China to scrap foreign investment quotas to attract more money into its stock, bond markets

Investors watch the electronic board at a stock exchange hall on February 11, 2019 in Chengdu, Sichuan Province of China. China’s foreign exchange regulator said on Tuesday that it had decided to scrap quota restrictions on two major inbound investment schemes, as a weakening yuan and rising outflows prompt Beijing to seek to attract more foreign capital. It said the move would “make it much more convenient for overseas investors to participate in China’s domestic financial markets, making China


Investors watch the electronic board at a stock exchange hall on February 11, 2019 in Chengdu, Sichuan Province of China. China’s foreign exchange regulator said on Tuesday that it had decided to scrap quota restrictions on two major inbound investment schemes, as a weakening yuan and rising outflows prompt Beijing to seek to attract more foreign capital. It said the move would “make it much more convenient for overseas investors to participate in China’s domestic financial markets, making China
China to scrap foreign investment quotas to attract more money into its stock, bond markets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quotas, yuan, capital, bond, investment, money, stock, attract, markets, qfii, china, investors, overseas, outflows, scrap, foreign, exchange, chinas


China to scrap foreign investment quotas to attract more money into its stock, bond markets

Investors watch the electronic board at a stock exchange hall on February 11, 2019 in Chengdu, Sichuan Province of China.

China’s foreign exchange regulator said on Tuesday that it had decided to scrap quota restrictions on two major inbound investment schemes, as a weakening yuan and rising outflows prompt Beijing to seek to attract more foreign capital.

While underlining China’s thirst for overseas funding as its economy slows amid a debilitating trade war with the United States, the move also appears largely symbolic, as two-thirds of the existing quotas remain unused.

China’s State Administration of Foreign Exchange (SAFE) would remove quotas on the dollar-dominated qualified foreign institutional investor (QFII) scheme and its yuan-denominated sibling, RQFII, it said in a statement on its website.

It said the move would “make it much more convenient for overseas investors to participate in China’s domestic financial markets, making China’s bond and stock markets more broadly accepted by international markets.”

The removal of quotas comes amid an escalating Sino-U.S. trade war that threatens growth in the world’s second-biggest economy.

Beijing hopes that foreign capital inflows could help to offset rising outflows and lend support to its yuan, which has dropped to its lowest levels against the U.S. dollar since the onset of the global financial crisis in 2008.

Inflows could also help bolster China’s balance of payments, as some analysts fear the country is slipping dangerously towards twin deficits in its fiscal and current accounts.

The removal “is a clear signal that policymakers want to encourage capital inflows,” wrote Win Thin, Global Head of Currency Strategy at Brown Brothers Harriman.

“The corollary is that they are still very worried about capital outflows and so will make sure to avoid any steps that might increase them,” he said.

China in January doubled the QFII quota to $300 billion, but only $111.4 billion of the limit had been used by foreign investors by the end of August.

China’s securities regulator also published draft rules earlier this year that would combine the QFII and RQFII programmes while also simplifying access for overseas investors.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quotas, yuan, capital, bond, investment, money, stock, attract, markets, qfii, china, investors, overseas, outflows, scrap, foreign, exchange, chinas


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