VMware acquires security start-up Intrinsic in ongoing cloud push

Trump says he’s considering payroll tax cut day after White House…Trump said he has “been thinking about payroll taxes for a long time” — and he cautioned that “whether or not we do something now, it’s not being done because of recession.” Politicsread more


Trump says he’s considering payroll tax cut day after White House…Trump said he has “been thinking about payroll taxes for a long time” — and he cautioned that “whether or not we do something now, it’s not being done because of recession.” Politicsread more
VMware acquires security start-up Intrinsic in ongoing cloud push Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxes, intrinsic, thinking, housetrump, vmware, white, recessionpoliticsread, ongoing, payroll, tax, trump, long, hes, acquires, security, push, startup, cloud


VMware acquires security start-up Intrinsic in ongoing cloud push

Trump says he’s considering payroll tax cut day after White House…

Trump said he has “been thinking about payroll taxes for a long time” — and he cautioned that “whether or not we do something now, it’s not being done because of recession.”

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxes, intrinsic, thinking, housetrump, vmware, white, recessionpoliticsread, ongoing, payroll, tax, trump, long, hes, acquires, security, push, startup, cloud


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To meet future energy demands, India is promising a push toward sustainability

Home to more than 1 billion people, India is a huge economic, political and cultural force and when it comes to renewable energy, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has ambitious plans. In June 2019, Anand Kumar, the secretary of India’s Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, said the country planned to have 500 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2030. “TERI is all about providing innovations for sustainable development,” Ajay Mathur, the director general of the organization, told C


Home to more than 1 billion people, India is a huge economic, political and cultural force and when it comes to renewable energy, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has ambitious plans. In June 2019, Anand Kumar, the secretary of India’s Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, said the country planned to have 500 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2030. “TERI is all about providing innovations for sustainable development,” Ajay Mathur, the director general of the organization, told C
To meet future energy demands, India is promising a push toward sustainability Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, demands, system, told, teri, promising, meet, india, sustainable, sustainability, organization, director, energy, innovations, push, sectors, future, renewable


To meet future energy demands, India is promising a push toward sustainability

Home to more than 1 billion people, India is a huge economic, political and cultural force and when it comes to renewable energy, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has ambitious plans.

In June 2019, Anand Kumar, the secretary of India’s Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, said the country planned to have 500 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2030.

Based in New Delhi, The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), is an independent organization that wants to drive India toward energy use that is less damaging to the planet, among other things.

“TERI is all about providing innovations for sustainable development,” Ajay Mathur, the director general of the organization, told CNBC’s Sustainable Energy.

“Innovations in technology, innovations in policy, innovations in business models,” Mathur added. “What we want to do is to help users to be comfortable with more sustainable options and be able to use them so that they become the preferred option.”

One area that TERI focuses on is the sustainable development of buildings. It has come up with a rating system called the Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment, or GRIHA. The GRIHA system aims to quantify things such as renewable energy adoption, waste generation and energy consumption.

“We are working towards pushing the boundaries to make sure that the buildings that come up in the future should be more efficient than the ones we have as of now, or have been built in the past,” Sanjay Seth, a senior director at TERI’s Sustainable Habitat Division, said.

TERI focuses on several sectors, from the built environment to agriculture, the climate and energy. Future Earth is another organization focusing on sustainability. Its executive director is Amy Luers.

“We need to work across a wide range of sectors and in between those sectors,” Luers told CNBC. “It’s only by taking the systems-based approach that we’re going to be able to address the large, complex, global sustainability challenges we face today.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, demands, system, told, teri, promising, meet, india, sustainable, sustainability, organization, director, energy, innovations, push, sectors, future, renewable


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Apple’s credit card push is about keeping iPhone users — not entering financial services

Apple’s highest-profile launch this year hasn’t been a new phone or tablet — it’s been a credit card. Rather, the Apple Card is all about keeping users glued to Apple’s most important product: the iPhone. The Apple Card can only be signed up for on an iPhone. Sure, there’s a metal card, but the primary interface for the credit card is on your iPhone — and that includes for paying bills. The credit card makes the phone much stickier.


Apple’s highest-profile launch this year hasn’t been a new phone or tablet — it’s been a credit card. Rather, the Apple Card is all about keeping users glued to Apple’s most important product: the iPhone. The Apple Card can only be signed up for on an iPhone. Sure, there’s a metal card, but the primary interface for the credit card is on your iPhone — and that includes for paying bills. The credit card makes the phone much stickier.
Apple’s credit card push is about keeping iPhone users — not entering financial services Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, keeping, entering, credit, push, theres, financial, pay, services, apple, products, apples, card, users, phone, iphone


Apple's credit card push is about keeping iPhone users -- not entering financial services

Apple’s highest-profile launch this year hasn’t been a new phone or tablet — it’s been a credit card. Investors and analysts have placed a lot of hope in the card as a high-profile new product in Apple’s online services business that management has highlighted as a growth engine for the company.

But the Apple Card could end up being a smashing success even if it doesn’t contribute a meaningful amount to the company’s services revenue or end up being Apple’s beachhead in the financial industry.

Rather, the Apple Card is all about keeping users glued to Apple’s most important product: the iPhone.

The Apple Card can only be signed up for on an iPhone. Sure, there’s a metal card, but the primary interface for the credit card is on your iPhone — and that includes for paying bills.

If you lose your iPhone, you have to pay your bill from another iOS device, or you can call an Apple support phone number, which will connect you to Goldman Sachs to pay your bill, according to Buzzfeed. There’s no web portal on Apple’s website.

All this means is that if you have an Apple Card, it’s going to be hard to switch to Android, at least before you pay off your balance. The credit card makes the phone much stickier.

And people with iPhones are much more likely to buy AirPods, Apple Watches and apps for their devices, all of which essentially require an iPhone to work properly, and all of which feed back into the cycle — when the person with all those Apple products wants a new phone, they’ll buy an iPhone, because it works with all of their Apple products.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, keeping, entering, credit, push, theres, financial, pay, services, apple, products, apples, card, users, phone, iphone


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Hard Brexit would push pressure back on German economy, strategist says


Hard Brexit would push pressure back on German economy, strategist says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, economy, hard, push, pressure, german, strategist


Hard Brexit would push pressure back on German economy, strategist says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brexit, economy, hard, push, pressure, german, strategist


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Cramer: Weakness in the industrial economy could push the Fed to cut rates

“The industrial economy is so weak that [Fed Chair] Jay Powell now has plenty of ammo to justify cutting interest rates,” he said. Much of the industrial slowdown can be attributed to China, which has impacted companies like Ford and 3M, among others. Align Technology, which makes Invisalign braces, similarly has a “cautious view for growth in the Asia Pacific region” in the third quarter due to the Chinese consumer, CEO Joe Hogan said. Electronics and autos companies are performing better in Br


“The industrial economy is so weak that [Fed Chair] Jay Powell now has plenty of ammo to justify cutting interest rates,” he said. Much of the industrial slowdown can be attributed to China, which has impacted companies like Ford and 3M, among others. Align Technology, which makes Invisalign braces, similarly has a “cautious view for growth in the Asia Pacific region” in the third quarter due to the Chinese consumer, CEO Joe Hogan said. Electronics and autos companies are performing better in Br
Cramer: Weakness in the industrial economy could push the Fed to cut rates Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, china, weakness, economy, cut, push, earnings, industrial, consumer, week, rates, companies, chinese, fed, trade


Cramer: Weakness in the industrial economy could push the Fed to cut rates

The consumer and industrial economies are telling conflicting tales this earnings season, and it could be enough to trigger a change in Federal Reserve policy, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Thursday.

“The industrial economy is so weak that [Fed Chair] Jay Powell now has plenty of ammo to justify cutting interest rates,” he said. “And if the president rolls out new tariffs on Chinese imports — that $300 billion — if oil goes down, then one rate cut will not be enough.”

After a string of earnings reports last week that revealed the strength of the consumer, the “Mad Money” host thinks the earnings cycle has “suddenly gone completely schizophrenic” and sent the major averages down on Thursday.The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed nearly 129 points during the session. The S&P 500 dropped 0.53%, and the Nasdaq Composite plunged 1%, a day after setting record closes.

Much of the industrial slowdown can be attributed to China, which has impacted companies like Ford and 3M, among others. In terms of the trade dispute, it appears that China is taking a bigger hit than the U.S., Cramer said, basing his conclusion on earnings conference calls.

CEO Nick Akins of American Electric Power, one of the biggest utilities in the U.S., told shareholders the “biggest economic headwind we have at this point” is the trade war impact.

Align Technology, which makes Invisalign braces, similarly has a “cautious view for growth in the Asia Pacific region” in the third quarter due to the Chinese consumer, CEO Joe Hogan said. The company’s shares plummeted 27% off its second quarter report.

Electronics and autos companies are performing better in Brazil, Canada and Mexico than in China, which Cramer called “bizarre.”

“Here’s the thing about this slowdown: If it pressures the Chinese government to make a deal, that’s great for our companies,” the host said. “But if China just digs in and takes the pain, it’s a real problem for the rest of the world. Their pain is not our gain.”

The U.S. and China are expected to hold face-to-face trade talks in China next week. Negotiators struck a truce in June and agreed to hold off on further tariff hikes, but it remains to be seen if a more permanent deal will be made in the near future to stave off additional levies.

“This industrial weakness is a serious problem. It will not go away unless the Fed steps on the accelerator and does so soon, if only to offset the weakness being exported here … from China,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cramer, china, weakness, economy, cut, push, earnings, industrial, consumer, week, rates, companies, chinese, fed, trade


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Facebook says its privacy push could hurt advertising growth, but analysts aren’t convinced

That’s partially because of “ad targeting related headwinds and uncertainties.” MoffettNathanson said in a note that though Facebook warned about slower growth in the coming quarters due to potential ad targeting headwinds, “the international results would argue against that.” A note from Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts said they were optimistic about Stories, messaging and video monetization, as well as Instagram and WhatsApp e-commerce, aiding revenue growth and offsetting those privacy


That’s partially because of “ad targeting related headwinds and uncertainties.” MoffettNathanson said in a note that though Facebook warned about slower growth in the coming quarters due to potential ad targeting headwinds, “the international results would argue against that.” A note from Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts said they were optimistic about Stories, messaging and video monetization, as well as Instagram and WhatsApp e-commerce, aiding revenue growth and offsetting those privacy
Facebook says its privacy push could hurt advertising growth, but analysts aren’t convinced Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, targeting, advertising, facebook, information, revenue, analysts, wehner, note, push, privacy, quarter, headwinds, arent, hurt, growth, convinced, ad


Facebook says its privacy push could hurt advertising growth, but analysts aren't convinced

Facebook is warning that changes in its ability to target ads will sting later this year and into 2020, but analysts don’t seem too concerned.

Facebook receives most of its revenue from advertising. Chief Financial Officer Dave Wehner said on the company’s earnings call Wednesday that he expects constant currency revenue growth rates will decelerate sequentially going forward, with a more pronounced slowdown in the fourth quarter and into 2020. That’s partially because of “ad targeting related headwinds and uncertainties.”

Asked by analysts on the call to elaborate, Wehner said the company is referring to headwinds in three areas. The first is regulatory changes like last year’s General Data Protection Regulation in the European Union. The regulation was meant to give individuals power to control their data, including the ability to demand that companies disclose how their data is being used or ask them to destroy it. After GDPR implementation, Wehner said, Europe saw a renewed acceleration of growth in the second quarter versus the first, but said the region is growing more slowly than in North America and APAC

Another factor focuses on privacy from operating systems “and the impact that that can have on measurements and also on targeting,” Wehner said. More stringent privacy rules for Apple or Google’s mobile operating systems could prove challenging in Facebook’s ability to track or collect information from its users.

Lastly, he cited Facebook’s own product changes “as we put privacy more front and center.” Examples include a tool allowing users to clear information that Facebook collects about them from third-party apps and websites. Earlier this month, Facebook also announced that users now have the ability to see more information about the businesses uploading lists of their information, and the advertisers using those lists to target ads.

Analysts seem to mostly be shrugging these warnings off.

Jefferies analysts said in a note Thursday that while those ad targeting headwinds could have a “slight impact” on the business, management “had the same cautionary language in Q1 and the constant currency revenue growth rate accelerated sequentially.” Wehner last quarter did say the company anticipates that ad targeting-related headwinds would be more pronounced in the second half of 2019.

MoffettNathanson said in a note that though Facebook warned about slower growth in the coming quarters due to potential ad targeting headwinds, “the international results would argue against that.”

“There doesn’t seem to be a good explanation why these aggregate markets would quickly decelerate after just accelerating for the first time in over two years,” the note says. “If there is pause in stabilization, perhaps it will come from North America where growth remained at or near 30% (as has been the case for the past year.) Our channel checks point to the growing advertiser embrace of Stories, which has added massive amounts of low cost impressions to the system.”

A note from Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts said they were optimistic about Stories, messaging and video monetization, as well as Instagram and WhatsApp e-commerce, aiding revenue growth and offsetting those privacy headwinds. They also cited strong ad revenue and average revenue per user growth in Europe “despite GDPR headwinds.” Europe saw ad revenue growth of 25% in the quarter, “an acceleration from 21% in Q1 as FB lapped GDPR implementation last year,” they wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, targeting, advertising, facebook, information, revenue, analysts, wehner, note, push, privacy, quarter, headwinds, arent, hurt, growth, convinced, ad


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The Fed is leading a global push to lower rates, and Europe is getting ready to follow suit

Turkey’s central bank is also expected to meet Thursday to cut rates, and the list of central banks now easing or getting ready to ease is long. Deutsche Bank economists said they expect all the central bank easing to help keep growth positive. They expect global growth of 3.2%, and central bank policy easing should keep the expansion going and limit downside risks. He does expect the ECB to cut rates in September and ultimately take its negative 0.4% discount rate to negative 0.6%. They could e


Turkey’s central bank is also expected to meet Thursday to cut rates, and the list of central banks now easing or getting ready to ease is long. Deutsche Bank economists said they expect all the central bank easing to help keep growth positive. They expect global growth of 3.2%, and central bank policy easing should keep the expansion going and limit downside risks. He does expect the ECB to cut rates in September and ultimately take its negative 0.4% discount rate to negative 0.6%. They could e
The Fed is leading a global push to lower rates, and Europe is getting ready to follow suit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-24  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, ecb, easing, getting, ready, leading, follow, fed, push, bank, rate, cut, central, interest, rates, suit, lower


The Fed is leading a global push to lower rates, and Europe is getting ready to follow suit

Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, right, walks with Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank (ECB), during the spring meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, April 20, 2018. Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images

With global growth slowing, the world’s central banks are in a race to cut interest rates to boost their economies, and the European Central Bank is expected Thursday to weigh lowering its already-negative interest rate. The ECB could act, but strategists and economists say it’s much more likely the central bank will set the stage for an interest rate cut and other easing at its September meeting. The ECB meets ahead of the Fed’s much-anticipated vote next week, when it is expected to cut rates and begin a new cycle of interest rate reductions. “I think [the ECB] is going to lay out a framework for doing more in the way of rate cuts and quantitative easing, in keeping with what [ECB President Mario] Draghi said at the Sintra conference,” said Rick Rieder, BlackRock’s CIO of global fixed income. “They are going to do whatever it takes to try to stem some of this disappointment around inflation and growth. He raised the bar quite a bit. This is a very big meeting … Quite frankly, I think what the ECB is doing and what the other central banks are doing in cutting rates in some way forces the Fed’s hand.”

Turkey’s central bank is also expected to meet Thursday to cut rates, and the list of central banks now easing or getting ready to ease is long. It includes emerging markets like Vietnam and Brazil, as well as Australia, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, Chile and, Indonesia, among others. Deutsche Bank economists said they expect all the central bank easing to help keep growth positive. They expect global growth of 3.2%, and central bank policy easing should keep the expansion going and limit downside risks. “I think the phrase is ‘when the Fed sneezes, the world catches a cure,'” said Ethan Harris, head of global economic research at Bank of America Merrill Lynch The flurry of central banks cutting rates, even before the Federal Reserve, is somewhat unusual, Harris said. “You have this slow but steady diet of cuts all over the place. For a lot of the smaller countries, it’s much easier for them to cut when the Fed cuts because they don’t have to worry about an attack on their currency,” he said. “These are countries that have weakening economies that were hurting while the Fed was tightening and now they’re cutting ahead of the Fed. The Fed is giving them an opening.”

Fed’s actions ‘off the charts unprecedented’

The Fed kicked off a round of rate cuts when it sent a strong signal about its own policy shift, telling markets after its June meeting that it is concerned about the impact of trade wars and the slower global economy. The Fed statement after that meeting echoed earlier comments from Chairman Jerome Powell that the bank would take appropriate action to sustain the U.S. expansion. “There’s a case for easing in Europe, but it’s not pressing hard on them. What the Fed is doing now is off the charts unprecedented where they move without any hard evidence in the data, and the ECB is not in that frame of mind at all. They’re going to lag the Fed,” Harris said. He does expect the ECB to cut rates in September and ultimately take its negative 0.4% discount rate to negative 0.6%.

The ECB could also provide some details on more quantitative easing, or asset purchases. It now buys sovereign debt and some corporate bonds. It could discuss buying more corporates and even stocks. “That kind of thing is much further out. Their tool kit for the next few year includes many things. Buying stocks would be one. They could explicitly change the way they guide on interest rates,” Harris said. When the Fed cuts that should help weaken the dollar, which is viewed by the International Monetary Fund as being overvalued relative to its trading partners. Market speculation has circulated that the U.S. could intervene to weaken the dollar because of President Donald Trump’s repeated comments about other central banks being currency manipulators, but strategists doubt that the Trump administration would do such a thing.

Fighting against the trade war


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-24  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, ecb, easing, getting, ready, leading, follow, fed, push, bank, rate, cut, central, interest, rates, suit, lower


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WeWork will host a Wall Street analyst day in IPO push

Signage is seen at the entrance of the WeWork offices on Broad Street in New York. The We Company, parent of shared office space manager WeWork, plans to host an analyst day for Wall Street banks on July 31, as the company steps up its preparations for an initial public offering (IPO), people familiar with the matter said. While WeWork filed for an IPO with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in December, it has yet to hire IPO underwriters, the sources said. WeWork wants to be in a posi


Signage is seen at the entrance of the WeWork offices on Broad Street in New York. The We Company, parent of shared office space manager WeWork, plans to host an analyst day for Wall Street banks on July 31, as the company steps up its preparations for an initial public offering (IPO), people familiar with the matter said. While WeWork filed for an IPO with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in December, it has yet to hire IPO underwriters, the sources said. WeWork wants to be in a posi
WeWork will host a Wall Street analyst day in IPO push Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: kate fazzini, annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, ipo, wework, sources, analyst, debt, day, company, public, wall, push, billion, street, host, offering


WeWork will host a Wall Street analyst day in IPO push

Signage is seen at the entrance of the WeWork offices on Broad Street in New York.

The We Company, parent of shared office space manager WeWork, plans to host an analyst day for Wall Street banks on July 31, as the company steps up its preparations for an initial public offering (IPO), people familiar with the matter said.

WeWork’s decision to host the event at this stage is unusual, given that IPO hopefuls have typically hired underwriters by the time they invite analysts from Wall Street banks to educate them about their company’s business.

While WeWork filed for an IPO with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in December, it has yet to hire IPO underwriters, the sources said. WeWork wants to be in a position to potentially go public by the end of 2019, the sources added.

The hosting of the event at this early stage indicates that the New York-based start-up wants to leave nothing to chance after other high-profile IPOs struggled or were canceled this year, amid pushback from investors over the frothy valuations sought.

The sources asked not to be identified because the matter is confidential. A spokesman for WeWork declined to comment.

The IPO market has been challenging for some of this year’s biggest listings. Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft faced criticism from investors about their steep losses and the lack of commitment to a timetable to reach profitability.

Last week, Anheuser Busch InBev NV, the world’s largest brewer, shelved the initial public offering (IPO) of its Asian business after it could not muster enough investor support for the valuation it sought.

WeWork was recently valued at $47 billion in a private fundraising round, making it one of the most valuable private companies in the world.

However, the money-losing company has faced questions about the sustainability of its business model, which is based on short-term revenue agreements and long-term loan liabilities.

The losses at WeWork’s parent company narrowed slightly in the first quarter of 2019 to $264 million as revenue continues to double annually.

WeWork is looking to raise $3 billion to $4 billion in debt before it goes public, and has held discussions with representatives of Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase to discuss the debt offering, Reuters reported earlier this month.

A substantial debt offering could allow it to pitch itself to potential investors in a planned IPO as having sufficient funding to see itself to profitability.

WeWork, which was co-founded in 2010 by CEO Adam Neumann, has helped pioneer “coworking,” or shared desk-space, with a focus on startups, entrepreneurs and freelancers.

In January, Japan’s SoftBank boosted its stake in WeWork by $2 billion in a deal that was billions of dollars below what the company had hoped to raise to fund growth and buy out existing shareholders.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: kate fazzini, annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, ipo, wework, sources, analyst, debt, day, company, public, wall, push, billion, street, host, offering


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How to snag a good deal on a car if you’re shopping during the July 4 sales push

Consumers looking for a new car might find themselves in the driver’s seat when negotiating during the industry’s annual July 4th sales push. The Volkswagen 2019 Jetta comes with a 1.9% interest rate for 60 months. “When you’re looking at how much the car will cost, be sure to consider the financing,” Drury said. “If a slightly higher selling price comes with a better interest rate, you might come out ahead over the life of the loan.” On top of manufacturer discounts, an individual dealer might


Consumers looking for a new car might find themselves in the driver’s seat when negotiating during the industry’s annual July 4th sales push. The Volkswagen 2019 Jetta comes with a 1.9% interest rate for 60 months. “When you’re looking at how much the car will cost, be sure to consider the financing,” Drury said. “If a slightly higher selling price comes with a better interest rate, you might come out ahead over the life of the loan.” On top of manufacturer discounts, an individual dealer might
How to snag a good deal on a car if you’re shopping during the July 4 sales push Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, push, good, interest, loan, snag, dealership, consumers, car, compared, price, shopping, deal, rate, months, youre, sales


How to snag a good deal on a car if you're shopping during the July 4 sales push

Consumers looking for a new car might find themselves in the driver’s seat when negotiating during the industry’s annual July 4th sales push. With prices continuing to climb and competition from millions of leased cars returning to the market this year, slowing demand for new autos has resulted in dealerships eager to unload inventory. “Dealers have too many vehicles on their lots compared to how many they’re selling,” said Ivan Drury, senior manager of industry analysis at Edmunds.com.

Source: Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The average price of a new car is now $36,902, compared with $32,113 in June 2014, according to Edmunds data. The average monthly payment is $562, compared with $476 five years ago. And, consumers are stretching out the length of auto loans to afford new-car purchases: As of June, the average loan length was closing in on 70 months — two months shy of six years. About 35% of new cars are priced below $30,000, compared with 54% in 2012, according to a recent Cox Automotive report. Separate data from Edmunds show that the price of a 3-year-old used car — the age of most autos coming off leases — averages $13,535 less than a new car. In 2010, the difference was less than $9,000. At the same time, however, consumers have shifted their preference to pricier SUVs and pickup trucks and away from lower-cost sedans and smaller cars. Improved technology and safety features add to the price, as well. For shoppers, the used-car competition and slowing consumer demand means manufacturers are boosting incentives for their sales events surrounding Independence Day. For example, the 2019 Hyundai Sante Fe, with a starting sticker price of $25,750, comes with a $2,500 cash back on certain styles or 0% financing for up to 60 months. The Volkswagen 2019 Jetta comes with a 1.9% interest rate for 60 months. Both deals, which expire July 8, require that you use the manufacturer’s financing arm. Those types of deals typically are only available to consumers with very good or excellent credit.

While interest rates on auto loans remain elevated compared with five years ago, the average rate has edged down over the last couple of months to 6% as the Federal Reserve has left alone a key rate that affects consumer debt and loans. In June, more car shoppers were able to get interest rates ranging from 2% to 5% than in any month so far this year, according to Edmunds. Consumers should not focus solely on the price of the car they’re considering, Drury said. “When you’re looking at how much the car will cost, be sure to consider the financing,” Drury said. “If a slightly higher selling price comes with a better interest rate, you might come out ahead over the life of the loan.” More from Personal Finance:

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Tying the knot? Some couples may face a ‘marriage tax penalty’

Here’s what super savers who plan to retire early do differently It’s also important to compare incentives at the dealership. On top of manufacturer discounts, an individual dealer might give you a better deal on a trade-in, or a lower interest rate, or even extras like free oil changes. “It takes a little more legwork to compare deals among dealerships, but you’re going to spend a ton of money so you might as well do the research,” Drury said. If you do end up looking at a car that comes with a manufacturer’s incentive, negotiations with a dealership should be based on the reduced price, said Kelsey Mays, senior editor of Cars.com. “That should be your starting point,” Mays said. “That incentive is a factory-to-consumer discount when it’s advertised by the manufacturer, so it’s not costing the dealership anything.” Here are some other tips to help smooth the car-buying process.

Get preapproved financing

Unless paying with cash, you should get preapproved for a loan from a bank or credit union. While there’s no obligation to use the preapproval, you’ll at least be armed with a comparison when the dealership offers its loan terms. Generally speaking, the better your credit score, the better terms you’ll get.

Collect key documents

Make sure you’re armed with all the documents you’ll need to complete a sale: your driver’s license, the title and registration for your existing car (if you’re trading it in), and proof of insurance. If you are making a down payment, call the dealership ahead of time to find out what forms of payment are accepted.

Beware the add-ons


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, push, good, interest, loan, snag, dealership, consumers, car, compared, price, shopping, deal, rate, months, youre, sales


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Sen. Josh Hawley on the push for data transparency in new bill

Sen. Josh Hawley on the push for data transparency in new bill7 Hours AgoSen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the new bipartisan bill he introduced with Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) to make Big Tech’s use of user data more transparent.


Sen. Josh Hawley on the push for data transparency in new bill7 Hours AgoSen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the new bipartisan bill he introduced with Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) to make Big Tech’s use of user data more transparent.
Sen. Josh Hawley on the push for data transparency in new bill Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transparent, josh, user, bill, data, sen, squawk, warner, push, transparency, techs, hawley


Sen. Josh Hawley on the push for data transparency in new bill

Sen. Josh Hawley on the push for data transparency in new bill

7 Hours Ago

Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the new bipartisan bill he introduced with Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) to make Big Tech’s use of user data more transparent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transparent, josh, user, bill, data, sen, squawk, warner, push, transparency, techs, hawley


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