The CEOs of nearly 200 companies just said shareholder value is no longer their main objective

Shareholder value is no longer the main focus of some of America’s top business leaders. The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers from major U.S. corporations, issued a statement Monday with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.” “We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.” “The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and chairman of


Shareholder value is no longer the main focus of some of America’s top business leaders. The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers from major U.S. corporations, issued a statement Monday with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.” “We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.” “The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and chairman of
The CEOs of nearly 200 companies just said shareholder value is no longer their main objective Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serves, dimon, roundtable, corporations, 200, companies, longer, communities, investing, shareholder, value, business, main, objective, nearly, purpose, statement, ceos


The CEOs of nearly 200 companies just said shareholder value is no longer their main objective

Shareholder value is no longer the main focus of some of America’s top business leaders.

The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers from major U.S. corporations, issued a statement Monday with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.”

The re-imagined idea of a corporation drops the age-old notion that corporations function first and foremost to serve their shareholders and maximize profits. Rather, investing in employees, delivering value to customers, dealing ethically with suppliers and supporting outside communities are now at the forefront of American business goals, according to the statement.

“While each of our individual companies serves its own corporate purpose, we share a fundamental commitment to all of our stakeholders,” said the statement, which signed by 181 CEOs. “We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.”

“The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and chairman of Business Roundtable, in a press release.

Along with Dimon, the statement also received signatures from chiefs Jeff Bezos, Tim Cook, Brian Moynihan, Dennis A. Muilenburg, Mary Barra and many more.

“Major employers are investing in their workers and communities because they know it is the only way to be successful over the long term. These modernized principles reflect the business community’s unwavering commitment to continue to push for an economy that serves all Americans,” said Dimon.

Here is the full Business Roundtable statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serves, dimon, roundtable, corporations, 200, companies, longer, communities, investing, shareholder, value, business, main, objective, nearly, purpose, statement, ceos


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This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no


Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no
This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


This woman sold her app for $85 million — here's the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette Lykke

Building a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. She co-founded fitness app Endomondo in 2007, developing the company for almost a decade before it gained enough interest to be acquired by American firm Under Armour. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017.

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According to Lykke, who began her career as a management consultant, a business can only experience vast growth rates if the people at its reins exercise what she calls “patient impatience.” “Every day you have to push (yourself) and you have to be willing to do that for quite a while,” she said. “I think a lot of stories about start-ups give the impression that two guys start a company in a basement and boom, two years later they change the world. That’s just not how it works – it takes years, so working hard every day is crucial.”

Be clear on your purpose

For the past two years, Lykke has been the CEO of Too Good To Go — an organization that works with restaurants and food retailers to tackle waste by selling food at a discounted price. The app has 11 million users and works with 22,000 stores across 11 countries. Her involvement with the company began around 9 months after the service was launched, when a friend who knew its founders showed her the app. “I thought it was such a cool concept,” she told CNBC. “I got invited to invest and then was asked to help the founders run the business.” She said her core driving force when it came to work was being part of a company that had a strong purpose and could make a real impact. “I work a lot and put everything into it, so I want to do something that really matters,” she explained. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and now I have an even stronger purpose in tackling food waste. I just hadn’t realized the scale of this problem, but it had always been natural to me not to throw away food.” Entrepreneurs looking to grow a company needed to follow her lead and work on something that they felt was meaningful, Lykke added. “Make sure you’re really, really passionate about what you do — that’s fundamental,” she said. “There are going to be days and nights where, if you don’t have that passion, it’s going to be too difficult.”

As well as being passionate about their business, start-up founders needed to build a team who believed in the purpose of the company. “Being clear about the company’s vision is important, (but) the people you find for your team need to believe what you believe — it’s important to establish that team really early on,” Lykke told CNBC. She noted that having a strong ethical purpose was also a big competitive advantage, helping to attract both talented employees and investors.

Seek advice — and share it too


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


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Trump orders Navy to rescind awards given to prosecutors of SEAL Eddie Gallagher

President Donald Trump talking with the press as he leaves the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Wednesday said he had ordered top U.S. Navy officials to rescind the achievement medals awarded to military prosecutors involved in case against Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who was found not guilty of murder and another serious crime earlier this month. Trump said those awards were “ridiculously given.” Gallagher, 40, was acquitted of murder in the killing of a teenage ISIS figh


President Donald Trump talking with the press as he leaves the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Wednesday said he had ordered top U.S. Navy officials to rescind the achievement medals awarded to military prosecutors involved in case against Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who was found not guilty of murder and another serious crime earlier this month. Trump said those awards were “ridiculously given.” Gallagher, 40, was acquitted of murder in the killing of a teenage ISIS figh
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, murder, military, eddie, seal, purpose, rescind, prosecutors, trial, orders, trump, gallagher, given, awards, prosecutor, navy, medals


Trump orders Navy to rescind awards given to prosecutors of SEAL Eddie Gallagher

President Donald Trump talking with the press as he leaves the White House in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said he had ordered top U.S. Navy officials to rescind the achievement medals awarded to military prosecutors involved in case against Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who was found not guilty of murder and another serious crime earlier this month.

Trump’s announcement on Twitter came a day after the military-oriented web site Task & Purpose revealed that the four Navy attorneys and four members of their legal support staff were given Navy Achievement Medals in a July 10 ceremony.

Trump said those awards were “ridiculously given.”

Task & Purpose, in its article Tuesday, reported that members of the prosecution were awarded the medals, just eight days after Gallagher’s acquittals for “superb results,” “expert litigation” and “exceptional witness preparation.”

One of the prosecutors, Brian John, was was praised in his award for “brilliant legal acumen” and performance despite an “unforseen personnel change” that led him to become the top prosecutor in the case.

John became lead prosecutor in June after the judge in the case removed the former lead prosecutor, Commander Christopher Czaplak after learning Czaplak had electronically tracked the email communications of Gallagher’s lawyers without obtaining a warrant.

Gallagher, 40, was acquitted of murder in the killing of a teenage ISIS fighter who was taken prisoner in 2017 in Iraq.

Trump had helped Gallagher to receive a transfer before his trial from a military brig to less restrictive barracks.

While he was acquitted of the murder charge, along with other charges of attempted murder of two noncombatants, Gallagher was convicted of wrongful posing for an unofficial picture with a human casualty.

While that latter charge has a maximum penalty of four months of incarceration, Gallagher had spent more than twice that amount of time locked up before his trial.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, murder, military, eddie, seal, purpose, rescind, prosecutors, trial, orders, trump, gallagher, given, awards, prosecutor, navy, medals


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Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin won’t release Trump’s tax returns to Congress, says no ‘legitimate legislative purpose’

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Monday said he will not allow President Donald Trump’s tax returns to be released to Congress by the IRS, as a powerful oversight committee has requested. House Democrats had asked the IRS to release six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns. Experts have said the U.S. tax code mandates that anyone’s tax returns “shall” be released to one of the authorized panels if they request them. Trump has repeatedly rebuffed requests to release his tax retu


Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Monday said he will not allow President Donald Trump’s tax returns to be released to Congress by the IRS, as a powerful oversight committee has requested. House Democrats had asked the IRS to release six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns. Experts have said the U.S. tax code mandates that anyone’s tax returns “shall” be released to one of the authorized panels if they request them. Trump has repeatedly rebuffed requests to release his tax retu
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin won’t release Trump’s tax returns to Congress, says no ‘legitimate legislative purpose’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mnuchin, treasury, secretary, returns, trumps, request, house, department, congress, steven, trump, purpose, release, wont, irs, tax


Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin won't release Trump's tax returns to Congress, says no 'legitimate legislative purpose'

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Monday said he will not allow President Donald Trump’s tax returns to be released to Congress by the IRS, as a powerful oversight committee has requested.

The formal denial, coming weeks after acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said Congress will never get those tax returns, sets the stage for yet another fight over documents sought by the Democratic-led House of Representatives from the Republican Trump’s administration.

The dispute could end up in court.

In a letter to House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., Mnuchin said that after conferring with the Justice Department, he has determined that the request “lacks a legitimate legislative purpose” and that because of that the request would be denied.

“I am informing you now that that [Treasury] Department may not lawfully fulfill the Committee’s request,” Mnuchin wrote to Neal, whose committee is one of three congressional panels with the power to request a president’s income tax returns.

House Democrats had asked the IRS to release six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns. Experts have said the U.S. tax code mandates that anyone’s tax returns “shall” be released to one of the authorized panels if they request them.

Mnuchin’s letter called that request “unprecedented” and said it also “presents serious constitutional questions, the resolution of which may have lasting consequences for all taxpayers.”

Mnuchin also said that the Justice Department intends to “memorialize its advice in a published legal opinion as soon as practicable.”

Neal, in a statement, said, “Today, Secretary Mnuchin notified me that the IRS will not provide the documents I requested under Section 6103 of the Internal Revenue Code. I will consult with counsel and determine the appropriate response.”

Trump has repeatedly rebuffed requests to release his tax returns to the public, saying they are being audited. But Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen has testified to Congress that he has seen no proof that Trump was being audited.

Cohen entered a federal prison in upstate New York on Monday to begin serving a three-year sentence for multiple crimes.

In April, Trump said Americans don’t care if they can see his tax returns.

“Remember, I got elected last time,” Trump told reporters then. “The same exact issue, with the same intensity, which wasn’t very much. Because frankly, the people don’t care.”

However, a poll conducted around the same time found that 51% of voters supported Democrats’ bid to obtain his tax returns, compared with 36% of voters who oppose that effort.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mnuchin, treasury, secretary, returns, trumps, request, house, department, congress, steven, trump, purpose, release, wont, irs, tax


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Trump sues Deutsche Bank and Capital One to block House subpoenas for his financial information

U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One, in a bid to block the two from responding to congressional subpoenas, according a Monday court filing. The U.S. House issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank earlier this month and the German lender had said in January that it had received inquiries from Democrat-controlled committees about its links to Trump. In the complaint filed on Monday, the president’s team argued that his politica


U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One, in a bid to block the two from responding to congressional subpoenas, according a Monday court filing. The U.S. House issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank earlier this month and the German lender had said in January that it had received inquiries from Democrat-controlled committees about its links to Trump. In the complaint filed on Monday, the president’s team argued that his politica
Trump sues Deutsche Bank and Capital One to block House subpoenas for his financial information Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoenas, services, deutsche, bank, capital, personal, trump, political, issued, sues, information, block, financial, purpose, president, house


Trump sues Deutsche Bank and Capital One to block House subpoenas for his financial information

U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One, in a bid to block the two from responding to congressional subpoenas, according a Monday court filing.

The U.S. House issued a subpoena to Deutsche Bank earlier this month and the German lender had said in January that it had received inquiries from Democrat-controlled committees about its links to Trump. In the complaint filed on Monday, the president’s team argued that his political opponents leading the House Intelligence and Financial Services Committees are on a fishing expedition.

“This case involves Congressional subpoenas that have no legitimate or lawful purpose. The subpoenas were issued to harass President Donald J. Trump, to rummage through every aspect of his personal finances, his businesses, and the private information of the President and his family, and to ferret about for any material that might be used to cause him political damage. No grounds exist to establish any purpose other than a political one,” the complaint said.

The filing said the two banks have “long provided business and personal banking services” to the Trumps, and the subpoenas seeking a complete accounting of financial records are an instance of “remarkable overbreadth.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoenas, services, deutsche, bank, capital, personal, trump, political, issued, sues, information, block, financial, purpose, president, house


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This dealmaker created billions of dollars in market value but quit to find a ‘greater purpose’

Then she set up her own business, Tandon Capital Associates, in 1992. “I was on this absolute breakneck pace with Tandon Capital … I was doing deal after deal and creating I think billions of dollars in market value,” Tandon told CNBC’s “The Brave Ones.” “I hadn’t signed on the dotted line … something happened to me; I couldn’t sign the contracts. “I started to think … ‘Is this what my life’s going to be, I’m going to do one deal after another, after another?’ … I locked my door and I just wante


Then she set up her own business, Tandon Capital Associates, in 1992. “I was on this absolute breakneck pace with Tandon Capital … I was doing deal after deal and creating I think billions of dollars in market value,” Tandon told CNBC’s “The Brave Ones.” “I hadn’t signed on the dotted line … something happened to me; I couldn’t sign the contracts. “I started to think … ‘Is this what my life’s going to be, I’m going to do one deal after another, after another?’ … I locked my door and I just wante
This dealmaker created billions of dollars in market value but quit to find a ‘greater purpose’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-05  Authors: lucy handley, chandrika tandon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, dealmaker, told, going, business, greater, dollars, billions, think, tandon, wanted, quit, capital, created, value, couldnt, market, sign, purpose


This dealmaker created billions of dollars in market value but quit to find a 'greater purpose'

During the 1980s, Chandrika Tandon was a highly successful McKinsey consultant and became the first Indian-American woman to be elected partner at the firm.

Then she set up her own business, Tandon Capital Associates, in 1992. “I was on this absolute breakneck pace with Tandon Capital … I was doing deal after deal and creating I think billions of dollars in market value,” Tandon told CNBC’s “The Brave Ones.”

But one day the business was about to sign a “very, very signature deal,” she said. But she couldn’t do it. “I hadn’t signed on the dotted line … something happened to me; I couldn’t sign the contracts. I just was paralyzed,” she said.

Tandon came to a crossroads in her life. “I started to think … ‘Is this what my life’s going to be, I’m going to do one deal after another, after another?’ … I locked my door and I just wanted to understand, I wanted to think. I cried. I just was trying to figure out who I was, what was success, why was I put on the planet? What was my greater purpose?” she told “The Brave Ones.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-05  Authors: lucy handley, chandrika tandon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, dealmaker, told, going, business, greater, dollars, billions, think, tandon, wanted, quit, capital, created, value, couldnt, market, sign, purpose


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How Michelle Obama overcame her insecurities to discover her true purpose as first lady

Michelle Obama, in her new book “Becoming,” reveals that she felt “overwhelmed,” “unworthy” and “uncertain of [her] purpose” when her husband’s appointment as president propelled her to become the country’s first African-American first lady. “At this point, I’d been first lady for just over two months,” Obama writes in her memoir, released on Tuesday. “In different moments, I’d felt overwhelmed by the pace, unworthy of the glamour, anxious about our children, and uncertain of my purpose.” While


Michelle Obama, in her new book “Becoming,” reveals that she felt “overwhelmed,” “unworthy” and “uncertain of [her] purpose” when her husband’s appointment as president propelled her to become the country’s first African-American first lady. “At this point, I’d been first lady for just over two months,” Obama writes in her memoir, released on Tuesday. “In different moments, I’d felt overwhelmed by the pace, unworthy of the glamour, anxious about our children, and uncertain of my purpose.” While
How Michelle Obama overcame her insecurities to discover her true purpose as first lady Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: karen gilchrist, scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyd, michelle, obama, felt, purpose, discover, girls, id, true, different, writes, lady, unworthy, overcame, insecurities, role


How Michelle Obama overcame her insecurities to discover her true purpose as first lady

With any new role, it can be easy to feel out of your depth.

Studies suggest that as many as 70 percent of people have suffered from a sense of inadequacy, or “imposter syndrome,” at some stage in their lives. And it turns out, that’s no different if you’re the first lady of the United States.

Michelle Obama, in her new book “Becoming,” reveals that she felt “overwhelmed,” “unworthy” and “uncertain of [her] purpose” when her husband’s appointment as president propelled her to become the country’s first African-American first lady.

In fact, Obama said it wasn’t until two months in, when she met with a group of schoolgirls from north London, that she figured out the real purpose of her role.

“At this point, I’d been first lady for just over two months,” Obama writes in her memoir, released on Tuesday. “In different moments, I’d felt overwhelmed by the pace, unworthy of the glamour, anxious about our children, and uncertain of my purpose.”

It was early 2009, and the Obamas were in the U.K. on their first official overseas visit. While President Barack Obama was meeting with officials, the then-first lady was invited to a government-funded, all-girls secondary school in London’s Islington neighborhood. Like herself, the majority of the girls there were ethnic minorities from modest backgrounds.

As she watched a performance by the girls — a medley of Shakespeare, modern dance and a Whitney Houston song — she says she was transported to her past. Suddenly, she says, she couldn’t help feeling disheartened by the barriers that inevitably lay ahead of them, no matter their academic abilities.

“You had only to look around at the faces in the room to know that despite their strengths, these girls would need to work hard to be seen,” the former first lady says of the students at Elizabeth Garrett Anderson School.

“There were girls in hijab, girls for whom English was a second language, girls whose skin made up every shade of brown,” she says. “I knew they’d have to push back against the stereotypes that would get put on them, all the ways they’d be defined before they’d have a chance to define themselves.”

But then she saw the young girls’ optimism. In that moment, she says, she realized that despite her own feelings of inadequacy in the role, being first lady would open up a door of opportunity for so many others like her.

“Here, finally, speaking to those girls, I felt something completely different and pure — an alignment of my old self with this new role,” writes Obama.

“Their faces were hopeful, and now so was I. For me, it was a strange, quiet revelation: They were me, as I’d once been. And I was them, as they could be,” she continues.

“The energy I felt thrumming in that school had nothing to do with obstacles. It was the power of 900 girls striving.”

Don’t miss: Here’s how Michelle Obama’s No. 1 daily habit can make you happier

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: karen gilchrist, scott olson, getty images
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Purpose in partnership: The changing face of corporate citizenship

Simone said that Support to Work gave her the confidence to carry on. ‘With my new-found confidence, I applied for a role as Operations Assistant and I got an interview straight away. What’s clear for Credit Suisse is that their corporate citizenship programmes align with the company’s core values. Accenture’s Accenture In the Future program provides technical training, ongoing mentoring, and in-house job opportunities to tech talent from low-income communities. Eva Halper sees this in action at


Simone said that Support to Work gave her the confidence to carry on. ‘With my new-found confidence, I applied for a role as Operations Assistant and I got an interview straight away. What’s clear for Credit Suisse is that their corporate citizenship programmes align with the company’s core values. Accenture’s Accenture In the Future program provides technical training, ongoing mentoring, and in-house job opportunities to tech talent from low-income communities. Eva Halper sees this in action at
Purpose in partnership: The changing face of corporate citizenship Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: paid post credit suisse
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Purpose in partnership: The changing face of corporate citizenship

Scope’s ambition is to reach one million disabled people with employment information and support by 2020 so that they can realise their career ambitions.

Upon developing repetitive strain injury Simone found that despite having an impressive CV she had yet to receive any responses from job applications after fifteen months of searching. Simone said that Support to Work gave her the confidence to carry on. ‘With my new-found confidence, I applied for a role as Operations Assistant and I got an interview straight away. The interview went really well and I was offered the job! I felt uplifted. I was so happy, I was smiling for days.’

Support to Work is funded by Virgin Media as part of a three year partnership with Scope to understand and tackle the issues disabled people face in the job market.

Simon Feldman of Virgin Media spoke about focusing their impact, and having that work both ways: “We had previously worked with 27 charities but we wanted to move our focus to something which could have a bigger impact. Through ‘Work With Me’ we want to create real, lasting change for disabled people. This has challenged and inspired us to transform how we support our own disabled employees and customers; we’ve also held a roundtable discussion with a number of other businesses to share best practice of hiring and supporting disabled employees.”

What’s clear for Credit Suisse is that their corporate citizenship programmes align with the company’s core values. Manuel Hoerl heads the Financial Inclusion Initiative, which has been tasked since 2008 with capacity building of microfinance organizations and beyond: “We’ve supported projects which have fostered product and services innovation (e-wallet, micro-leasing, education finance), training, and research … Over the years, we’ve developed a combined approach of funding and skills which has a good value proposition for our partners and strongly embeds our activities in financial inclusion in our overall organization.”

It’s not just about microfinance for social impact, there is also a potential extra benefit the bank offers to its partners: “Once a partner’s needs outgrow our offering in the Corporate Citizenship space, we also have our dedicated impact investing experts in the business that can – assuming sufficient growth and success – potentially serve their commercial needs.”

This dual approach of not only using specific corporate expertise to grow organisations as well as possibly add to pipeline is not uncommon with service companies. Accenture’s Accenture In the Future program provides technical training, ongoing mentoring, and in-house job opportunities to tech talent from low-income communities. The program was founded on the understanding that investing in talent from a diverse range of backgrounds has positive outcomes for the company as well as the wider community – providing both a lasting social impact, an immediate advantage to the participants, and obvious benefits to the company’s talent pool.

The growing trend of purpose-led (as opposed to brand marketing- or regulatory-led) CSR is increasingly a focus of the most forward-looking companies – and with this approach, Bain & Company found employee productivity to grow by 125 percent, while the Workforce Purpose Index shows that these businesses are 50 percent more likely to have employees develop into leaders. The diversion from small, sporadic donations to purposeful partnerships seems well justified.

Eva Halper sees this in action at Credit Suisse: “The closer a company’s citizenship efforts are aligned with a company’s core purpose and values, the more effective and sustainable it will be.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: paid post credit suisse
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companys, job, citizenship, purpose, impact, talent, work, partners, changing, face, disabled, weve, corporate, support, partnership


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The real purpose behind US sanctions on Iran

The real purpose behind US sanctions on Iran17 Hours AgoBehaviour change, not regime change, is Washington’s goal, according to Emily Hawthorne of Stratfor.


The real purpose behind US sanctions on Iran17 Hours AgoBehaviour change, not regime change, is Washington’s goal, according to Emily Hawthorne of Stratfor.
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-03
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The real purpose behind US sanctions on Iran

The real purpose behind US sanctions on Iran

17 Hours Ago

Behaviour change, not regime change, is Washington’s goal, according to Emily Hawthorne of Stratfor.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-03
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Watch: Trump leads rally after ex-lawyer Michael Cohen pleads guilty

Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] President Donald Trump is set to lead a campaign-style rally in West Virginia on Tuesday, hours after his former personal lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to bank and tax fraud charges lodged by federal officers. However, Cohen’s lawyer, Lanny Davis, had no reservations about calling out Trump by name in a statement following Cohen’s appearance in court. Trump was expected to travel to West Virginia to lead voter turnout


Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] President Donald Trump is set to lead a campaign-style rally in West Virginia on Tuesday, hours after his former personal lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to bank and tax fraud charges lodged by federal officers. However, Cohen’s lawyer, Lanny Davis, had no reservations about calling out Trump by name in a statement following Cohen’s appearance in court. Trump was expected to travel to West Virginia to lead voter turnout
Watch: Trump leads rally after ex-lawyer Michael Cohen pleads guilty Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-21  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawyer, lead, watch, pleads, guilty, purpose, rally, trump, leads, office, influencing, virginia, exlawyer, women, cohen, west, michael


Watch: Trump leads rally after ex-lawyer Michael Cohen pleads guilty

[The stream is slated to start at 7 p.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.]

President Donald Trump is set to lead a campaign-style rally in West Virginia on Tuesday, hours after his former personal lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to bank and tax fraud charges lodged by federal officers.

Cohen had struck a deal with U.S. attorneys in Manhattan’s southern district after months of court proceedings related to a raft of materials seized in raids on his office and hotel room in April.

Trump’s name was not used in the lower Manhattan courtroom, but Cohen made references to an unidentified “candidate,” at whose direction Cohen said he paid two women for the purpose of influencing the presidential election.

However, Cohen’s lawyer, Lanny Davis, had no reservations about calling out Trump by name in a statement following Cohen’s appearance in court.

“Today he stood up and testified under oath that Donald Trump directed him to commit a crime by making payments to two women for the principal purpose of influencing an election,” Davis said of Trump.

At nearly the same time, Trump’s ex-campaign chairman Paul Manafort was found guilty on eight out of the 18 criminal counts against him in a federal trial prosecuted by attorneys for special counsel Robert Mueller.

Trump was expected to travel to West Virginia to lead voter turnout efforts against Democratic incumbent Sen. Joe Manchin, who faces re-election in November.

Trump’s appearance in Charleston on Tuesday night will mark his sixth visit to West Virginia since taking office.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-21  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawyer, lead, watch, pleads, guilty, purpose, rally, trump, leads, office, influencing, virginia, exlawyer, women, cohen, west, michael


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