These 15 cities boast the best 20-year returns on home values

Depending where you live, staying put in your home for the last two decades could be paying off well. As in really well. While the median nationwide home value is about 90% higher now than it was in 1999 — $226,800 compared with about $119,000 — some spots boast values that have jumped far more than that. In some places, the gain is more than 300% or even 400%. However, that doesn’t take into consideration other housing costs that can eat into profits: property taxes, maintenance or improvements


Depending where you live, staying put in your home for the last two decades could be paying off well. As in really well. While the median nationwide home value is about 90% higher now than it was in 1999 — $226,800 compared with about $119,000 — some spots boast values that have jumped far more than that. In some places, the gain is more than 300% or even 400%. However, that doesn’t take into consideration other housing costs that can eat into profits: property taxes, maintenance or improvements
These 15 cities boast the best 20-year returns on home values Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: sarah obrien, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, jim r bounds
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, value, spots, 15, returns, boast, staying, profits, wellwhile, property, thatin, really, values, 20year, taxes, cities


These 15 cities boast the best 20-year returns on home values

Depending where you live, staying put in your home for the last two decades could be paying off well. As in really well.

While the median nationwide home value is about 90% higher now than it was in 1999 — $226,800 compared with about $119,000 — some spots boast values that have jumped far more than that.

In some places, the gain is more than 300% or even 400%. However, that doesn’t take into consideration other housing costs that can eat into profits: property taxes, maintenance or improvements.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: sarah obrien, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, jim r bounds
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, value, spots, 15, returns, boast, staying, profits, wellwhile, property, thatin, really, values, 20year, taxes, cities


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We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said

China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help


China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help
We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here's what they said

China’s President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Nicolas Asfouri | AFP | Getty Images

With trade negotiations between the U.S. and China stalled and an escalating trade war threatening global markets, President Donald Trump has said that the Chinese are “DREAMING” that he will be defeated by a Democrat in 2020. But Democrats have not said much about their own plans for negotiating with the Chinese. To learn more, CNBC asked the 21 top Democrats running for president about their views. We asked them what they believe is working under Trump — and what they would change. We also asked whether human rights issues in China, where the U.S. has said more than a million Muslims are held in concentration camps, should be part of any trade deal. Lastly, we asked about what they would do about China’s efforts to tighten its military grip on the South China Sea, where more than $3 trillion of trade passes annually. Below, unedited, are our questions and the answers we received from the seven Democrats who responded. Those Democrats are Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., Miramar, Florida, Mayor Wayne Messam and spiritual coach Marianne Williamson. Two other Democrats provided partial responses. A spokesperson for Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., provided an excerpt from the senator’s platform that is included as a response to the first question. An aide to Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke wrote in a statement: “Holding China accountable should not come at the expense of American workers. That is why we must not settle for any deal that does not respect intellectual property, level the playing field in the Chinese market, nor end unfair trade practices. We must advance progress based on shared interests and core democratic values.” Joe Biden, the Democratic front runner, did not respond to CNBC’s survey as of publication time but has dismissed China’s economic competitiveness while on the campaign trail, earning some criticism from his fellow contenders. “China is going to eat our lunch? Come on, man,” Biden told a crowd in Iowa earlier this month. He described himself as a “fair trader” and said he has been “arguing for a long time that we should treat other countries the way in which they treat us, which is, particularly as it relates to China: If they want to trade here, they’re going to be under the same rules.” CNBC provided the questions to each campaign on May 6. What do you think is the best approach to addressing China’s practices with regard to intellectual property theft, technology transfer, industrial subsidies and other matters in which the two countries are at odds. Is it through multinational organizations like the World Trade Organization and the United Nations? Will you take any action unilaterally? If so, what action? Sanders: It is in the interests of the United States to work to strengthen institutions like the WTO and the UN rather than trying to go it alone. American concerns about China’s technology practices are shared in Europe and across the Asia-Pacific. We can place far more pressure on China to change its policies if we work together with the broader international community and the other developed economies. International institutions also offer China a template for reforming its own internal intellectual property and industrial practices. Swalwell: I’m a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, as well as of the Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet, so I’ve seen first-hand the economic espionage that China commits and the adverse impact it has on American businesses. China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. Nor is China transparent on its industrial subsidies. Curbing China’s dishonest practices must be a part of any negotiation; as president, I would hold China accountable. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. In order to combat this we must take a multi-pronged approach — both defensive and offensive. We must have a strong enforcement mechanism with which to hold China accountable for their actions and continue to impose penalties when theft occurs. China has made promises to institute reforms of their policies governing IP rights, technology transfers and cyber-theft of trade secrets in the past but we know these are not being imposed. Read more: Eric Swalwell of California joins 2020 presidential race The legal and diplomatic approaches have not been completely effective, it is critical that we implement other actions such as developing early warning systems, particularly when it comes to the stealing of defense technology. This can be done through private-public partnerships. We must also be ready to take counter action when a theft is detected. It is vital that we continue to have a multinational approach to addressing these issues. We can’t go it alone; we must involve allies — and other victims of China’s practices — such as Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

While the U.S. does not have to go through the World Trade Organization and can invoke Section 301 if they are to impose tariffs against China (even though it still has to file a simultaneous complaint with the WTO), the WTO can still be a useful partner. In fact, the WTO has an obligation to enforce the rules they have set up, otherwise it is left to the United States to impose punishment. We should hold the WTO to its obligation. It is also important that U.S. companies acknowledge when theft is occurring by China. In the past, companies have not wanted to impinge on their business with China so they’ve turned a blind eye. I would ensure that reporting this theft it is a win-win for American companies through fair trade practices. Lastly, government departments must coordinate with each other and with U.S. companies. The departments of Commerce and the Treasury, the U.S. Trade Representative and the U.S. State Department must all be aligned to tackle the problem of IP property theft in coordination with the private sector. I would continue to make sure the Justice Department brings criminal cases against the companies that violate trade agreements and steal our trade secrets and intellectual property. I would boost our Trade Representative’s investigation of China’s activities by adding more staff and funding. Ryan: When it comes to China stealing intellectual property from the United States, there is no doubt that multinational organizations need to play a part in holding them accountable. These actions are a serious national security and economic risk for the United States. At the same time, I think our government must take further action when it comes to creating safeguards against China’s actions. That is why I have cosponsored legislation the Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act, which would hold China accountable and create necessary regulations when it comes to trade with China, including prohibiting the sale of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property to China. Read more: Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan — who once tried to take down Nancy Pelosi — is running for president Delaney: China has acted like pirates, stealing intellectual property, building illegal islands, and not playing by the rules. I will build a broad coalition of U.S. allies and have a unified front against China (this will involve working with multinational organizations but also doing a lot more), I will unify our business community against these practices by preventing them from depositing intellectual property funded by taxpayers into joint ventures with China, and I will re-enter the TPP to compete with China. We can hold China accountable and have a productive relationship with them. Read more: What being a successful businessman taught Rep. John Delaney about politics Moulton: These options aren’t mutually exclusive. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. Protecting our international property is a national security issue, and we need to build a cyberwall to protect against Chinese and Russian attacks. We should start by strengthening the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center created under President Obama and improve the information-sharing between the private sector and government on cyber threats. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help American workers. Donald Trump has shown he knows nothing about trade. An initial analysis of the net effect of the tariffs is that they are costing the United States economy $1.4 billion a month, and the cost of the tariffs is being passed on to U.S. farmers, companies, and consumers. Read more: Seth Moulton is the latest Democrat running for president. Here are his biggest policy priorities, from green jobs to a public option The United States led the 15 years of negotiations that enabled China to join the WTO and we should reap the benefits of that successful diplomatic effort. Our negotiators secured unprecedented changes to China’s economic and trade policies as conditions for membership, including requiring a dramatic opening of China’s telecom, banking, and insurance sectors, along with the lowering of tariffs on key agricultural products to almost zero. The point is: WTO leverage works. China’s membership in the WTO has been a huge boon to the United States, with U.S. exports to China increasing by 500 percent and agricultural exports increasing by 1000 percent since China joined the organization. Going forward, the WTO should absolutely be involved in establishing trust in trade negotiations and in providing the mechanisms for the enforcement of trade agreements. Bennet: Instead of slapping tariffs on our allies and perpetrating a trade war, Michael believes we need to do the hard work of building coalitions to counter Chinese predatory economic practices, like intellectual property theft and economic espionage, that harm American workers, businesses, farmers, and ranchers. In order to compete with and counter an increasingly authoritarian China, Michael believes we must reinvest in our alliances, champion democratic values like the rule of law and human rights, and sharpen our efforts to combat technology threats that undermine U.S. economic and national security.

Messam: The strained trade relations between the U.S. and China is a complex issue that should be confronted with a measured and sober disposition. The combined approach of multinational organizations and unilateral action should be leveraged to protect intellectual property, technology assets, and trade secrets. Before engaging trade wars that could have detrimental impacts to American businesses and our economy, we must seek to solve our trade differences diplomatically. Where multinational organization negotiations don’t work, I would seek specific and direct trade remedies not limited to: • tariffs • blockade on imports of stolen intellectual property Read more: Little-known Florida mayor becomes the latest Democrat vying to take on Trump in 2020 Williamson: The United States Intellectual Property is some of the most valued in the world. According to the USTR, by stealing our intellectual property, China costs American businesses between $225 billion and $600 billion annually. We must use all tools at our disposal to ensure China respects intellectual property law. This will include working with and leveraging the power of the international community to make certain that China engages in fair trade. The U.S. government must also enlist the help and cooperation from American businesses to help solve this problem. Increased internal controls, more robust screening and standardized best practices will make it more difficult for Chinese agents to operate. Many opportunities are a matter of simple theft. More diligence will help curb crimes of opportunity. Lastly, a firm no nonsense stance against China on every front will be necessary to send a clear message that these practices won’t be tolerated. Should a trade deal with China address human rights issues? If not, will your administration address human rights in China and, if so, how? Sanders: Yes. Labor protections are very weak in China, and the rights of workers are an essential component of human rights. The Trump administration has proven itself indifferent to labor rights, and apparently would prefer that American workers are reduced to the position of Chinese workers, rather than that labor everywhere enjoy basic protections and strong standard of living. The Trump administration has also done nothing to pressure China over its abhorrent treatment of the Uighur and Tibetan peoples. Future trade negotiations should, for example, target American corporations that contribute surveillance technologies that enable China’s authoritarian practices. Swalwell: Yes, a trade deal must have a component to address human rights activity. We must be a model for the world and call out countries such as China that violate human rights. Ryan: Yes. As the United States negotiates any future trade deal with China, we must address the human rights violations. The actions we have seen from the Chinese government when it comes to the inhumane treatment of the ethnic minorities is inexcusable. And no future trade agreement can ignore these violations. Delaney: Human rights are a priority to the Delaney Administration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, practices, property, running, negotiate, democrats, wto, trade, american, president, asked, theft, rights, heres, intellectual, china, chinas


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Why I’m cashing out of San Francisco’s tech IPO boom and retiring to Hawaii at 42

My wife and I moved to San Francisco in 2001, and after 18 years, we finally decided we’ve had enough. San Francisco has its perks, but once we became parents in 2017, our outlook started to fade. After Uber’s IPO, we believe it’ll be the biggest catalyst for an uptick in San Francisco real estate demand given its estimated $100 billion market capitalization. Real estate arbitrage to the rescueCap rates in San Francisco are roughly 3% to 3.5%. Although $3,500 a month sounds like a lot, it’s stil


My wife and I moved to San Francisco in 2001, and after 18 years, we finally decided we’ve had enough. San Francisco has its perks, but once we became parents in 2017, our outlook started to fade. After Uber’s IPO, we believe it’ll be the biggest catalyst for an uptick in San Francisco real estate demand given its estimated $100 billion market capitalization. Real estate arbitrage to the rescueCap rates in San Francisco are roughly 3% to 3.5%. Although $3,500 a month sounds like a lot, it’s stil
Why I’m cashing out of San Francisco’s tech IPO boom and retiring to Hawaii at 42 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: sam dogen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, estate, im, cashing, 42, real, wife, boom, retiring, hawaii, franciscos, sell, tech, techies, income, francisco, ipo, san


Why I'm cashing out of San Francisco's tech IPO boom and retiring to Hawaii at 42

My wife and I moved to San Francisco in 2001, and after 18 years, we finally decided we’ve had enough. Our plan now is to cash out of the tech IPO boom and move to Hawaii to semi-retire in our early 40s. San Francisco has its perks, but once we became parents in 2017, our outlook started to fade. For starters, San Francisco has the lowest percentage of kids in the U.S., which means fewer family-friendly places, fewer first-time parents to interact with and fewer kids for our son to play with. The public school system starting in kindergarten is based on a lottery system, so even if you pay property taxes, your child is not guaranteed a spot in your neighborhood schools. Most parents are forced to pay big bucks to send their kids to private school, but even paying $30,000 or more doesn’t guarantee your child admission into the top-rated private schools. We feel a tremendous burden to keep working so we can earn higher salaries only to keep up with the city’s rising costs. That said, the only way to break free from this trap is to sell during the tech IPO boom.

Our priority is to reduce our ownership burden in California by as much as possible. While my wife and I aren’t “techies,” we do own several assets that techies may want to buy. A two-bedroom, two-bathroom park view condo in Pacific Heights: In 2003, at 26, I purchased my first property for $580,500. To come up with the down payment, I had saved 50% of my salary and 100% of my bonus each year from ages 22 to 26. My base ranged from $40,000 to $80,000 during this time period.

A four-bedroom, three-bathroom home in the Marina District: In 2005, my girlfriend and I rented out our Pacific Heights property and bought a single family home for $1.5 million. It took everything I had to come up with the $304,000 down payment and closing costs. I actually had to get a bridge loan from my grandfather for two months because the house was for sale in December, and I wasn’t going to get paid my bonus until February.

A two-bedroom, two-bathroom vacation home in Lake Tahoe: In 2007, we purchased a Squaw Valley vacation property for $715,000. I thought I was getting a good deal because the seller had purchased it for $820,000 a year prior. Unfortunately, over the next several years, the property lost half its value due to the housing crisis. Our goal is to sell the properties during the tech IPO boom. So far, Lyft, Pinterest and Zoom have all successfully gone public. After Uber’s IPO, we believe it’ll be the biggest catalyst for an uptick in San Francisco real estate demand given its estimated $100 billion market capitalization.

While my wife and I aren’t ‘techies,’ we do own several assets that techies may want to buy.

If we’re able to sell to one of the newly minted tech millionaires once their six-month lockup period is over, we would reinvest the proceeds into various passive income investments such as dividend stocks, short-term treasury bonds, venture debt and private equity.

Real estate arbitrage to the rescue

Cap rates in San Francisco are roughly 3% to 3.5%. Owning investment property in San Francisco is mostly about capital appreciation, not income generation. One could easily earn a risk-free 2.5% per year by investing in three-month treasury bonds today. Here’s our strategy: Sell our Lake Tahoe (estimated value: $450,000) and Pacific Heights (estimated value: $1,300,000) properties. After paying fees and taxes, we should have about $1,500,000 in net proceeds to reinvest.

Reinvest 50% of the proceeds in AA-rated Hawaii municipal bonds once we move there. This will generate a tax-free yield of $22,500 (or 3%) per year in tax-free income.

Invest the other $750,000 in real estate crowdfunding and and public REITs to take advantage of much lower valuations and much higher cap rates in the heartland of America. The heartland is seeing an influx of residents from expensive coastal city residents who realize they no longer need to be stuck paying $4,500 per month for rent or $1,500,000 for a median-priced home. With a target 10% annual return due to much higher cap rates in heartland real estate, I expect the $750,000 invested in real estate crowdfunding to generate roughly $75,000 a year in gross income. In other words, instead of generating only $50,000 a year in gross income a year from my existing San Francisco and Lake Tahoe properties, I could generate an equivalent of roughly $105,000 a year in gross income from the combination of municipal bonds and real estate crowdfunding. A 6% blended return on the gross capital base with no maintenance or tenant issues sounds much better to me. As of now, our retirement income currently stands as follows. By selling one or two of our rental properties, we hope to simplify life and boost our retirement income further.

Honolulu over San Francisco

My goal is to retire sometime this year, right after I hit my 42nd birthday. My parents, currently living in Honolulu, are in their 70s. If we don’t move now, I know I’ll regret not spending more time with them later on. When we move to Honolulu, I plan to continue running Financial Samurai, the personal finance site I started in 2009. My wife and I will also be working on the third edition of our severance negotiation book, “How To Engineer Your Layoff: Make a Small Fortune by Saying Goodbye.”

Although $3,500 a month sounds like a lot, it’s still $2,000 (or 40%) less than what we spend on housing here in San Francisco.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: sam dogen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, estate, im, cashing, 42, real, wife, boom, retiring, hawaii, franciscos, sell, tech, techies, income, francisco, ipo, san


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NY state bill could bring bigger tax bite to golf clubs, including Trump’s Briarcliff course

Two Democratic lawmakers in New York state proposed legislation that could take a financial bite out of private golf clubs, including Trump National Golf Club Westchester in Briarcliff Manor. The legislation would allow local assessment of golf courses based on the “highest and best use rather than its current use.” A rally was held Sunday outside Trump National’s Briarcliff golf club where about 45 supporters gathered. “Right now, unfortunately, we have a few golf courses that are taking advant


Two Democratic lawmakers in New York state proposed legislation that could take a financial bite out of private golf clubs, including Trump National Golf Club Westchester in Briarcliff Manor. The legislation would allow local assessment of golf courses based on the “highest and best use rather than its current use.” A rally was held Sunday outside Trump National’s Briarcliff golf club where about 45 supporters gathered. “Right now, unfortunately, we have a few golf courses that are taking advant
NY state bill could bring bigger tax bite to golf clubs, including Trump’s Briarcliff course Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, state, tax, bring, clubs, legislation, club, course, briarcliff, courses, york, property, trumps, golf, including, trump, ny


NY state bill could bring bigger tax bite to golf clubs, including Trump's Briarcliff course

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, April 9, 2019.

Two Democratic lawmakers in New York state proposed legislation that could take a financial bite out of private golf clubs, including Trump National Golf Club Westchester in Briarcliff Manor.

The legislation would allow local assessment of golf courses based on the “highest and best use rather than its current use.” It comes as the 140-acre club in Briarcliff — a property President Donald Trump bought in the 1990s — faces an ongoing legal dispute on property taxes dating back to 2015.

New York Assemblywoman Sandy Galef, D-Ossining, is the author of the legislation, Assembly bill A6444. Sen. David Carlucci, D-Rockland/Westchester, is the key sponsor of the state Senate version, S4420.

A rally was held Sunday outside Trump National’s Briarcliff golf club where about 45 supporters gathered. Some held up signs, including one that read “Pay Your Taxes Trump” and another, “Play Fairways, Pay Fair Taxes.”

“Right now, unfortunately, we have a few golf courses that are taking advantage of a loophole in New York state law that allows for golf courses to be assessed as if they were a municipal course,” Carlucci told CNBC. He said the current assessment “doesn’t take into consideration other factors, like a beautiful club house on the property, etc.”

Carlucci called Trump National’s Briarcliff golf club “one of the most egregious cases” he’s seen of private courses filing questionable tax grievances with towns. He said these grievances go back many years and have the potential to cost communities “hundreds of thousands of dollars” in tax revenues, including money needed for schools.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, state, tax, bring, clubs, legislation, club, course, briarcliff, courses, york, property, trumps, golf, including, trump, ny


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Paul Simon’s $13.9 million Connecticut mansion is for sale — take a look inside

Musician Paul Simon, of the popular duo Simon & Garfunkel, has listed his Connecticut mansion for $13.9 million. The property is just an hour from New York, but has all the trappings of a countryside home, including formal walled gardens and waterfalls. We have our own park’,” Simon said in a statement . There’s also a separate, 2,400 square foot guest cottage (with a garage) that is billed in the listing as being an “ideal guest house, musician’s or writer’s studio.” The $13.9 million listing p


Musician Paul Simon, of the popular duo Simon & Garfunkel, has listed his Connecticut mansion for $13.9 million. The property is just an hour from New York, but has all the trappings of a countryside home, including formal walled gardens and waterfalls. We have our own park’,” Simon said in a statement . There’s also a separate, 2,400 square foot guest cottage (with a garage) that is billed in the listing as being an “ideal guest house, musician’s or writer’s studio.” The $13.9 million listing p
Paul Simon’s $13.9 million Connecticut mansion is for sale — take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, million, simons, look, house, park, connecticut, york, simon, long, mansion, hour, guest, property, listing, 139, inside, paul


Paul Simon's $13.9 million Connecticut mansion is for sale — take a look inside

Musician Paul Simon, of the popular duo Simon & Garfunkel, has listed his Connecticut mansion for $13.9 million. The property is just an hour from New York, but has all the trappings of a countryside home, including formal walled gardens and waterfalls.

“The first thing we thought when we moved from Manhattan was ‘Wow! We have our own park’,” Simon said in a statement . “It took half an hour to walk a loop of the property with the dogs.”

The 8,525-square foot home has six bedrooms, seven full bathrooms, three partial bathrooms, five fireplaces and a three car garage.

The home sits on 31.79 acres in a private park and, according to its listing , overlooks a pond surrounded by meadows and long swaths of lawn.

The mansion’s exteriors also features a terraced pool that surrounds the main house.

There’s also a separate, 2,400 square foot guest cottage (with a garage) that is billed in the listing as being an “ideal guest house, musician’s or writer’s studio.”

The $13.9 million listing price is 16 percent less than what Simon paid for the compound in 2002, according to the Wall Street Journal .

The house is located in New Canaan, Connecticut.

“Along a 30-mile stretch of coastline in Fairfield County, Connecticut, is a collection of blue-chip communities that are among the most affluent in America,” the listing, by Sotheby’s International Realty states. “This is the Gold Coast, on the Long Island Sound, where 24-karat pockets like Greenwich and Darien have some of the nation’s highest per capita income levels.”

Don’t miss: This is America’s richest ZIP code — and it’s not in New York or California

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-26  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, million, simons, look, house, park, connecticut, york, simon, long, mansion, hour, guest, property, listing, 139, inside, paul


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PayPal co-founder is selling his $7.25 million San Francisco home — take a look inside

Take a look inside. The 3,049-square-foot property built in 2003 is located in Cow Hollow, an upscale district near the Presidio and the bay. The home has five bedrooms and five bathrooms, as well as a backyard and a top-floor wraparound deck.


Take a look inside. The 3,049-square-foot property built in 2003 is located in Cow Hollow, an upscale district near the Presidio and the bay. The home has five bedrooms and five bathrooms, as well as a backyard and a top-floor wraparound deck.
PayPal co-founder is selling his $7.25 million San Francisco home — take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: jimmy im, jacob elliott
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, located, million, selling, property, cofounder, 725, near, hollow, paypal, look, inside, wraparound, upscale, presidio, insidethe, topfloor, francisco, san


PayPal co-founder is selling his $7.25 million San Francisco home — take a look inside

Take a look inside.

The 3,049-square-foot property built in 2003 is located in Cow Hollow, an upscale district near the Presidio and the bay. The home has five bedrooms and five bathrooms, as well as a backyard and a top-floor wraparound deck.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: jimmy im, jacob elliott
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, located, million, selling, property, cofounder, 725, near, hollow, paypal, look, inside, wraparound, upscale, presidio, insidethe, topfloor, francisco, san


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China developer Soho wins ‘feng shui’ lawsuit against blog who claimed its property was unlucky

A Beijing district court ruled Wednesday that a blog operator must apologize and pay more than 200,000 yuan ($29,851) to real estate developer Soho China for reputational damage. That’s after a blog run by the operator, Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology, claimed that one of the developer’s properties brought bad luck to its tenants due to inauspicious “feng shui.” Soho China is one of the largest real estate developers in the country, best known for several iconic office complexes located throug


A Beijing district court ruled Wednesday that a blog operator must apologize and pay more than 200,000 yuan ($29,851) to real estate developer Soho China for reputational damage. That’s after a blog run by the operator, Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology, claimed that one of the developer’s properties brought bad luck to its tenants due to inauspicious “feng shui.” Soho China is one of the largest real estate developers in the country, best known for several iconic office complexes located throug
China developer Soho wins ‘feng shui’ lawsuit against blog who claimed its property was unlucky Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: evelyn cheng, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claimed, shui, developer, waterloo, property, feng, beijing, post, lawsuit, wins, unlucky, official, blog, china, soho, court, operator


China developer Soho wins 'feng shui' lawsuit against blog who claimed its property was unlucky

A Beijing district court ruled Wednesday that a blog operator must apologize and pay more than 200,000 yuan ($29,851) to real estate developer Soho China for reputational damage.

That’s after a blog run by the operator, Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology, claimed that one of the developer’s properties brought bad luck to its tenants due to inauspicious “feng shui.”

Feng shui is an ancient Chinese way of determining the optimal location and layout of a dwelling, office or capital for the occupants’ success. The practice, which translates to “wind and water” in Chinese, is still followed by some in China.

“The internet is not outside the bounds of the law,” Ouyang Hua, the official on the case, said in a public verdict posted on the Beijing Chaoyang District Court website.

In the Mandarin-language post translated by CNBC, the official added that companies should focus on building up core technology and “not entrust development to feng shui theory.”

The South China Morning Post first reported the court ruling.

Soho China is one of the largest real estate developers in the country, best known for several iconic office complexes located throughout Beijing.

In November, a blog called “S Shengunju S” published an article claiming that the feng shui of Soho’s Wangjing development in northeastern Beijing was a “Waterloo” for internet companies, according to Soho’s complaint to the court published online. The term refers to the Battle of Waterloo which marked the downfall of French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte in the early 19th century.

The blog also said the development was only suitable for early-stage companies, and that they should move away if they wanted to develop further, the court website said.

According to the public verdict, the article in question was read more than 100,000 times before it was deleted from the blogger’s official account on WeChat — China’s ubiquitous messaging app run by internet giant Tencent.

Tencent and Soho China did not immediately respond to a CNBC request for comment. Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology’s website returned an error message and no other method of contact was immediately apparent.

The blog operator told the Beijing court that the post was deleted and phrases such as “Waterloo” were only a form of expression and did not constitute insults.

The complex in question was designed by the late award-winning architect Zaha Hadid.

Pan Shiyi, chairman of Soho China, said in a post on Weibo, China’s version of Twitter, that the company will continue to manage Wangjing Soho with great care.

“Criticism of architecture and malicious slander are two separate things,” he said in the Mandarin-language post translated by CNBC. “The distance between reason and ignorance are worlds apart.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: evelyn cheng, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claimed, shui, developer, waterloo, property, feng, beijing, post, lawsuit, wins, unlucky, official, blog, china, soho, court, operator


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Jessica Alba’s $6.2 million Beverly Hills home is for sale — take a look inside

Actress and founder of The Honest Company Jessica Alba has listed her Beverly Hills, California mansion for nearly $6.2 million. Alba purchased the home more than a decade ago, according to Variety. Take a look inside. The 5,300-square-foot, three-bedroom and five-bathroom property was built in the mid-1970s and is located in the famous 90210 zip code.


Actress and founder of The Honest Company Jessica Alba has listed her Beverly Hills, California mansion for nearly $6.2 million. Alba purchased the home more than a decade ago, according to Variety. Take a look inside. The 5,300-square-foot, three-bedroom and five-bathroom property was built in the mid-1970s and is located in the famous 90210 zip code.
Jessica Alba’s $6.2 million Beverly Hills home is for sale — take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: jimmy im, adam latham, bel air photography
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, alba, purchased, albas, property, mansion, inside, varietytake, mid1970s, jessica, zip, threebedroom, hills, beverly, nearly, 62, million, look


Jessica Alba's $6.2 million Beverly Hills home is for sale — take a look inside

Actress and founder of The Honest Company Jessica Alba has listed her Beverly Hills, California mansion for nearly $6.2 million. Alba purchased the home more than a decade ago, according to Variety.

Take a look inside.

The 5,300-square-foot, three-bedroom and five-bathroom property was built in the mid-1970s and is located in the famous 90210 zip code.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: jimmy im, adam latham, bel air photography
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, alba, purchased, albas, property, mansion, inside, varietytake, mid1970s, jessica, zip, threebedroom, hills, beverly, nearly, 62, million, look


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Here’s how much income tax you’re paying to your state

Start spreading the news: New Yorkers are coughing up the most cash in state income taxes. The Empire State collected $2,249 per capita in individual state income taxes during the 2017 fiscal year, according to data from the Tax Foundation. In all, seven states don’t tax individual income: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington state and Wyoming. See below for a map of where your state ranks with respect to income tax, according to data from the Tax Foundation. If you’re thinki


Start spreading the news: New Yorkers are coughing up the most cash in state income taxes. The Empire State collected $2,249 per capita in individual state income taxes during the 2017 fiscal year, according to data from the Tax Foundation. In all, seven states don’t tax individual income: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington state and Wyoming. See below for a map of where your state ranks with respect to income tax, according to data from the Tax Foundation. If you’re thinki
Here’s how much income tax you’re paying to your state Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: darla mercado, john w schoen, alexander spatari, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, income, wages, individual, levies, state, tax, paying, according, youre, heres, states, taxes


Here's how much income tax you're paying to your state

Start spreading the news: New Yorkers are coughing up the most cash in state income taxes.

The Empire State collected $2,249 per capita in individual state income taxes during the 2017 fiscal year, according to data from the Tax Foundation.

Connecticut was second, at $2,218, followed by Massachusetts’ $2,146.

In all, seven states don’t tax individual income: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington state and Wyoming.

Tennessee and New Hampshire don’t tax wages, but they do so on income from interest and dividends.

See below for a map of where your state ranks with respect to income tax, according to data from the Tax Foundation.

Income taxes make a significant contribution to states’ coffers. Nearly 40 percent of state tax collections come from levies on your wages, according to the foundation.

If you’re thinking of fleeing to a place with a lower or no income tax, remember that states need to get their revenue from somewhere.

“There are other taxes that matter, including sales and property taxes,” said Katherine Loughead, policy analyst at the foundation.

“The state estate tax can factor in for a lot of people as to whether they’ll be taxed at high rates if they pass their estate along to their heirs.”

Here’s an example: New Hampshire won’t levy your wages, yet the Granite State imposes some of the highest state and local property taxes per capita — $3,115, the Tax Foundation found.

Further, some localities have their own income levies. This means that while the state you move to matters, so does the city or town in which you work or reside.

“Local taxes can really depend on whether you live in an urban environment versus rural,” said Loughead.

More from Personal Finance:

Where to draw the line when getting your kid into college

Michael Avenatti allegedly made this tax slip-up

Why millennials aren’t buying homes

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: darla mercado, john w schoen, alexander spatari, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, income, wages, individual, levies, state, tax, paying, according, youre, heres, states, taxes


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Trump says he is in ‘no rush’ to complete US-China trade deal

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was in no rush to complete a trade pact with China and insisted that any deal include protection for intellectual property, a major sticking point between the two sides during months of negotiations. “I think President Xi saw that I’m somebody that believes in walking when the deal is not done, and you know there’s always a chance it could happen and he probably wouldn’t want that,” Trump said. China has not made any public comment confirming Xi i


U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was in no rush to complete a trade pact with China and insisted that any deal include protection for intellectual property, a major sticking point between the two sides during months of negotiations. “I think President Xi saw that I’m somebody that believes in walking when the deal is not done, and you know there’s always a chance it could happen and he probably wouldn’t want that,” Trump said. China has not made any public comment confirming Xi i
Trump says he is in ‘no rush’ to complete US-China trade deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completed, trade, meeting, uschina, summit, xi, president, property, deal, rush, complete, inperson, trump


Trump says he is in 'no rush' to complete US-China trade deal

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was in no rush to complete a trade pact with China and insisted that any deal include protection for intellectual property, a major sticking point between the two sides during months of negotiations.

Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping had been expected to hold a summit at the president’s Mar-a-Lago property in Florida later this month, but no date has been set for a meeting and no in-person talks between their trade teams have been held in more than two weeks.

The president, speaking to reporters at the White House, said he thought there was a good chance a deal would be made, in part because China wanted one after suffering from U.S. tariffs on its goods.

But he acknowledged Xi may be wary of coming to a summit without an agreement in hand after seeing Trump end a separate summit in Vietnam with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un without a peace deal.

“I think President Xi saw that I’m somebody that believes in walking when the deal is not done, and you know there’s always a chance it could happen and he probably wouldn’t want that,” Trump said.

China has not made any public comment confirming Xi is considering going to meet Trump in Florida or elsewhere.

The president, who likes to emphasize his own deal-making abilities, said an agreement to end a months-long trade war could be finished ahead of a presidential meeting or completed in-person with his counterpart.

“We could do it either way. We could have the deal completed and come and sign, or we could get the deal almost completed and negotiate some of the final points. I would prefer that,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completed, trade, meeting, uschina, summit, xi, president, property, deal, rush, complete, inperson, trump


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