Social media has become a battleground in Hong Kong’s protests

Using social media as a tool to galvanize support during a political movement isn’t new — the image of a yellow umbrella was widely shared on Facebook to show support to Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement in 2014. Hong Kong demonstrators have remained largely anonymous, using social media to avoid being identified and arrested by police authorities. Social media has changed the way people document history, said Tracy Loh, senior lecturer of communication management at Singapore Management Univer


Using social media as a tool to galvanize support during a political movement isn’t new — the image of a yellow umbrella was widely shared on Facebook to show support to Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement in 2014. Hong Kong demonstrators have remained largely anonymous, using social media to avoid being identified and arrested by police authorities. Social media has changed the way people document history, said Tracy Loh, senior lecturer of communication management at Singapore Management Univer
Social media has become a battleground in Hong Kong’s protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, using, hong, loh, used, protesters, movement, media, protests, battleground, demonstrators, videos, social, brutality, kongs


Social media has become a battleground in Hong Kong's protests

Using social media as a tool to galvanize support during a political movement isn’t new — the image of a yellow umbrella was widely shared on Facebook to show support to Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement in 2014. But this time around, the protesters are using social media in a way demonstrating a heightened awareness of cybersecurity and an increased understanding of how to effectively communicate with the medium.

Hong Kong demonstrators have remained largely anonymous, using social media to avoid being identified and arrested by police authorities. Media experts said such tech has played a significant role in the documentation, organization, and assembly of the large-scale demonstrations.

Social media has changed the way people document history, said Tracy Loh, senior lecturer of communication management at Singapore Management University. She told CNBC that social media has played a “more apparent” role in the 2019 protests than ever before.

Just as in the 2014 “Umbrella Movement,” social media is being used by protesters to conceal identities, spread information, mobilize demonstrators and avoid detainment — but it’s now gone beyond that, according to Loh

“I think that what has changed now is that social media is used to win the hearts and minds of the people. Both sides are using images of police brutality and/or protester brutality to further their own agendas,” she said.

The ongoing demonstrations in Hong Kong — a former British colony that was returned to Chinese rule in 1997 — started as peaceful rallies against a single proposed law. They’ve since snowballed into a wider pro-democracy movement, with some even demanding full autonomy from Beijing and occasional outbreaks of violence and disruptions to the city’s operations.

Protesters have circulated images of a female protester that was injured in the eye by members of the police force, and videos of police brutality have been spread to galvanize demonstrators, explained Loh. But, in the meantime, Chinese authorities have also utilized the power of social media, pushing out videos of military vehicles on standby in the neighboring city of Shenzhen and circulating videos of protesters disrupting public transit operations.

Social media has been used “as a tool in the battle for public opinion,” said Loh. She added that it has become more and more difficult for users and consumers of online content because they have to “deal with misinformation and fake news and the associated damages that (such content) can cause.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, using, hong, loh, used, protesters, movement, media, protests, battleground, demonstrators, videos, social, brutality, kongs


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Trump clarifies ‘personal meeting’ tweet, suggests Xi should meet Hong Kong protesters

President Donald Trump on Thursday said he has “no doubt” that Chinese President Xi Jinping could bring an end to the unrest in Hong Kong by meeting face to face with the protesters. Trump said this in a tweet Thursday morning, less than a day after he first appeared to propose that a “personal meeting” between himself and Xi could bring a speedy end to “the Hong Kong problem. ” All aspects of the U.S.-China relationship have come under intense scrutiny, as the escalating trade war between Beiji


President Donald Trump on Thursday said he has “no doubt” that Chinese President Xi Jinping could bring an end to the unrest in Hong Kong by meeting face to face with the protesters. Trump said this in a tweet Thursday morning, less than a day after he first appeared to propose that a “personal meeting” between himself and Xi could bring a speedy end to “the Hong Kong problem. ” All aspects of the U.S.-China relationship have come under intense scrutiny, as the escalating trade war between Beiji
Trump clarifies ‘personal meeting’ tweet, suggests Xi should meet Hong Kong protesters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suggests, end, washington, clarifies, meet, chinese, personal, meeting, president, hong, kong, xi, trump, face, protesters, bring


Trump clarifies 'personal meeting' tweet, suggests Xi should meet Hong Kong protesters

President Donald Trump on Thursday said he has “no doubt” that Chinese President Xi Jinping could bring an end to the unrest in Hong Kong by meeting face to face with the protesters.

Trump said this in a tweet Thursday morning, less than a day after he first appeared to propose that a “personal meeting” between himself and Xi could bring a speedy end to “the Hong Kong problem. ”

All aspects of the U.S.-China relationship have come under intense scrutiny, as the escalating trade war between Beijing and Washington roils global markets and tensions ratchet up between mainland China and protesters in semiautonomous Hong Kong.

Trump has been criticized for taking an ambiguous stance on the Chinese government’s action in Hong Kong, where hundreds of thousands of people have taken to the streets originally to protest a divisive extradition bill supported by Beijing.

Fights have erupted at the protests, and the threat of increased violence has hovered over the demonstrations, which included storming government buildings and occupying the city’s airport.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suggests, end, washington, clarifies, meet, chinese, personal, meeting, president, hong, kong, xi, trump, face, protesters, bring


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Yen up as markets dismiss Trump’s trade concession, Chinese data disappoints

The yen rose on Wednesday as weaker-than-expected Chinese economic data reinforced the view that resolving the trade war was a long way off even if U.S. President Donald Trump had delayed some additional tariffs. The onshore yuan rose against the dollar, taking its cue from a stronger fixing. The dollar fell 0.41% to 106.31 yen in Asia. The Australian dollar slipped 0.6% to 72.10 yen, while the New Zealand dollar fell 0.5% to 71.77 yen. Against the offshore yuan, the dollar rose 0.5% to 7.0405 y


The yen rose on Wednesday as weaker-than-expected Chinese economic data reinforced the view that resolving the trade war was a long way off even if U.S. President Donald Trump had delayed some additional tariffs. The onshore yuan rose against the dollar, taking its cue from a stronger fixing. The dollar fell 0.41% to 106.31 yen in Asia. The Australian dollar slipped 0.6% to 72.10 yen, while the New Zealand dollar fell 0.5% to 71.77 yen. Against the offshore yuan, the dollar rose 0.5% to 7.0405 y
Yen up as markets dismiss Trump’s trade concession, Chinese data disappoints Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rose, yen, dismiss, yuan, markets, disappoints, dollar, united, states, data, protesters, concession, chinese, fell, trade, trumps


Yen up as markets dismiss Trump's trade concession, Chinese data disappoints

The yen rose on Wednesday as weaker-than-expected Chinese economic data reinforced the view that resolving the trade war was a long way off even if U.S. President Donald Trump had delayed some additional tariffs.

The offshore yuan remained lower against the dollar after China’s closely watched industrial output rose in July at the slowest pace in more than 17 years. The onshore yuan rose against the dollar, taking its cue from a stronger fixing.

News the United States would delay some tariffs supported Asian stocks, but optimism in the currency market quickly faded on broader concerns there are no quick solutions to the trade row, which economists say is dragging on China’s economy and threatening global growth.

Increasingly violent clashes between protesters and police in Hong Kong, worries about Britain’s exit from the European Union, and Middle East tensions mean risk aversion could quickly flare up again and roil major currencies.

“If we think only about the United States and China, there could be more room for dollar gains and yen losses, but this does not mean trade frictions have been resolved,” said Tohru Sasaki, head of Japan markets research at JP Morgan Securities in Tokyo.

“There are still a lot of geopolitical risks, such as Hong Kong, Brexit, and the Iranian situation. I don’t expect significant (risk-on) moves.”

The dollar fell 0.41% to 106.31 yen in Asia.

The Australian dollar slipped 0.6% to 72.10 yen, while the New Zealand dollar fell 0.5% to 71.77 yen.

Against the offshore yuan, the dollar rose 0.5% to 7.0405 yuan. However, in the onshore market, the yuan opened at 7.0240 per dollar, stronger than its previous close at 7.0558.

On Tuesday, U.S. President Donald Trump backed off of his Sept. 1 deadline for 10% tariffs on remaining Chinese imports, delaying duties on cellphones, laptops and other consumer goods, in the hopes of blunting their impact on U.S. holiday sales.

Still, trade negotiations between the United States and China have progressed in fits and starts, so many investors and analysts have scaled back expectations for a resolution in the near term.

China’s industrial output rose 4.8% in July from a year earlier, which was below the median estimate for a 5.8% year-on-year increase and marked the slowest growth since February 2002, data showed on Wednesday.

Retail sales and fixed-asset investment in July also grew less than forecast, highlighting concerns the trade war is damaging the health of the world’s second-largest economy.

The dollar index, measuring the greenback against a basket of six currencies, was little changed at 97.755 after jumping 0.4% on Tuesday.

Hong Kong’s airport resumed operations on Wednesday, rescheduling hundreds of flights that had been disrupted this week as protesters clashed with riot police in a deepening crisis in the Chinese-controlled city.

Ten weeks of increasingly violent clashes between police and pro-democracy protesters, angered by a perceived erosion of freedoms, have plunged the Asian financial hub into its worst crisis since it came under Chinese rule from Britain in 1997.

The euro was unchanged at $1.1152, but fell 0.43% to 118.76 yen.

European data on consumer prices and GDP is due from Europe later on Wednesday and could shape the near-term direction of the common currency.

Sterling was little changed at $1.2065, but remained within striking distance of $1.2015, the lowest level since January 2017.

Britain will release consumer price data later on Wednesday, but uncertainty about how Britain will exit the European Union has clouded the outlook for the Bank of England’s monetary policy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rose, yen, dismiss, yuan, markets, disappoints, dollar, united, states, data, protesters, concession, chinese, fell, trade, trumps


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Chinese state media urge action, voice support for Hong Kong police after overnight clashes

Protesters occupy the departure hall of the Hong Kong International Airport during a demonstration on August 12 in Hong Kong. However, Chinese state media has stopped short of calling for military action to deal with the protests. “Extreme political ideas have found frequent expression in Hong Kong, with some even raising ‘Hong Kong independence’ slogans recently. Chinese state media has also posted messages of support for the Hong Kong police, describing what was happening in the city as “a sha


Protesters occupy the departure hall of the Hong Kong International Airport during a demonstration on August 12 in Hong Kong. However, Chinese state media has stopped short of calling for military action to deal with the protests. “Extreme political ideas have found frequent expression in Hong Kong, with some even raising ‘Hong Kong independence’ slogans recently. Chinese state media has also posted messages of support for the Hong Kong police, describing what was happening in the city as “a sha
Chinese state media urge action, voice support for Hong Kong police after overnight clashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, overnight, state, peoples, media, urge, voice, clashes, chinas, protesters, chinese, kong, hong, reporter, times, support


Chinese state media urge action, voice support for Hong Kong police after overnight clashes

Protesters occupy the departure hall of the Hong Kong International Airport during a demonstration on August 12 in Hong Kong.

Chinese state media called on Beijing on Wednesday to deal with protests in Hong Kong more decisively after a reporter from one of China’s largest government-backed newspapers was caught up in overnight clashes.

Ten weeks of increasingly violent clashes between police and pro-democracy protesters, angered by a perceived erosion of freedoms, are posing one of the biggest challenges for Chinese President Xi Jinping since he came to power in 2012.

Demonstrators and riot police clashed at Hong Kong’s airport late on Tuesday after flights were cancelled for a second day. Protesters at one point held a man who Chinese media have said was a reporter from China’s Global Times newspaper.

A front-page commentary on the overseas edition of the Communist Party’s official People’s Daily newspaper said on Wednesday Hong Kong had reached a critical juncture.

“Using the sword of the law to stop violence and restore order is overwhelmingly the most important and urgent task for Hong Kong!” it said.

Another commentary by a Shenzhen University researcher, published by the China Daily, said the central government should deal with Hong Kong issues more decisively.

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Twitter overnight the Chinese government was moving troops to the border with Hong Kong and urged calm.

However, Chinese state media has stopped short of calling for military action to deal with the protests.

Demonstrators say they are fighting the erosion of the “one country, two systems” arrangement that enshrined some autonomy for Hong Kong after China took it back from Britain in 1997.

“Extreme political ideas have found frequent expression in Hong Kong, with some even raising ‘Hong Kong independence’ slogans recently. Which means the ‘one country, two systems’ principle faces a new challenge,” Chinese author Li Peiwen said.

Chinese state media has also posted messages of support for the Hong Kong police, describing what was happening in the city as “a shame”. Such posts were the most-discussed topics on China’s social media platforms on Wednesday.

“We support the Hong Kong police too!” said a post on the People’s Daily’s official Twitter-like Weibo account that was reposted more than 500,000 times.

Global Times editor Hu Xijin said one of the newspaper’s reporters was rescued by police after being tied up by demonstrators. The tabloid is published by the People’s Daily.

“GT reporter Fu Guohao has been rescued by police and sent to the hospital. We’re still learning about his injury conditions,” said in a tweet.

Chinese state broadcaster CCTV called Fu “a real man” in a another Weibo post that had more than 140,000 “likes.”

Netizens have been closely watching what Beijing might do next after China this week condemned some protesters for using dangerous tools to attack police and said the clashes showed “sprouts of terrorism.”

The Global Times reported on Monday that China’s People’s Armed Police assembled in the southeastern city of Shenzhen, fueling speculation of a possible intervention in Hong Kong.

Some reactions on China’s social media platforms called for Beijing to intervene while many others urged calm.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, overnight, state, peoples, media, urge, voice, clashes, chinas, protesters, chinese, kong, hong, reporter, times, support


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Hong Kong protesters offer apologies, China doubles down after airport clash

Pro-democracy protestors block the entrance to the airport terminals after a scuffle with police at Hong Kong’s international airport late on August 13, 2019. China said on Wednesday Hong Kong’s protest movement had reached “near terrorism” and more street clashes followed ugly scenes the previous day when protesters set upon men they suspected of being government sympathizers. Ten weeks of increasingly violent confrontation between police and protesters have plunged Hong Kong into its worst cri


Pro-democracy protestors block the entrance to the airport terminals after a scuffle with police at Hong Kong’s international airport late on August 13, 2019. China said on Wednesday Hong Kong’s protest movement had reached “near terrorism” and more street clashes followed ugly scenes the previous day when protesters set upon men they suspected of being government sympathizers. Ten weeks of increasingly violent confrontation between police and protesters have plunged Hong Kong into its worst cri
Hong Kong protesters offer apologies, China doubles down after airport clash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kongs, doubles, protesters, scenes, chinese, hong, china, apologies, movement, offer, clash, kong, late, demonstrators, airport


Hong Kong protesters offer apologies, China doubles down after airport clash

Pro-democracy protestors block the entrance to the airport terminals after a scuffle with police at Hong Kong’s international airport late on August 13, 2019.

China said on Wednesday Hong Kong’s protest movement had reached “near terrorism” and more street clashes followed ugly scenes the previous day when protesters set upon men they suspected of being government sympathizers.

The United States said it was deeply concerned at news of Chinese police forces gathering near the border, urged Hong Kong’s government to respect freedom of speech, and issued a travel advisory urging caution when visiting the city.

By nightfall, police and protesters were again facing off on the streets, with riot officers shooting tear gas almost immediately as their response to demonstrators toughens.

Ten weeks of increasingly violent confrontation between police and protesters have plunged Hong Kong into its worst crisis since it reverted from British to Chinese rule in 1997.

Flights resumed on Wednesday amid heightened security at Hong Kong airport, which is one of the world’s busiest, after two days of disruptions sparked by protesters swarming the airport and, late Tuesday, detaining there two men they suspected opposed them.

China’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office in Beijing called the behavior at the airport no different to terrorism and said it must be severely punished.

“We’re deeply sorry about what happened yesterday,” read a banner held up by a group of a few dozen demonstrators in the airport arrivals hall in the morning.

“We were desperate and we made imperfect decisions. Please accept our apologies,” the banner said.

In chaotic scenes that would once have been unthinkable for Hong Kong, a peaceful sit-in at the airport turned violent late on Tuesday as protesters confronted and held a man they believed was an undercover Chinese agent.

Busloads of riot police arrived in response, clashing with furious demonstrators before withdrawing once the man was removed, and leaving the terminal briefly in control of activists who then detained a Chinese reporter for a short time.

It was not clear whether the scenes of violence might have eroded the broad support the movement has so far attracted in Hong Kong, a major financial hub. The protests have also hit the city’s faltering economy.

“We promise to reflect and to improve,” protesters said in one message distributed on social media app Telegram.

“Sorry we were too reckless … we are only afraid of losing your support to the whole movement due to our mistake, and that you give up on fighting.”

They also showed little sign of relenting in their protests, which began in opposition to a now-suspended bill that would have allowed the extradition of suspects for trial in mainland China, but have swelled into wider calls for democracy.

Hundreds attended a demonstration in the residential area of Sham Shui Po, where police arrived and quickly used tear gas after protesters pointed lasers at the police station.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kongs, doubles, protesters, scenes, chinese, hong, china, apologies, movement, offer, clash, kong, late, demonstrators, airport


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Hong Kong airport returns to calm, after riot police clashed with protesters earlier

Riot police disperse anti-extradition bill protesters during a mass demonstration after a woman was shot in the eye, at the Hong Kong international airport, in Hong Kong China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersThe Hong Kong airport returned to calm as most protesters left the airport early Wednesday morning. At the airport, protesters discussed among themselves whether they should simply block all access to the facility. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump tweeted that U.S. intelligence info


Riot police disperse anti-extradition bill protesters during a mass demonstration after a woman was shot in the eye, at the Hong Kong international airport, in Hong Kong China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersThe Hong Kong airport returned to calm as most protesters left the airport early Wednesday morning. At the airport, protesters discussed among themselves whether they should simply block all access to the facility. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump tweeted that U.S. intelligence info
Hong Kong airport returns to calm, after riot police clashed with protesters earlier Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airport, clashed, riot, earlier, flights, return, shut, kong, hong, china, returns, city, night, protesters, calm


Hong Kong airport returns to calm, after riot police clashed with protesters earlier

Riot police disperse anti-extradition bill protesters during a mass demonstration after a woman was shot in the eye, at the Hong Kong international airport, in Hong Kong China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | Reuters

The Hong Kong airport returned to calm as most protesters left the airport early Wednesday morning. Earlier, riot police clashed with pro-democracy protesters late Tuesday night, moving into the terminal where the demonstrators had shut down operations at the busy transport hub for two straight days. The Tuesday night demonstrations involved officers armed with pepper spray and batons confronting the protesters who used luggage carts to barricade entrances to the airport terminal. Police took several people into a police van waiting at the entrance to the airport’s arrivals hall. Police said they tried to help ambulance officers reach an injured man whom protesters had detained on suspicion of being an undercover agent. Protesters also detained a second man who they suspected of being an undercover agent. After emptying out his belongings, they found a blue T-shirt that has been worn by pro-Beijing supporters that they said was evidence he was a spy.

Earlier in the day, authorities were forced to cancel all remaining flights as the city’s pro-Beijing leader warned that the protesters had pushed events onto a “path of no return.” After a brief period when flights were able to take off and land, the airport authority suspended check-in services for departing flights as of 4:30 p.m. Departing flights that had completed the process were able to continue to operate. It said it did not expect arriving flights to be affected, although dozens were already canceled. The authority advised people not to come to the airport, one of the world’s busiest. More than 200 flights were canceled Monday and the airport was effectively shut down with no flights taking off or landing. Passengers have been forced to stay in the city while airlines tried to find other ways to get them to their destinations. For Grace Bendal, a 43-year-old contractor from the Philippines, Tuesday was the second straight day she came to the airport only to learn flights were canceled. She spent the weekend in Hong Kong with her primary school-age children, who were eager to return to classes. She said they have already missed two days of school and the extra day in the city has cost her around 3,000 Hong Kong dollars ($400). Though there were no airline employees at check-in counters Tuesday evening, Bendal said she and her children planned to stay at the airport all night. “I cannot blame them, because they are fighting for something,” Bendal said of the protesters. “But then it’s not right if we are the ones suffering.” The airport disruptions are an escalation of a summer of demonstrations aimed at what many Hong Kong residents see as an increasing erosion of the freedoms they were promised in 1997 when Communist Party-ruled mainland China took over what had been a British colony. The protests have built on an opposition movement that shut down much of the city for seven weeks in 2014 before it eventually fizzled and its leaders were jailed on public disturbance charges. The central government in Beijing has ominously characterized the current protest movement as something approaching “terrorism” that poses an “existential threat” to citizens. While Beijing tends to define terrorism broadly, extending it especially to nonviolent movements opposing government policies in minority regions such as Tibet and Xinjiang, its use of the term in relation to Hong Kong raised the prospect of greater violence and the possible suspension of legal rights for those detained.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said the instability, chaos and violence have placed the city on a “path of no return.” The black-clad demonstrators have shown no sign of letting up on their campaign to force Lam’s administration to respond to their demands, including that she step down and scrap proposed legislation under which some suspects could be sent to mainland China, where critics say they could face torture and unfair or politically charged trials. Lam has rejected all calls for dialogue, part of what analysts say is a strategy to wear down the opposition movement through police action while prompting demonstrators to take more violent and extreme actions that will turn the Hong Kong public against them. At the airport, protesters discussed among themselves whether they should simply block all access to the facility. Meanwhile, paramilitary police were assembling across the border in the city of Shenzhen for exercises that some saw as a threat to increase force against the mostly young protesters who have turned out by the thousands in the past 10 weeks. On Tuesday, President Donald Trump tweeted that U.S. intelligence informed him that Chinese troops were being moved to the Hong Kong border.

Anti-government protesters try to prevent a passenger from breaching a barricade in front of departure gates, during a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | Reuters


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airport, clashed, riot, earlier, flights, return, shut, kong, hong, china, returns, city, night, protesters, calm


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen


Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | ReutersChinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Despite that reopen
China media says Hong Kong protesters are ‘asking for self-destruction’ as military assembles nearby Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, media, assembles, protesters, peoples, asking, hong, china, airport, beijing, selfdestruction, military, kong, nearby, city


China media says Hong Kong protesters are 'asking for self-destruction' as military assembles nearby

Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration at Hong Kong Airport, China August 13, 2019. Thomas Peter | Reuters

Chinese propaganda outlets warned on Tuesday that protesters in Hong Kong are “asking for self-destruction,” as they released a video showing military vehicles amassing near the border of the city. Meanwhile, the city’s embattled leader, Carrie Lam, told the news media on Tuesday that “lawbreaking activities in the name of freedom” were damaging the rule of law and that the Asian financial hub’s recovery from anti-government protests could take a long time. Her comments came after Beijing said widespread anti-government protests in the semi-autonomous city showed “sprouts of terrorism,” and such violence must be severely punished, “without leniency, without mercy.” Hong Kong’s airport reopened Tuesday early morning after airport authorities canceled all flights on Monday, blaming demonstrators’ disruption to regular operations. Another sit-in is expected to take place at the airport, a major global hub, on Tuesday. Despite that reopening, Hong Kong flag carrier Cathay Pacific said it had cancelled over 200 flights to and out of the airport for the day, according to its website. The protest at the airport, while disruptive, was largely peaceful. That’s in contrast to Sunday night, where protesters appeared to have thrown Molotov cocktails at police stations around the city and dozens of protesters were arrested.

Beijing’s clear message

On Monday, Chinese officials focused on what they described as “deranged acts” by the protesters, including throwing gasoline bombs, saying they marked the emergence of terrorism in the Chinese city. “Radical Hong Kong protesters have repeatedly used extremely dangerous tools to attack police officers,” Yang Guang, a spokesman for the Chinese government’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, said in a news briefing on Monday, according to Chinese state broadcaster CCTV. China’s media is sending a clear signal to the protesters. On Monday afternoon, Chinese state-owned English tabloid the Global Times tweeted a video showing the People’s Armed Police assembling in Shenzhen, a city bordering Hong Kong, about a 1.5 hour- drive away. The People’s Daily, the official newspaper of China’s Communist Party, posted on Chinese social media a statement saying the People’s Armed Police are in Shenzhen prepared to handle “riots, disturbance, major violence and crime and terrorism-related social security issues.” In a Tuesday social media post from the Global Times‘ Chinese edition, the outlet said “if Hong Kong rioters cannot read the signal of having armed police gathering in Shenzhen, then they are asking for self-destruction,” according to a CNBC translation. China is “implying they might send in the People’s Liberation Army or issue direct intervention but they don’t want to,” according to Ben Bland, a director at Sydney-based policy think tank Lowy Institute. “(Beijing) hopes that the signals will scare protesters to back down,” but if and when Beijing decides to deploy troops they will not “advertise it,” he told CNBC. This is all part of a “delicate dance between China and Hong Kong” that’s reached a critical point because there is almost no common ground or overlapping interests between the protesters and Beijing, Bland added. Although China’s leaders do not want to deploy the PLA, they are “willing to do it if they have to,” the Asia politics expert said. Hong Kong’s former governor, Chris Patten, said on Tuesday that if China intervened in the city, it would be a “catastrophe” and that Chinese President Xi Jinping should see the wisdom of trying to bring people together. Patten called on British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to garner support from its allies to ensure Beijing does not intervene.

Protests continue


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, media, assembles, protesters, peoples, asking, hong, china, airport, beijing, selfdestruction, military, kong, nearby, city


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Many of the leaders of Hong Kong’s protests are millennials—here’s why they’re taking action

A protester throws an egg at the police headquarters during a demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, on Friday, June 21, 2019. Hong Kong protesters, including student groups, resumed demonstrations in the city center Friday to demand Chief Executive Carrie Lam step down. Young people are at the forefront of Hong Kong’s protest movement. Although Hong Kong’s government suspended the bill in response to the widespread backlash, the protests have continued. Many young residents maintain a strong sense


A protester throws an egg at the police headquarters during a demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, on Friday, June 21, 2019. Hong Kong protesters, including student groups, resumed demonstrations in the city center Friday to demand Chief Executive Carrie Lam step down. Young people are at the forefront of Hong Kong’s protest movement. Although Hong Kong’s government suspended the bill in response to the widespread backlash, the protests have continued. Many young residents maintain a strong sense
Many of the leaders of Hong Kong’s protests are millennials—here’s why they’re taking action Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: carmin chappell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, law, future, protesters, china, wong, leaders, kong, protests, theyre, action, bill, hong, taking, kongs, millennialsheres


Many of the leaders of Hong Kong's protests are millennials—here's why they're taking action

A protester throws an egg at the police headquarters during a demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, on Friday, June 21, 2019. Hong Kong protesters, including student groups, resumed demonstrations in the city center Friday to demand Chief Executive Carrie Lam step down. Photographer: Eduardo Leal/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The city of Hong Kong has been roiled by protests this summer. Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators have occupied the city’s streets, government buildings and even the main airport. All departing flights were canceled on Monday, putting travel at a standstill. Young people are at the forefront of Hong Kong’s protest movement. Many of the most prominent opposition leaders are still in their 20s, but they’re demanding big changes that could alter the future of their entire generation. These are the issues they’re calling attention to:

Democracy

Hong Kong’s protests were sparked in June by a proposed bill that would allow extraditions to mainland China. Opponents of the bill feared it was a sign of the Communist Party’s growing influence over Hong Kong, which is designated as a Special Administrative Region of China that operates largely independently. Although Hong Kong’s government suspended the bill in response to the widespread backlash, the protests have continued. Demonstrators have harnessed the momentum to advocate for greater democratic freedoms overall. Joshua Wong and Agnes Chow, both 22, and Nathan Law, 26, are three of the leaders of Demosisto, a pro-democracy youth activist group in Hong Kong that has been on the front lines of the protests. Wong and Law were among several people sentenced to jail in 2017 for their role in the Umbrella Movement, another wave of pro-democracy protests in 2014 led in large part by college students. But they haven’t let their previous run-ins with the law stop them from supporting this summer’s protests. “What kind of young people does Hong Kong produce? Smart, efficient, attentive and freedom-loving,” Wong tweeted after protesters stormed the city’s legislative headquarters. “I am proud of them.”

Economic inequality

Hong Kong is known as one of the world’s major economic hubs, but it’s also home to extreme inequality. The gap between the rich and the poor is staggering: According to the latest census report, the wealthiest 10% of households earn 44 times more than the poorest 10%. Housing prices are also some of the highest in the world, surpassing even New York and London. To save money, many residents have opted to live in cramped, dorm-style rooms with bunk beds and shared bathrooms, known as “coffin homes. ” Half of the protesters identify as middle class, according to a field survey conducted by local universities. But some experts say that the protests will ultimately hurt Hong Kong’s economy overall, if companies decide to relocate due to the unrest.

Hong Kong’s identity

Hong Kong’s transition from a British colony to part of mainland China was seen as a massive step for the future of the city. But many of those protesting today weren’t even born yet when Hong Kong was handed over to China in 1997, and they now worry for the loss of the city’s autonomy at the hands of the Communist Party. “Police and Chinese mob are ruling Hong Kong,” tweeted Law. “When the Chinese mobs are attacking the citizens, no law enforcements are there.” At times during the demonstrations police have fired tear gas and rubber bullets into crowds of protesters. Many young residents maintain a strong sense of identity with Hong Kong over China: 9% of Hong Kong residents ages 18 to 29 say they’re proud to be a Chinese citizen, while 38% of those over 50 feel the same way, according to a survey by Hong Kong University. The actions of Hong Kong’s youth mirror millennials around the world, who are increasingly standing up against the status quo and demanding more radical political change. “If there is just one takeaway for the world: Events in Hong Kong are about so much more than the bill, more than Lam, more even than democracy,” tweeted Wong. “They all matter of course. But in the end it is about the future of Hong Kong beyond 2047, a future that belongs to our generation.” In 2047 the current political arrangement between Hong Kong and China will expire, opening up the possibility for a completely new system to take its place. Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: Small business confidence drops to a low as U.S.–China trade war rattles Main Street


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: carmin chappell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, law, future, protesters, china, wong, leaders, kong, protests, theyre, action, bill, hong, taking, kongs, millennialsheres


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Facebook has hired the professor who Johns Hopkins fired after he stormed a building occupied by protesters

Facebook told CNBC it has hired Daniel Povey, a speech recognition researcher who was fired this week from Johns Hopkins University. Facebook confirmed on Monday that it has hired a speech recognition researcher who was fired this month from Johns Hopkins University after the university said he put students in danger while trying to enter a building occupied by protesters. A spokesman for the company told CNBC that it has hired Daniel Povey, who had been a research professor at Johns Hopkins sin


Facebook told CNBC it has hired Daniel Povey, a speech recognition researcher who was fired this week from Johns Hopkins University. Facebook confirmed on Monday that it has hired a speech recognition researcher who was fired this month from Johns Hopkins University after the university said he put students in danger while trying to enter a building occupied by protesters. A spokesman for the company told CNBC that it has hired Daniel Povey, who had been a research professor at Johns Hopkins sin
Facebook has hired the professor who Johns Hopkins fired after he stormed a building occupied by protesters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stormed, university, hired, protesters, students, professor, speech, building, povey, facebook, johns, hopkins, occupied, note, fired, told


Facebook has hired the professor who Johns Hopkins fired after he stormed a building occupied by protesters

Facebook told CNBC it has hired Daniel Povey, a speech recognition researcher who was fired this week from Johns Hopkins University.

Facebook confirmed on Monday that it has hired a speech recognition researcher who was fired this month from Johns Hopkins University after the university said he put students in danger while trying to enter a building occupied by protesters.

A spokesman for the company told CNBC that it has hired Daniel Povey, who had been a research professor at Johns Hopkins since 2012, according to his LinkedIn profile. Before joining Johns Hopkins, Povey was a researcher at Microsoft as well as IBM.

The school decided to fire Povey after a May incident in which he used bolt cutters to attempt to forcibly enter one of the school’s buildings that had been occupied by student protesters. The school notified Povey of his termination last Thursday, he says.

“As a faculty member at Johns Hopkins University, you created a dangerous situation that could have ended in serious harm to our students, yourself, and others in the community,” reads a copy of the termination letter that Povey posted on his website.

Povey on Thursday also published a note explaining his actions and firing from Johns Hopkins, saying “I may not have my job, but at least I still have my dignity and my independence of thought.”

In the note, Povey also suggested he was terminated partly because he was a white man while the protesting students were minorities.

“White males in this environment seem to be expected to constantly atone for their existence by telegraphing their exclusive concern for every demographic group but their own, like a neutered puppy-dog or some Justin Trudeau man-child,” Povey wrote. “It’s pathetic, in my opinion; and I don’t accept it at all.”

In his goodbye note, Povey said he has many career options.

“When this whole thing started I told my friends, if the worst comes to the worst I can always go to China or Russia,” Povey wrote. “I’ll tell you this, though: whatever happens, I will never apologize and I will never back down.”

Povey will work out of Facebook’s offices in Seattle starting on Aug. 19, according to his note. Povey said he will be working on speech recognition for Facebook and will report to Mike Seltzer, a Facebook applied research scientist.

In April, CNBC reported that Facebook is building a new artificial intelligence voice assistant lead by a team in Redmond, Washington.

Povey told CNBC he is hoping for the best in his new role, but would not be surprised if controversy follows him.

“I just wouldn’t expect to last very long at any big Silicon Valley company after expressing the kinds of opinions I have expressed in my leaving message,” Povey said in an email.

WATCH: Artist creates ‘deepfake’ of Mark Zuckerberg


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stormed, university, hired, protesters, students, professor, speech, building, povey, facebook, johns, hopkins, occupied, note, fired, told


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Protesters clash with police, chant ‘liberate Hong Kong’ as unrest continues for 10th week

Hong Kong police and protesters clashed in cat-and-mouse encounters across the city on Sunday, marking a shift in tactics during a tenth straight weekend of unrest in the former British colony where many are chafing at Chinese rule. “If she doesn’t listen to the people and respond to our reasonable demands, we’re going to continue to spread protests across Hong Kong.” Demonstrators say they are fighting against the erosion of the “one country, two systems” arrangement enshrining some autonomy fo


Hong Kong police and protesters clashed in cat-and-mouse encounters across the city on Sunday, marking a shift in tactics during a tenth straight weekend of unrest in the former British colony where many are chafing at Chinese rule. “If she doesn’t listen to the people and respond to our reasonable demands, we’re going to continue to spread protests across Hong Kong.” Demonstrators say they are fighting against the erosion of the “one country, two systems” arrangement enshrining some autonomy fo
Protesters clash with police, chant ‘liberate Hong Kong’ as unrest continues for 10th week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, streets, volley, clash, tear, continues, shopping, week, 10th, violent, kong, chant, chinese, response, protests, hong, protesters, unrest, liberate


Protesters clash with police, chant 'liberate Hong Kong' as unrest continues for 10th week

Hong Kong police and protesters clashed in cat-and-mouse encounters across the city on Sunday, marking a shift in tactics during a tenth straight weekend of unrest in the former British colony where many are chafing at Chinese rule.

Seeking to clear streets more quickly than before, police fired tear gas and charged with batons at flashpoints from big shopping boulevards to bar-lined streets and railway stations.

Demonstrators, who at one point lobbed two petrol bombs, retaliated with a flash-mob strategy – withdrawing when pressed, only to re-appear elsewhere relentlessly.

The increasingly violent protests since June have plunged the Asian financial hub into its most serious crisis in decades and are one of the biggest popular challenges to Chinese leader Xi Jinping since he came to power in 2012.

Despite the intense police response and a toughening stance from China, the movement that began two months ago in opposition to a bill allowing extradition to the mainland still seems to enjoy broad support in the city of more than 7 million people.

“We’ve been running all day but we’re not tired,” said Ah Sing, a protester in his 30s, wearing a black vest and surgical mask while he rushed from one protest to another.

“This is our response to Carrie Lam,” he added, referring to the city’s Beijing-backed leader. “If she doesn’t listen to the people and respond to our reasonable demands, we’re going to continue to spread protests across Hong Kong.”

Beijing says criminals and agitators are stirring violence, encouraged by “interfering” foreign powers including Britain.

Hong Kong’s government called the protests “unlawful assemblies” and said a petrol bomb had injured a policeman.

There is “no longer any fixed period of time or fixed locations for these persistent and large-scale illegal and violent acts”, which have deprived ordinary people of the right to carry on their daily lives, a government spokesman said in a statement.

Demonstrators say they are fighting against the erosion of the “one country, two systems” arrangement enshrining some autonomy for Hong Kong when China took it back in 1997.

“Independence for Hong Kong is not viable in the near term,” acknowledged protester Sam, 23, a barrister, while music pumped from cabaret lounges in Wan Chai’s bar district behind him. “But we have to fight for our freedoms and democracy.”

Shortly after, riot police fired volley after volley of tear gas at his makeshift barricade of railings, wood and police cones, forcing protesters to withdraw.

“Why are you hitting my friends? They are teenagers,” politics student Sabrina, 19, cried out after officers went in with batons at crowds in a shopping district at Kowloon.

“Who are you working for? The Communist Party? The Chinese government? How can you sleep at night?”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, streets, volley, clash, tear, continues, shopping, week, 10th, violent, kong, chant, chinese, response, protests, hong, protesters, unrest, liberate


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post