Trouble feared as Hong Kong activists return to scene of suspected triad attack

Police enter the Long Ping station in the Yuen Long district of Hong Kong on July 23, 2019. Police and activists are bracing for further violence later on Saturday as protesters plan to converge on a rural Hong Kong town where suspected triad gangsters attacked protesters and commuters at a train station last weekend. Police, widely criticized for failing to better protect the public from the triad raid in Yuen Long, have refused to allow the latest march on safety grounds. They attacked black-c


Police enter the Long Ping station in the Yuen Long district of Hong Kong on July 23, 2019. Police and activists are bracing for further violence later on Saturday as protesters plan to converge on a rural Hong Kong town where suspected triad gangsters attacked protesters and commuters at a train station last weekend. Police, widely criticized for failing to better protect the public from the triad raid in Yuen Long, have refused to allow the latest march on safety grounds. They attacked black-c
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suspected, return, activists, protesters, yuen, trouble, station, scene, long, office, triad, hong, attack, chiefs, protest, kong, feared


Trouble feared as Hong Kong activists return to scene of suspected triad attack

Police enter the Long Ping station in the Yuen Long district of Hong Kong on July 23, 2019. A rally of more than 100,000 people in devolved into a night of violence just a few days earlier, with police firing tear gas and masked men wearing white shirts and wielding batons attacking people in a metro station and mall.

Police and activists are bracing for further violence later on Saturday as protesters plan to converge on a rural Hong Kong town where suspected triad gangsters attacked protesters and commuters at a train station last weekend.

Police, widely criticized for failing to better protect the public from the triad raid in Yuen Long, have refused to allow the latest march on safety grounds.

Activists are insisting they will push ahead, with some planning to skirt the police ban by openly organizing shopping and dining expeditions to the town, government-funded broadcaster RTHK reported.

Residents described a mounting police presence on Saturday morning, with force chiefs insisting they will still seek to keep order despite the ban. Extra fortifications have been placed around the local police station.

Activists told Reuters they fear the protest could turn violent, given feelings of palpable anger among protesters over last Sunday’s events and a determination among some to challenge villagers they believe are close to long-standing triad groups in the area.

“The situation is escalating, and tomorrow could be the start of a more violent period,” one told Reuters.

Local district councilors and rural hamlet chiefs earlier urged police to object to the march, citing grave concerns over public safety and fears symbolic village sites could be attacked.

Last Sunday, 100 white shirted men stormed the Yuen Long station in an attack that came hours after protesters marched through central Hong Kong and defaced China’s Liaison Office — the leading symbol of Beijing’s authority over the former British colony.

They attacked black-clad protesters returning from Hong Kong island, passers-by, journalists and lawmakers with pipes and clubs, leaving 45 people injured.

Reuters reported on Friday that a Liaison Office official had days earlier urged local village chiefs to drive away any activists from the town.

The Yuen Long attack and the encirclement of the Liaison Office marked new fronts in a protest movement that has intensified over the last two months and sparked the most direct challenge to the authority of Chinese President Xi Jinping.

The movement further mushroomed on Friday as thousands of activists thronged the arrivals halls of Hong Kong international airport.

Initially demanding the scrapping of a bill that would have allowed people to be sent to mainland courts for trial, marchers are also seeking independent inquiries into police use of force, the resignation of Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam and full democratic reform — anathema to Beijing’s Communist Party leadership.

The protracted crisis is exposing fissures across Lam’s administration, with police chiefs and rank-and-file officers enraged at an apology over last weekend’s attacks by her Chief Secretary on Friday, apparently without consultation.

Matthew Cheung said the government would not shirk its responsibility “and the police’s handling fell short of residents’ expectations.”

Britain handed Hong Kong over to Chinese rule in 1997 amid guarantees that its core freedoms and autonomy, including the right to protest and an independent judiciary, would be protected under a “one country, two systems” formula. Many fear those rights are under threat as Beijing’s reach extends into the city.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suspected, return, activists, protesters, yuen, trouble, station, scene, long, office, triad, hong, attack, chiefs, protest, kong, feared


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Amazon workers are reportedly planning a Prime Day protest

Amazon employees in Minnesota are reportedly planning a strike on Prime Day this year, as the company is promoting its faster delivery options but not giving its workers enough credit, they say. Last year’s Prime Day was met with a massive strike by European employees that included workers in Spain, Poland, Germany, Italy and France. In the Minnesota facility, Bloomberg said workers, who are primarily East African Muslims, had been growing increasingly frustrated with Amazon not acknowledging th


Amazon employees in Minnesota are reportedly planning a strike on Prime Day this year, as the company is promoting its faster delivery options but not giving its workers enough credit, they say. Last year’s Prime Day was met with a massive strike by European employees that included workers in Spain, Poland, Germany, Italy and France. In the Minnesota facility, Bloomberg said workers, who are primarily East African Muslims, had been growing increasingly frustrated with Amazon not acknowledging th
Amazon workers are reportedly planning a Prime Day protest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reportedly, workers, 15, bloomberg, prime, amazon, working, minnesota, employees, protest, planning, strike, day


Amazon workers are reportedly planning a Prime Day protest

Amazon employees in Minnesota are reportedly planning a strike on Prime Day this year, as the company is promoting its faster delivery options but not giving its workers enough credit, they say.

Workers at an Amazon fulfillment center in Shakopee, Minnesota, have plotted to stop working for six hours on July 15, when the 48-hour Prime Day extravaganza kicks off, Bloomberg reported Monday after speaking with one of the people organizing the strike.

Amazon didn’t immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment on this story.

Some engineers are planning to fly into Minnesota to join the strike, the report said. Activists there are going to be pushing Amazon to take action against things like climate change and giving more temporary workers the option to become full-time, it said.

In the past, Amazon has dealt with more worker retaliation in Europe, where labor unions have greater power. Last year’s Prime Day was met with a massive strike by European employees that included workers in Spain, Poland, Germany, Italy and France.

In the Minnesota facility, Bloomberg said workers, who are primarily East African Muslims, had been growing increasingly frustrated with Amazon not acknowledging their religious practices. Bloomberg reported organizers there ultimately were able to push Amazon to give workers lighter quotas during Ramadan and space for prayer. But they still think the labor conditions are too intense overall, it said.

The disruption on July 15, though it’s just planned for one area of the country, could empower other Amazon facilities to take a stand and do the same.

Though Amazon has raised its minimum wage for all U.S. employees to $15 per hour, the company has still been a target for its reportedly poor working conditions.

Read the full story from Bloomberg.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reportedly, workers, 15, bloomberg, prime, amazon, working, minnesota, employees, protest, planning, strike, day


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Former Cambridge Analytica CEO cancels ad conference interview after protest

The former Cambridge Analytica executive Alexander Nix has pulled out of an appearance at the largest advertising industry conference in the world following criticism. The interview was billed as his first speaking appearance since Cambridge Analytica went into administration after allegedly harvesting Facebook user data to try to influence the outcome of the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign and the Brexit vote. But on Wednesday afternoon, conference attendees were sent notifications on


The former Cambridge Analytica executive Alexander Nix has pulled out of an appearance at the largest advertising industry conference in the world following criticism. The interview was billed as his first speaking appearance since Cambridge Analytica went into administration after allegedly harvesting Facebook user data to try to influence the outcome of the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign and the Brexit vote. But on Wednesday afternoon, conference attendees were sent notifications on
Former Cambridge Analytica CEO cancels ad conference interview after protest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protest, data, ad, analytica, cancels, ceo, conference, lions, cambridge, nix, appearance, alexander, cannes, industry, festival, interview


Former Cambridge Analytica CEO cancels ad conference interview after protest

The former Cambridge Analytica executive Alexander Nix has pulled out of an appearance at the largest advertising industry conference in the world following criticism.

Nix was due to be interviewed on stage Thursday at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity in France by Gillian Tett, the Financial Times’ editorial board chair and editor at large, U.S. The interview was billed as his first speaking appearance since Cambridge Analytica went into administration after allegedly harvesting Facebook user data to try to influence the outcome of the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign and the Brexit vote.

Nix was set to discuss “personal data and political agendas,” as well as how the scandal was reported and its implications for the media and ad industry, according to a post on the Cannes Lions website. But on Wednesday afternoon, conference attendees were sent notifications on their cell phones that his appearance had been cancelled.

Guardian journalist Carole Cadwalladr, one of the reporters who broke the story in March 2018, tweeted on Monday: “Well done, lads. This is pretty special. Cambridge Analytica’s Alexander Nix will speak at the Cannes Lions “Festival of Creativity” this week on….DRUM ROLL…’the morality of data.’ Oh, and you know who else is going? Only Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg..! ”

One ad director wrote an anonymous letter to Philip Thomas, chair of Cannes Lions, calling the organizers’ inclusion of Nix a “monumental act of self-harm,” and said he had cut up his Lion award, one of the most coveted prizes in the ad industry.

A spokeswoman for Cannes Lions confirmed to industry title PR Week: “Alexander Nix, former CEO and founder of Cambridge Analytica, will no longer be speaking in the Debussy Theatre on Thursday June 20. Festival organizers accept his decision to withdraw.”

– CNBC’s Sam Meredith contributed to this report


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protest, data, ad, analytica, cancels, ceo, conference, lions, cambridge, nix, appearance, alexander, cannes, industry, festival, interview


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Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong freed from jail, and vows to join mass protests

Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong walked free from prison on Monday after serving nearly five weeks for contempt of court, pledging to join a mass protest movement demanding that the city’s Beijing-backed leader, Carrie Lam, to step down. His release comes a day after organizers of the protest calling for Lam to quit over a controversial extradition bill said almost two million black-clad people joined Sunday’s march to government offices. Before he was jailed, both Wong and his supporter


Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong walked free from prison on Monday after serving nearly five weeks for contempt of court, pledging to join a mass protest movement demanding that the city’s Beijing-backed leader, Carrie Lam, to step down. His release comes a day after organizers of the protest calling for Lam to quit over a controversial extradition bill said almost two million black-clad people joined Sunday’s march to government offices. Before he was jailed, both Wong and his supporter
Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong freed from jail, and vows to join mass protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jail, vows, freed, movement, step, protests, lam, hong, bill, kong, extradition, mass, protest, wong, joshua, join


Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong freed from jail, and vows to join mass protests

Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong walked free from prison on Monday after serving nearly five weeks for contempt of court, pledging to join a mass protest movement demanding that the city’s Beijing-backed leader, Carrie Lam, to step down.

His release comes a day after organizers of the protest calling for Lam to quit over a controversial extradition bill said almost two million black-clad people joined Sunday’s march to government offices.

“I will join to fight against this evil law,” said Wong, 22, who was one of the leaders of the 2014 “Umbrella” pro- democracy protests that blocked major roads in the Chinese-ruled city for 79 days.

“I believe this is the time for her, Carrie Lam the liar, to step down.”

Before he was jailed, both Wong and his supporters had called for the Hong Kong government to scrap the extradition proposal.

Wong was just 17 when he stood at the forefront of the broad civil disobedience movement that presented China’s Communist Party rulers in Beijing with one of their biggest political challenges in decades.

The protests against the extradition bill have become the most significant challenge to China’s relationship with the territory since it was handed back by Britain 22 years ago.

While Lam delayed the bill at the weekend, it has yet to be completely shelved, despite widespread concern that the status of Hong Kong as a financial hub could be eroded by changes to the rule of law.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jail, vows, freed, movement, step, protests, lam, hong, bill, kong, extradition, mass, protest, wong, joshua, join


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Hong Kong protest organizers say demonstrations swell to 2 million amid calls for top official to quit

Protesters shine lights from their mobile phones during rally against a controversial extradition law proposal on June 16, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Hong Kong, June 16, 2019. But demonstrator Man-lok Ng said Hong Kong’s people faced exposure to China’s legal system and, thus, danger. Sunday’s demonstration marks a week of anti-government protests that included scenes of violence — especially on Wednesday – that are rare in Hong Kong. ‘Hong Kong is still alive’


Protesters shine lights from their mobile phones during rally against a controversial extradition law proposal on June 16, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Hong Kong, June 16, 2019. But demonstrator Man-lok Ng said Hong Kong’s people faced exposure to China’s legal system and, thus, danger. Sunday’s demonstration marks a week of anti-government protests that included scenes of violence — especially on Wednesday – that are rare in Hong Kong. ‘Hong Kong is still alive’
Hong Kong protest organizers say demonstrations swell to 2 million amid calls for top official to quit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-16  Authors: kelly olsen, vivian kam
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Hong Kong protest organizers say demonstrations swell to 2 million amid calls for top official to quit

Protesters shine lights from their mobile phones during rally against a controversial extradition law proposal on June 16, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Billy H.C. Kwok | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Massive crowds took to the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday in a rally which organizers say drew almost 2 million people to demand the city’s top official resign a day after she suspended — but did not withdraw — unpopular legislation to allow extraditions to China that opponents say must be scrapped. Citizens, many dressed in black, packed subway carriages as they made their way to participate in the march beginning in the late afternoon in hot, muggy weather. It followed a similar one last Sunday in which hundreds of thousands turned out. Crowds also lined up to take ferries across the city’s famed harbor to join the demonstration. The estimate in a statement by the Civil Human Rights Front, the pro-democracy political advocacy group that organized the protest, was almost double what it gave for last week’s. Police, however, announced a considerably lower count, estimating a peak crowd of 338,000 people but qualified that by stressing the figure was for the “original agreed procession route.” The discrepancy was similar to last week when the organizers said a little over one million participated, while police counted 240,000. Huge crowds walked along the approved thoroughfare but others spilled over into adjacent streets. Marchers held numerous signs including ones demanding that Chief Executive Carrie Lam quit, with others denouncing the extradition proposal and alleged police brutality. “Stop killing us,” read one. Marchers also chanted slogans such as “withdraw it” in reference to the legislation.

‘Apologized to the people’

Lam had vowed to press ahead with amendments to local law to allow extraditions to places with which the city has no such arrangements — including mainland China, where many in Hong Kong fear possible entanglement with its courts. But citing injuries to police and protesters in demonstrations that turned violent Wednesday and what Lam called divisions in society wrought by the plan, she announced Saturday at a press conference she was putting the legislation on indefinite hold. And while refusing calls to step down, on Sunday she offered an apology — via a government spokesperson — after avoiding one the day before. In a statement, the spokesperson said that Lam “admitted” that the government had caused “disappointment and grief” to Hong Kong’s people. “The chief executive apologized to the people of Hong Kong for this and pledged to adopt a most sincere and humble attitude to accept criticisms and make improvements in serving the public.” Many in the Asian trade and finance center of 7.4 million people oppose the extradition plan, worrying their legal system and freedoms – legacies of the territory’s history as a British colony – would be compromised by closer judicial ties with China. Hong Kong was guaranteed a high degree of control over its own affairs for at least 50 years under a “one country, two systems” arrangement when Britain ceded sovereignty to China on July 1, 1997. But local unease over increasing mainland influence has steadily grown.

A crowd of protesters marches in Hong Kong, part of an anti-government demonstration demanding the withdrawal of proposed legislation that would allow extraditions to mainland China. Hong Kong, June 16, 2019. Kelly Olsen | CNBC

Foreign business groups and governments, including the United States, also oppose the extradition plan, stressing concerns that any erosion to Hong Kong’s legal system could make it a less attractive place for banks and companies to operate. Lam and other government officials repeatedly offered assurances that adequate safeguards would guarantee protection from possible human rights abuses and that only fugitives accused of serious crimes could be extradited. The government also eliminated a number of economic-related offenses from the bill to lessen concern in the business community. China supported the plan and said that Hong Kong’s rights and freedoms are safe. But demonstrator Man-lok Ng said Hong Kong’s people faced exposure to China’s legal system and, thus, danger. “So anyone of us could be at risk if this bill would be passed,” he told CNBC.

A mourner lays flowers at the site of a makeshift shrine in Hong Kong near where a man reportedly fell to his death after protesting against a government proposal to allow extraditions to mainland China. Hong Kong, June 16, 2019. Kelly Olsen | CNBC

The mood on Sunday was one of anger at Lam but also sorrow after the death of a protester on Saturday after he reportedly fell from the top of a shopping mall where he had unfurled a banner demanding the plan be withdrawn. Ahead of the protest, hundreds of people paid their respects at a makeshift memorial set up outside the mall, offering flowers, prayers and incense. Numerous marchers carried white flowers they planned to offer when passing by. Kelly Wong, who thinks Hong Kong is completely under China’s control, said she felt “angry” at Lam for saying she would listen more to the opinions of citizens but with the aim of still eventually passing the bill. “So I think we should come out and express our voice,” Wong said near the memorial before the protest. Sunday’s demonstration marks a week of anti-government protests that included scenes of violence — especially on Wednesday – that are rare in Hong Kong. Crowds on that day estimated by police at more than 10,000 people surrounded the local legislature to stop debate on the bill.

‘Hong Kong is still alive’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-16  Authors: kelly olsen, vivian kam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, hong, kong, kongs, million, lam, quit, say, mainland, extradition, crowds, organizers, extraditions, demonstrations, swell, protest, official, plan


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Police repeatedly fire tear gas on protesters as confrontation turns violent in Hong Kong

Protesters flee the area after police fired tear gas during demonstrations outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. Isaac Lawrence | AFP | Getty ImagesHong Kong police repeatedly fired tear gas and rubber bullets into large crowds of protesters gathering around the local legislature on Wednesday. After one instance of tear gas being fired, protesters yelled “Shame on the Hong Kong police.” A spokesman at the Hong Kong office of China’s foreign ministry declined to c


Protesters flee the area after police fired tear gas during demonstrations outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. Isaac Lawrence | AFP | Getty ImagesHong Kong police repeatedly fired tear gas and rubber bullets into large crowds of protesters gathering around the local legislature on Wednesday. After one instance of tear gas being fired, protesters yelled “Shame on the Hong Kong police.” A spokesman at the Hong Kong office of China’s foreign ministry declined to c
Police repeatedly fire tear gas on protesters as confrontation turns violent in Hong Kong Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legal, tear, legislature, local, hong, protesters, gas, confrontation, kong, violent, repeatedly, protest, china, turns


Police repeatedly fire tear gas on protesters as confrontation turns violent in Hong Kong

Protesters flee the area after police fired tear gas during demonstrations outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. Isaac Lawrence | AFP | Getty Images

Hong Kong police repeatedly fired tear gas and rubber bullets into large crowds of protesters gathering around the local legislature on Wednesday. That came as lawmakers postponed debate on proposed legal changes condemned by hundreds of thousands in the city. The protests, which kicked off over the weekend, were aimed at stopping a government plan to allow extraditions to mainland China. The heart of the issue, demonstrators say, is the city’s ceding its autonomy to Beijing. Large crowds overflowed roads and pathways leading to the Legislative Council, the local assembly, while police in riot gear were deployed. Police early on raised a red warning flag that reads: “Stop Charging or We Use Force.” Crowds surrounded Legco — as the council is informally known — in the morning but by late afternoon had largely been pushed to areas south of the facility. In the afternoon, explosion-like sounds could be heard and smoke from tear gas was seen rising from near one protest point where police squared off with demonstrators. Video showed authorities using gas canisters and other methods to push back demonstrators. Protesters wearing white or black paper face masks dispersed and shouted amid the smoky tear gas. Police walked through cleared areas knocking debris out of the way. Sirens from emergency vehicles were occasionally heard. Massed protesters shouted “go away” to police and yelled out warnings and made gestures with their hands to send signals to others in the crowd. After one instance of tear gas being fired, protesters yelled “Shame on the Hong Kong police.” Security was heavy in central Hong Kong from the morning with non-authorized access blocked to the legislature. Activists have called on opponents of the proposal to surround the facility days after the biggest public demonstration in years shook the global finance and trade hub of 7.4 million people.

‘A large crowd’

Lawmakers were scheduled to discuss the proposal Wednesday but the legislature announced in a brief statement on its website that the meeting would be “changed to a later time.” Hong Kong’s Chief Secretary for Administration, Matthew Cheung, later issued a video statement saying: “Due to a large crowd blocking areas around the Legislative Council building, the president of Legislative Council ordered to delay the meeting to another time,” according to a CNBC translation. “The government urges citizens who are occupying the roads to return to the pedestrian walkways so that traffic can resume soon,” said Cheung, the No. 2 official in Hong Kong. “I also wanted to call for the citizens here to remain calm and restrained, to leave peacefully soon and not to break the law.” The Legco press office subsequently confirmed to CNBC that lawmakers will not meet Wednesday. Dennis Kwok, one of the legislators who has led opposition to the government plan, said he’s doing so because of Hong Kong and the mainland’s fundamentally different legal characters. “It’s because we do not trust the legal system in China, where there is no independence of judiciary and there is no respect for human rights and due process,” Kwok told CNBC on Wednesday. “And sending people there to face serious criminal trials with no human rights safeguard is below our standard.” A spokesman at the Hong Kong office of China’s foreign ministry declined to comment when contacted by CNBC for reaction to Kwok’s remarks. Police said that 240,000 people participated at the peak of Sunday’s protest that saw throngs march down a main street shouting slogans and carrying signs denouncing the legislation and demanding Hong Kong’s top official, Chief Executive Carrie Lam, resign. Organizers, however, claimed a turnout of slightly more than 1 million. The last time Hong Kong saw a protest of such scale was in 2003 when an estimated 500,000 people rallied against a proposed security law that also raised fears of closer links to China. Sunday’s protest was overwhelmingly peaceful, but there were clashes at night between protesters and police at the legislature with injuries suffered and arrests made. Lam, who next month starts the third year of a five-year term, on Monday rejected calls to quit , telling reporters that she will push ahead with the plan in the local assembly.

‘Hong Kong is Hong Kong’

Lam also said the idea for the legal change came from her government, denying widespread suspicions that she is acting at the behest of Beijing authorities. The government says it is necessary to close a legal “gap” that prevents it from extraditing a local man to Taiwan for allegedly killing his girlfriend while on a visit there last year. It wants to amend a local ordinance to that effect, but the change would also apply to China and other locales with which Hong Kong lacks extradition treaties. The government says the bill includes strong safeguards, including those that will prevent human rights abuses, and has claimed it won’t be used for political purposes.

A demonstrator displays the U.K. flag behind a police line on June 10 in Hong Kong. Chan Long Hei | SOPA Images | LightRocket | Getty Images

But Tsai Ing-wen, Taiwan’s president, in a Tuesday Facebook post lauded the Hong Kong protesters and criticized the proposal, saying the self-governing island would not accept the accused man’s extradition under the proposed legal change. Many in Hong Kong, which has a separate legal system from mainland China, fear being caught up in mainland courts, which are widely criticized by human groups as a political tool of the Chinese Communist Party. “I think Hong Kong is Hong Kong. It’s not China,” said Jeace Chan, who participated in Sunday’s demonstration and was having breakfast Wednesday before heading to the legislature to join the latest protest aimed at stopping passage of the bill. “This is our goal,” she added.

Hong Kong’s role as a business hub


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legal, tear, legislature, local, hong, protesters, gas, confrontation, kong, violent, repeatedly, protest, china, turns


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Protests against Kazakhstan’s presidential election lead to violence in the capital

Though that may seem a sweeping victory for Jomart-Tokayev, the transfer of office has spurred unrest in the country’s capital Nur-Sultan and largest city Almaty. About 500 protesters were arrested by police, the BBC reported, citing local officials. The demonstration, decrying what protests called a “dictatorship” in the country, is the largest Kazakhstan has seen in recent years. As protest is not tolerated in the country, the demonstration led to violence in the streets. A BBC correspondent i


Though that may seem a sweeping victory for Jomart-Tokayev, the transfer of office has spurred unrest in the country’s capital Nur-Sultan and largest city Almaty. About 500 protesters were arrested by police, the BBC reported, citing local officials. The demonstration, decrying what protests called a “dictatorship” in the country, is the largest Kazakhstan has seen in recent years. As protest is not tolerated in the country, the demonstration led to violence in the streets. A BBC correspondent i
Protests against Kazakhstan’s presidential election lead to violence in the capital Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nearly, protests, protest, violence, capital, reported, bbc, largest, election, country, kazakhstans, jomarttokayev, lead, demonstration, yearsas, presidential, nursultan


Protests against Kazakhstan's presidential election lead to violence in the capital

Kazakhstan’s first president, Nursultan Nazarbayev, has stepped down after a nearly three-decade-long tenure.

His successor, Kassym Jomart-Tokayev, confirmed his position after taking nearly 71% of the vote in Sunday’s election against six other government-approved candidates, according to Foreign Policy. His closest opposition candidate trailed behind with 16.2%.

Though that may seem a sweeping victory for Jomart-Tokayev, the transfer of office has spurred unrest in the country’s capital Nur-Sultan and largest city Almaty.

About 500 protesters were arrested by police, the BBC reported, citing local officials. The demonstration, decrying what protests called a “dictatorship” in the country, is the largest Kazakhstan has seen in recent years.

As protest is not tolerated in the country, the demonstration led to violence in the streets. A BBC correspondent in Nur-Sultan reported people being dragged onto buses by riot police. Many journalists were also detained covering the protest, while social media platforms such as Facebook and Telegram were reportedly inaccessible in the country during that time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nearly, protests, protest, violence, capital, reported, bbc, largest, election, country, kazakhstans, jomarttokayev, lead, demonstration, yearsas, presidential, nursultan


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Hong Kong leader vows to go ahead with contentious China extradition law despite mass protest

Hong Kong’s top official doubled down on a contentious plan to allow extraditions to China on Monday, one day after hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets in one of the biggest demonstrations to shake the former British colony in years. Carrie Lam, the territory’s chief executive, ignored calls for her resignation and reiterated the need for the legislation. The rally highlights increasing public anger against the government’s proposal to seek legal changes to allow people in Ho


Hong Kong’s top official doubled down on a contentious plan to allow extraditions to China on Monday, one day after hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets in one of the biggest demonstrations to shake the former British colony in years. Carrie Lam, the territory’s chief executive, ignored calls for her resignation and reiterated the need for the legislation. The rally highlights increasing public anger against the government’s proposal to seek legal changes to allow people in Ho
Hong Kong leader vows to go ahead with contentious China extradition law despite mass protest Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, proposal, kong, protest, kongs, lam, contentious, leader, rights, security, extradition, participated, increased, vows, hong, despite, freedoms, mass, law


Hong Kong leader vows to go ahead with contentious China extradition law despite mass protest

Hong Kong’s top official doubled down on a contentious plan to allow extraditions to China on Monday, one day after hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets in one of the biggest demonstrations to shake the former British colony in years.

Carrie Lam, the territory’s chief executive, ignored calls for her resignation and reiterated the need for the legislation.

The rally highlights increasing public anger against the government’s proposal to seek legal changes to allow people in Hong Kong to be extradited to places with which it has no such agreement — including China.

Flanked by the secretaries for justice and security on Monday, Lam stressed safeguards built into the legislation to prevent human rights abuses and said she will continue in her job. She also lauded those who participated in the march and said it shows that Hong Kong’s “rights and freedoms are as robust as ever.”

Police estimated about 240,000 people marched Sunday at the peak of the protest which saw crowds overflow a city thoroughfare. Organizers, meanwhile, claimed that slightly more than one million people participated. The event rivaled a 2003 demonstration when a reported 500,000 people protested proposed security legislation.

Marchers shouted slogans and held up signs demanding the government withdraw the proposal and for Lam to quit.

It came as concerns have increased that Hong Kong’s rights and freedoms are eroding under what is perceived as increased efforts by the central government in Beijing to increase its influence.

Hong Kong, which on July 1 marks 22 years since Britain handed the territory back to China, was guaranteed a high degree of autonomy as a Special Administrative Region under a “one country, two systems” framework that was to remain unchanged for at least 50 years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, proposal, kong, protest, kongs, lam, contentious, leader, rights, security, extradition, participated, increased, vows, hong, despite, freedoms, mass, law


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Trump baby blimp flies again in London as thousands protest UK visit

A 20-foot-tall blimp depicting President Donald Trump as a baby is raised in London on Tuesday June 4. CNBC’s Hollie WongA 20-foot-tall blimp depicting President Donald Trump in a diaper was raised Tuesday morning in London, with thousands protesting against the U.S. president’s state visit to the U.K. The group’s Facebook event, called “Together Against Trump – stop the state visit,” had more than 8,500 potential attendees and 34,000 people interested in attending. A 20-foot-tall blimp depictin


A 20-foot-tall blimp depicting President Donald Trump as a baby is raised in London on Tuesday June 4. CNBC’s Hollie WongA 20-foot-tall blimp depicting President Donald Trump in a diaper was raised Tuesday morning in London, with thousands protesting against the U.S. president’s state visit to the U.K. The group’s Facebook event, called “Together Against Trump – stop the state visit,” had more than 8,500 potential attendees and 34,000 people interested in attending. A 20-foot-tall blimp depictin
Trump baby blimp flies again in London as thousands protest UK visit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protests, flies, baby, khan, stop, president, blimp, balloon, protest, visit, london, raised, thousands, trump, uk


Trump baby blimp flies again in London as thousands protest UK visit

A 20-foot-tall blimp depicting President Donald Trump as a baby is raised in London on Tuesday June 4. 2019. CNBC’s Hollie Wong

A 20-foot-tall blimp depicting President Donald Trump in a diaper was raised Tuesday morning in London, with thousands protesting against the U.S. president’s state visit to the U.K. The giant balloon named “Trump Baby” was unveiled at 10:30 a.m. London time near the U.K.’s Houses of Parliament, close to where protesters marched to show their discontent against the president and his policies. Organizers said winds in the U.K. capital had delayed a full flight for the balloon, but by 11:15 a.m. it had been raised 30 feet above the ground. A rally held by the Stop Trump Coalition and other campaign groups started at 11 a.m. London time, and thousands planned to march from Trafalgar Square to Downing Street as the president’s schedule unfolded. London’s Metropolitan Police put up a blockade, but protesters will be allowed a clear view of the access to the prime minister’s residence at 10 Downing St.

“Now Trump is coming back for a state visit and we have to get out there again in a diverse Carnival of Resistance that shows we reject Trump’s divisive politics and policies of bigotry, hate and greed,” the Stop Trump Coalition said on its website ahead of the demonstration. The group’s Facebook event, called “Together Against Trump – stop the state visit,” had more than 8,500 potential attendees and 34,000 people interested in attending. It is one of a string of protests against the president’s visit that are being organized in different cities across the country. In 2018, a mass protest in London against Trump’s visit attracted tens of thousands of people and the security costs amounted to an estimated bill of more than £12 million ($15.8 million). Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the U.K.’s Labour Party, will speak at Tuesday’s protest, a spokesperson for the party told British media. Corbyn said Monday on Twitter that the demonstration was “an opportunity to stand in solidarity with those he’s attacked in America, around the world and in our own country.”

A 20-foot-tall blimp depicting President Donald Trump as a baby is raised in London on Tuesday June 4. 2019. CNBC’s Hollie Wong

In a tweet on Monday evening, Trump said his visit was “going really well” and that there had been “tremendous crowds of well wishers.” “Haven’t seen any protests yet, but I’m sure the Fake News will be working hard to find them,” he added.

Row with London mayor

Trump and his family will be in the U.K. until Wednesday, when he is due to fly to France to attend a D-Day ceremony in France with French President Emmanuel Macron. Asked about protests ahead of his 2018 U.K. visit, the president said: “I think it’s fine. I think they like me a lot in the U.K., I think they agree with me on immigration.” However, he later told British newspaper The Sun that the protests made him feel “unwelcome.”

Before landing in London on Monday, Trump tweeted a strongly worded criticism of the city’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, after Khan likened the president to “the fascists of the 20th century.” Trump accused Khan of being incompetent and “foolishly ‘nasty’ to the visiting president of the United States,” before dubbing him a “stone cold loser.” The angry-orange baby balloon that flew on Tuesday has been a point of tension between the president and the mayor. Khan did not authorize its use in 2018 at first, but then changed his mind after more than 10,000 people signed a petition calling for him to do so. Khan explained in an interview that there’s no reason to stop the balloon given that it is a safe and peaceful way of protesting.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protests, flies, baby, khan, stop, president, blimp, balloon, protest, visit, london, raised, thousands, trump, uk


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Venezuela’s Guaido calls for ‘largest march in history’ in uprising effort

In his boldest effort yet to gain the support of the armed forces, Guaido appeared early Tuesday morning outside a Caracas air force base with dozens of National Guard members. That triggered a day of violent protests, leaving more than 100 injured but without any concrete signs of defection from the armed forces leadership. “We know that Maduro does not have the backing or the respect of the armed forces,” Guaido said in a video message posted to his social media accounts on Tuesday evening. Wh


In his boldest effort yet to gain the support of the armed forces, Guaido appeared early Tuesday morning outside a Caracas air force base with dozens of National Guard members. That triggered a day of violent protests, leaving more than 100 injured but without any concrete signs of defection from the armed forces leadership. “We know that Maduro does not have the backing or the respect of the armed forces,” Guaido said in a video message posted to his social media accounts on Tuesday evening. Wh
Venezuela’s Guaido calls for ‘largest march in history’ in uprising effort Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, largest, calls, maduro, protest, president, forces, support, history, armed, opposition, guaido, effort, supporters, venezuelas, uprising, venezuelan


Venezuela's Guaido calls for 'largest march in history' in uprising effort

Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido (C) speaks to supporters next to high-profile opposition politician Leopoldo Lopez, who had been put under home arrest by Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s regime, and members of the Bolivarian National Guard who joined his campaign to oust Maduro, in Caracas on April 30, 2019.

Venezuelans were expected to take to the streets on Wednesday for what opposition leader Juan Guaido pledged would be the “largest march” in the country’s history, a day after he called for the military to oust President Nicolas Maduro.

In his boldest effort yet to gain the support of the armed forces, Guaido appeared early Tuesday morning outside a Caracas air force base with dozens of National Guard members. That triggered a day of violent protests, leaving more than 100 injured but without any concrete signs of defection from the armed forces leadership.

“We know that Maduro does not have the backing or the respect of the armed forces,” Guaido said in a video message posted to his social media accounts on Tuesday evening. “We have seen that protest yields results. We should keep up the pressure.”

Whether the protest turnout meets those lofty hopes will provide a key test for Guaido, as some supporters grow frustrated that Maduro remains in office more than three months after Guaido — who leads the opposition-controlled National Assembly — invoked the constitution to assume an interim presidency, arguing Maduro’s May 2018 re-election was illegitimate.

While Guaido earned the backing of the United States and most Western countries, the armed forces have stood by Maduro, who retains the support of allies like Russia, China and Cuba. That has frustrated Guaido’s bid to assume the day-to-day functions of government on an interim basis – which he says would be a prelude to calling new elections.

Venezuelan living standards have declined even further in the first several months of the year, with a series of blackouts and water shortages adding to hyperinflation and chronic shortages of food and medicine that have prompted millions to emigrate.

“I hope this will be the last time we have to take to the streets,” said Claudia Riveros, a 36-year-old bakery worker carrying a Venezuelan flag during Tuesday’s protest. “I want to see the end of this usurping government.”

Maduro, a socialist who calls Guaido a U.S. puppet seeking to orchestrate a coup against him, has also called on supporters to march on Wednesday.

“Tomorrow, the first of May, we will have a large, millions-strong march of the working class,” Maduro said in a Tuesday night television address. “We have been confronting different types of aggression and attempted coups never before seen in our history.”

Guaido’s choice of International Workers’ Day for a major march comes as he is making appeals to union leaders and public workers, a traditional base of support for Maduro and his predecessor and mentor, the late President Hugo Chavez.

“If he does get some degree of participation from labor movements, then that can be an additional feather in his cap,” said Risa Grais-Targow, the Latin America director at Eurasia Group in Washington, adding that the march would be “a significant barometer of his support and capacity to mobilize.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, largest, calls, maduro, protest, president, forces, support, history, armed, opposition, guaido, effort, supporters, venezuelas, uprising, venezuelan


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