Former Obama aide urges Republicans to ‘do some soul-searching’ over Trump impeachment inquiry

A long-time aide to former President Barack Obama has urged Republicans in the U.S. Senate to “remember their oath of office” as they prepare to hear the final House impeachment hearing of the week on Thursday. A Democratic-led inquiry is trying to determine whether President Donald Trump improperly put pressure on Ukraine to force the country to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden. Ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland, delivered testimony that stunned both Republicans and D


A long-time aide to former President Barack Obama has urged Republicans in the U.S. Senate to “remember their oath of office” as they prepare to hear the final House impeachment hearing of the week on Thursday.
A Democratic-led inquiry is trying to determine whether President Donald Trump improperly put pressure on Ukraine to force the country to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.
Ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland, delivered testimony that stunned both Republicans and D
Former Obama aide urges Republicans to ‘do some soul-searching’ over Trump impeachment inquiry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, urges, republicans, president, week, worked, obama, soulsearching, vice, purpose, trump, urged, aide, inquiry, impeachment, valerie


Former Obama aide urges Republicans to 'do some soul-searching' over Trump impeachment inquiry

A long-time aide to former President Barack Obama has urged Republicans in the U.S. Senate to “remember their oath of office” as they prepare to hear the final House impeachment hearing of the week on Thursday.

A Democratic-led inquiry is trying to determine whether President Donald Trump improperly put pressure on Ukraine to force the country to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland, delivered testimony that stunned both Republicans and Democrats. He said that not only was there a “quid pro quo” — a Latin term meaning to exchange one favor for another — but that he and other officials were acting under direction from the president himself.

Speaking to CNBC’s Karen Tso in Paris, France on Thursday, Valerie Jarrett, who worked as a senior adviser to Obama from 2009 to 2017, said that a lot of people were “deeply troubled” by the ongoing impeachment inquiry.

It is “stunning that a U.S. president would put anything above the interests of the United States. You are there for one purpose — and one purpose only — and that’s to look out for all of us.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, urges, republicans, president, week, worked, obama, soulsearching, vice, purpose, trump, urged, aide, inquiry, impeachment, valerie


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TGI Friday’s is going public again

Friday’s is going public again. The casual dining chain is planning on merging with Allegro Merger, a special purpose acquisition company with ties to investment firm Crescendo Partners, the two companies announced Friday. Special purpose acquisition companies have no assets but use the proceeds from an IPO, combined with bank financing, to buy and take privately held consumer companies public. If the deal closes, T.G.I. Earlier this year, Chuck E. Cheese’s parent company scrapped a deal with a


Friday’s is going public again.
The casual dining chain is planning on merging with Allegro Merger, a special purpose acquisition company with ties to investment firm Crescendo Partners, the two companies announced Friday.
Special purpose acquisition companies have no assets but use the proceeds from an IPO, combined with bank financing, to buy and take privately held consumer companies public.
If the deal closes, T.G.I.
Earlier this year, Chuck E. Cheese’s parent company scrapped a deal with a
TGI Friday’s is going public again Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, triartisan, company, public, tgi, fridays, purpose, going, deal, special, companies, acquisition


TGI Friday's is going public again

T.G.I. Friday’s is going public again.

The casual dining chain is planning on merging with Allegro Merger, a special purpose acquisition company with ties to investment firm Crescendo Partners, the two companies announced Friday. Special purpose acquisition companies have no assets but use the proceeds from an IPO, combined with bank financing, to buy and take privately held consumer companies public.

If the deal closes, T.G.I. Friday’s owners will receive $30 million in cash and stock. TriArtisan Capital Advisors, the restaurant company’s majority owner, expects to exchange most of its ownership for shares of Allegro.

The proceeds of the deal are expected to help T.G.I. Friday’s pay down its debt. The casual dining industry as a whole is struggling as fewer consumers want to sit down for family meals.

In 2014, longtime owner Carlson Restaurants sold the chain, known for its wings, potato skins and endless appetizers, to TriArtisan and Sentinel Partners for reportedly for more than $800 million. T.G.I. Friday’s has been privately held since merging with Carlson 30 years ago.

Earlier this year, Chuck E. Cheese’s parent company scrapped a deal with a special purpose acquisition company that would have taken it public again.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, triartisan, company, public, tgi, fridays, purpose, going, deal, special, companies, acquisition


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Watch CNBC’s full interview with BlackRock CEO Larry Fink

Watch CNBC’s full interview with BlackRock CEO Larry Fink2 Hours AgoBlackRock CEO and Chairman Larry Fink joins “Squawk Box” to discuss the investment management company’s quarterly earnings as well as the big headlines in the news including the markets, China trade, the Fed, corporate purpose, recession risks and more.


Watch CNBC’s full interview with BlackRock CEO Larry Fink2 Hours AgoBlackRock CEO and Chairman Larry Fink joins “Squawk Box” to discuss the investment management company’s quarterly earnings as well as the big headlines in the news including the markets, China trade, the Fed, corporate purpose, recession risks and more.
Watch CNBC’s full interview with BlackRock CEO Larry Fink Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: david orrell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, blackrock, trade, recession, markets, risks, fink, quarterly, watch, purpose, ceo, interview, cnbcs, larry


Watch CNBC's full interview with BlackRock CEO Larry Fink

Watch CNBC’s full interview with BlackRock CEO Larry Fink

2 Hours Ago

BlackRock CEO and Chairman Larry Fink joins “Squawk Box” to discuss the investment management company’s quarterly earnings as well as the big headlines in the news including the markets, China trade, the Fed, corporate purpose, recession risks and more.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: david orrell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, squawk, blackrock, trade, recession, markets, risks, fink, quarterly, watch, purpose, ceo, interview, cnbcs, larry


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Doctor launches the first online clinic dedicated to using common drugs for a different purpose: to slow aging

One of the many wild medical pursuits in Silicon Valley is the effort to slow down the aging process. Zalzala, a 38-year-old family medicine doctor based in the Detroit area, has just opened an online clinic called Qalytude, dedicated to anti-aging. “There’s this movement around Metformin that I could see having a snowball effect,” Zalzala told CNBC. He’s jumping into a market for anti-aging services, products and technologies that’s expected to reach $271 billion by 2024, according to Market Re


One of the many wild medical pursuits in Silicon Valley is the effort to slow down the aging process. Zalzala, a 38-year-old family medicine doctor based in the Detroit area, has just opened an online clinic called Qalytude, dedicated to anti-aging. “There’s this movement around Metformin that I could see having a snowball effect,” Zalzala told CNBC. He’s jumping into a market for anti-aging services, products and technologies that’s expected to reach $271 billion by 2024, according to Market Re
Doctor launches the first online clinic dedicated to using common drugs for a different purpose: to slow aging Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slow, online, doctor, metformin, market, drug, aging, warn, wild, purpose, zalzala, launches, visit, common, antiaging, different, using, drugs, dedicated


Doctor launches the first online clinic dedicated to using common drugs for a different purpose: to slow aging

One of the many wild medical pursuits in Silicon Valley is the effort to slow down the aging process. Sajad Zalzala is trying to make it a reality.

Zalzala, a 38-year-old family medicine doctor based in the Detroit area, has just opened an online clinic called Qalytude, dedicated to anti-aging. As a physician licensed to practice in all 50 states, Zalzala can treat patients anywhere in the country by phone or online, in addition to those who visit his physical clinic.

Initially, Zalzala will be targeting the small but growing segment of Americans who take medicines like Metformin, a type 2 diabetes drug, but for the unintended purpose of staving off aging. Researchers are now finding evidence of reduced cancer risk in the drug, and studies in mice have shown potential for an improved life span, but scientists warn that it might not produce the same result in humans.

“There’s this movement around Metformin that I could see having a snowball effect,” Zalzala told CNBC.

He’s jumping into a market for anti-aging services, products and technologies that’s expected to reach $271 billion by 2024, according to Market Research Engine. Venture capital funds are dabbling in the space as are billionaires like Jeff Bezos and biohackers, who experiment with drugs and supplements for health and longevity purposes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slow, online, doctor, metformin, market, drug, aging, warn, wild, purpose, zalzala, launches, visit, common, antiaging, different, using, drugs, dedicated


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‘Create a personal mission statement,’ says Faviana CEO, to find purpose in your career

It was only 13 years ago that Omid Moradi, the CEO of Faviana, told fellow entrepreneurs of his plan. And, for the past decade, he has served as CEO, helping the company expand and partner with over 1,000 global retailers. One of the ways Faviana has continued to expand was by hiring younger employees and learning from them. “Even if you’re in touch with the times, there’s still plenty to learn from the younger generation,” says Omid. “Learn how to be more creative, find out the technology they’


It was only 13 years ago that Omid Moradi, the CEO of Faviana, told fellow entrepreneurs of his plan. And, for the past decade, he has served as CEO, helping the company expand and partner with over 1,000 global retailers. One of the ways Faviana has continued to expand was by hiring younger employees and learning from them. “Even if you’re in touch with the times, there’s still plenty to learn from the younger generation,” says Omid. “Learn how to be more creative, find out the technology they’
‘Create a personal mission statement,’ says Faviana CEO, to find purpose in your career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: sofia pitt, anna-louise jackson, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, faviana, personal, younger, omid, career, business, mission, youre, learn, company, ceo, purpose, create, statement, women, learning


'Create a personal mission statement,' says Faviana CEO, to find purpose in your career

Kim Kardashian and Nicky Hilton Rothschild are just two of the many celebrities who have walked the red carpet dressed in Faviana. But the label isn’t exclusively for the rich and famous. Faviana wedding and prom dresses are available at more reasonable price points — around $200 to $500 — from retailers like Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. Getting room on the rack at department stores is a relatively recent achievement for the 31-year-old company. It was only 13 years ago that Omid Moradi, the CEO of Faviana, told fellow entrepreneurs of his plan. “At least two or three people said, ‘That’s never going to happen,'” Omid recalls. One year later, he proved the critics wrong. “Defying the odds is in our company’s DNA,” says Omid. Omid’s mother, Shala, went to school in Iran to study pattern-making, despite policies that prevented many women from receiving an education. When the family fled the country after the revolution started in 1979 and moved to the U.S., they drew upon Shala’s fashion design talents. They officially founded Faviana in 1988.

Kim Kardashian attends the Golden Nymph awards ceremony during the 2008 Monte Carlo Television Festival held at Grimaldi Forum on June 12, 2008, in Monte Carlo, Principality of Monaco. (Photo by Tony Barson/WireImage) Tony Barson | WireImage | Getty Images

While working towards a bachelor’s degree in finance and international business at New York University, Omid decided to pitch in. “We came together as a family and all took a piece of the business,” he says. His part-time help over summer break quickly turned into a full-time role. And, for the past decade, he has served as CEO, helping the company expand and partner with over 1,000 global retailers. Omid shared with Grow four of his best pieces of advice for succeeding as an entrepreneur.

1. ‘Learn from the younger generation’

Omid learned to adapt quickly to new situations as a child. He was just 10 years old when his family immigrated to the U.S. and, over the next five years, the Moradis moved to five different U.S. towns before settling on Long Island. His ability to embrace change helped Omid pivot quickly as the retail industry shifted from brick-and-mortar to online sales. One of the ways Faviana has continued to expand was by hiring younger employees and learning from them. “Even if you’re in touch with the times, there’s still plenty to learn from the younger generation,” says Omid. “Learn how to be more creative, find out the technology they’re using, include them in your decisions so they’re not just learning from you — you’re learning from them.”

Faviana founders Omid, Shala, Paul, and Navid Moradi. Courtesy Faviana

Being open to new technology and hiring social-media savvy millennials has helped Faviana keep up with the times and market to younger consumers, including prom-goers. The label currently has 60,000 Instagram followers and 628,000 page likes on Facebook. Omid makes it a point to give his younger employees a seat at the table so they can observe and learn the tricks of the trade. And he says his willingness to adapt and take risks helped set him up for success: “Making decisions out of fear doesn’t serve anyone’s interest. Change isn’t something I’m afraid of. I have a strong belief everything will work out the best way possible.”

2. ‘Don’t operate with blinders on’

If you want to grow your business, keep an open mind and acknowledge when someone else has a better solution to a problem you’re trying to solve. Getting a diversity of opinions helps him see his business from a different perspective. In other words, he says, “don’t operate with blinders on.” Omid practices what he preaches, regularly attending and presenting his company’s challenges at learning events to gain insight from entrepreneurs in other industries. At one such event, Omid admitted the company was struggling with publicity and marketing. In response, someone asked why the company wasn’t investing in public relations to increase brand exposure.

Nicky Hilton Rothschild wearing Faviana. Courtesy Faviana

“That very basic idea of hiring a PR firm never even crossed my mind,” he says. “Within one year of hiring them, we were on Access Hollywood, on E! News, and on the front page of The New York Times.” Generating publicity has helped Faviana continue to grow his business by attracting celebrity clientele, dressing the likes of Teresa Giudice from “The Real Housewives of New Jersey,” Andi Dorfman from “The Bachelor,” and Ajiona Alexus, who stars in Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why.”

3. ‘If you’re just in business to make money, then what’s the point?’

“I firmly believe every person, no matter if they’re the CEO of a company or just starting their career, should envision what their life should be,” says Omid. To that end, he suggests figuring out your mission statement. “Mission statements give people clarity and a reason for existence. If you’re just in business to make money, then what’s the point? When we’re able to help by donating … or contributing to someone’s life event, [our work] becomes more meaningful,” he says. “It connects and empowers everyone.” A key part of Faviana’s mission is to help and support women. So, “not only do we sell to women, but there are women behind the scenes who are running the show,” says Shala, who is now Faviana’s creative director.

Change isn’t something I’m afraid of. I have a strong belief everything will work out the best way possible. Omid Moradi CEO of Faviana

Since another part of the company mission is to address environmental concerns in the fashion industry, a few weeks ago, leaders of the company met to discuss how they could start utilizing eco-friendly fabrics and factories for dressmaking. Eliminating drama is another core Faviana value. Omid suggests creating boundaries in your relationships and separating your personal and professional feelings. Omid and his brother, Navid, put this into practice every morning, when they commute by train from Long Island to their office in New York City. The brothers use their time on the train to catch each other up on their families and avoid shop talk. But as soon as Omid steps off the train, “he’s a different person. He’s all business,” Navid says.

4. ‘Set goals, dream big’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: sofia pitt, anna-louise jackson, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, faviana, personal, younger, omid, career, business, mission, youre, learn, company, ceo, purpose, create, statement, women, learning


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The CEOs of nearly 200 companies just said shareholder value is no longer their main objective

Shareholder value is no longer the main focus of some of America’s top business leaders. The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers from major U.S. corporations, issued a statement Monday with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.” “We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.” “The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and chairman of


Shareholder value is no longer the main focus of some of America’s top business leaders. The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers from major U.S. corporations, issued a statement Monday with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.” “We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.” “The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and chairman of
The CEOs of nearly 200 companies just said shareholder value is no longer their main objective Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serves, dimon, roundtable, corporations, 200, companies, longer, communities, investing, shareholder, value, business, main, objective, nearly, purpose, statement, ceos


The CEOs of nearly 200 companies just said shareholder value is no longer their main objective

Shareholder value is no longer the main focus of some of America’s top business leaders.

The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers from major U.S. corporations, issued a statement Monday with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.”

The re-imagined idea of a corporation drops the age-old notion that corporations function first and foremost to serve their shareholders and maximize profits. Rather, investing in employees, delivering value to customers, dealing ethically with suppliers and supporting outside communities are now at the forefront of American business goals, according to the statement.

“While each of our individual companies serves its own corporate purpose, we share a fundamental commitment to all of our stakeholders,” said the statement, which signed by 181 CEOs. “We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.”

“The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and chairman of Business Roundtable, in a press release.

Along with Dimon, the statement also received signatures from chiefs Jeff Bezos, Tim Cook, Brian Moynihan, Dennis A. Muilenburg, Mary Barra and many more.

“Major employers are investing in their workers and communities because they know it is the only way to be successful over the long term. These modernized principles reflect the business community’s unwavering commitment to continue to push for an economy that serves all Americans,” said Dimon.

Here is the full Business Roundtable statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serves, dimon, roundtable, corporations, 200, companies, longer, communities, investing, shareholder, value, business, main, objective, nearly, purpose, statement, ceos


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This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no


Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no
This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


This woman sold her app for $85 million — here's the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette Lykke

Building a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. She co-founded fitness app Endomondo in 2007, developing the company for almost a decade before it gained enough interest to be acquired by American firm Under Armour. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017.

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According to Lykke, who began her career as a management consultant, a business can only experience vast growth rates if the people at its reins exercise what she calls “patient impatience.” “Every day you have to push (yourself) and you have to be willing to do that for quite a while,” she said. “I think a lot of stories about start-ups give the impression that two guys start a company in a basement and boom, two years later they change the world. That’s just not how it works – it takes years, so working hard every day is crucial.”

Be clear on your purpose

For the past two years, Lykke has been the CEO of Too Good To Go — an organization that works with restaurants and food retailers to tackle waste by selling food at a discounted price. The app has 11 million users and works with 22,000 stores across 11 countries. Her involvement with the company began around 9 months after the service was launched, when a friend who knew its founders showed her the app. “I thought it was such a cool concept,” she told CNBC. “I got invited to invest and then was asked to help the founders run the business.” She said her core driving force when it came to work was being part of a company that had a strong purpose and could make a real impact. “I work a lot and put everything into it, so I want to do something that really matters,” she explained. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and now I have an even stronger purpose in tackling food waste. I just hadn’t realized the scale of this problem, but it had always been natural to me not to throw away food.” Entrepreneurs looking to grow a company needed to follow her lead and work on something that they felt was meaningful, Lykke added. “Make sure you’re really, really passionate about what you do — that’s fundamental,” she said. “There are going to be days and nights where, if you don’t have that passion, it’s going to be too difficult.”

As well as being passionate about their business, start-up founders needed to build a team who believed in the purpose of the company. “Being clear about the company’s vision is important, (but) the people you find for your team need to believe what you believe — it’s important to establish that team really early on,” Lykke told CNBC. She noted that having a strong ethical purpose was also a big competitive advantage, helping to attract both talented employees and investors.

Seek advice — and share it too


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


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Trump orders Navy to rescind awards given to prosecutors of SEAL Eddie Gallagher

President Donald Trump talking with the press as he leaves the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Wednesday said he had ordered top U.S. Navy officials to rescind the achievement medals awarded to military prosecutors involved in case against Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who was found not guilty of murder and another serious crime earlier this month. Trump said those awards were “ridiculously given.” Gallagher, 40, was acquitted of murder in the killing of a teenage ISIS figh


President Donald Trump talking with the press as he leaves the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Wednesday said he had ordered top U.S. Navy officials to rescind the achievement medals awarded to military prosecutors involved in case against Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who was found not guilty of murder and another serious crime earlier this month. Trump said those awards were “ridiculously given.” Gallagher, 40, was acquitted of murder in the killing of a teenage ISIS figh
Trump orders Navy to rescind awards given to prosecutors of SEAL Eddie Gallagher Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, murder, military, eddie, seal, purpose, rescind, prosecutors, trial, orders, trump, gallagher, given, awards, prosecutor, navy, medals


Trump orders Navy to rescind awards given to prosecutors of SEAL Eddie Gallagher

President Donald Trump talking with the press as he leaves the White House in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said he had ordered top U.S. Navy officials to rescind the achievement medals awarded to military prosecutors involved in case against Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who was found not guilty of murder and another serious crime earlier this month.

Trump’s announcement on Twitter came a day after the military-oriented web site Task & Purpose revealed that the four Navy attorneys and four members of their legal support staff were given Navy Achievement Medals in a July 10 ceremony.

Trump said those awards were “ridiculously given.”

Task & Purpose, in its article Tuesday, reported that members of the prosecution were awarded the medals, just eight days after Gallagher’s acquittals for “superb results,” “expert litigation” and “exceptional witness preparation.”

One of the prosecutors, Brian John, was was praised in his award for “brilliant legal acumen” and performance despite an “unforseen personnel change” that led him to become the top prosecutor in the case.

John became lead prosecutor in June after the judge in the case removed the former lead prosecutor, Commander Christopher Czaplak after learning Czaplak had electronically tracked the email communications of Gallagher’s lawyers without obtaining a warrant.

Gallagher, 40, was acquitted of murder in the killing of a teenage ISIS fighter who was taken prisoner in 2017 in Iraq.

Trump had helped Gallagher to receive a transfer before his trial from a military brig to less restrictive barracks.

While he was acquitted of the murder charge, along with other charges of attempted murder of two noncombatants, Gallagher was convicted of wrongful posing for an unofficial picture with a human casualty.

While that latter charge has a maximum penalty of four months of incarceration, Gallagher had spent more than twice that amount of time locked up before his trial.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, murder, military, eddie, seal, purpose, rescind, prosecutors, trial, orders, trump, gallagher, given, awards, prosecutor, navy, medals


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Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin won’t release Trump’s tax returns to Congress, says no ‘legitimate legislative purpose’

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Monday said he will not allow President Donald Trump’s tax returns to be released to Congress by the IRS, as a powerful oversight committee has requested. House Democrats had asked the IRS to release six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns. Experts have said the U.S. tax code mandates that anyone’s tax returns “shall” be released to one of the authorized panels if they request them. Trump has repeatedly rebuffed requests to release his tax retu


Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Monday said he will not allow President Donald Trump’s tax returns to be released to Congress by the IRS, as a powerful oversight committee has requested. House Democrats had asked the IRS to release six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns. Experts have said the U.S. tax code mandates that anyone’s tax returns “shall” be released to one of the authorized panels if they request them. Trump has repeatedly rebuffed requests to release his tax retu
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin won’t release Trump’s tax returns to Congress, says no ‘legitimate legislative purpose’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mnuchin, treasury, secretary, returns, trumps, request, house, department, congress, steven, trump, purpose, release, wont, irs, tax


Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin won't release Trump's tax returns to Congress, says no 'legitimate legislative purpose'

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Monday said he will not allow President Donald Trump’s tax returns to be released to Congress by the IRS, as a powerful oversight committee has requested.

The formal denial, coming weeks after acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said Congress will never get those tax returns, sets the stage for yet another fight over documents sought by the Democratic-led House of Representatives from the Republican Trump’s administration.

The dispute could end up in court.

In a letter to House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., Mnuchin said that after conferring with the Justice Department, he has determined that the request “lacks a legitimate legislative purpose” and that because of that the request would be denied.

“I am informing you now that that [Treasury] Department may not lawfully fulfill the Committee’s request,” Mnuchin wrote to Neal, whose committee is one of three congressional panels with the power to request a president’s income tax returns.

House Democrats had asked the IRS to release six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns. Experts have said the U.S. tax code mandates that anyone’s tax returns “shall” be released to one of the authorized panels if they request them.

Mnuchin’s letter called that request “unprecedented” and said it also “presents serious constitutional questions, the resolution of which may have lasting consequences for all taxpayers.”

Mnuchin also said that the Justice Department intends to “memorialize its advice in a published legal opinion as soon as practicable.”

Neal, in a statement, said, “Today, Secretary Mnuchin notified me that the IRS will not provide the documents I requested under Section 6103 of the Internal Revenue Code. I will consult with counsel and determine the appropriate response.”

Trump has repeatedly rebuffed requests to release his tax returns to the public, saying they are being audited. But Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen has testified to Congress that he has seen no proof that Trump was being audited.

Cohen entered a federal prison in upstate New York on Monday to begin serving a three-year sentence for multiple crimes.

In April, Trump said Americans don’t care if they can see his tax returns.

“Remember, I got elected last time,” Trump told reporters then. “The same exact issue, with the same intensity, which wasn’t very much. Because frankly, the people don’t care.”

However, a poll conducted around the same time found that 51% of voters supported Democrats’ bid to obtain his tax returns, compared with 36% of voters who oppose that effort.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mnuchin, treasury, secretary, returns, trumps, request, house, department, congress, steven, trump, purpose, release, wont, irs, tax


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Trump sues Deutsche Bank and Capital One to block House subpoenas for his financial information

U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One, in a bid to block the two from responding to congressional subpoenas, according a Monday court filing. The U.S. House issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank earlier this month and the German lender had said in January that it had received inquiries from Democrat-controlled committees about its links to Trump. In the complaint filed on Monday, the president’s team argued that his politica


U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One, in a bid to block the two from responding to congressional subpoenas, according a Monday court filing. The U.S. House issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank earlier this month and the German lender had said in January that it had received inquiries from Democrat-controlled committees about its links to Trump. In the complaint filed on Monday, the president’s team argued that his politica
Trump sues Deutsche Bank and Capital One to block House subpoenas for his financial information Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoenas, services, deutsche, bank, capital, personal, trump, political, issued, sues, information, block, financial, purpose, president, house


Trump sues Deutsche Bank and Capital One to block House subpoenas for his financial information

U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One, in a bid to block the two from responding to congressional subpoenas, according a Monday court filing.

The U.S. House issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank earlier this month and the German lender had said in January that it had received inquiries from Democrat-controlled committees about its links to Trump. In the complaint filed on Monday, the president’s team argued that his political opponents leading the House Intelligence and Financial Services Committees are on a fishing expedition.

“This case involves Congressional subpoenas that have no legitimate or lawful purpose. The subpoenas were issued to harass President Donald J. Trump, to rummage through every aspect of his personal finances, his businesses, and the private information of the President and his family, and to ferret about for any material that might be used to cause him political damage. No grounds exist to establish any purpose other than a political one,” the complaint said.

The filing said the two banks have “long provided business and personal banking services” to the Trumps, and the subpoenas seeking a complete accounting of financial records are an instance of “remarkable overbreadth.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoenas, services, deutsche, bank, capital, personal, trump, political, issued, sues, information, block, financial, purpose, president, house


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