Richard Branson, Sara Blakely and other billionaire entrepreneurs share one ‘underrated quality’

It’s a quality that goes a long way: “The return on the investment in kindness is enormous. If you run a kind company and you’re a kind entrepreneur and you’re collaborative, you will retain your employees. Successful entrepreneurs share “an incredibly underrated quality,” Raz tells CNBC Make It : They’re nice. “Early on in my career, I was like bam, bam, bam, bam, bam — I might curse. It’s no coincidence that the successful CEOs and business owners that Raz has talked to actively practice kindn


It’s a quality that goes a long way: “The return on the investment in kindness is enormous.
If you run a kind company and you’re a kind entrepreneur and you’re collaborative, you will retain your employees.
Successful entrepreneurs share “an incredibly underrated quality,” Raz tells CNBC Make It : They’re nice.
“Early on in my career, I was like bam, bam, bam, bam, bam — I might curse.
It’s no coincidence that the successful CEOs and business owners that Raz has talked to actively practice kindn
Richard Branson, Sara Blakely and other billionaire entrepreneurs share one ‘underrated quality’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kind, share, work, company, underrated, business, raz, cuban, successful, richard, sara, career, billionaire, entrepreneurs, bam, branson, blakely, quality


Richard Branson, Sara Blakely and other billionaire entrepreneurs share one 'underrated quality'

It’s a quality that goes a long way: “The return on the investment in kindness is enormous. If you run a kind company and you’re a kind entrepreneur and you’re collaborative, you will retain your employees. You will find that people will work so hard to innovate for you and your ideas.”

“Virtually all the people we’ve had on the show are kind,” he says. “They are respectful and they value and show appreciation for the people who work around them.”

The key to their success isn’t just work ethic and resiliency, Raz found. Successful entrepreneurs share “an incredibly underrated quality,” Raz tells CNBC Make It : They’re nice.

Guy Raz has interviewed some of the most influential business leaders of today: Over the past three years, the host of NPR’s “How I Built This” podcast has sat down with Spanx founder Sara Blakely, serial entrepreneur Richard Branson and Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, among others.

Billionaire Mark Cuban, who owns the Dallas Mavericks and is a judge on ABC’s “Shark Tank,” agrees. “One of the most underrated skills in business right now is being nice. Nice sells,” he told Vanity Fair in a 2018 interview.

It’s a lesson the 61-year-old has learned over his lengthy career. “I wouldn’t have wanted to do business with me when I was in my 20s,” admitted Cuban, who started his first company, MicroSolutions, after being fired from a computer software company in his 20s. “Early on in my career, I was like bam, bam, bam, bam, bam — I might curse. I might get mad. I had to change, and I did, and it really paid off.”

Similarly, studies show that emotional intelligence, or EQ, can make you wealthy and successful. People with high levels of EQ tend to be self-aware, socially aware, empathetic and open to feedback.

Ultimately, it’s your ability to cooperate with others that will make you valuable in the work force, global career development expert Soulaima Gourani tells CNBC Make It: “A lot of jobs are going to disappear, but the thing that we will always have that is more important is your emotional intelligence.” She defines that as having a “good understanding of yourself, self-control, empathy and a natural understanding of people’s decisions, needs and desires.”

Those skills can go a long way. “If you can handle people’s diversity — people of a different age, different personalities, or educational backgrounds, for example — and you can handle the conflict that comes with that, you will be the highest-paid, most valuable employee in the company,” she adds.

It’s no coincidence that the successful CEOs and business owners that Raz has talked to actively practice kindness. It’s “one of their secret weapons,” he says. “They really do think about how to be kind.”

Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”

Don’t miss: Billionaire Mark Cuban: This is the No. 1 most common business mistake

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kind, share, work, company, underrated, business, raz, cuban, successful, richard, sara, career, billionaire, entrepreneurs, bam, branson, blakely, quality


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Health-care leaders mourn Kaiser Permanente CEO Bernard Tyson, who unexpectedly died at age 60

Kaiser Permanente chairman and CEO Bernard Tyson died unexpectedly in his sleep Sunday, the health care giant announced. One of the nation’s leading health care executives, Tyson was 60. He rose through the ranks during a 30-year career at Kaiser to become CEO in 2013. Over his tenure, the integrated health care system and health insurance giant grew from 9 million members, with more than 174,000 employees, to serve more than 12 million members with a workforce of 218,000. “His loss is a loss fo


Kaiser Permanente chairman and CEO Bernard Tyson died unexpectedly in his sleep Sunday, the health care giant announced.
One of the nation’s leading health care executives, Tyson was 60.
He rose through the ranks during a 30-year career at Kaiser to become CEO in 2013.
Over his tenure, the integrated health care system and health insurance giant grew from 9 million members, with more than 174,000 employees, to serve more than 12 million members with a workforce of 218,000.
“His loss is a loss fo
Health-care leaders mourn Kaiser Permanente CEO Bernard Tyson, who unexpectedly died at age 60 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: bertha coombs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, affordable, system, tyson, quality, kaiser, ceo, social, healthcare, leaders, bernard, permanente, mourn, died, health, care, million, unexpectedly


Health-care leaders mourn Kaiser Permanente CEO Bernard Tyson, who unexpectedly died at age 60

Kaiser Permanente chairman and CEO Bernard Tyson died unexpectedly in his sleep Sunday, the health care giant announced. One of the nation’s leading health care executives, Tyson was 60.

He rose through the ranks during a 30-year career at Kaiser to become CEO in 2013. Over his tenure, the integrated health care system and health insurance giant grew from 9 million members, with more than 174,000 employees, to serve more than 12 million members with a workforce of 218,000. Under his leadership, the nation’s largest non-profit health system became a leading advocate in the movement to improve the delivery on care and benefits in the U.S.

His sudden passing elicited an outpouring of remembrances from fellow health-care leaders.

“Bernie was a good friend and trusted peer, and I am so saddened by his passing,” said Larry Merlo, CVS Health CEO, adding, “I’ll miss Bernie’s keen mind and good nature, as well as his unique ability to rally people from all walks of life around a singular goal of making health care better for all Americans.”

“Bernie was a visionary leader with a passion for health equity, quality care and serving those in need,” said Ceci Connolly, president and CEO of the Alliance of Community Health Plans. “His loss is a loss for all who strive to improve the quality of care and coverage in the American health care system.”

“He truly ‘walked the talk’ in his concern for making health care not just a right, but something that is affordable and centered on the great diversity of patients,” said Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, the agency that runs the Affordable Care Act exchange in the golden state.

Tyson’s most recent push has been in the area of social determinants of health, economic and social issues in lower income communities which have negative impact the health patients. Last spring, Kaiser launched a $200 million fund to help address some of those issues in the Bay Area, half of which would address affordable housing and homelessness.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: bertha coombs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, affordable, system, tyson, quality, kaiser, ceo, social, healthcare, leaders, bernard, permanente, mourn, died, health, care, million, unexpectedly


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How algae could improve the air quality of our towns and cities

Architectural and urban design practice ecoLogicStudio has produced what it describes as a “photosynthetic building cladding system.” “The design of this cavity is such that we can inoculate, or introduce, dirty air from the bottom,” he added. “The air naturally rises through and comes into contact with the molecules of the algae, which cleans it. Poletto went on to explain why micro algae were useful for the system. “Now, when you’re doing restoration, retrofit, the inside of the building is ea


Architectural and urban design practice ecoLogicStudio has produced what it describes as a “photosynthetic building cladding system.”
“The design of this cavity is such that we can inoculate, or introduce, dirty air from the bottom,” he added.
“The air naturally rises through and comes into contact with the molecules of the algae, which cleans it.
Poletto went on to explain why micro algae were useful for the system.
“Now, when you’re doing restoration, retrofit, the inside of the building is ea
How algae could improve the air quality of our towns and cities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, air, energy, cities, co2, technology, buildings, went, quality, urban, towns, building, system, algae, improve


How algae could improve the air quality of our towns and cities

From smart thermostats that can be managed using our cellphones to energy efficient lightbulbs and rooftop solar panels, today’s buildings use a wide range of technology to reduce their environmental impact.

In London, a system has been developed which could transform the way buildings look and behave.

Architectural and urban design practice ecoLogicStudio has produced what it describes as a “photosynthetic building cladding system.”

Called PhotoSynthetica, it uses solar energy to take carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants out of the atmosphere. The panels of the system harbor a solution containing algae microbes.

In the latest episode of CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy” Marco Poletto, ecoLogicStudio’s director, described how one of the bio-plastic prototypes works.

“The sun shines through the curtain and activates … photosynthesis,” he said. “The design of this cavity is such that we can inoculate, or introduce, dirty air from the bottom,” he added.

“The air naturally rises through and comes into contact with the molecules of the algae, which cleans it. And then clean air and oxygen is released from the top back into the atmosphere.”

Poletto went on to explain why micro algae were useful for the system. “Their ability to capture CO2 is 10 times higher than large trees and that’s because their entire body is photosynthetic,” he said.

“So when we integrated it in our technology, even a thin layer has the same capacity to absorb CO2 as a micro forest. This offers renewed potential for integrating carbon capturing technology into dense and polluted urban environments.”

Ideas like PhotoSynthetica could become important in the years ahead, as governments and businesses look to transform the built environment and make it more sustainable.

Speaking to CNBC, Derek Clements-Croome, an emeritus professor at the University of Reading, emphasized the importance of adapting and adding to existing buildings to make them more sustainable.

“I mean, this is very important that we do this because over 80% of the buildings that will be present in 2050 are already here now with us,” he said.

“Now, when you’re doing restoration, retrofit, the inside of the building is easier to cope with,” he went on to explain. “It’s usually the shell of the building which is the most challenging part.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-01  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, air, energy, cities, co2, technology, buildings, went, quality, urban, towns, building, system, algae, improve


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High-tech California relies on a startup in Utah to see how smoky its air is

Peacock said he’s stopped using an air quality map run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others because the government’s map can’t compete with the neighborhood-level information from PurpleAir. People in California are increasingly calling for quality data about air quality as wildfires have become bigger, more common and more intense. “Air quality sensors are *yet another case* where decentralization and distributed systems outperform centralized services,” she wrote, directing p


Peacock said he’s stopped using an air quality map run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others because the government’s map can’t compete with the neighborhood-level information from PurpleAir.
People in California are increasingly calling for quality data about air quality as wildfires have become bigger, more common and more intense.
“Air quality sensors are *yet another case* where decentralization and distributed systems outperform centralized services,” she wrote, directing p
High-tech California relies on a startup in Utah to see how smoky its air is Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: david ingram, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, california, monitors, quality, smoky, hightech, utah, information, map, data, air, relies, measure, wildfire, startup


High-tech California relies on a startup in Utah to see how smoky its air is

A firefighter gives orders as he battles the wind-driven Kincade Fire in Windsor, California, October 27, 2019.

When software engineer Kyle Peacock wanted to know how bad the air was from nearby wildfires, he didn’t turn to government monitors or even the local tech giants.

He went instead to the website of a tiny Utah company that’s the talk of the nation’s tech capital whenever wildfire smoke fills the air.

The company, PurpleAir, employs seven people and began as a home project of its founder in 2015. But by crowdsourcing data from inexpensive air quality monitors in people’s homes and businesses, the company’s online map has quickly become an essential if unlikely source of information in a region choked by smoke — and a case in point for the tech community’s larger frustrations with what many see as mismanagement by California’s government and national gridlock.

“PurpleAir is kind of my go-to for measuring the risk for going outdoors,” Peacock, 27, said in an interview.

The website is generating buzz on social media including Twitter, Facebook and Slack, where people share screenshots of the latest map as they plan how much time they’ll spend outside that day. PurpleAir’s founder, Adrian Dybwad, said he saw a 100-fold increase in traffic to his map after wildfire season began this year.

It follows a robust tradition of crowdsourcing in the tech industry, from volunteer-edited Wikipedia articles to the traffic information and mapping app Waze.

Peacock said he’s stopped using an air quality map run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others because the government’s map can’t compete with the neighborhood-level information from PurpleAir.

“What really matters is: Right where you are, what is it like?” he said.

People in California are increasingly calling for quality data about air quality as wildfires have become bigger, more common and more intense. The Kincade fire north of San Francisco forced almost 200,000 people from their homes this month, marking the third year in a row of intense fires in the northern part of the state.

The crowdsourcing approach has a certain appeal in Silicon Valley, where frustration about the inefficiency of government in California and nationally can sometimes boil over into a feeling that traditional bureaucracies can’t do anything right.

“If you’re using @AIRNow by the U.S. gov’t EPA it is giving you inaccurate — and dangerous — information,” Caterina Fake, a venture capitalist who co-founded the photo service Flickr, on Monday.

“Air quality sensors are *yet another case* where decentralization and distributed systems outperform centralized services,” she wrote, directing people to PurpleAir.

Some of the government monitors in the Bay Area even produced incorrect readings in recent days, according to .

The EPA said in a statement that its web traffic had also increased several orders of magnitude in the past week. The agency maintained that its instruments and those of state and local authorities remain of higher quality than PurpleAir’s, but it said it also realizes that its data isn’t available everywhere.

“In these extreme wildfire situations, we understand that residents will consult a variety of sources,” the agency said.

Finding out information related to wildfires has been difficult in other ways. The California utility company PG&E, which has been cutting power to some customers in a bid to avoid sparking new fires, admitted in a report on Oct. 25 that its website crashed several times as users looked for outage details. It pledged to improve.

PG&E has warned that rolling blackouts will continue for years, deepening the sense in California’s tech community that they can’t rely on traditional systems of authority.

“Researching power wall & home generator options due to the recent shutdowns, & the obvious global warming/wildfire trends that will eventually lead to savvy homeowners building off the grid systems,” tech investor Jason Calacanis. “Government is only getting worse in California — oh yeah, earthquakes.”

The investor James Beshara “California, the land of no plastic straws and no electricity.”

Unofficial sources of authority like PurpleAir’s may be the beneficiaries of this pushback.

The EPA and state and local authorities have built a nationwide network to measure air quality, using instruments that can cost in the tens of thousands of dollars. The instruments, which receive regular maintenance and calibration to ensure accuracy, measure types of pollution such as ozone that less expensive monitors can’t detect.

But there’s a trade-off. Because the high-quality monitors are so expensive, there aren’t enough of them to give most people a detailed picture near where they live or work.

PurpleAir, by contrast, pulls data from the small, privately owned monitors that it sells to homeowners or businesses. What the monitors may lack in sophistication is made up in numbers, with some 3,000 monitors in California, according to the company. The map averages nearby monitors so that outliers aren’t as noticeable.

Robert Harley, an engineering professor who studies air quality at the University of California, Berkeley, said the “gold standard” for measuring pollution remains the government data. But he said that he has used PurpleAir, too, and that in locations where there’s a large enough number of sensors around to take an average, “they’re quite good.”

The operation started in 2015, when Dybwad said he began building the air quality monitors for himself and for neighbors to measure dust from a gravel pit near his home. Word spread around the Salt Lake City area, and he began selling them. His outdoor monitors, which use lasers to measure particles in the air, sell for $229 to $259.

Soot and other particles from smoky air can have lasting health consequences, in addition to the more immediate breathing problems, discomfort and disruption to daily life.

Outside California’s wildfire season, local government groups and environmental advocates have used the PurpleAir monitors to “democratize” pollution data.

“We didn’t set out to do better than the government’s own monitoring,” Dybwad said. “We set out to satisfy our own curiosity.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-31  Authors: david ingram, jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, california, monitors, quality, smoky, hightech, utah, information, map, data, air, relies, measure, wildfire, startup


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Valerie Jarrett says this one quality is why she once hired Michelle Obama—and anyone can harness it

“The name at the top was Michelle Robinson,” Jarrett writes in her book “Finding My Voice: My Journey to the West Wing and the Path Forward.” While Jarrett was impressed with the young lawyer’s resume, it was the job interview that clinched the deal. “I always say to people, ‘Tell me something that’s important to you that isn’t on your resume,'” Jarrett tells CNBC Make It. Jarrett says her goal is to put people at ease during a job interview, and that she doesn’t view them as a test. By the end


“The name at the top was Michelle Robinson,” Jarrett writes in her book “Finding My Voice: My Journey to the West Wing and the Path Forward.”
While Jarrett was impressed with the young lawyer’s resume, it was the job interview that clinched the deal.
“I always say to people, ‘Tell me something that’s important to you that isn’t on your resume,'” Jarrett tells CNBC Make It.
Jarrett says her goal is to put people at ease during a job interview, and that she doesn’t view them as a test.
By the end
Valerie Jarrett says this one quality is why she once hired Michelle Obama—and anyone can harness it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, quality, robinson, harness, jarrett, candidates, resume, obamaand, work, thats, sure, valerie, michelle, interview, hired, job


Valerie Jarrett says this one quality is why she once hired Michelle Obama—and anyone can harness it

Former First Lady Michelle Obama (L) discusses her new book “Becoming” with moderator Valerie Jarrett at Capital One Arena on November 17, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Valerie Jarrett has made a few notable hires in her career. Before serving as senior advisor to President Barack Obama, she launched her political career working for the Chicago mayor’s office, where she says she made her “best hire ever.” During the summer of 1991, a resume came across her desk for a 26-year-old Chicago native, Princeton grad, Harvard Law alum and second-year associate at a private law firm. “The name at the top was Michelle Robinson,” Jarrett writes in her book “Finding My Voice: My Journey to the West Wing and the Path Forward.” (Robinson was at the time engaged to Barack Obama.) Her joining Jarrett’s team at the mayor’s office that summer kicked off a decades-long working relationship that would take all three to the White House and beyond. While Jarrett was impressed with the young lawyer’s resume, it was the job interview that clinched the deal. Here’s what Jarrett says made that in-person meeting a success, and how anyone can harness the same winning formula.

Think beyond work history

Jarrett reviews a lot of resumes, so if one stands out to her, that’s already a good sign. But during an interview, she doesn’t want to hear any more about a candidate’s work history. “I always say to people, ‘Tell me something that’s important to you that isn’t on your resume,'” Jarrett tells CNBC Make It. She opens this way because candidates should presume the hiring manager has already read their resume and doesn’t need to be reminded of all their career moves. “It just takes the conversation to a more relaxed personal place to begin with,” she adds. Oftentimes, candidates will respond by telling Jarrett about an interesting place they’ve traveled to, an instrument they play, a foreign language they studied, or other passions and pursuits outside of work. Jarrett says her goal is to put people at ease during a job interview, and that she doesn’t view them as a test. Instead, getting to a more personal space helps Jarrett understand what drives the candidate beyond the job title. For example, some of Robinson and Jarrett’s first conversations during that job interview were around family and how it impacted the young professional’s desire to no longer practice law. “That’s when Michelle Robinson told me about her father and her best friend having died within the last year, and how that motivated her to want to have a more purposeful life,” Jarrett explains. Jarrett, who had also lost a relative recently, could relate.

Talk about your vision for the future

Throughout her four-decade career, Jarrett says she’s been better able to invest in and mentor people she cares about, built through a sense of trust. In addition to getting a sense of personality, Jarrett also likes to hear what the job-seeker hopes to accomplish once they leave the job they’re interviewing for. “I often say to people, ‘What job do you want to have after this job?'” she says. “I ask that question because I want to make sure it’s a good fit and the job they’re interviewing for will prepare them for the next one.” Candidates don’t always have an answer to this — it’s likely they’re just focused on landing the job in front of them that they haven’t thought about the next move — which Jarrett says is perfectly fine. But she does want to make sure the opportunity she can provide them will help them achieve their next goals. “I really do believe the interview process should be a two-way street,” she says, “and as an employer, I should be thinking thoughtfully about the person applying for the job to make sure it’s actually going to prepare them for the next step.”

Ask these thoughtful questions

Career experts agree candidates should ask questions throughout the interview, not only to show interest in the company, but also to better understand if it’s the right fit for them. That’s what Robinson did back in 1991, when a 20-minute interview turned into an hour-long conversation. About halfway through, Robinson began to engage in a “rigorous and thoughtful grilling” about staff, organizational chart, projects and assignments, Jarrett writes in her book. While this caught the hiring manager off-guard, it was another sign that the candidate was thinking seriously about how the job would shape up for her. “To be able to realize that it was as important for her to want to work with me as it was for me to want her showed a maturity I certainly didn’t possess at her age,” Jarrett writes. By the end of the discussion, Jarrett offered Robinson a job on the spot (even though she hadn’t gotten manager approval yet). Robinson joined the mayor’s office later in the summer of 1991.

As an employer, I should be thinking thoughtfully about the person applying for the job to make sure it’s actually going to prepare them for the next step. Valerie Jarrett


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, career, quality, robinson, harness, jarrett, candidates, resume, obamaand, work, thats, sure, valerie, michelle, interview, hired, job


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Here are 2 experts’ favorite dividend ETFs for 2019 — and the ones they’d avoid

Contrast that with the U.S. 10-year Treasury, which Davi cast as a “risk-free asset,” and ETFs with large dividend yields look riskier and riskier, he said. Davi flagged three high-dividend ETFs that he would outright avoid: the iShares Core High Dividend ETF (HDV), the Vanguard High Dividend Yield Index Fund ETF Shares (VYM), and the iShares Select Dividend ETF (DVY). And the idea there is that strong fundamentals can eventually lead to high dividend growth.” Davi also liked emerging markets di


Contrast that with the U.S. 10-year Treasury, which Davi cast as a “risk-free asset,” and ETFs with large dividend yields look riskier and riskier, he said.
Davi flagged three high-dividend ETFs that he would outright avoid: the iShares Core High Dividend ETF (HDV), the Vanguard High Dividend Yield Index Fund ETF Shares (VYM), and the iShares Select Dividend ETF (DVY).
And the idea there is that strong fundamentals can eventually lead to high dividend growth.”
Davi also liked emerging markets di
Here are 2 experts’ favorite dividend ETFs for 2019 — and the ones they’d avoid Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quality, etf, 2019, yield, high, stocks, favorite, experts, yields, etfs, look, dividend, lot, avoid, theyd, ones, fund


Here are 2 experts' favorite dividend ETFs for 2019 — and the ones they'd avoid

It may be time to go diving for dividends.

A strong start to the third-quarter earnings season has boosted stocks, but as risks tied to monetary policy and U.S.-China trade linger, buyers may be looking for gains beyond just those of the broader equity market.

But income-seeking investors should be careful where they choose to put their money, at least in the ever-expanding exchange-traded fund space, experts warn.

John Davi, founder and chief investment officer at Astoria Portfolio Advisors, told CNBC’s “ETF Edge” on Monday that stocks and bonds with high dividend yields currently look “crowded, expensive [and] vulnerable” to him.

“I think what a lot of investors do is they say, ‘OK, I like this high-dividend-yield ETF. It yields 3, 4%.’ That’s great, but just keep in mind that that carries a lot of risk,” the ETF investor said.

Contrast that with the U.S. 10-year Treasury, which Davi cast as a “risk-free asset,” and ETFs with large dividend yields look riskier and riskier, he said.

Davi flagged three high-dividend ETFs that he would outright avoid: the iShares Core High Dividend ETF (HDV), the Vanguard High Dividend Yield Index Fund ETF Shares (VYM), and the iShares Select Dividend ETF (DVY).

His reasoning? HDV’s portfolio is 21% energy stocks, and energy is the worst-performing S&P 500 sector this year. VYM has 18% of its holdings in the banking subsector, another risky area with the Federal Reserve’s next policy move still in question. DVY’s portfolio is 40% banks and utilities, which could be at risk if the economic cycle turns lower.

“That’s a lot of risk for me,” Davi said. “What we use is DGRW from WisdomTree. This is more of a dividend growth, high-quality ETF, so it screens for companies with above-average [return on equity], [return on assets], and above-average earnings. And the idea there is that strong fundamentals can eventually lead to high dividend growth.”

That’s the WisdomTree U.S. Quality Dividend Growth Fund, which is up over 18% year to date and counts the stocks of Apple, Microsoft and Verizon among its top five holdings. Davi also liked emerging markets dividend play EDIV, the SPDR S&P Emerging Markets Dividend ETF, which is up a modest 3% this year.

Dave Nadig, managing director of ETF.com, also issued a warning on high-yielding ETFs.

“If you look at some of the funds that have very attractive headline yields right now, like the Global X Superdividend fund [ticker SDIV], yeah, that may have a 7 or 8% yield on it, but it’s actually been a terrible performer,” Nadig said in the same “ETF Edge” interview.

His suggestion was to approach the idea of dividends differently — not necessarily as a primary source of income, but as a way to add quality into a portfolio.

“Dividends as sort of a proxy for cash flow, as a proxy for quality, can make a lot of sense,” Nadig said. “If you look at First Trust’s Dividend fund [FVD] this year, … it’s got a headline yield of 3%, which is very market-like, yet it’s beaten the S&P handily. So, I think thinking about dividends not so much for the coupon yield like you would for bonds, but as a proxy for quality, is probably a better play.”

The First Trust Value Line Dividend Fund was Nadig’s top pick for a 2019 dividend play. That ETF is up more than 20% for the year and counts industrial stock Fastenal and tobacco play Altria among its top holdings.

DGRW and FVD were both practically flat in Wednesday trading.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quality, etf, 2019, yield, high, stocks, favorite, experts, yields, etfs, look, dividend, lot, avoid, theyd, ones, fund


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China’s economic growth could fall below 6% in 2020, says the IMF

China’s economic growth could moderate further in 2020 — even though the global economy is likely to pick up pace, projected the International Monetary Fund. The fund, in its World Economic Outlook report, said the Chinese economy could grow at 5.8% next year — slower than the 6.1% forecast for 2019. Such a transition would translate to slower but better quality growth in China, according to Zhang. So, I think, we are talking about growth with better quality, higher sustainability,” he said. WAT


China’s economic growth could moderate further in 2020 — even though the global economy is likely to pick up pace, projected the International Monetary Fund.
The fund, in its World Economic Outlook report, said the Chinese economy could grow at 5.8% next year — slower than the 6.1% forecast for 2019.
Such a transition would translate to slower but better quality growth in China, according to Zhang.
So, I think, we are talking about growth with better quality, higher sustainability,” he said.
WAT
China’s economic growth could fall below 6% in 2020, says the IMF Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grow, think, fall, world, quality, imfs, 2020, china, chinas, fund, economic, economy, imf, zhang, growth


China's economic growth could fall below 6% in 2020, says the IMF

China’s economic growth could moderate further in 2020 — even though the global economy is likely to pick up pace, projected the International Monetary Fund. The fund, in its World Economic Outlook report, said the Chinese economy could grow at 5.8% next year — slower than the 6.1% forecast for 2019. China grew 6.6% last year, according to the IMF. “The Chinese economy is slowing down, which has continued an earlier trend of slowing down, which started a couple of years ago,” Tao Zhang, IMF’s deputy managing director, told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore at the World Bank-IMF Annual Meetings in Washington on Saturday. “In recent years, what’s going on in the world — we have trade tensions, we have other geopolitical forces, we have all these uncertainties around the world … these add further downside pressures to the Chinese economy,” he added.

You won’t expect any of the economies, whatever the size, to grow continuously at 10% or 7% or 8% … So, I think, we are talking about growth with better quality, higher sustainability. Tao Zhang managing director at IMF

Still, Zhang said such growth rates are “reasonable” given that China is restructuring its economy to expand in a more sustainable way. That means relying less on debt to fuel growth, while focusing more on domestic consumption. Such a transition would translate to slower but better quality growth in China, according to Zhang. On Friday, China said its economy grew by 6% in the third quarter, the slowest since the first quarter of 1992, according to Reuters. “You won’t expect any of the economies, whatever the size, to grow continuously at 10% or 7% or 8% … So, I think, we are talking about growth with better quality, higher sustainability,” he said. “5.8%, or any number in that neighborhood, I think is reasonable.”

‘Precarious’ global outlook

China’s projected slowdown next year contrasts with the IMF’s forecast for a recovery in the global economy. The fund said world economic growth is forecast to rebound to 3.4% in 2020, after an anticipated slowdown to 3% this year from 3.6% last year due partly to uncertainties caused by the U.S.-China trade war. But the fund said the outlook remained “precarious.” “We said that projection is precarious because a lot has to depend on what’s going on with policy uncertainty reductions — and there’s a huge uncertainty to that,” said Zhang.

WATCH: Expect strong recovery in emerging Asia next year, IMF’s Zhang says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grow, think, fall, world, quality, imfs, 2020, china, chinas, fund, economic, economy, imf, zhang, growth


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Harley-Davidson halts production of new electronic motorcycles

Harley-Davidson has halted production and deliveries of its new LiveWire electric motorcycle after reportedly discovering a problem with its charging mechanism. “We are in close contact with our LiveWire dealers and customers and have assured them they can continue to ride LiveWire motorcycles. But the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the news, said the company told dealers last week it was stopping production to test its charging mechanism. The motorcycle maker began previewing the Liv


Harley-Davidson has halted production and deliveries of its new LiveWire electric motorcycle after reportedly discovering a problem with its charging mechanism. “We are in close contact with our LiveWire dealers and customers and have assured them they can continue to ride LiveWire motorcycles. But the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the news, said the company told dealers last week it was stopping production to test its charging mechanism. The motorcycle maker began previewing the Liv
Harley-Davidson halts production of new electronic motorcycles Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: mallika mitra, michael wayland, riya bhattacharjee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, harleydavidson, halts, livewire, company, sales, quality, electronic, motorcycles, electric, motorcycle, production


Harley-Davidson halts production of new electronic motorcycles

Harley-Davidson has halted production and deliveries of its new LiveWire electric motorcycle after reportedly discovering a problem with its charging mechanism.

“We recently discovered a non-standard condition during a final quality check; stopped production and deliveries; and began additional testing and analysis, which is progressing well,” the company said in an emailed statement to CNBC on Monday. “We are in close contact with our LiveWire dealers and customers and have assured them they can continue to ride LiveWire motorcycles. As usual, we’re keeping high quality as our top priority.”

The company didn’t provide more details on the “non-standard condition” that was holding up production. But the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the news, said the company told dealers last week it was stopping production to test its charging mechanism.

The motorcycle maker began previewing the LiveWire Electric Motorcycle last year in the U.S. and Europe, to try to rejuvenate lagging sales. The electric motorcycle was a step into a new territory for Harley-Davidson, which had previously been mostly known for louder motorcycles nicknamed “hogs.”

The Milwaukee-based manufacturer has struggled in recent years. Sales of the company’s signature motorcycles continued to slide during its second quarter as profit eroded nearly 20%. Harley-Davidson told investors in July it expects less sales revenue in 2019 than originally foretasted, and expects to ship about 212,000 to 217,000 bikes in 2019, down 5,000 from its April estimate of 217,000 to 222,000 bikes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: mallika mitra, michael wayland, riya bhattacharjee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, harleydavidson, halts, livewire, company, sales, quality, electronic, motorcycles, electric, motorcycle, production


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Big cities are posing a major threat to the economy by ignoring minor crimes

In fact it’s the opposite: we’re seeing a significant drop in arrests for minor offenses, or “quality of life” crimes. After all, the argument goes, shouldn’t the cops be spending their time focusing on more serious crimes? Strictly enforcing misdemeanor crime laws or restricting quality of life offenses isn’t really about reducing more serious crimes. That’s often overlooked by critics who portray minor crime enforcement in poorer neighborhoods as some kind of war on the people by the police. B


In fact it’s the opposite: we’re seeing a significant drop in arrests for minor offenses, or “quality of life” crimes. After all, the argument goes, shouldn’t the cops be spending their time focusing on more serious crimes? Strictly enforcing misdemeanor crime laws or restricting quality of life offenses isn’t really about reducing more serious crimes. That’s often overlooked by critics who portray minor crime enforcement in poorer neighborhoods as some kind of war on the people by the police. B
Big cities are posing a major threat to the economy by ignoring minor crimes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, posing, major, crimes, big, economy, minorities, economic, neighborhoods, areas, minor, cities, serious, quality, crime, life, ignoring, enforcement, threat


Big cities are posing a major threat to the economy by ignoring minor crimes

Police allow someone though the perimeter outside the Time Warner Center in New York City after a suspicious package was found inside CNN Headquarters, October 24, 2018.

Of all the brewing threats to America’s continuing economic prosperity, one of the most serious comes straight out of the police blotter. No, it’s not a rise in murders or other serious felonies. In fact it’s the opposite: we’re seeing a significant drop in arrests for minor offenses, or “quality of life” crimes.

And it could destroy the momentum for one of the country’s most powerful economic growth engines.

The trend started to take hold in New York in 2016, when the city council passed a law easing stricter arrest rules initiated during Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s administration in the 1990s. But these moves have now spread to cities like Seattle and Austin. And as many critics of the homeless crisis in Los Angeles and San Francisco will tell you, police in those cities have not been used to permanently crack down on the growing tent cities in those areas.

Relaxing arrest policies for minor offenses such as graffiti, petty vandalism, public urination and public transportation fare-beating are often seen as compassionate or cost-cutting. After all, the argument goes, shouldn’t the cops be spending their time focusing on more serious crimes? There are even a number of fair-minded arguments and studies that say easing up on minor misdemeanor arrests won’t spark new crime waves or lead to much more serious felony crimes.

Those arguments miss the point. Strictly enforcing misdemeanor crime laws or restricting quality of life offenses isn’t really about reducing more serious crimes. It’s about saving and resurrecting economic opportunity.

Opponents of these quality of life crackdowns point to the fact that arrests for these crimes disproportionately hit African-Americans and other minorities. This is a legitimate concern too often dismissed by conservatives and law-and-order types. In fact, they sometimes come off as only being interested in cleaning up inner-city areas so they and their families can feel safer once in a while when they decide to go downtown to see a show or visit a trendy restaurant.

Yet the critics of these policies from the left and the right frequently miss the fact that petty crime enforcement benefits minority communities much more than anyone else. It’s the black and Latino neighborhoods that are being vandalized by “broken window” crimes, not the more affluent parts of town or the richer suburbs. Yes, the people arrested for these crimes are likelier to be minorities, but the economic victims are even more likely to be minorities. In short, quality of life crime enforcement isn’t a war on America’s minorities. It’s a war for them.

The transformation of New York in the 1990s from a high-crime, high-homicide-rate locale is really a story about the changes in several individual neighborhoods once deemed to be off-limits to decent people and businesses alike. Remember that even during the worst of times, Midtown Manhattan, Wall Street and the fancy apartment towers of Park and 5th Avenues were still always valuable and desirable addresses.

But when Harlem, Hell’s Kitchen, Williamsburg, the Lower East Side, and Bedford-Stuyvesant started to become hot areas, it was clear the majority of the old fears had melted away. Each one of those neighborhoods had been written off for years as too dangerous to invest in despite their attractive proximity to the established money-making centers in Manhattan.

Quality of life and community policing transformed the image of those neighborhoods and helped prove to the business world that the old risks and fears weren’t as serious anymore. New York’s urban resurgence was not isolated in the 1990s. It was a major trend across the country and was a significant factor in that decade’s economic boom.

Here’s the kicker: the quality of life enforcement in those neighborhoods in the 1990s came mostly at the request of the local residents and remaining business owners. That’s often overlooked by critics who portray minor crime enforcement in poorer neighborhoods as some kind of war on the people by the police.

By contrast, New York’s economic and cultural decline began in the mid-1950s when then Mayor Robert Wagner relaxed police enforcement of quality of life crimes. As documented in the brilliant book “The Ungovernable City,” by Vincent Cannato, Wagner’s ill-advised withdrawal of police presence began on the city’s subways which serviced many of the above-named neighborhoods. This ended up importing more economically devastating crime to those areas.

Reopening these areas to more economic opportunity starts with instilling a new confidence for entrepreneurs considering moving into these areas. Economic growth occurs when money is made where it hadn’t been made before. There are still many crime-ridden areas blighted for years by fear and neglect in America. These places need more police attention and care, not less.

These facts shine a light on another cultural and economic misconception that may be at the root of these ill-advised leniency policies.

Many of us have been taught since birth that much of the reason for crime, terrorism, drug abuse, etc. is because of poverty. Poor people with few prospects are supposedly more likely to turn to crime to get by and as a way to lash out at their difficult lot in life.

But the truth is the exact opposite, and not just because we know that billionaires are often caught committing just as many serious crimes as poorer folks. Poor people are the most affected by crime because more crime occurs in their neighborhoods.

These Americans and their communities remain a largely untapped resource for the U.S. economy. It would be a shame to rob them of their rightful place in spurring more economic growth all because of misplaced and misapplied compassion.

Jake Novak is a political and economic analyst at Jake Novak News and former CNBC TV producer. You can follow him on Twitter @jakejakeny.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, posing, major, crimes, big, economy, minorities, economic, neighborhoods, areas, minor, cities, serious, quality, crime, life, ignoring, enforcement, threat


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Floating NYC art installation shows East River’s pollution level

But a new art installation, which provides real-time data on the cleanliness of the water, is aiming to show that it might not actually be all that bad. They glow blue when the water is safe to swim in, and pink when it’s not. The direction with which the lights illuminate is based the movement of the water’s current, and the speed with which the lights move is determined by the water’s velocity. It’s part of +POOL’s grander ambition of building a public swimming pool within the East River, whic


But a new art installation, which provides real-time data on the cleanliness of the water, is aiming to show that it might not actually be all that bad. They glow blue when the water is safe to swim in, and pink when it’s not. The direction with which the lights illuminate is based the movement of the water’s current, and the speed with which the lights move is determined by the water’s velocity. It’s part of +POOL’s grander ambition of building a public swimming pool within the East River, whic
Floating NYC art installation shows East River’s pollution level Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lights, york, shows, based, pollution, quality, art, installation, level, waters, change, east, rivers, nyc, floating, series, pool, water


Floating NYC art installation shows East River's pollution level

But a new art installation, which provides real-time data on the cleanliness of the water, is aiming to show that it might not actually be all that bad.

The installation, created by PLAYLAB Inc., Family New York and Friends of +POOL and funded by Heineken, The Howard Hughes Corporation and the National Endowment for the Arts, is a 50 x 50-foot plus sign composed of a series of LED lights that change color based on the water quality. They glow blue when the water is safe to swim in, and pink when it’s not. The direction with which the lights illuminate is based the movement of the water’s current, and the speed with which the lights move is determined by the water’s velocity.

The “+” design of POOL+ Light symbolizes “the positive steps we have taken to improve water quality since the Clean Water Act of 1972,” according to the installation’s website, and it’s also “a symbol of inclusivity in that the water that surrounds us belongs to no one single group, but to everyone.”

The sculpture is located off lower Manhattan’s Pier 17. It’s part of +POOL’s grander ambition of building a public swimming pool within the East River, which has faced a series of roadblocks since the idea was initially proposed in 2010.

Friends of +Pool managing director Kara Meyer believes the timing of the installation was fortuitous, given the growing emphasis on how society interacts with the natural resources that surround us, all within the broader conversation about climate change.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lights, york, shows, based, pollution, quality, art, installation, level, waters, change, east, rivers, nyc, floating, series, pool, water


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