fun is just as crucial, said the adventurous, fun-loving founder of Virgin. “It’s easier to attract top talent when you are open and flexible,” Branson said in a recent blog post. “Many people out there would love three-day or even four-day weekends,” said Branson. His businesses serve 53 million customers, employ 69,000 people in 53 countries and reaps nearly $22 billion in annual revenue. When Branson isn’t focusing on growing the Virgin bu
Richard Branson believes the key to success is a three-day workweek Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-12  Authors: barbara booth, -richard branson, founder of virgin group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threeday, technology, businesses, success, productive, fun, love, flexible, branson, richard, believes, leaders, key, workweek, work, virgin


Richard Branson believes the key to success is a three-day workweek

Billionaire Richard Branson is pushing business leaders to embrace the idea of flexible work arrangements, claiming that with today’s cutting-edge technology, there is no reason people can’t work less hours and be equally — if not more — effective.

Hard work is key, but enjoying what you do and having fun is just as crucial, said the adventurous, fun-loving founder of Virgin. In his international best seller “The Virgin Way: If It’s Not Fun, It’s Not Worth Doing,” he wrote that “fun is one of the most important — and underrated — ingredients in any successful venture.”

Branson often touts the importance of relaxing, recharging and reconnecting with the people you love and believes flexible working allows Virgin’s staff to find a better balance between their work and private lives. “Through this balance they become happier and more productive,” he said.

Virgin offers its employees unlimited leave and a work-from-home option. “It’s easier to attract top talent when you are open and flexible,” Branson said in a recent blog post. “It’s not effective or productive to force them to behave in a conventional way.”

And he believes advances in technology fully supports the transition.

Instead of fearing robots will take over jobs, he says technology should be embraced, because innovation is making it possible to do more work in less time, which means employees should be free to have more personal time to do the things they want to do.

“Many people out there would love three-day or even four-day weekends,” said Branson. “Everyone would welcome more time to spend with their loved ones, more time to get fit and healthy, more time to explore the world.”

The billionaire knows a thing or two about balancing work and family life. Virgin Group, his venture capital investment firm, has an interest in more than 60 businesses, from trains and planes to spaceships and tech. His businesses serve 53 million customers, employ 69,000 people in 53 countries and reaps nearly $22 billion in annual revenue. When Branson isn’t focusing on growing the Virgin businesses, he’s meeting with world leaders about global issues through his philanthropic arm, Virgin Unite.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-12  Authors: barbara booth, -richard branson, founder of virgin group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threeday, technology, businesses, success, productive, fun, love, flexible, branson, richard, believes, leaders, key, workweek, work, virgin


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