PayPal co-founder is selling his $7.25 million San Francisco home — take a look inside

Take a look inside. The 3,049-square-foot property built in 2003 is located in Cow Hollow, an upscale district near the Presidio and the bay. The home has five bedrooms and five bathrooms, as well as a backyard and a top-floor wraparound deck.


Take a look inside. The 3,049-square-foot property built in 2003 is located in Cow Hollow, an upscale district near the Presidio and the bay. The home has five bedrooms and five bathrooms, as well as a backyard and a top-floor wraparound deck.
PayPal co-founder is selling his $7.25 million San Francisco home — take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: jimmy im, jacob elliott
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, located, million, selling, property, cofounder, 725, near, hollow, paypal, look, inside, wraparound, upscale, presidio, insidethe, topfloor, francisco, san


PayPal co-founder is selling his $7.25 million San Francisco home — take a look inside

Take a look inside.

The 3,049-square-foot property built in 2003 is located in Cow Hollow, an upscale district near the Presidio and the bay. The home has five bedrooms and five bathrooms, as well as a backyard and a top-floor wraparound deck.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: jimmy im, jacob elliott
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, located, million, selling, property, cofounder, 725, near, hollow, paypal, look, inside, wraparound, upscale, presidio, insidethe, topfloor, francisco, san


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

China developer Soho wins ‘feng shui’ lawsuit against blog who claimed its property was unlucky

A Beijing district court ruled Wednesday that a blog operator must apologize and pay more than 200,000 yuan ($29,851) to real estate developer Soho China for reputational damage. That’s after a blog run by the operator, Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology, claimed that one of the developer’s properties brought bad luck to its tenants due to inauspicious “feng shui.” Soho China is one of the largest real estate developers in the country, best known for several iconic office complexes located throug


A Beijing district court ruled Wednesday that a blog operator must apologize and pay more than 200,000 yuan ($29,851) to real estate developer Soho China for reputational damage. That’s after a blog run by the operator, Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology, claimed that one of the developer’s properties brought bad luck to its tenants due to inauspicious “feng shui.” Soho China is one of the largest real estate developers in the country, best known for several iconic office complexes located throug
China developer Soho wins ‘feng shui’ lawsuit against blog who claimed its property was unlucky Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: evelyn cheng, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claimed, shui, developer, waterloo, property, feng, beijing, post, lawsuit, wins, unlucky, official, blog, china, soho, court, operator


China developer Soho wins 'feng shui' lawsuit against blog who claimed its property was unlucky

A Beijing district court ruled Wednesday that a blog operator must apologize and pay more than 200,000 yuan ($29,851) to real estate developer Soho China for reputational damage.

That’s after a blog run by the operator, Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology, claimed that one of the developer’s properties brought bad luck to its tenants due to inauspicious “feng shui.”

Feng shui is an ancient Chinese way of determining the optimal location and layout of a dwelling, office or capital for the occupants’ success. The practice, which translates to “wind and water” in Chinese, is still followed by some in China.

“The internet is not outside the bounds of the law,” Ouyang Hua, the official on the case, said in a public verdict posted on the Beijing Chaoyang District Court website.

In the Mandarin-language post translated by CNBC, the official added that companies should focus on building up core technology and “not entrust development to feng shui theory.”

The South China Morning Post first reported the court ruling.

Soho China is one of the largest real estate developers in the country, best known for several iconic office complexes located throughout Beijing.

In November, a blog called “S Shengunju S” published an article claiming that the feng shui of Soho’s Wangjing development in northeastern Beijing was a “Waterloo” for internet companies, according to Soho’s complaint to the court published online. The term refers to the Battle of Waterloo which marked the downfall of French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte in the early 19th century.

The blog also said the development was only suitable for early-stage companies, and that they should move away if they wanted to develop further, the court website said.

According to the public verdict, the article in question was read more than 100,000 times before it was deleted from the blogger’s official account on WeChat — China’s ubiquitous messaging app run by internet giant Tencent.

Tencent and Soho China did not immediately respond to a CNBC request for comment. Zhuhai Shengun Network Technology’s website returned an error message and no other method of contact was immediately apparent.

The blog operator told the Beijing court that the post was deleted and phrases such as “Waterloo” were only a form of expression and did not constitute insults.

The complex in question was designed by the late award-winning architect Zaha Hadid.

Pan Shiyi, chairman of Soho China, said in a post on Weibo, China’s version of Twitter, that the company will continue to manage Wangjing Soho with great care.

“Criticism of architecture and malicious slander are two separate things,” he said in the Mandarin-language post translated by CNBC. “The distance between reason and ignorance are worlds apart.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: evelyn cheng, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claimed, shui, developer, waterloo, property, feng, beijing, post, lawsuit, wins, unlucky, official, blog, china, soho, court, operator


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jessica Alba’s $6.2 million Beverly Hills home is for sale — take a look inside

Actress and founder of The Honest Company Jessica Alba has listed her Beverly Hills, California mansion for nearly $6.2 million. Alba purchased the home more than a decade ago, according to Variety. Take a look inside. The 5,300-square-foot, three-bedroom and five-bathroom property was built in the mid-1970s and is located in the famous 90210 zip code.


Actress and founder of The Honest Company Jessica Alba has listed her Beverly Hills, California mansion for nearly $6.2 million. Alba purchased the home more than a decade ago, according to Variety. Take a look inside. The 5,300-square-foot, three-bedroom and five-bathroom property was built in the mid-1970s and is located in the famous 90210 zip code.
Jessica Alba’s $6.2 million Beverly Hills home is for sale — take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: jimmy im, adam latham, bel air photography
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, alba, purchased, albas, property, mansion, inside, varietytake, mid1970s, jessica, zip, threebedroom, hills, beverly, nearly, 62, million, look


Jessica Alba's $6.2 million Beverly Hills home is for sale — take a look inside

Actress and founder of The Honest Company Jessica Alba has listed her Beverly Hills, California mansion for nearly $6.2 million. Alba purchased the home more than a decade ago, according to Variety.

Take a look inside.

The 5,300-square-foot, three-bedroom and five-bathroom property was built in the mid-1970s and is located in the famous 90210 zip code.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: jimmy im, adam latham, bel air photography
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, alba, purchased, albas, property, mansion, inside, varietytake, mid1970s, jessica, zip, threebedroom, hills, beverly, nearly, 62, million, look


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here’s how much income tax you’re paying to your state

Start spreading the news: New Yorkers are coughing up the most cash in state income taxes. The Empire State collected $2,249 per capita in individual state income taxes during the 2017 fiscal year, according to data from the Tax Foundation. In all, seven states don’t tax individual income: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington state and Wyoming. See below for a map of where your state ranks with respect to income tax, according to data from the Tax Foundation. If you’re thinki


Start spreading the news: New Yorkers are coughing up the most cash in state income taxes. The Empire State collected $2,249 per capita in individual state income taxes during the 2017 fiscal year, according to data from the Tax Foundation. In all, seven states don’t tax individual income: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington state and Wyoming. See below for a map of where your state ranks with respect to income tax, according to data from the Tax Foundation. If you’re thinki
Here’s how much income tax you’re paying to your state Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: darla mercado, john w schoen, alexander spatari, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, income, wages, individual, levies, state, tax, paying, according, youre, heres, states, taxes


Here's how much income tax you're paying to your state

Start spreading the news: New Yorkers are coughing up the most cash in state income taxes.

The Empire State collected $2,249 per capita in individual state income taxes during the 2017 fiscal year, according to data from the Tax Foundation.

Connecticut was second, at $2,218, followed by Massachusetts’ $2,146.

In all, seven states don’t tax individual income: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington state and Wyoming.

Tennessee and New Hampshire don’t tax wages, but they do so on income from interest and dividends.

See below for a map of where your state ranks with respect to income tax, according to data from the Tax Foundation.

Income taxes make a significant contribution to states’ coffers. Nearly 40 percent of state tax collections come from levies on your wages, according to the foundation.

If you’re thinking of fleeing to a place with a lower or no income tax, remember that states need to get their revenue from somewhere.

“There are other taxes that matter, including sales and property taxes,” said Katherine Loughead, policy analyst at the foundation.

“The state estate tax can factor in for a lot of people as to whether they’ll be taxed at high rates if they pass their estate along to their heirs.”

Here’s an example: New Hampshire won’t levy your wages, yet the Granite State imposes some of the highest state and local property taxes per capita — $3,115, the Tax Foundation found.

Further, some localities have their own income levies. This means that while the state you move to matters, so does the city or town in which you work or reside.

“Local taxes can really depend on whether you live in an urban environment versus rural,” said Loughead.

More from Personal Finance:

Where to draw the line when getting your kid into college

Michael Avenatti allegedly made this tax slip-up

Why millennials aren’t buying homes

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: darla mercado, john w schoen, alexander spatari, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, income, wages, individual, levies, state, tax, paying, according, youre, heres, states, taxes


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump says he is in ‘no rush’ to complete US-China trade deal

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was in no rush to complete a trade pact with China and insisted that any deal include protection for intellectual property, a major sticking point between the two sides during months of negotiations. “I think President Xi saw that I’m somebody that believes in walking when the deal is not done, and you know there’s always a chance it could happen and he probably wouldn’t want that,” Trump said. China has not made any public comment confirming Xi i


U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was in no rush to complete a trade pact with China and insisted that any deal include protection for intellectual property, a major sticking point between the two sides during months of negotiations. “I think President Xi saw that I’m somebody that believes in walking when the deal is not done, and you know there’s always a chance it could happen and he probably wouldn’t want that,” Trump said. China has not made any public comment confirming Xi i
Trump says he is in ‘no rush’ to complete US-China trade deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completed, trade, meeting, uschina, summit, xi, president, property, deal, rush, complete, inperson, trump


Trump says he is in 'no rush' to complete US-China trade deal

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was in no rush to complete a trade pact with China and insisted that any deal include protection for intellectual property, a major sticking point between the two sides during months of negotiations.

Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping had been expected to hold a summit at the president’s Mar-a-Lago property in Florida later this month, but no date has been set for a meeting and no in-person talks between their trade teams have been held in more than two weeks.

The president, speaking to reporters at the White House, said he thought there was a good chance a deal would be made, in part because China wanted one after suffering from U.S. tariffs on its goods.

But he acknowledged Xi may be wary of coming to a summit without an agreement in hand after seeing Trump end a separate summit in Vietnam with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un without a peace deal.

“I think President Xi saw that I’m somebody that believes in walking when the deal is not done, and you know there’s always a chance it could happen and he probably wouldn’t want that,” Trump said.

China has not made any public comment confirming Xi is considering going to meet Trump in Florida or elsewhere.

The president, who likes to emphasize his own deal-making abilities, said an agreement to end a months-long trade war could be finished ahead of a presidential meeting or completed in-person with his counterpart.

“We could do it either way. We could have the deal completed and come and sign, or we could get the deal almost completed and negotiate some of the final points. I would prefer that,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completed, trade, meeting, uschina, summit, xi, president, property, deal, rush, complete, inperson, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Former MLB All-Star Mark Teixeira wants you to be smart about your money. His advice: ‘Be boring’

He said his best investment was buying a piece of property in Atlanta between 2008 and 2010. For professional sports players, it’s particularly important to think ahead since their careers don’t last very long and they retire early. You tend to not think about what happens when I’m 40, 50 or 80 because you have to live in the moment.” In order to avoid a crisis once retirement comes, Teixeira suggests they should always think of their latest contract as their last. So 10 million bucks — you bett


He said his best investment was buying a piece of property in Atlanta between 2008 and 2010. For professional sports players, it’s particularly important to think ahead since their careers don’t last very long and they retire early. You tend to not think about what happens when I’m 40, 50 or 80 because you have to live in the moment.” In order to avoid a crisis once retirement comes, Teixeira suggests they should always think of their latest contract as their last. So 10 million bucks — you bett
Former MLB All-Star Mark Teixeira wants you to be smart about your money. His advice: ‘Be boring’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: michelle fox, rich schultz, getty images, -mark teixeira, former mlb all-star
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, advice, allstar, players, teixeira, sign, important, tend, contract, property, boring, smart, mlb, live, money, think, wants, early, mark


Former MLB All-Star Mark Teixeira wants you to be smart about your money. His advice: 'Be boring'

What’s most important is to make sure you have enough for retirement.

“What I learned early is there is a bucket for my nest egg that I put away and I never have to worry about again. Then there is a bucket for opportunities,” Teixeira said.

Thanks to his baseball income and smart planning, he’s able to take some chances. He said his best investment was buying a piece of property in Atlanta between 2008 and 2010. That property is now being developed into Quarry Yards in Atlanta and will include office, retail and hotel space, as well as apartments.

“It just taught me about buying low,” he said.

For professional sports players, it’s particularly important to think ahead since their careers don’t last very long and they retire early. Many of them get big paychecks — but some have still wound up broke.

“You have to be so focused to play your sport. It’s a 12-month-a year job,” he said. “You tend to not think about things off the field. You tend to not think about what happens when I’m 40, 50 or 80 because you have to live in the moment.”

And having a financial advisor can only do so much — they advise, and the players can chose not to listen and still make bad decisions.

In order to avoid a crisis once retirement comes, Teixeira suggests they should always think of their latest contract as their last.

“A lot of guys don’t realize that hey this contract that’s on your desk right now, when you sign it that could be the last contract you sign. So 10 million bucks — you better put way 90 percent of that so you can live off it the rest of your life.”

Disclosure: NBCUniversal and Comcast Ventures are investors in Acorns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: michelle fox, rich schultz, getty images, -mark teixeira, former mlb all-star
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, advice, allstar, players, teixeira, sign, important, tend, contract, property, boring, smart, mlb, live, money, think, wants, early, mark


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

40% of A.I. start-ups in Europe have almost nothing to do with A.I., research finds

Nearly half of the companies in Europe that call themselves AI start-ups don’t in fact use artificial intelligence, a new report found. The research, published Tuesday by London-based venture capital firm MMC Ventures, found no evidence that artificial intelligence was an important part of the products offered by 40 percent of Europe’s 2,830 AI start-ups. Kelnar said Europe is entering an “era of AI entrepreneurship” with one out of every 12 new start-ups putting AI at the core of their operatio


Nearly half of the companies in Europe that call themselves AI start-ups don’t in fact use artificial intelligence, a new report found. The research, published Tuesday by London-based venture capital firm MMC Ventures, found no evidence that artificial intelligence was an important part of the products offered by 40 percent of Europe’s 2,830 AI start-ups. Kelnar said Europe is entering an “era of AI entrepreneurship” with one out of every 12 new start-ups putting AI at the core of their operatio
40% of A.I. start-ups in Europe have almost nothing to do with A.I., research finds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: elizabeth schulze, fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 40, software, research, ai, companies, property, finds, survey, europe, startups, value, funding, mmc


40% of A.I. start-ups in Europe have almost nothing to do with A.I., research finds

Nearly half of the companies in Europe that call themselves AI start-ups don’t in fact use artificial intelligence, a new report found.

The research, published Tuesday by London-based venture capital firm MMC Ventures, found no evidence that artificial intelligence was an important part of the products offered by 40 percent of Europe’s 2,830 AI start-ups. The report’s authors individually reviewed the activities, functions and funding of start-ups across 13 EU countries. It did not name any of the start-ups involved in the study.

The findings raise questions about how the term AI has become a blanket phrase for start-ups looking to attract investments and position themselves at the forefront of tech innovation.

“There’s a huge amount of hype around, but one of the ways that we hope to add value as an investor … is to help cut through that and highlight the technology,” said David Kelnar, head of research at MMC, in a phone interview with CNBC on Tuesday.

Kelnar said Europe is entering an “era of AI entrepreneurship” with one out of every 12 new start-ups putting AI at the core of their operations. In 2013, the survey found just one in 50 new start-ups embraced AI.

One reason start-ups could be calling themselves AI companies is to attract more funding. MMC’s survey found AI companies have raised between 15 and 50 percent more capital in their funding rounds than traditional software companies since 2015. AI start-ups also secured higher valuations than software firms.

Peter Finnie, a partner at intellectual property law firm Gill Jennings and Every, said there has been a surge in AI patent filings as companies look to make their businesses more investable.

“From an intellectual property perspective, the use of AI in this way actually holds little to no value,” he said in an email to CNBC. “The AI sector is a bubble that might well burst because of this.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: elizabeth schulze, fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 40, software, research, ai, companies, property, finds, survey, europe, startups, value, funding, mmc


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Kyle Bass says trade deal with China must address IP theft: ‘They’re stealing our game from us’

Hayman Capital Management founder Kyle Bass thinks any trade deal with China must include enforcement mechanisms against intellectual property theft for the U.S. to truly benefit from it. China and the U.S. are in the “final stages” of working out a trade deal, CNBC learned through sources. These changes include a way to enforce intellectual property of U.S. products in China. “We have a golden opportunity today for a global reset in our relationship with China,” Bass said. “Our real issue is fo


Hayman Capital Management founder Kyle Bass thinks any trade deal with China must include enforcement mechanisms against intellectual property theft for the U.S. to truly benefit from it. China and the U.S. are in the “final stages” of working out a trade deal, CNBC learned through sources. These changes include a way to enforce intellectual property of U.S. products in China. “We have a golden opportunity today for a global reset in our relationship with China,” Bass said. “Our real issue is fo
Kyle Bass says trade deal with China must address IP theft: ‘They’re stealing our game from us’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stealing, ip, way, kyle, bass, property, chinese, intellectual, theft, deal, control, theyre, china, game, world, trade


Kyle Bass says trade deal with China must address IP theft: 'They're stealing our game from us'

Hayman Capital Management founder Kyle Bass thinks any trade deal with China must include enforcement mechanisms against intellectual property theft for the U.S. to truly benefit from it.

“Over the last decade, they’ve stolen $2-to-$3 trillion in IP from us. The U.S.’ No. 1 asset, in my view, is our ingenuity, our intellectual property, our ability to innovate,” Bass told CNBC’s Brian Sullivan in a pre-taped interview that aired on “Worldwide Exchange.” “That’s our game and they’re stealing our game from us. It’s really important for this new agreement to be measurable and punishable.”

China and the U.S. are in the “final stages” of working out a trade deal, CNBC learned through sources. However, The New York Times reported Sunday that any deal would do little to address key structural changes in China that the U.S. has been seeking. These changes include a way to enforce intellectual property of U.S. products in China.

“We have a golden opportunity today for a global reset in our relationship with China,” Bass said. “Our real issue is forced technology transfers, it’s intellectual property theft, it’s subversive industrial policies that circumvent WTO rules. It’s basically the way the Chinese lie, cheat and steal their way through our economy.”

Investors across the globe have been cheering the apparent progress in trade talks between the two countries. The S&P 500 has risen more than 11 percent this year. In China, the Shanghai Composite has surged more than 20 percent, rebounding from a sharp sell-off in 2018.

But Bass is skeptical about the sharp run-up in Chinese equities. “Can the Chinese run up their stock market? Absolutely. Domestically, they control the price, they control the printing press, they control the police, they control the narrative,” he said. “The Chinese print more money than any other country has ever printed, in gross terms, in world history. Since 2001, they’ve printed roughly $30 billion worth of RMB.”

“Why would you invest in a country where there is no rule of law?” added Bass, claiming that Western investors would have no standing if a Chinese company were to go bankrupt. Chinese stocks should be considered tracking stocks not ownership in a piece of the company, he argued.

Bass also said “the ultimate arbiter” for China will be its foreign exchange reserves and how its currency performs against those around the world. This is because China makes it nearly impossible for investors to bet against the country’s domestic companies.

“The economics between our two nations are very, very different. At some point in time, the world is going to see the emperor has no clothes.”

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stealing, ip, way, kyle, bass, property, chinese, intellectual, theft, deal, control, theyre, china, game, world, trade


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Michael Jackson’s ‘Neverland’ ranch is on sale for a discounted $31 million

The estate has had a tumultuous time on the market. As the Wall Street Journal notes, it was originally listed for $100 million in 2015 and then the price was cut to $67 million in 2017; after briefly being taken off the market, it has been reintroduced at an asking price of $31 million. The 12,598-square-foot, six-bedroom, nine-bathroom ranch is located 40 miles from Santa Barbara. The estate also includes three separate guest houses, a movie theater, several barns, a pool, pool-house and tenni


The estate has had a tumultuous time on the market. As the Wall Street Journal notes, it was originally listed for $100 million in 2015 and then the price was cut to $67 million in 2017; after briefly being taken off the market, it has been reintroduced at an asking price of $31 million. The 12,598-square-foot, six-bedroom, nine-bathroom ranch is located 40 miles from Santa Barbara. The estate also includes three separate guest houses, a movie theater, several barns, a pool, pool-house and tenni
Michael Jackson’s ‘Neverland’ ranch is on sale for a discounted $31 million Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: sarah berger, jim bartsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, michael, wall, estate, wildfires, neverland, tumultuous, price, includes, market, ranch, million, discounted, theater, sale, 31, jacksons


Michael Jackson's 'Neverland' ranch is on sale for a discounted $31 million

The estate has had a tumultuous time on the market. As the Wall Street Journal notes, it was originally listed for $100 million in 2015 and then the price was cut to $67 million in 2017; after briefly being taken off the market, it has been reintroduced at an asking price of $31 million.

Kyle Forsyth and Suzanne Perkins of Compass, who represent the property, have cited the estate’s high price as well as recent wildfires, mudslides and drought that ravaged the area for its failure to sell.

The 12,598-square-foot, six-bedroom, nine-bathroom ranch is located 40 miles from Santa Barbara. The estate also includes three separate guest houses, a movie theater, several barns, a pool, pool-house and tennis court. The property includes 2,698 acres of land.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: sarah berger, jim bartsch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, property, michael, wall, estate, wildfires, neverland, tumultuous, price, includes, market, ranch, million, discounted, theater, sale, 31, jacksons


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Beijing’s capital controls are weighing on Chinese investors looking to buy property abroad

Chinese investors are keeping unchanged or even reducing the amount of money they allocate for overseas property purchases as they continue to struggle to get money out of the country, according to a survey conducted by a global real estate services company. On top of that, it became increasingly difficult for investors to obtain loans last year as Beijing sought to control the high levels of debt in the real estate sector. The firm said the results, released Friday, were based on responses from


Chinese investors are keeping unchanged or even reducing the amount of money they allocate for overseas property purchases as they continue to struggle to get money out of the country, according to a survey conducted by a global real estate services company. On top of that, it became increasingly difficult for investors to obtain loans last year as Beijing sought to control the high levels of debt in the real estate sector. The firm said the results, released Friday, were based on responses from
Beijing’s capital controls are weighing on Chinese investors looking to buy property abroad Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: kelly olsen, frederic j brown, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, wakefield, estate, real, overseas, capital, investors, beijings, property, weighing, respondents, money, survey, chinese, looking, buy, controls, abroad


Beijing's capital controls are weighing on Chinese investors looking to buy property abroad

Chinese investors are keeping unchanged or even reducing the amount of money they allocate for overseas property purchases as they continue to struggle to get money out of the country, according to a survey conducted by a global real estate services company.

That comes amid China’s continued campaign to clamp down on funds leaving the country. Beijing ramped up capital controls several years ago to fight a volatile currency, but the last few months of slowing economic growth, a declining current account surplus and uncertainty due to the trade war with the United States have led many to believe those measures will persist.

On top of that, it became increasingly difficult for investors to obtain loans last year as Beijing sought to control the high levels of debt in the real estate sector.

In its 2019 China Outbound Real Estate Investor Intention Survey conducted during the final three months of last year, Cushman & Wakefield found that a combined 84 percent of respondents had either kept their funds for foreign real estate acquisitions at about the same level or reduced them compared with 2017.

The firm said the results, released Friday, were based on responses from 51 mainland Chinese who invest in overseas real estate and who represent combined offshore capital of 280 billion yuan ($41.81 billion).

The survey also found that 65 percent of respondents were “significantly or severely impacted” by Beijing’s measures to crack down on money leaving the country, an increase from 50 percent who expressed such a view in 2017.

Also, 60 percent of respondents said they didn’t think policy restrictions would ease this year while 59 percent expressed the view that domestic lending conditions for real estate won’t improve.

Chinese investors acquired a total of $15.7 billion worth of overseas real estate in 2018, down 63 percent from 2017 and the lowest figure since 2014, according to data from Real Capital Analytics cited in the Cushman & Wakefield report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: kelly olsen, frederic j brown, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, wakefield, estate, real, overseas, capital, investors, beijings, property, weighing, respondents, money, survey, chinese, looking, buy, controls, abroad


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post