North Korea is threat even if Trump ends Korean War at summit: Experts

There’s a possibility that U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un might declare an end to the Korean War at this week’s summit — but experts warn that the move could have “real political consequences” for the U.S., and South Korea will still have to keep the North in check. Ending the war does not negate the fact that North Korea “remains as dangerous a threat today as it was on the first day of the Trump administration,” said Abraham Denmark, director of the Asia progra


There’s a possibility that U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un might declare an end to the Korean War at this week’s summit — but experts warn that the move could have “real political consequences” for the U.S., and South Korea will still have to keep the North in check. Ending the war does not negate the fact that North Korea “remains as dangerous a threat today as it was on the first day of the Trump administration,” said Abraham Denmark, director of the Asia progra
North Korea is threat even if Trump ends Korean War at summit: Experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: weizhen tan, pyeongyang press corps, pool, getty images, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threat, korean, war, declare, trump, north, korea, south, end, ended, experts, kim, summit, ends


North Korea is threat even if Trump ends Korean War at summit: Experts

There’s a possibility that U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un might declare an end to the Korean War at this week’s summit — but experts warn that the move could have “real political consequences” for the U.S., and South Korea will still have to keep the North in check.

Ending the war does not negate the fact that North Korea “remains as dangerous a threat today as it was on the first day of the Trump administration,” said Abraham Denmark, director of the Asia program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

South Korea’s presidential office said on Monday that the U.S. and North Korea could agree to declare the end of the Korean War when Trump and Kim meet this week for their second face-to face meeting in Vietnam.

Seoul and Pyongyang are technically still at war today.

The Korean War began in 1950 when the North invaded the South. It ended in 1953 with an armistice — not a peace treaty, which means the war has not ended even if fighting has ceased. Since then, the U.S. has maintained a robust military presence in the South, in the form of tens of thousands of troops.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: weizhen tan, pyeongyang press corps, pool, getty images, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threat, korean, war, declare, trump, north, korea, south, end, ended, experts, kim, summit, ends


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Kim Jong Un must be rewarded for move to abandon nuclear weapons, South Korean president says

Trump: Next meeting with North Korea’s Kim being set up now 11:29 AM ET Tue, 9 Oct 2018 | 03:48″This year I have discussed in depth with Kim for hours. These meetings have convinced me that he has taken the strategic decision to abandon his nuclear weapon,” Moon told Le Figaro in an interview before a state visit to Paris. But Moon said Kim was “sincere, calm and polite” and “felt frustrated by the international community’s continuing mistrust.” “It is now time to respond to these efforts that w


Trump: Next meeting with North Korea’s Kim being set up now 11:29 AM ET Tue, 9 Oct 2018 | 03:48″This year I have discussed in depth with Kim for hours. These meetings have convinced me that he has taken the strategic decision to abandon his nuclear weapon,” Moon told Le Figaro in an interview before a state visit to Paris. But Moon said Kim was “sincere, calm and polite” and “felt frustrated by the international community’s continuing mistrust.” “It is now time to respond to these efforts that w
Kim Jong Un must be rewarded for move to abandon nuclear weapons, South Korean president says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-14  Authors: pyeongyang press corps, pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weapon, visit, kim, wish, rewarded, nuclear, decision, jong, international, trump, weapons, abandon, moon, president, south, need, korean


Kim Jong Un must be rewarded for move to abandon nuclear weapons, South Korean president says

Trump: Next meeting with North Korea’s Kim being set up now 11:29 AM ET Tue, 9 Oct 2018 | 03:48

“This year I have discussed in depth with Kim for hours. These meetings have convinced me that he has taken the strategic decision to abandon his nuclear weapon,” Moon told Le Figaro in an interview before a state visit to Paris.

Moon is to meet President Emmanuel Macron on Monday.

While Pyongyang has stopped nuclear and missile tests this year, it failed to keep its promise to allow international inspections of its dismantling of the Punggye-ri site in May, stirring criticism that the move could be reversed.

But Moon said Kim was “sincere, calm and polite” and “felt frustrated by the international community’s continuing mistrust.”

“It is now time to respond to these efforts that were hard to agree to,” Moon said. “We need to assure Kim Jong Un that he took the right decision in deciding to denuclearize and we need to accompany him in his wish for a durable and solid peace.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-14  Authors: pyeongyang press corps, pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weapon, visit, kim, wish, rewarded, nuclear, decision, jong, international, trump, weapons, abandon, moon, president, south, need, korean


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South Korea’s economy is slowing. Its leader still wants to spend millions on Pyongyang

As South Korea’s economy stumbles, the government is looking to spend hundreds of millions on economic and cultural projects with its northern neighbor. Those commitments were first mentioned in a declaration signed by Moon and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un back in April. The multimillion-dollar proposals come as some grow increasingly concerned about South Korea’s slowing economy. South Korea’s full-year gross domestic product is seen at 2.9 percent this year, compared to 3.1 percent last yea


As South Korea’s economy stumbles, the government is looking to spend hundreds of millions on economic and cultural projects with its northern neighbor. Those commitments were first mentioned in a declaration signed by Moon and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un back in April. The multimillion-dollar proposals come as some grow increasingly concerned about South Korea’s slowing economy. South Korea’s full-year gross domestic product is seen at 2.9 percent this year, compared to 3.1 percent last yea
South Korea’s economy is slowing. Its leader still wants to spend millions on Pyongyang Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: nyshka chandran, pyeongyang press corps
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, north, leader, office, seen, economy, pyongyang, korea, wants, moon, spending, south, survey, koreas, millions, slowing, spend


South Korea's economy is slowing. Its leader still wants to spend millions on Pyongyang

As South Korea’s economy stumbles, the government is looking to spend hundreds of millions on economic and cultural projects with its northern neighbor. The initiatives are seen as long-term investments to peace, but they threaten to inflate Seoul’s debt load and may become a burden if inter-Korea relations hit a road-bump, experts warned.

In a September bill to parliament, South Korean President Moon Jae-in’s government proposed spending $419 million for various North Korea-related ventures that include family reunions, a joint liaison office as well as sporting exchanges. Those commitments were first mentioned in a declaration signed by Moon and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un back in April.

The $419 million figure refers only to 2019 expenditures, and opposition politicians have accused the government of deliberately concealing long-term costs for fear of public backlash. That’s led to a delay in ratifying the bill.

The multimillion-dollar proposals come as some grow increasingly concerned about South Korea’s slowing economy. While the majority of South Koreans say they want peace with Pyongyang, many believe the domestic state of affairs should be a priority for public funds, especially at a time of weak growth.

South Korea’s full-year gross domestic product is seen at 2.9 percent this year, compared to 3.1 percent last year. Meanwhile, the pace of job creation hit its weakest level in nine years after Moon raised minimum wages and cut working hours — moves that have made it difficult for small and medium-sized enterprises to hire new workers.

Public discontent with the economy actually pushed Moon’s approval rating to 49 percent, the lowest level since he entered office last May, according to a Gallup Korea survey on Sept. 7. The leader’s rating ticked up to 50 percent, however, in Gallup’s following survey a week later.

“Regardless of diplomacy, spending tens of billions of dollars in North Korea at a time when many South Koreans are unhappy with their own economy could be tough to sell politically,” said Kyle Ferrier, director of academic affairs and research at the Korea Economic Institute of America.

The Blue House, the office of South Korea’s president, didn’t respond to CNBC’s request for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: nyshka chandran, pyeongyang press corps
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, north, leader, office, seen, economy, pyongyang, korea, wants, moon, spending, south, survey, koreas, millions, slowing, spend


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North and South Korea begin removing landmines along fortified border

Troops from North and South Korea began removing some landmines along their heavily fortified border on Monday, the South’s defense ministry said, as part of a pact to reduce tension and build trust on the divided peninsula. Project details were agreed during last month’s summit in Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea, between its leader, Kim Jong Un, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in. There was no immediate confirmation from North Korea that its troops had begun the process. In November 2


Troops from North and South Korea began removing some landmines along their heavily fortified border on Monday, the South’s defense ministry said, as part of a pact to reduce tension and build trust on the divided peninsula. Project details were agreed during last month’s summit in Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea, between its leader, Kim Jong Un, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in. There was no immediate confirmation from North Korea that its troops had begun the process. In November 2
North and South Korea begin removing landmines along fortified border Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-01  Authors: pyeongyang press corps, pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, troops, removing, soldiers, korean, border, begin, jsa, summit, fortified, landmines, korea, north, ministry, south


North and South Korea begin removing landmines along fortified border

Troops from North and South Korea began removing some landmines along their heavily fortified border on Monday, the South’s defense ministry said, as part of a pact to reduce tension and build trust on the divided peninsula.

Project details were agreed during last month’s summit in Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea, between its leader, Kim Jong Un, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in.

In a statement, the ministry said the two sides agreed to remove all landmines in the so-called Joint Security Area (JSA) in Panmunjom within the next 20 days, with military engineers performing the hazardous task on the South Korean side.

There was no immediate confirmation from North Korea that its troops had begun the process.

The deal also provides for removal of guard posts and weapons from the JSA to follow the removal of the mines, with the troops remaining there to be left unarmed.

The JSA is the only spot along the 155-mile -long “demilitarized zone” (DMZ) where troops from both Koreas are face to face, and it is also staffed by United Nations troops.

In November 2017, North Korean troops at the JSA shot one of their soldiers defecting to the South five times.

Since then, however, it has been the scene of the first dramatic April summit between Kim and Moon, as well as their second, more low-key meeting, in May.

At the April summit, the two Koreas announced their intention to turn the DMZ — long a symbol of tension and division — into a “peace zone.”

They have already dismantled propaganda loudspeakers and some guard posts along the border.

Demining projects are also set to begin on Monday in Gangwon province in eastern South Korea, to allow teams to search for the remains of soldiers killed in the 1950-1953 Korean War, the ministry added.

More than a million landmines were laid in border areas including the DMZ and the Civilian Control Zone in the South, say demining experts, and civilians and soldiers alike have been killed or injured by them.

In 2015, two South Korean soldiers were maimed by what Seoul said was a North Korean landmine, an accusation the North denied.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-01  Authors: pyeongyang press corps, pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, troops, removing, soldiers, korean, border, begin, jsa, summit, fortified, landmines, korea, north, ministry, south


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Korea summit: No real progress on denuclearization

The third round of bilateral talks between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un officially concluded Thursday but many believe it failed to make any breakthroughs on freeing the peninsula of nuclear weapons. The burden is now on Washington to negotiate more concessions from the reclusive state, experts say. Moon and Kim this week signed the September Pyongyang Joint Declaration, in which the isolated country promised a shut down of the missile-engine testing fac


The third round of bilateral talks between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un officially concluded Thursday but many believe it failed to make any breakthroughs on freeing the peninsula of nuclear weapons. The burden is now on Washington to negotiate more concessions from the reclusive state, experts say. Moon and Kim this week signed the September Pyongyang Joint Declaration, in which the isolated country promised a shut down of the missile-engine testing fac
Korea summit: No real progress on denuclearization Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-21  Authors: nyshka chandran, pyeongyang press corps
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, real, moon, korea, trump, signed, pyongyang, president, progress, north, denuclearization, summit, kim, korean, washington, nuclear


Korea summit: No real progress on denuclearization

The third round of bilateral talks between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un officially concluded Thursday but many believe it failed to make any breakthroughs on freeing the peninsula of nuclear weapons.

The burden is now on Washington to negotiate more concessions from the reclusive state, experts say.

Moon and Kim this week signed the September Pyongyang Joint Declaration, in which the isolated country promised a shut down of the missile-engine testing facility and launchpad at Tongchang-ri, in the west coast of North Korea. Pyongyang also said it was willing to permanently close the Yongbyon nuclear site — where the country produced plutonium used in its first atomic weapons test — if the United States took reciprocal action.

The signed accord is rife with ambiguities, analysts at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) said in a note. “Experts in the Trump administration will likely be unimpressed by the specifics announced in Pyongyang, which means the hard work remains for the U.S. negotiators,” they said.

A closer look at the agreement shows “there’s really not a lot there,” echoed Sean King, senior vice president of Park Strategies, a business advisory firm. “I’m a little concerned as to where we go from here,” he said.

However, the declaration was a positive for Pyongyang’s relations with the international community, especially with Washington, which will likely use the latest momentum to set up a second meeting between Kim and President Donald Trump. The Moon government also obtained an agreement to ease the process of family reunions and start construction on road projects connecting the two Koreas by year-end. Kim said he will visit Seoul soon, which would be the first time a North Korean leader visits the South’s capital.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-21  Authors: nyshka chandran, pyeongyang press corps
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, real, moon, korea, trump, signed, pyongyang, president, progress, north, denuclearization, summit, kim, korean, washington, nuclear


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